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Editorial Results (free)

1. Biden easing foreign travel restrictions, requiring vaccines -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will ease foreign travel restrictions into the U.S. beginning in November, when his administration will require all foreign nationals flying into the country to be fully vaccinated.

2. Democrats push to retool health care programs for millions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Dental work for seniors on Medicare. An end to sky's-the-limit pricing on prescription drugs. New options for long-term care at home. Coverage for low-income people locked out of Medicaid by ideological battles.

3. Senate parliamentarian deals blow to Dems' immigration push -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats can't use their $3.5 trillion package bolstering social and climate programs for their plan to give millions of immigrants a chance to become citizens, the Senate's parliamentarian said, a crushing blow to what was the party's clearest pathway in years to attaining that long-sought goal.

4. Biden pitching partnership after bumpy stretch with allies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden goes before the United Nations this week eager to make the case for the world to act with haste against the coronavirus, climate change and human rights abuses. His pitch for greater global partnership comes at a moment when allies are becoming increasingly skeptical about how much U.S. foreign policy really has changed since Donald Trump left the White House.

5. Parents in China laud rule limiting video game time for kids -

Li Zhanguo's two children, ages 4 and 8, don't have their own smartphones, but like millions of other Chinese children, they are no strangers to online gaming.

"If my children get their hands on our mobile phones or an iPad, and if we don't closely monitor their screen time, they can play online games for as long as three to four hours each time," he said.

6. US unveils plan to address 'silent killer' extreme heat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is moving to protect workers and communities from extreme heat after a dangerously hot summer that spurred an onslaught of drought-worsened wildfires and caused hundreds of deaths from the Pacific Northwest to hurricane-ravaged Louisiana.

7. Probe of Southern Baptist sex abuse response moves forward -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Rev. Marshall Blalock feels the weight of his new responsibility.

The South Carolina pastor serves as vice chair of a recently formed Southern Baptist Convention task force charged with overseeing an investigation into how a top denominational committee handled sex abuse allegations, a review that comes years into the SBC's public reckoning with the scandal.

8. King Henry leads Titans' late rally to stun Seahawks 33-30 -

SEATTLE (AP) — Derrick Henry and the Tennessee Titans found a way to silence Seattle's notorious noise that hadn't been heard for nearly two years.

The Titans leaned on their All-Pro star and staged the kind comeback they haven't pulled off in a regular-season game in more than a decade.

9. Pentagon reverses itself, calls deadly Kabul strike an error -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon retreated from its defense of a drone strike that killed multiple civilians in Afghanistan last month, announcing Friday that a review revealed that only civilians were killed in the attack, not an Islamic State extremist as first believed.

10. Man sentenced to 12 years in $200 million phone-fraud scheme -

SEATTLE (AP) — A Pakistan resident has been sentenced to 12 years in prison for a conspiracy to "unlock" phones from AT&T's network, a scheme the company says cost it more than $200 million.

Muhammad Fahd, 35, of Karachi, recruited an employee of an AT&T call center in Bothell, Washington, via Facebook in 2012, and began bribing that employee and his coworkers to use their credentials to unlock phones.

11. Stocks fall on Wall Street, giving up the week's gains -

Wall Street capped an up-and-down week of trading Friday with a broad sell-off that wiped out the major indexes' gains for the week.

The S&P 500 lost 0.9% and posted its second straight weekly loss. Roughly 80% of the stocks in the benchmark index fell. Technology and communication companies accounted for much of the pullback. Industrial and financial stocks also were big drags on the index. Only the index's health care sector managed a gain.

12. Protest for jailed Capitol rioters: Police ready this time -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Burned before, Capitol Police say they are taking no chances as they prepare for a Saturday rally at the U.S. Capitol in support of rioters imprisoned after the violent Jan. 6 insurrection.

13. Biden, world leaders try to hammer out next steps on climate -

Washington (AP) — President Joe Biden tried to hammer out the world's next steps against rapidly worsening climate change in a private, virtual session with a small group of other global leaders Friday, and announced a new U.S.-European pledge to cut climate-wrecking methane leaks.

14. FDA panel is first key test for Biden COVID-19 booster plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration's embattled plan to dispense COVID-19 booster shots to most Americans faced its first major hurdle Friday as a government advisory panel met to decide whether to endorse extra doses of the Pfizer vaccine.

15. Biden angers France, EU with new Australia, UK initiative -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's decision to form a strategic Indo-Pacific alliance with Australia and Britain to counter China is angering France and the European Union. They're feeling left out and seeing it as a return to the Trump era.

16. Organizer of Saturday rally looks to rewrite Jan. 6 history -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The architect of a Washington protest planned for Saturday that aims to rewrite history about the violent January assault on the U.S. Capitol is hardly a household name.

Matt Braynard worked as an analyst for the Republican Party, crunched data for a small election firm and later started a consulting business that attracted few federal clients, records show. He started a nonprofit after he was dismissed by Donald Trump's 2016 campaign following several months on the job, but struggled to raise money. The group's tax-exempt status was revoked last year.

17. Justice Department reviewing policies on transgender inmates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is reviewing its policies on housing transgender inmates in the federal prison system after protections for transgender prisoners were rolled back in the Trump administration, The Associated Press has learned.

18. AP FACT CHECK: Biden's shaky claims on jobs, gasoline -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Boasting that government policies can make a difference in improving the economy, President Joe Biden went too far Thursday in taking credit for job growth since taking office.

He also made a dubious suggestion that wrongdoing is behind higher gasoline prices — something that his administration will seek to fix. But analysts say there is little evidence that is the case.

19. Ford adding 450 jobs to meet demand for new electric truck -

DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) — Ford Motor Co. plans to spend $250 million and add 450 jobs at three Michigan plants to meet demand for the new F-150 Lightning.

20. Titans' Lewan: Bad day due to worrying more about messing up -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee Titans left tackle Taylor Lewan says he didn't deal well with his first game back after the first injury of his career, getting so amped up the three-time Pro Bowler was drained by kickoff.

21. Biden's 'summer of love' with Europe hits an abrupt break-up -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's summer of love with Europe appears to have come to an abrupt end.

After promising European leaders that "America is back" and that multilateral diplomacy would guide U.S. foreign policy, Biden has angered numerous allies with a go-it-alone approach on key issues, the latest being a new security initiative for the Indo-Pacific that notably excluded France and the European Union.

22. Mortgage rates dip lower this week; 30-year loan at 2.86% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term mortgage rates dipped lower this week as economic prospects continued muted amid a wave of new delta variant coronavirus cases. They remained under 3%.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday that the average rate for a 30-year mortgage edged down to 2.86% from 2.88% last week. That's very close to where the benchmark rate stood at this time last year, 2.87%. It peaked this year at 3.18% in April. Home loan rates fell in the early summer and then remained steady despite increases in inflation.

23. Stanford good model for now, Vandy coach sees higher ceiling -

NASHVILLE (AP) — First-year Commodores coach Clark Lea is the latest attempting to build a football program at Vanderbilt.

He admires what David Shaw has accomplished at Stanford, marrying football success with academic excellence. But Lea sees his alma mater having an advantage Stanford can't match: a top school in Nashville and playing in the Southeastern Conference.

24. Small agency, big job: Biden tasks OSHA with vaccine mandate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn't make many headlines. Charged with keeping America's workplaces safe, it usually busies itself with tasks such as setting and enforcing standards for goggles, hardhats and ladders.

25. Cuba opens door to more private business, but red tape looms -

HAVANA (AP) — Opening a small business is a bureaucratic headache in many parts of the world. In Cuba, it's an adventure in largely unknown territory.

Most sorts of private businesses have been banned for more than 50 years, even if hundreds of thousands of Cubans in recent years have taken advantage of reforms that opened up cracks for small private enterprise in the once-solid wall of the state-dominated socialist economy.

26. Blowers, mowers and more: American yards quietly go electric -

For Jared Anderman, of Croton-on-Hudson, New York, switching from gasoline-powered tools to electric ones for lawn care was a no-brainer.

"I'm concerned about climate change and wanted tools that are more eco-friendly, and also quieter. I like listening to music when I do yardwork and this way I can enjoy music or a podcast while I work," he said. "I could never do that with gas-powered equipment."

27. Drought haves, have-nots test how to share water in the West -

MADRAS, Ore. (AP) — Phil Fine stands in a parched field and watches a harvester gnaw through his carrot seed crop, spitting clouds of dust in its wake. Cracked dirt lines empty irrigation canals, and dust devils and tumbleweeds punctuate a landscape in shades of brown.

28. Surprise uptick in spending by Americans as delta spread -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans continued to spend at a brisk pace last month in the face of rising COVID-19 infections, though much of it was done online and not at restaurants or other sectors in the U.S. economy beleaguered by the arrival of the delta variant.

29. Job market disconnect raises concerns over economic recovery -

The gulf between record job openings and a lack of people taking those jobs is forcing Wall Street to reassess the pace of the economic recovery.

Jobs were gutted during the pandemic and employment growth has been a closely watched gauge for investors. Increasing employment eventually results in increased consumer spending, which is the biggest driver of economic growth. Without the former, analysts have said, it will take longer than expected for the economy to operate at some semblance of a pre-pandemic normal.

30. Biden announces Indo-Pacific alliance with UK, Australia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden announced Wednesday that the United States is forming a new Indo-Pacific security alliance with Britain and Australia that will allow for greater sharing of defense capabilities — including helping equip Australia with nuclear-powered submarines. It's a move that could deepen a growing chasm in U.S.-China relations.

31. Biden $3.5T plan tests voter appeal of expansive gov't role -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's "build back better" agenda is poised to be the most far-reaching federal investment since FDR's New Deal or LBJ's Great Society — a prodigious effort to tax the rich and shift money into projects and programs touching the lives of nearly every American.

32. Tesla builds 1st store on tribal land, dodges state car laws -

NAMBÉ, N.M. (AP) — Carmaker Tesla has opened a store and repair shop on Native American land for the first time, marking a new approach to its yearslong fight to sell cars directly to consumers and cut car dealerships out of the process.

33. Titans eager to respond after offense 'got hit in the mouth' -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans are trying to get back to what they do on offense after a stumbling performance in their season opener, and Ryan Tannehill says that means playing up to their own standards.

34. Contest winners, health worker orbiting world in SpaceX 1st -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The four people on SpaceX's first private flight are fairly ordinary, down-to-Earth types brought together by chance.

They'll circle Earth for three days at an unusually high altitude — on their own without a professional escort — before splashing down off the Florida coast.

35. SpaceX launches 4 amateurs on private Earth-circling trip -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — SpaceX's first private flight streaked into orbit Wednesday night with two contest winners, a health care worker and their rich sponsor, the most ambitious leap yet in space tourism.

36. As COVID-19 vaccine mandates rise, religious exemptions grow -

About 3,000 Los Angeles Police Department employees are citing religious objections to try to get out of the required COVID-19 vaccination. In Washington state, thousands of state workers are seeking similar exemptions.

37. Separating fact from fiction about green cars -

With all the developments in the auto industry you may think your next car will be electric, including a new federal target that would mean half of all new vehicles sold within a decade will have zero emissions. This will be a dramatic – and perhaps unsettling – shift for car shoppers.

38. ‘Roar’ could use more bite but has good information -

You thought you’d be back by now. When you left your job last year, they said they’d call you when things opened up, but here we are, 18 months in, and you’re still sitting at home.

39. How to beat your summer ‘revenge shopping’ debt -

The joy of shouting to your friends over the roar of a crowded bar, the giddiness of seeing the world rushing by below you from the seat of an airplane, the weirdly constricting sensation of wearing pants that aren’t elastic – the summer of 2021 brought back many experiences we had forgone during the past year and a half of the pandemic.

40. A few tips for negotiating your way to a richer life -

Negotiating is an important personal finance skill that can help you earn more and pay less. Whether you’re discussing a job offer, dickering at a car dealership or just trying to work out a budget with your significant other, the ability to bargain effectively can have a huge impact.

41. Animal ‘privacy’ used as public records dodge -

In late April, the city of Memphis abruptly changed course and shut down access to records that show how the city-owned animal shelter treats the dogs and cats in its care.

The map to reach this decision is familiar to those of us in the public records community and sobering to anyone who wants government to be open and accountable to its citizens.

42. Nashville health group pushes vaccines for all -

The Nashville Health Care Council board of directors has issued a statement urging every person to get vaccinated against COVID-19, and it invited top executives of health care companies nationwide to sign on to the statement.

43. Milley defends calls to Chinese as effort to avoid conflict -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The top U.S. military officer on Wednesday defended the phone calls he made to his Chinese counterpart in the turbulent final months of Donald Trump's presidency, saying the conversations were intended to convey "reassurance" to the Chinese military and were in line with his responsibilities as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

44. Biles: FBI turned 'blind eye' to reports of gymnasts' abuse -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Olympic gold medalist Simone Biles told Congress in forceful testimony Wednesday that federal law enforcement and gymnastics officials turned a "blind eye" to USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar's sexual abuse of her and hundreds of other women.

45. VA loans mount comeback; August sales in slight retreat -

There was a time when there were fewer veterans than there are now, and Veterans’ Administration loans had seemingly faded away.

With the 20 years of fighting in and around Iraq and Afghanistan, there have been tens of thousands of men and women serving our country, and the number of veterans eligible for VA loans has skyrocketed.

46. A few random thoughts as summer fades -

Here, there and everywhere: Speaking strictly from a male perspective, I think it’s unfortunate that nothing rhymes with “happy husband.”

• The little bios posted online and elsewhere of people who die from COVID should say whether the victim had been vaccinated, just as articles about traffic fatalities say (or used to) whether the victims were wearing seat belts. Same principle.

47. You want us to work for you? -

Hiring employees used to be a fairly straightforward affair. A company posted its openings online through its own website, ran ads and possibly engaged a staffing agency or recruiter. It was similarly easy for job seekers, who prowled postings on their own, or retained professional help to find the best match for their talents.

48. Trump aides aim to build GOP opposition to Afghan refugees -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As tens of thousands of Afghan refugees fleeing the Taliban arrive in the U.S., a handful of former Trump administration officials are working to turn Republicans against them.

49. UN urges moratorium on use of AI that imperils human rights -

GENEVA (AP) — The U.N. human rights chief is calling for a moratorium on the use of artificial intelligence technology that poses a serious risk to human rights, including face-scanning systems that track people in public spaces.

50. Biden: Nearly 3M get health coverage during COVID-19 sign-up -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly 3 million consumers took advantage of a special six-month period to sign up for subsidized health insurance coverage made more affordable by the COVID-19 relief law, President Joe Biden said Wednesday.

51. Study: State worker pension systems in best shape since 2008 -

Pension systems for state government workers across the U.S. are in their best shape since the Great Recession began more than a dozen years ago, according to a study released Tuesday.

The Pew Charitable Trust report credits a booming stock market over the past year as well as states' longer-term steps, which include boosting taxpayer contributions to public pension funds and reducing promised retirement benefits, particularly to newly hired workers.

52. Book: Top US officer feared Trump could order China strike -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fearful of Donald Trump's actions in his final weeks as president, the United States' top military officer twice assured his Chinese counterpart that the two nations would not go to war, according to a forthcoming book.

53. Democrats revise elections bill but face Senate headwinds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Democrats unveiled a pared back elections bill Tuesday in hopes of kickstarting their stalled push to counteract new laws in Republican states that could make it more difficult to cast a ballot.

54. GM to invest $50M in Detroit education, jobs, neighborhoods -

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors Corp. plans to invest $50 million by 2025 to help improve access to education in Detroit, employment opportunities and city neighborhoods.

55. Blinken defense of Afghan policy clouded by al-Qaida warning -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Tuesday sought to parry bipartisan congressional criticism of the Biden administration's Afghanistan withdrawal, as new intelligence estimates warned that al-Qaida could soon again use Afghan soil to plot attacks on the United States.

56. Amazon eyes 125K more hires, $18+ per hour average salary -

Amazon wants to hire 125,000 delivery and warehouse workers and said Tuesday that it is paying new hires an average of $18 an hour in a tight job market as more people shop online.

Competition for hourly workers has become fierce, and many companies are offering higher pay, sign-on bonuses and other incentives. Last week, package delivery company UPS promised to handout job offers in 30 minutes after candidates apply for many of the 100,000 holiday workers it plans to hire.

57. Biden: Results of California recall will be felt nationally -

LONG BEACH, Calif. (AP) — President Joe Biden put Democrats' approach to the coronavirus pandemic on the line Monday, casting the California recall that could remove Gov. Gavin Newsom from office as an opportunity for voters to show the nation that "leadership matters, science matters."

58. Democrats seek corporate, wealthy tax hikes for $3.5T plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats unveiled a sweeping proposal for tax hikes on big corporations and the wealthy to fund President Joe Biden's $3.5 trillion rebuilding plan, as Congress speeds ahead to shape the far-reaching package that touches almost all aspects of domestic life.

59. UK recommends COVID-19 booster shots for over 50s -

LONDON (AP) — The U.K. said Tuesday it will offer a third dose of COVID-19 vaccine to everyone over age 50 and other vulnerable people after an expert panel said the boosters were needed to protect against waning immunity this winter.

60. US stocks edge higher, regrouping after a down week -

Stocks managed to end a wobbly day mostly higher on Wall Street Monday as the market regroups after its biggest weekly drop since June.

The S&P 500 shook off an afternoon slump and edged up 0.2%, the Dow Jones Industrial Average added 0.8% and the Nasdaq slipped 0.1%.

61. Apple patches exploit attributed to hacker-for-hire firm -

BOSTON (AP) — Apple released an emergency software patch to fix a security vulnerability that researchers said could allow hackers to directly infect Apple devices without any user action.

The researchers at the University of Toronto's Citizen Lab said the flaw allowed spyware from the world's most infamous hacker-for-hire firm, NSO Group, to directly infect the iPhone of a Saudi activist.

62. No time for excuses or pouting for Titans after ugly loss -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee is about to find out if the Titans are who they thought they were coming into this season.

The Titans came into this season with high expectations as the defending AFC South champs. That swagger deflated quickly as the Arizona Cardinals scored the first 17 points in romping all over them in a 38-13 flop Sunday that had fans booing before halftime and leaving before the fourth quarter.

63. US budget deficit rises to $2.71 trillion through August -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. budget deficit rose to $2.71 trillion through August, on track to be the second largest shortfall in history due to trillions of dollars in COVID relief.

In its monthly budget report, the Treasury Department said Monday that the deficit for the first 11 months of this budget year is 9.9% less than the imbalance during the same period last year.

64. NTSB chief: focus on road safety must shift to entire system -

DETROIT (AP) — The new chairman of the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board wants governments and businesses to change the way they look at highway safety, considering the whole system rather than individual driver behavior.

65. House Democrats post record August fundraising ahead of 2022 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The campaign organization aiming to maintain Democratic control of the House in the 2022 midterm races raised $10 million last month, its best August haul ever during a year without a national election.

66. US steps up effort to unite families separated under Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is expanding its effort to find and reunite migrant families who were separated at the U.S.-Mexico border under President Donald Trump as part of a zero-tolerance policy on illegal crossings.

67. Democrats seek corporate, wealthy tax hikes for $3.5T plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats unveiled a sweeping proposal Monday for tax hikes on big corporations and the wealthy to fund President Joe Biden's $3.5 trillion rebuilding plan, as Congress speeds ahead to shape the far-reaching package  that touches almost all aspects of domestic life.

68. Titans wind up outcoached, outplayed in opening 38-13 loss -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Outcoached. Outplayed. Beaten soundly. The Tennessee Titans just got a big ego check after being routed in their season opener.

Ryan Tannehill was sacked six times, fumbled twice and intercepted once as the defending AFC South champs found themselves smothered 38-13 by the Arizona Cardinals on Sunday.

69. Federal judge acquits Tennessee professor with ties to China -

A federal judge on Thursday threw out all charges against a University of Tennessee professor accused of hiding his relationship with a Chinese university while receiving research grants from NASA.

70. Biden's vaccine rules ignite instant, hot GOP opposition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's aggressive push to require millions of U.S. workers to vaccinate against the coronavirus is running into a wall of resistance from Republicans threatening everything from lawsuits to civil disobedience, plunging the country deeper into culture wars that have festered since the onset of the pandemic.

71. Policy center says debt limit could be hit in mid-October -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government will likely face an unprecedented default on its debt obligations between mid-October and mid-November, a Washington think tank said Friday, seconding a warning earlier this week from the Treasury.

72. Federal mandate takes vaccine decision off employers' hands -

Larger U.S. businesses now won't have to decide whether to require their employees to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Doing so is now federal policy.

President Joe Biden announced sweeping new orders Thursday that will require employers with more than 100 workers to mandate immunizations or offer weekly testing. The new rules could affect as many as 100 million Americans, although it's not clear how many of those people are currently unvaccinated.

73. US doubles the fine for people who break mask rule on planes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. is doubling the fine for people who break the rule requiring masks on planes, trains and other forms of public transit to slow the spread of COVID-19, with President Joe Biden warning Thursday that violators should "be prepared to pay."

74. Analysis: Biden takes fight to unvaccinated in virus battle -

WASHINGTON (AP) — They're a source of frustration. A risk to their fellow citizens. A threat to the nation's economic recovery.

President Joe Biden is trying to concentrate the anger of the nation's inoculated majority against the refusal of 25% of eligible Americans to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

75. Biden: GOP governors 'cavalier' for resisting vaccine rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden called some Republican governors "cavalier" on Friday for resisting his call for far-reaching new federal coronavirus vaccine requirements he hopes will curb the surging delta variant.

76. As flights resume, plight of Afghan allies tests Biden's vow -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Evacuation flights have resumed for Westerners, but thousands of at-risk Afghans who had helped the United States are still stranded in their homeland with the U.S. Embassy shuttered, all American diplomats and troops gone and the Taliban now in charge.

77. Key parts of Biden's plan to confront delta variant surge -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has unveiled a new "action plan" plan to confront the COVID-19 surge that's being driven by the spread of the delta variant. It mandates vaccines for federal workers and contractors and certain health care workers, requires employees at companies with 100 or more workers to be vaccinated or tested weekly, lays the groundwork for a booster shot campaign and recommends that large venues require proof of vaccination or a negative COVID test. The plan also makes recommendations on keeping schools open.

78. McDonald's introducing McPlant vegan burger in UK, Ireland -

McDonald's will begin selling a vegan burger in the United Kingdom and Ireland this month.

The McPlant burger, developed with Beyond Meat, features a plant-based patty on a vegan sesame bun with vegan cheese, vegan sauce and other toppings. Both the patty and cheese are made with pea protein.

79. For new hires, remote work brings challenges, opportunities -

LONDON (AP) — Rebekah Ingram's remote internship has come with a series of unexpected challenges: She lacks a proper office set-up, her mother often calls for her while she works, and her dog barks during video calls.

80. In a hot market, companies compete with would-be homeowners -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Soaring home prices and rents are fueling real estate companies' appetite for houses, adding unwelcome competition for many would-be homebuyers.

Residential real estate bought by companies or institutions hit an all-time high of 67,943 properties in the second quarter, according to Redfin, a Seattle-based online brokerage.

81. US average mortgage rates rise slightly; 30-year at 2.88% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term mortgage rates were marginally higher this week as the recovering economy appeared stalled against the backdrop of a wave of new delta variant coronavirus cases. They remained under 3%.

82. CBS to broadcast 5-hour Nashville New Years Eve 'Bash' -

CBS will ring in the New Year by presenting "New Year’s Eve Live: Nashville’s Big Bash," marking the first time for Music City to anchor an entire New Year’s Eve national TV special, the Nashville Convention & Visitors Corp announced today.

83. EPA seeks to restart process that could restrict Alaska mine -

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday it would seek to restart a process that could restrict mining in Alaska's Bristol Bay region, which is renowned for its salmon runs.

84. FDA delays decision on e-cigarettes from vaping giant Juul -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal health officials on Thursday delayed a high-stakes decision on whether to permit bestselling vaping brand Juul to stay on the market, while ordering thousands of other electronic cigarettes off store shelves.

85. Sweeping new vaccine mandates for 100 million Americans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Thursday is announcing sweeping new federal vaccine requirements affecting as many as 100 million Americans in an all-out effort to increase COVID-19 vaccinations and curb the surging delta variant that is killing thousands each week and jeopardizing the nation's economic recovery.

86. Microsoft return to U.S. offices delayed indefinitely -

REDMOND, Washington (AP) — Microsoft told employees Thursday that it has indefinitely delayed their return to U.S. offices until it's safer to do so.

"Given the uncertainty of COVID-19, we've decided against attempting to forecast a new date for a full reopening of our U.S. work sites," Jared Spataro, a corporate vice president, wrote in a blog post.

87. US jobless claims reach a pandemic low as economy recovers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits fell last week to 310,000, a pandemic low and a sign that the surge in COVID-19 cases caused by the delta variant has yet to lead to widespread layoffs.

88. Police planning to reinstall Capitol fence ahead of rally -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Law enforcement officials concerned by the prospect for violence at a rally in the nation's capital next week are planning to reinstall protective fencing that surrounded the U.S. Capitol for months after the Jan. 6 insurrection, according to a person familiar with the discussions.

89. EasyJet rejects bid offer as it seeks to raise more money -

LONDON (AP) — British airline easyJet said Thursday it rejected an unsolicited takeover approach as it announced plans to raise another 1.2 billion pounds ($1.7 billion) from shareholders to shore up its recovery from the coronavirus pandemic.

90. Elizabeth Holmes drawn as villain, underdog as trial begins -

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — Prosecutors and defense attorneys sketched dueling portraits of fallen Silicon Valley star Elizabeth Holmes as her trial got underway Wednesday, alternatively portraying her as a greedy villain who faked her way to the top and a passionate underdog whose spent years trying to shake up the health care industry.

91. Suits draw mixed rulings for Tennessee school mask opt-out -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Lawsuits have drawn mixed results in opposite ends of Tennessee for Gov. Bill Lee's order that lets parents opt out of school mask requirements, with a federal judge in East Tennessee declining to block the directive after another judge paused the order specifically for the state's largest county, which includes Memphis.

92. COVID-19 surge in the US: The summer of hope ends in gloom -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The summer that was supposed to mark America's independence from COVID-19 is instead drawing to a close with the U.S. more firmly under the tyranny of the virus, with deaths per day back up to where they were last March.

93. Report: Solar could power 40% of US electricity by 2035 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Solar energy has the potential to supply up to 40% of the nation's electricity within 15 years — a 10-fold increase over current solar output, but one that would require massive changes in U.S. policy and billions of dollars in federal investment to modernize the nation's electric grid, a new federal report says.

94. 5 ways to curb impulse spending as finances return to normal -

Since the COVID-19 vaccine started becoming available in the U.S., there have been more opportunities to impulse spend on items and experiences that you didn’t get to enjoy early in the pandemic.

95. Don’t love your work? It’s time to look elsewhere -

Labor Day was designed to both honor and recognize the American labor movement. It’s a nod to the works and contributions of workers in the United States. But, let’s face it. As you celebrated Labor Day this week, could you confidently say you love your work?

96. Check finances now to avoid falling behind later -

Fall is the perfect time to review your finances because there’s still time to make adjustments before the end of the year. The continuing pandemic and economic uncertainty are making it more complicated, but financial experts recommend taking a close look at your savings and planning for 2022 goals now.

97. Vehicle prices remain high as traditional sale season ends -

If this were a normal year, dealers would be kicking off their end-of-model-year vehicle clearance sales. Consumers can often find good deals as dealerships are eager to sell their remaining inventory to make room for next year’s models.

98. Four Downs: Titans vs. Cardinals -

The Titans open the 2021 season at home Sunday against the Arizona Cardinals (noon, CBS). Here’s what to watch:

First down

Containing Kyler Murray. The Titans’ pass rush, which they hope has improved with the additions of Bud Dupree, Denico Autry and Rashad Weaver, doesn’t need to get Murray on the ground so much as they need to simply make him uncomfortable and keep him from breaking free for runs or off-schedule passes.

99. Tannehill, receivers have some rust to shake in opener -

What’s an NFL season without a COVID-19 interruption? We already saw how COVID wreaked havoc last year, moving games around, closing the Titans practice facility and generally making everyone jump through hoops to try and squeeze a full season in.

100. NFL roster spots are for the great or versatile -

I first heard the term, “the more you can do,” from the late Floyd Reese, former Titans general manager, when I first started covering the Titans and the NFL.

Now a quarter century later, you’ll still hear that phrase spring forth from the Titans administration, including current general manager Jon Robinson and head coach Mike Vrabel. It came into play again last week when roster cuts were finalized.