» Subscribe Today!
The Power of Information
Home
The Ledger - EST. 1978 - Nashville Edition
X
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Article
VOL. 35 | NO. 3 | Friday, January 21, 2011

Tell employers what they need to know

Print | Front Page | Email this story

When selling an employer on your abilities and skills in a resume, cover letter or during an interview, don’t do it from your perspective. You need to focus on the employer’s point-of-view.

Give them what they need to know so they can meet their goal of filling a position with the best available candidate. Not doing this actually creates a barrier against your goal of getting the job.

Realize that the hiring process is not about pleasing you. It is about informing the employer about what you have to offer. However, the information provided should be encapsulated within your marketing program in such a fashion as to be in your best interest. In other words, you are looking out for you.

Employers need to know about your abilities, skills, interests and motivation as these pertain to their needs within the position. They normally hire a person who has the attributes needed to perform the duties of the position. They want to know, based on past performance in either school or jobs, if you can provide them with the benefits necessary to meet their expectations.

There are always exceptions in hiring, such as the hiring of a friend or relative. This is something you can do nothing about.

After finding positions you are qualified to fill, your goal in the job search process should be to demonstrate how well you fit the needs of the employer for the job or jobs you have targeted. In other words, you need to persuade the employer in writing and in conversation that you are the best choice. Past performance and accomplishments are generally what employers use to predict future performance.

When preparing your resume, make sure you have thoroughly reviewed your skills and abilities. Think about what courses you have completed in school. What were your past job responsibilities? What have you accomplished in your career? Were you promoted? Do you have any special skills? Consider quantitative and qualitative information about accomplishments when you can.

Be prepared to show skills such being a good writer or having knowledge of specific software. Consider whether you are good at multi-tasking, leading a team, taking initiative, creating or organizing.

The purpose behind this is to help you go through and select the relevant information about yourself that pertains to a position of interest. Give as many details about the available position as you can.

Why would someone want to hire you for this job? When doing cover letters or resumes, answer this question. Make sure you demonstrate your background, orchestrated to the needs of the employer. When you get an interview, make sure you do the same in any conversations. Often there is more than one interview or interviewers.

The interviewer is probably a stranger, so approach him/her to charm and impress. This is your chance to shine. Don’t try to be modest. Don’t be overbearing either.

Many job seekers only list job duties and responsibilities when describing themselves. Employers want to know more. Let them know what you have actually accomplished while in school or on the job. Give them outcomes, benefits and actual progress made.

Be prepared to explain, during an interview, how you achieved your accomplishments. These may come as follow-up questions from the interviewer.

This approach allows the employer to know what to expect from you in future performance. It paints a more complete picture of what you are all about.

When you are competing against others in the employment market, you want to have every advantage you can have, to get the job you truly want. Take the time to know yourself so you can let employers know who you really are.

M.B. Owens is a Nashville-based columnist and journalist with a decade of experience writing on employment topics and business.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter & RSS:
Sign-Up For Our FREE email edition
Get the news first with our free weekly email
Name
Email  
TNLedger.com Knoxville Editon
RECORD TOTALS DAY WEEK YEAR
PROPERTY SALES 0 0 0
MORTGAGES 0 0 0
FORECLOSURE NOTICES 0 0 0
BUILDING PERMITS 0 0 0
BANKRUPTCIES 0 0 0
BUSINESS LICENSES 0 0 0
UTILITY CONNECTIONS 0 0 0
MARRIAGE LICENSES 0 0 0