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Editorial Results (free)

1. UK posts the biggest jump in annual inflation on record -

LONDON (AP) — Consumer prices in the U.K. rose at their fastest recorded rate during August as global supply shortages and higher wages accentuated the uptick from pandemic-related discounts a year ago, official figures showed Wednesday.

2. US producer prices jump an unprecedented 8.3% in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation at the wholesale level climbed 8.3% last month from August 2020, the biggest annual gain since the Labor Department started calculating the 12-month number in 2010.

The Labor Department reported Friday that its producer price index — which measures inflationary pressures before they reach consumers — rose 0.7% last month from July after increasing 1% in both June and July.

3. Sweeping new vaccine mandates for 100 million Americans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Thursday is announcing sweeping new federal vaccine requirements affecting as many as 100 million Americans in an all-out effort to increase COVID-19 vaccinations and curb the surging delta variant that is killing thousands each week and jeopardizing the nation's economic recovery.

4. Japan extends virus emergency until end of September -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan announced Thursday it is extending a coronavirus state of emergency in Tokyo and 18 other areas until the end of September as health care systems remain under severe strain, although new infections have slowed slightly.

5. Fed survey finds growth 'downshifted' in summer due to COVID -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. economic activity "downshifted" in July and August due to rising concerns about COVID's delta variant, as well as supply chain problems and labor shortages, the Federal Reserve's latest survey of the nation's business conditions revealed.

6. US hiring slows as delta variant weakens travel and tourism -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's employers added just 235,000 jobs in August, a surprisingly weak gain after two months of robust hiring and the clearest sign to date that the delta variant's spread has discouraged some people from flying, shopping and eating out.

7. UN: Brief gains in air quality in 2020 over COVID lockdowns -

GENEVA (AP) — The U.N. weather agency says the world — and especially urban areas — experienced a brief, sharp drop in emissions of air pollutants last year amid lockdown measures and related travel restrictions put in place over the coronavirus pandemic.

8. Goodbye to five models being discontinued -

Automakers are constantly introducing new models and nameplates to their lineups to meet consumer preferences and to keep their lineup fresh. With that comes the need to cycle older models out.

These discontinuations aren’t promoted, and shoppers often don’t realize they’re gone until it’s too late. With this in mind, Edmunds’ experts highlighted five outgoing vehicles that will be gone after the 2021 model year.

9. US consumer confidence falls in August to 6-month low -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer confidence fell in August to the lowest level since February amid rising concerns about the rapidly spreading delta variant of the coronavirus and worries about higher inflation.

10. TN, other state mask bans face federal civil rights inquiries -

The Education Department on Monday opened civil rights investigations into five Republican-led states that have banned or limited mask requirements in schools, saying the policies could amount to discrimination against students with disabilities or health conditions.

11. July US consumer spending eeks up 0.3% as delta threatens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Growth in U.S. consumer spending slowed in July to a modest increase of 0.3% as infections from the delta variant spread, while inflation over the past 12 months hit its fastest pace in three decades.

12. Powell: Fed on track to slow aid for economy later this year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve will start dialing back its ultra-low-rate policies this year as long as hiring continues to improve, Chair Jerome Powell said Friday, signaling the beginning of the end of the Fed's extraordinary response to the pandemic recession.

13. Dilemma for Fed chief: High inflation and a surging virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Not long ago, anticipation was high that Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell might begin to sketch out a plan this week for the Fed to start pulling back on its support for an economy that has been steadily strengthening.

14. Harris urges Vietnam to join US in opposing China 'bullying' -

HANOI (AP) — Vice President Kamala Harris called on Vietnam to join the U.S. in challenging China's "bullying" in the South China Sea, continuing her sharp rhetoric against Beijing as she met with Vietnamese leaders on Wednesday.

15. Imagination, Skittles help boy, 5, conquer Appalachian Trail -

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Harvey Sutton, or "Little Man," as he is known on the Appalachian Trail, won't have long to bask in the glory of hiking its full length. After all, he starts kindergarten Friday.

16. Biden: Greater threats than Taliban-controlled Afghanistan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden says even with the Taliban in power in Afghanistan, he sees a greater threat from outposts of al-Qaida and its affiliated groups in other countries, and that it was no longer "rational" to continue to focus U.S. military power there.

17. Robinhood's crypto trading surges, as overall growth slows -

NEW YORK (AP) — After helping a new generation of investors get into stocks, Robinhood is increasingly doing the same for cryptocurrencies.

More than $4 of every $10 that Robinhood Markets Inc. made in revenue during the spring came just from customers trading bitcoin, dogecoin and other cryptocurrencies.

18. Housing construction slumps 7% in July to 1.53 million units -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Home construction fell a sharp 7% in July as homebuilders struggled to cope with a variety of headwinds.

The July decline put home construction at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.53 million units, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday. It was the slowest pace since April but was 2.5% higher than a year ago.

19. Study: Pandemic accelerated trends away from live TV viewing -

NEW YORK (AP) — The pandemic accelerated changes in how people use their televisions, further reducing the dominance in traditional live viewing of what networks are showing, a new study has found.

20. White House: Taliban agree to allow civilian 'safe passage' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Taliban have agreed to allow "safe passage" from Afghanistan for civilians hoping to join a U.S.-directed airlift from the capital, President Joe Biden's national security adviser said Tuesday, although a timetable for completing the evacuation of Americans, Afghan allies and possibly other civilians has yet to be worked out with the country's new rulers.

21. Biden: Afghan chaos 'gut-wrenching' but stands by withdrawal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A defiant President Joe Biden rejected blame for chaotic scenes of Afghans clinging to U.S. military planes in Kabul in a desperate bid to flee their home country after the Taliban's easy victory over an Afghan military that America and NATO allies had spent two decades trying to build.

22. Home Depot sales climb again, but DIY frenzy may be cooling -

Home Depot's sales continue to surge, though same-store sales appeared to come back to earth after a year in which the home improvement chain outperformed expectations repeatedly.

For the three months ended August 1, sales climbed to $41.12 billion from $38.05 billion. Chairman and CEO Craig Menear said in a prepared statement Tuesday that this was the first time the chain surpassed quarterly sales of more than $40 billion.

23. Gov. Lee allows opt-out of student mask requirements -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee signed an executive order Monday letting parents opt their children out of coronavirus-related mask mandates in K-12 schools, after a few school districts issued mask requirements for students and others.

24. Airbnb cuts 2Q loss to $68 million, COVID clouds forecast -

Airbnb said Thursday that it narrowed its second-quarter loss to $68 million and gave a bullish forecast for revenue, but the company warned that new variants of COVID-19 will make future bookings and cancellations harder to predict.

25. US jobless claims near pandemic low as economy strengthens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits fell for a third straight time last week, the latest sign that employers are laying off fewer people as they struggle to fill a record number of open jobs and meet a surge in consumer demand.

26. Rescuing ‘Someone like me’ -

Margie Quin recalls the breakthrough with a bit of wonder lingering as she shared the memory: A handful of special agents listening intently to a newly rescued sex trafficking survivor who had just turned 18.

27. US consumer prices rose in July but at slower pace -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prices for U.S. consumers rose last month but at the slowest pace since February, a sign that Americans may gain some relief after four months of sharp increases that have imposed a financial burden on the nation's households.

28. Norwegian cruises challenges Florida passenger vaccine law -

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — Norwegian Cruise Line asked a federal judge Friday to block a Florida law prohibiting cruise companies from demanding that passengers show written proof of coronavirus vaccination before they board a ship.

29. United Airlines will require US employees to be vaccinated -

United Airlines will require employees in the U.S. to be vaccinated against COVID-19 by late October, perhaps sooner, joining a growing number of big corporations that are responding to a surge in virus cases.

30. Shipping snags prompt US firms to mull retreat from China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Game maker Eric Poses last year created The Worst-Case Scenario Card Game, making a wry reference to the way the coronavirus had upended normal life.

He had no idea.

In a twist that Poses never could have predicted, his game itself would become caught up in the latest fallout from the health crisis: a backlogged global supply chain that has delayed shipments around the world and sent freight costs rocketing.

31. Robinhood discloses stock offering, shares down premarket -

Shares of Robinhood are down more than 10% before the market open on Thursday as the company disclosed in a regulatory filing that it plans a stock offering of up to nearly 98 million shares.

Robinhood Markets Inc. said that the stock is being sold over time by selling shareholders and that it won't receive any proceeds from the sales.

32. Robinhood shares fly again, soaring as much as 80% -

NEW YORK (AP) — Robinhood's stock is flying again Wednesday, jumping so much that trading was temporarily halted three times in the first half hour after the market opened.

Robinhood Markets was up 28.5% at $60.15, as of 10:47 a.m. Eastern time, accelerating what's already been a blistering week of gains. At one point the stock was up 80%. It's a sharp turnaround from the lackluster debut last week, when Robinhood's stock dropped 8.4% from its initial price of $38 on Thursday.

33. China orders mass testing in Wuhan as COVID outbreak spreads -

BEIJING (AP) — China suspended flights and trains, canceled professional basketball league games and announced mass coronavirus testing in Wuhan on Tuesday as widening outbreaks of the delta variant reached the city where the disease was first detected in late 2019.

34. Biden unveils picks for key religious freedom roles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Friday announced his picks for four key religious freedom roles, including Khzir Khan, the Muslim-American father of a slain U.S. soldier who became an outspoken critic of former President Donald Trump throughout both of his campaigns.

35. Worker pay rises strongly as businesses fight to fill jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Wages and salaries rose at a healthy pace in the three months ended in June as employers competed to find enough workers to fill millions of available jobs.

Pay increased 1% in the second quarter for workers in the private sector, the Labor Department said Friday. That's down slightly from 1.1% in the first three months of the year but still the second-highest reading in more than a decade.

36. Biden orders tough new vaccination rules for federal workers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has announced sweeping new pandemic requirements aimed at boosting vaccination rates for millions of federal workers and contractors as he lamented the "American tragedy" of rising-yet-preventable deaths among the unvaccinated.

37. German economy rebounds in 2nd quarter but short of forecast -

BERLIN (AP) — Germany's economy grew by 1.5% in the second quarter compared with the previous three-month period, picking up after a sharp first-quarter fall but less strongly than expected.

The figure released Friday by the Federal Statistical Office fell short of the 2% gain economists had forecast. In addition, the first-quarter decline was sharper than previously reported — a 2.1% drop in gross domestic product, rather than the 1.8% reported in May.

38. European economy grows 2%, ending double-dip recession -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Europe emerged from a double-dip recession in the second quarter with stronger than expected growth of 2.0% over the quarter before, according to official figures released Friday, as restrictions eased, consumers started spending built-up savings and major companies showed stronger results.

39. US economy surpasses pre-pandemic size with 6.5% Q2 growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fueled by vaccinations and government aid, the U.S. economy grew at a solid 6.5% annual rate last quarter in another sign that the nation has achieved a sustained recovery from the pandemic recession. The total size of the economy has now surpassed its pre-pandemic level.

40. Fed's Powell downplays delta variant's threat to the economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The spread of the COVID-19 delta variant is raising infections, leading some companies and governments to require vaccinations and raising concerns about the U.S. economic recovery.

41. IMF forecasts 6% global growth this year as economies reopen -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The International Monetary Fund is sharply upgrading its economic outlook this year for the world's wealthy countries, especially the United States, as COVID-19 vaccinations help sustain solid rebounds from the pandemic recession. But the 190-country lending agency has downgraded its forecast for poorer countries, most of which are struggling to vaccinate.

42. Sales of new homes fall 6.6% in June -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sales of new homes fell for a third straight month in June, dropping by 6.6%. to the lowest level in more than a year.

The June sales decline left sales at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 676,000, the Commerce Department reported Monday. That followed a 7.7% sales decline in May and a 10.1% fall in April.

43. AP FACT CHECK: Biden goes too far in assurances on vaccines -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden offered an absolute guarantee Wednesday that people who get their COVID-19 vaccines are completely protected from infection, sickness and death from the coronavirus. The reality is not that cut and dried.

44. CSX 2Q profit more than doubled as railroad hauled 27% more -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — CSX railroad's second-quarter profit more than doubled as the economy continued to rebound from the depths of the coronavirus pandemic and it hauled 27% more freight than a year ago.

45. Stocks climb on Wall Street as more company earnings roll in -

Stocks closed higher again on Wall Street, extending their gains following a sharp drop at the beginning of the week.

Investors turned their attention to company earnings, which have started to roll in steadily.

46. Pfizer, subsidiaries agree to pay $345M in EpiPen settlement -

KANSAS CITY, Kan. (AP) — Pfizer Inc. and two of its subsidiaries have agreed to pay $345 million under a proposed settlement to resolve lawsuits over EpiPen price hikes.

47. Vaccine deliveries rising as delta virus variant slams Asia -

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — As many Asian countries battle their worst surge of COVID-19 infections, the slow flow of vaccine doses from around the world is finally picking up speed, giving hope that low inoculation rates can increase and help blunt the effect of the rapidly spreading delta variant.

48. Top Davidson County residential sales for second quarter 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, second quarter 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

49. UK inflation rises to highest level in nearly 3 years -

LONDON (AP) — Official figures show inflation in the U.K. rising to its highest level in nearly three years because of increases in the prices of food and motor fuel.

The Office for National Statistics said Wednesday that the annual rate of inflation rose to 2.5% in June from 2.1% the previous month. June's rate is the highest August 2018 when inflation hit 2.7%.

50. Pressured by allies, Biden escalates fight for voting rights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will lay out the "moral case" for voting rights as he faces growing pressure from civil rights activists and other Democrats to combat efforts by Republican-led state legislatures to restrict access to the ballot.

51. UK's Johnson set to confirm England unlocking will go ahead -

LONDON (AP) — British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is set to confirm Monday that all remaining lockdown restrictions in England will be lifted in a week's time while urging people to remain cautious amid a resurgence of the coronavirus.

52. Biden signs competition order targeting big business -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed an executive order on Friday targeting what he labeled anticompetitive practices in tech, health care and other parts of the economy, declaring it would fortify an American ideal "that true capitalism depends on fair and open competition."

53. UK economy takes another step toward pre-pandemic level -

LONDON (AP) — The British economy took another step toward its pre-pandemic level following the latest easing of lockdown restrictions, though the 0.8% growth recorded in May was around half that expected by economists as a microchip shortage hurt car production.

54. Fewer working-age people may slow economy. Will it lift pay? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As America's job market rebounds this summer and the need for workers intensifies, employers won't likely have a chance to relax anytime soon. Worker shortages will likely persist for years after the fast-reopening economy shakes off its growing pains.

55. US construction spending fell 0.3% in May, housing slowing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. construction spending fell 0.3% in May. Growth in housing, the economy's standout performer, slowed while activity in areas most directly impacted by the pandemic showed further weakness.

56. Tech gains nudge S&P 500, Nasdaq further into record heights -

NEW YORK (AP) — Strength for tech stocks nudged U.S. indexes a bit further into record heights Monday, more than making up for losses across much of the rest of Wall Street.

The S&P 500 rose 9.91 points, or 0.2%, to 4,290.61 after drifting between small gains and losses for much of the day. It added to its all-time high set Friday as optimism builds about the strengthening economy and expectations that the Federal Reserve will keep interest rates low for a while longer.

57. Congress votes to reinstate methane rules loosened by Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional Democrats have approved a measure reinstating rules aimed at limiting climate-warming greenhouse gas emissions from oil and gas drilling, a rare effort by Democrats to use the legislative branch to overturn a regulatory rollback under President Donald Trump.

58. US, Germany confront rising antisemitism, Holocaust denial -

BERLIN (AP) — The United States and Germany launched a new initiative Thursday to stem an alarming rise in antisemitism and Holocaust denial around the world.

The two governments announced the start of a U.S.-Germany Holocaust Dialogue that seeks to reverse the trend that gained traction during the coronavirus pandemic amid a surge in political populism across Europe and the U.S. The dialogue creates a way to develop educational and messaging tools to teach youth and others about the crimes of Nazis and their collaborators.

59. Falling short: Why the White House will miss its vax target -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Standing in the State Dining Room on May 4, President Joe Biden laid out a lofty goal to vaccinate 70% of American adults by Independence Day, saying the U.S. would need to overcome "doubters" and laziness to do it. "This is your choice," he told Americans. "It's life and death."

60. US existing home sales fall again as prices continue to soar -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sales of previously-occupied homes fell for the fourth straight month in May as soaring prices and a limited number of available properties discouraged many would-be buyers.

Existing home sales dropped 0.9% last month from April to a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 5.8 million units, the National Association of Realtors said Tuesday. The string of sales declines comes after sharp gains last fall and through the winter, as many Americans sought more living space during the pandemic. Sales are up nearly 45% from last May, when purchases fell to their lowest point of the COVID-19 outbreak.

61. Powell says economy growing rapidly, inflation up 'notably' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The economy is growing at a healthy clip, and that has accelerated inflation, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell says in written testimony to be delivered Tuesday at a congressional oversight hearing.

62. Wall Street snaps back following worst week since February -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rebounded on Wall Street Monday and clawed back most of their sharp loss from last week. The S&P 500 snapped 1.4% higher as the initial jolt passed from the Federal Reserve's reminder that it will eventually offer less help for markets. Oil producers, banks and other companies that were hit particularly hard last week made the biggest gains. High-growth tech stocks lagged. Shorter-term yields fell, and longer-term yields rose in another reversal from last week's initial reaction to the Fed's saying it may raise rates twice by late 2023.

63. US jobless claims tick up to 412,000 from a pandemic low -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits rose last week for the first time since April despite widespread evidence that the economy and the job market are rebounding steadily from the pandemic recession.

64. In poorest countries, surges worsen shortages of vaccines -

KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — Hati Maronjei once swore he would never get a COVID-19 shot, after a pastor warned that vaccines aren't safe.

Now, four months after the first batch of vaccines arrived in Zimbabwe, the 44-year-old street hawker of electronic items is desperate for the shot he can't get. Whenever he visits a clinic in the capital, Harare, he is told to try again the next day.

65. Biden trip takeaways: Respect, optimism, some skepticism -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's first overseas trip put his diplomatic and negotiating philosophy on display, as he rallied traditional U.S. democratic allies to confront new and old challenges and offered an often rosy take on the possibilities of cooperation with Russian President Vladimir Putin after a one-on-one summit.

66. Biden abroad: Pitching America to welcoming, wary allies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden spent his first trip overseas highlighting a sharp break from his disruptive predecessor, selling that the United States was once more a reliable ally with a steady hand at the wheel. European allies welcomed the pitch — and even a longtime foe acknowledged it.

67. Southern Baptists vote to probe leaders' sex abuse response -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Delegates at the Southern Baptist Convention's annual meeting voted overwhelmingly Wednesday to create a task force to oversee an independent investigation into the denomination's handling of sexual abuse.

68. US home construction up a moderate 3.6% in May -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home construction rose 3.6% in May as builders battled a surge in lumber prices that have made homes more expensive

The May increase left construction at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.57 million units, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday.

69. Yellen: Administration is watching inflation closely -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen assured Congress that the recent jump in inflation is being monitored very carefully by the Biden administration, but said again that any increase will prove temporary.

70. Delicate task for Fed: When to pull back on low-rate support -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With inflation rising in a fast-rebounding economy, the Federal Reserve is poised this week to discuss when it will take its first steps toward dialing back its ultra-low interest rate policies.

71. Lordstown Motors' rough road continues; CEO, CFO are out -

The top two executives at Lordstown Motors have resigned as problems at the Ohio electric truck startup mount.

CEO Steve Burns and Chief Financial Officer Julio Rodriguez stepped down, the company said Monday, sending shares already down 40% this year tumbling more than 17%.

72. Medicare copays for new Alzheimer's drug could reach $11,500 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new $56,000-a-year Alzheimer's drug would raise Medicare premiums broadly, and some patients who are prescribed the medication could face copayments of about $11,500 annually, according to a research report published Wednesday.

73. US economy: Plenty of growth, not enough workers or supplies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy is sparking confusion and whiplash almost as fast as it's adding jobs.

Barely more than a year after the coronavirus caused the steepest economic fall and job losses on record, the speed of the rebound has been so unexpectedly swift that many companies can't fill jobs or acquire enough supplies to meet a pent-up burst of customer demand.

74. EXPLAINER: 5 key takeaways from the May jobs report -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The American economy delivered 559,000 added jobs in May.

In ordinary times, that would amount to a blockbuster burst of hiring for one month, and the response would be an outpouring of cheers.

75. Biden says jobs report bolsters case for government spending -

President Joe Biden portrayed the May jobs report as a jumping off point for more spending on infrastructure and education to keep growth going — essentially an argument for his agenda. But the employment numbers issued Friday also hinted at the possible limits of how much government aid can be pumped into the world's largest economy.

76. US adds 559K jobs as firms still struggle to fill positions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added a modest 559,000 jobs in May, an improvement from April's sluggish gain but still evidence that many companies are struggling to find enough workers as the economy rapidly recovers from the pandemic recession.

77. AMC embraces its meme stock status, shares quickly double -

After its movie theaters were shut and its stock was nearly left for dead because of the pandemic, AMC Entertainment is embracing the horde of fanatical investors who helped shock its shares back to life as part of this year's "meme stock" buying spree.

78. Senate R&D bill to counter China shelved by GOP opposition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A sweeping Senate bill aimed at making the United States more competitive with China and shoring up domestic computer chip manufacturing with $50 billion in emergency funds was abruptly shelved Friday after a handful of Republican senators orchestrated a last-minute attempt to halt it.

79. US tells Russia it won't rejoin Open Skies arms control pact -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration informed Russia on Thursday that it will not rejoin a key arms control pact, even as the two sides prepare for a summit next month between their leaders.

80. Summer travel forecast calls for longer waits, fewer choices -

After a year of coronavirus lockdowns, the start of summer beckons with vacation plans made possible by relaxed COVID-19 restrictions. But a severe worker shortage brings a warning for travelers: Expect delays and pack a little patience.

81. AP FACT CHECK: House GOP falsely blames Biden for gas prices -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Heading into the Memorial Day travel weekend, House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy and other members of his party are falsely blaming President Joe Biden for higher gasoline and lumber costs.

82. EU takes on AstraZeneca in court over vaccine deliveries -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union took on vaccine producer AstraZeneca in a Brussels court on Wednesday and accused the drugmaker of delivering shots to other nations when it had promised them for delivery among the 27 member states.

83. Factory boss defiant as sanctions bite in China's Xinjiang -

AKSU, China (AP) — A backlash against reports of forced labor and other abuses of the largely Muslim Uyghur ethnic group in Xinjiang is taking a toll on China's cotton industry, but it's unclear if the pressure will compel the government or companies to change their ways.

84. Carolina, Nashville could use a breath – and breathing room -

Four overtimes. A total of 191 minutes, 4 seconds of hockey. Two hundred and fourteen shots on goal.

In just two games.

"Got to be mentally tough. You've got to stay ultra-focused and your detail has to be very sharp," said Ryan Johansen, whose Predators won consecutive double-overtime games in Nashville to tie their Central Division playoff series against Carolina at two wins apiece. "All we're going to do now is prepare for Game 5 and get some rest."

85. EU ministers seek to cement trade ties with Biden team -

BRUSSELS (AP) — European Union and U.S. top trade officials on Thursday will seek to further cement recent advances in settling some key differences that have soured trans-Atlantic relations over the past few years.

86. EXPLAINER: Why has the price of Bitcoin been falling? -

NEW YORK (AP) — The price of Bitcoin fell as much as 29% Wednesday after the China Banking Association warned member banks of risks associated with digital currencies. Other digital currencies suffered sharp declines as well.

87. UK inflation spikes as retailers respond to lockdown easing -

LONDON (AP) — Britain's inflation rate more than doubled in April as energy prices soared and clothing retailers hiked prices as the country's coronavirus lockdown was eased, official statistics showed Wednesday.

88. AP FACT CHECK: Hyperbole from Biden, GOP on state of economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden and House Republicans alike are revising history when asserting that the new administration set records in U.S. job creation — either the best ever or among the worst, depending on the vantage point. The truth is in between.

89. Biden plan would pick winners, losers in move to green jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In Georgia, school bus-maker Blue Bird has visions of going from selling a few hundred electric buses annually to 15,000. In Michigan, Ford plans to produce an all-electric version of its F-150 pickup truck.

90. US industrial output rose a modest 0.7% amid shortages -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. industrial production increased for a second straight month in April as more factories came online after being shutdown by winter ice storms.

Industrial production — which includes output at factories, mines and utilities — rose 0.7% last month, down from a sharp increase of 2.4% in March, the Federal Reserve reported Friday. The March gain, however, was revised sharply higher from an initial estimate of a 1.4% rise.

91. Stocks climb after three days of losses, led by Big Tech -

Wall Street put the brakes on a three-day losing streak with a broad stock market rally Thursday powered by Big Tech companies and banks.

The S&P 500 notched a 1.2% gain, clawing back almost half of its loss from a day earlier, when it had its biggest one-day drop since February. Even so, the benchmark index is on track for a 2.8% weekly decline, which would be its largest since January. The other major indexes were also on pace for sharp weekly declines, despite recouping some of their losses.

92. Facebook-backed digital currency project Diem shifts to US -

A once-ambitious Facebook-backed digital currency project — formerly known as Libra, now called Diem — is shifting operations from Switzerland to the U.S. and said it plans to launch a cryptocurrency tied to the U.S. dollar later this year.

93. EXPLAINER: Why are fears of high inflation getting worse? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Gas prices are rising. Auto prices are soaring. Consumer goods companies are charging more for household basics like toilet paper, peanut butter and soft drinks.

All of which is resurrecting fears of an economic threat that has all but disappeared over the past generation: Runaway inflation. It occurs when prices for most goods and services not only rise but accelerate, making the cost of living steadily more expensive and shrinking the purchasing power of Americans' earnings and savings.

94. Top Davidson County residential sales for April 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, April 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

95. Shelton joins drive to help feed out-of-work musicians -

For more than a year now, the state of America's live music industry has been a grim one.

The COVID-19 pandemic threw hundreds of thousands of musicians, roadies and other touring industry professionals out of work, according to the Country Music Association. In Tennessee alone, the industry's unemployed number around 50,000.

96. Cautious cuddling? England to OK hugs as lockdown eases -

LONDON (AP) — In England, it's going to be time to hug again.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is expected to give the go-ahead for that much-missed human contact when he announces the next round of lockdown easing later Monday in the wake of a sharp fall in new coronavirus infections.

97. Job market for new grads: Much hiring but much competition -

After a painful year of joblessness, the future has finally brightened for Alycia St. Germain, a 22-year-old college senior at the University of Minnesota.

Having lost a part-time gig at Barnes and Noble last March as the viral pandemic tore through the U.S. economy, she was left unemployed like tens of millions of other Americans. But now, St. Germain has a job lined up — with benefits — even before graduation and in her chosen field of developmental psychology. A family friend established a new child-care center in St. Paul, and St. Germain landed a job as an assistant in the infant room.

98. Fed warns US financial system remains vulnerable to threats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is warning that the U.S. financial system remains vulnerable to threats stemming from the global pandemic, including the possibility of a sharp rise in global interest rates that could strain developing countries.

99. Productivity rebounds at solid 5.4% rate in first quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. productivity posted a sharp rebound between January and March after falling in the previous quarter. Labor costs declined slightly.

Productivity increased at an annual rate of 5.4% in the first quarter, recovering from a 3.8% rate of decline in the fourth quarter of last year, the Labor Department reported Thursday. Labor costs fell at a 0.3% rate in the first quarter following a 5.6% jump in the fourth.

100. Judge orders Justice Dept. to release Trump obstruction memo -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge has ordered the release of a legal memorandum the Trump-era Justice Department prepared for then-Attorney General William Barr before he announced his conclusion that President Donald Trump had not obstructed justice during the Russia investigation.