» Subscribe Today!
The Power of Information
Home
The Ledger - EST. 1978 - Nashville Edition
X
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Article
VOL. 35 | NO. 24 | Friday, June 17, 2011

Knee joint’s connected to film festival

Print | Front Page | Email this story

The column about my knee evoked a record amount of mail. Evidently, many folk have joint pain issues.

My PRP injection was one month ago, and my knee feels better than it has in years. On a couple days there’s been some semblance of the old pain, as after three days of golf and yard work Memorial Day weekend.

But a couple of extra 20-minute icings seemed to do the trick. Next morning, things were back to where they should be. No throbbing. No bursts of pain when I straighten my leg after sitting for a couple hours. Even in movie seats!

Speaking of which, I’m writing after the conclusion of the fifth annual Little Rock Film Festival. Featuring more than 100 films, plus Q&A sessions with some 80 filmmakers, it was, in a word, super. Some 25,000 viewers attended.

Susan and I took in about 20 films, feature-length and short. We bought Silver Passes, which were good for all screenings and most parties. Despite good intentions, we didn’t go to any parties. Still, it was a great deal!

The comedy Natural Selection (Robbie Pickering, director), about a woman’s quest to find her dying husband’s illegitimate son, took Best Narrative Film.

The Interrupters (Steve James, director), a documentary about people who intervene in local disputes before they turn violent, snagged the Audience Award.

The Last Mountain (Bill Haney, director), about the coal industry vs. locals in a small Appalachian town, won the Oxford American Southern Film Award.

We saw four films with strong Arkansas ties:

Harry Thomason’s The Last Ride, a fictional account of the last days of Hank Williams

Jeff Nichols’ (Little Rock Central High class of 1997) Shotgun Stories is about revenge among two sets of brothers. His Take Shelter won a major prize at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, but could not be screened at LRFF)

•Disfarmer (Martin Lavut, director), about Heber Springs’ Mike Disfarmer, whose black-and-white photography is considered “artistic genius”

•The Crab (Rona Mark, director), which features former University of Arkansas basketballer Guy Whitney as the most tragic protagonist imaginable

•Hot Coffee (Susan Saladoff, director) explores the infamous, misunderstood 1994 “McDonald’s Coffee Case” from Albuquerque. Saladoff also chronicles how tort reform took off in the wake of this case.

We love short films, which are shown in sets of four to six, totaling 90 to 120 minutes.

In Sand Mountain (Kathryn McCool, director), a New Zealander journeys through the rural south to interview a reclusive music legend Cast King.

The South Will Rise Again (Ben Guest, director) examines racial attitudes at Ole Miss amid an effort to get its band to cease playing a certain song at ballgames.

A Marine’s Guide to Fishing (Nicholas Brennan, director) is about an Iraqi war veteran’s return to his job working on boat motors.

Punch Drunk (Sam Wark, director) is the story of an elderly man battling dementia.

No Tracks Home (Josh Harrell, director), is about two train-hopping musicians.

There’s more to tell, but I am out of space.

Check out littlerockfilmfestival.org and don’t miss the fun next year!

Vic Fleming is a district court judge in Little Rock, Ark., where he also teaches at the William H. Bowen School of Law. Contact him at vicfleming@att.net.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter & RSS:
Sign-Up For Our FREE email edition
Get the news first with our free weekly email
Name
Email  
TNLedger.com Knoxville Editon
RECORD TOTALS DAY WEEK YEAR
PROPERTY SALES 0 0 0
MORTGAGES 0 0 0
FORECLOSURE NOTICES 0 0 0
BUILDING PERMITS 0 0 0
BANKRUPTCIES 0 0 0
BUSINESS LICENSES 0 0 0
UTILITY CONNECTIONS 0 0 0
MARRIAGE LICENSES 0 0 0