» Subscribe Today!
The Power of Information
Home
The Ledger - EST. 1978 - Nashville Edition
X
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search

Name & Property Search

Search results for 'memphis greenspace' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:9
Editorial:14
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:0
East Tennessee:0
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

TNLedger Knoxville Edition subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Forrest's relatives want $30M to move grave from Memphis park -

MEMPHIS (AP) — Relatives of Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest are demanding $30 million from the city of Memphis, Tennessee, and a nonprofit to move his remains from a park and settle a lawsuit over the takedown of a statue of the former Ku Klux Klan leader.

2. State Sen. Tate goes a step too far in dance with GOP -

Sen. Reginald Tate ran a campaign ad in the waning days of the Democratic primary race bragging about his service to the city of Memphis.

But voters, apparently tired of Tate’s shenanigans, finally decided he was more concerned about serving himself and opted for political newcomer Katrina Robinson instead.

3. Davy Crockett’s fine, but let’s not get carried away -

The Tennessee General Assembly is making some monumental decisions these days – literally. Not only is the Legislature prepared to put a statue of Tennessee folk hero Davy Crockett in front of the State Capitol, replacing obscure Nashville politician Edward Carmack, it’s also likely to erect a monument, or memorial, to unborn children in the ongoing battle against abortion.

4. Bill to criminalize voting to remove monuments fails -

One of several bills considered retribution against the city of Memphis for the removal of Confederate statues died in a House committee today amid questions about its constitutionality.

The House Criminal Justice Committee sent to “summer study” a piece of legislation enabling the state to charge local elected officials with a felony for “knowingly” casting votes in conflict with state law on historical monuments and sanctuary cities. The move effectively defeats the legislation for this session.

5. Civil War re-enactor outflanked on statues, Medicaid expansion -

When state Rep. Steve McDaniel was a youngster he often read the historical marker at the intersection of Highway 22 and Wildersville Road detailing Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s first West Tennessee raid in the Battle of Parker’s Crossroads.

6. Report: Confederate statues move followed open meetings law -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee comptroller's report says Memphis officials followed state open meetings law when they sold two parks to a nonprofit, which removed three Confederate statues.

The report Wednesday also says Memphis followed municipal law by selling the parks in December to Memphis Greenspace Inc. for $1,000 apiece.

7. Legislators file 4 bills to protect Civil War monuments -

Legislative battles are looming over a spate of bills designed to hammer Memphis and any other cities accused of violating the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act.

Lawmakers filed several pieces of legislation aimed at punishing local governments in the wake of the Memphis City Council move to topple the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue in Health Sciences Park and two other Confederate monuments in another park by selling the property to a newly-created nonprofit organization.

8. Judge: Memphis nonprofit must preserve Confederate statues -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A judge says a Tennessee nonprofit must preserve and cannot sell statues of three Confederate-era leaders removed from Memphis parks in December.

The Commercial Appeal reports that Davidson County Chancellor Ellen Hobbs Lyle barred Memphis Greenspace Inc. on Monday from moving the statues of three figures — Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest, Capt. J. Harvey Mathes and President of the Confederate States Jefferson Davis — pending a hearing before the Tennessee Historical Commission within 60 days.

9. Groups sue over Confederate statues removal at Memphis parks -

MEMPHIS (AP) — Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest's family and the Sons of Confederate Veterans are challenging last month's removal of Confederate statues from Memphis parks.

According to The Commercial Appeal , the petition with the Tennessee Historical Commission claims Memphis and nonprofit Memphis Greenspace Inc. violated numerous state laws.

10. Shot fired from Memphis ignites Civil War rematch -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest died in 1877, but 140 years later some people just can’t let their hero or the Old South go away.

In fact, the state Legislature is set to reignite the Civil War – to some degree – in 2018. We hope no gunshots are fired.

11. Anonymous donors helped buy Memphis public parks -

MEMPHIS (AP) — A private group headed by a county commissioner used anonymous donations to purchase two parks from the city of Memphis, remove two Confederate statues and keep the parks running at their current level.

12. Confederate statues removed after Memphis sells public parks -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A private group headed by a county commissioner and fueled by anonymous donations bought two parks from the city of Memphis at little cost this week, allowing for the swift removal of two Confederate statues that had sparked conflict for years.

13. Confederate statues removed after Memphis sells public parks -

MEMPHIS (AP) — Crews removed two Confederate statues from Memphis parks after the city sold them to a private entity.

The City Council had earlier voted unanimously Wednesday to sell two parks where Confederate statues were located and crews began working right away to remove a statue of Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest. At the second park, a statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis was later taken down.

14. Elvis Presley's Graceland opens new entertainment complex -

MEMPHIS (AP) — Nearly four decades after Elvis sang his last tune, his legacy got a $45 million boost with the Thursday opening of a major new attraction at his Graceland estate -- an entertainment complex that Priscilla Presley says gives "the full gamut" of the King of Rock 'n' Roll.