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Editorial Results (free)

1. UK recommends COVID-19 booster shots for over 50s -

LONDON (AP) — The U.K. said Tuesday it will offer a third dose of COVID-19 vaccine to everyone over age 50 and other vulnerable people after an expert panel said the boosters were needed to protect against waning immunity this winter.

2. Bradley attorneys appointed to ABA leadership positions -

Seven Bradley Arant Boult Cummings attorneys have been appointed to new leadership roles with the American Bar Association, including Junaid Odubeko, a partner in the firm’s Nashville office.

3. From ‘It’s curtains!’ to ‘curtains up!’ -

The show must go on? No, March 14, 2020, changed all that when the shows definitely did not go on. Theaters, concert halls and other arts venues around Tennessee were forced to cease operations as COVID-19 began its march across the state. A jarring situation, certainly, but given that a life in the performing arts is one that requires near-daily adapting to new challenges, everyone from actors and musicians to artistic directors and CEOs initially took it in stride.

4. Imagination, Skittles help boy, 5, conquer Appalachian Trail -

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Harvey Sutton, or "Little Man," as he is known on the Appalachian Trail, won't have long to bask in the glory of hiking its full length. After all, he starts kindergarten Friday.

5. Dollar General thrives despite ‘retail apocalypse' -

Don’t blink! You might miss the grand opening of another Dollar General store. OK, that’s an exaggeration. But not by much.

In the 14 years since an investment group purchased the family owned business and took it public again two years later, the Goodlettsville-based chain has added nearly 10,000 stores to boast more retail locations than any other company in the United States – quickly closing on 18,000 stores in 46 states.

6. Top Davidson County residential sales for July 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, July 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

7. Attorney: $35M settlement was opioid firm's best, last offer -

NASHVILLE (AP) — An attorney who helped reach a $35 million settlement with an opioid manufacturer over the company's role in the epidemic in Tennessee said Thursday that his team accepted the drug maker's "last, best and final" offer, arguing the agreement avoids the possible complications of a jury verdict.

8. EXPLAINER: How Democrats hope to enact Biden domestic agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers' most consequential battle this year over President Joe Biden's expansive domestic agenda will snake through a legislative maze that's eye-rolling even by Congress' standards.

9. Senator: Bipartisan infrastructure bill loses IRS provision -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A proposal to strengthen IRS enforcement to crack down on tax scofflaws and help fund a nearly $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure spending bill is officially off the table, Republican Sen. Rob Portman said Sunday.

10. Tennessee, dozens others target Google's app store in antitrust suit -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Dozens of states are taking aim at Google in an escalating legal offensive on Big Tech.

This time, attorneys general for 36 states and the District of Columbia have filed a lawsuit targeting Google's Play store, where consumers download apps designed for the Android software that powers most of the world's smartphones.

11. In hunt for infrastructure deal, every Dem has leverage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a crucial moment for Democrats, party leaders are hunting for a sweet spot that would satisfy their rival moderate and progressive wings on legislation to finance President Joe Biden's multitrillion-dollar agenda of bolstering the economy and helping families.

12. Tax law experts see 'strong' case against Trump Org. CFO -

NEW YORK (AP) — Companies give perks to their employees all the time. Many top executives at Fortune 500 companies have access to a corporate jet for personal use, a company apartment, or an expense account for fancy meals. Even lower-level employees regularly get access to perks like tuition reimbursement or cash to join a gym.

13. Senators press Interior Secretary Haaland on oil lease pause -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Both Republican and Democratic senators pressed Interior Secretary Deb Haaland for answers Wednesday after a federal court blocked the Biden administration's suspension of new oil and gas leases on federal lands and waters.

14. Emails show Trump pressured Justice Dept. over 2020 election -

WASHINGTON (AP) — During the last weeks of his presidency, Donald Trump and his allies pressured the Justice Department to investigate unsubstantiated claims of widespread 2020 election fraud that even his former attorney general declared without evidence, newly released emails show.

15. US recovers most of ransom paid after Colonial Pipeline hack -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department has recovered most of a multimillion-dollar ransom payment made to hackers after a cyberattack that caused the operator of the nation's largest fuel pipeline to halt its operations last month, officials said Monday.

16. Gresham Smith names new owners in Nashville -

Gresham Smith has named 14 new firm owners, including six from Nashville. Nashvillians selected are:

• Andy Aparicio is director of corporate communications and has joined the firm in 2020. He has since developed an extensive internal and external communications strategy to support the firm’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. He also has led his team to deliver several other high-profile initiatives, including the firm’s first virtual Celebration and the communication of the firm’s Diversity, Equity & Inclusion program.

17. Survey: Business economists more optimistic about US growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The accelerated rollout of COVID-19 vaccines, along with the Biden administration's rescue aid policies, have brightened the outlook for the U.S. economy as it extends its recovery from the pandemic recession.

18. VW, Ford unveil SUVs at China auto show under virus controls -

SHANGHAI (AP) — Volkswagen, Ford and Chinese brands unveiled new SUVs for China on Monday at the Shanghai auto show, the industry's biggest marketing event in a year overshadowed by the coronavirus pandemic.

19. Cooper: Oracle to bring 8,500 jobs, $1.2B investment -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Oracle Corporation plans to bring 8,500 jobs and a $1.2 billion investment to fast-growing Nashville over the coming decade, a deal Mayor John Cooper's office announced Wednesday as unprecedented in the history of Tennessee economic development projects.

20. US nominates NY lawyer to monitor United Auto Workers union -

DETROIT (AP) — The U.S. attorney's office in Detroit is recommending that a federal judge name New York lawyer Neil Barofsky to monitor the United Auto Workers union's behavior after a corruption scandal.

21. Uber to give UK drivers minimum wage, pension, holiday pay -

LONDON (AP) — Uber is giving its U.K. drivers the minimum wage, pensions and holiday pay, following a recent court ruling that said they should be classified as workers and entitled to such benefits.

22. Nashville-based Bridgestone offers employees $100 to vaccinate -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Bridgestone said Wednesday it will offer its 33,000 U.S. employees $100 payments to get vaccinated against COVID-19, joining a group of large companies offering incentives for the shots.

23. No vaccine, no job? Not yet -

A steady stream of people line up quietly on a weekday morning to get vaccinated against COVID-19. “We’ve been waiting for this for months,” one man says as he reaches the head of the line.

24. Kentucky Kingdom sold to company that operates Dollywood -

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A Kentucky amusement park that once operated as a Six Flags has been sold to a company that operates family-oriented venues around the country including Dollywood in Tennessee and Silver Dollar City in Missouri.

25. Fed's Powell: Recovery incomplete, higher inflation unlikely -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell underscored the U.S. economy's ongoing weakness Tuesday in remarks that suggested that the Fed sees no need to alter its ultra-low interest rate policies anytime soon.

26. Puerto Rico rejects key deal with creditors to reduce debt -

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Puerto Rico's governor announced Tuesday that a federal control board reached a key deal that would reduce the U.S. territory's overall debt by nearly 80%, but that his administration is rejecting it because it would require cuts to the island's crumbling public pension system.

27. Pandemic first job for HHS pick but health agenda is broader -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Health secretary nominee Xavier Becerra told senators Tuesday that confronting the coronavirus pandemic will be his first priority if confirmed, but he also pledged to expand health insurance, rein in prescription drug costs and reduce racial and ethnic disparities in medical care.

28. US charges North Korean computer programmers in global hacks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department has charged three North Korean computer programmers in a broad range of global hacks, including a destructive attack targeting an American movie studio, and in the attempted theft and extortion of more than $1.3 billion from banks and companies, federal prosecutors said Wednesday.

29. Stax Music Academy found a way to flourish during pandemic -

MEMPHIS (AP) — For the denizens of Soulsville — the South Memphis-based community/nonprofit foundation centered on the Stax Museum of American Soul Music and the Stax Music Academy — 2020 was supposed to have been a year of celebration. Stax Music Academy was set to mark its 20th anniversary with a series of concerts and events, while the museum was poised to continue its curatorial reinvigoration. Instead, COVID-19 happened.

30. TVA gives raise to CEO that Trump had criticized -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A federal utility's board voted Thursday to increase the multimillion-dollar pay scale of its CEO, coming to the decision based on findings of an independent review ordered up after then-President Donald Trump blasted the executive as "ridiculously overpaid" last summer.

31. Trump can't hang on to lawyers after false election claims -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump spent much of his career deploying high-powered lawyers to do his bidding. Now he is having trouble finding top-tier help when he might need it most.

Since losing the November election to President Joe Biden, Trump has been hemorrhaging attorneys. Established firms backed away from his baseless claims of election fraud. Those he did retain made elementary errors in cases that were quickly rejected as meritless. His personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, was ridiculed for his performance before a federal judge during one election-related case.

32. 9 Bradley lawyers named ‘Attorneys for Justice’ -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP attorneys Kimberly M. Ingram, Alexandra C. Lynn, Erin Malone-Smolla, Casey L. Miller, Peter C. Sales, Edmund S. Sauer, Jeffrey W. Sheehan, Fritz Spainhour and David K. Taylor have been recognized by the Tennessee Supreme Court as 2020 “Attorneys for Justice.”

33. Full text of Gov. Bill Lee's State of the State address -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Thank you very much. Lieutenant Governor McNally, Speaker Sexton, Speaker Pro Tem Haile, Speaker Pro Tem Marsh, Members of the 112th General Assembly, Justices, Constitutional Officers, fellow Tennesseans:

34. Stuck in DC, Biden team pitches rest of US on big virus aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Even as President Joe Biden meets with senators and works the phones with Capitol Hill to push for a $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package, his team is increasingly focused on selling the plan directly to voters.

35. UN forecasts 4.7% global economic growth in 2021 -

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The United Nations warned Monday that the world economy is "on a cliffhanger," still reeling from the COVID-19 pandemic whose impact will be felt for years but still expected to make a modest recovery of 4.7% in 2021 which would barely offset 2020 losses.

36. Dollar General, other companies push incentives for vaccinations -

As vaccinations continue across the U.S., some companies are offering financial incentives to encourage their workers to get the shots.

Instacart Inc., the grocery delivery service, announced Thursday that it would provide a $25 stipend for workers who get the COVID-19 vaccine. It joins others, including Dollar General, which plans to pay workers extra if they get vaccinated.

37. AP VoteCast: Warnock relied on Black and young voters to win -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Georgia's Senate runoff elections were a clash of two closely matched coalitions, with Democrat Raphael Warnock edging out his rival in the one-time Republican stronghold.

Warnock and fellow Democrat Jon Ossoff — whose race was still too early to call — relied on the backing of Black voters, younger voters, people earning less than $50,000 and newcomers to the state, according to AP VoteCast, a survey of more than 3,700 voters in Tuesday's high-stakes Senate contests.

38. A look at the 29 people Trump pardoned or gave commutations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For a second night in a row, President Donald Trump issued a round of pardons and commutations in the final weeks of his presidency, giving full pardons to his former campaign chairman, his son-in-law's father and another of his allies convicted in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

39. Biden picks deal-makers, fighters for climate, energy team -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden is picking deal-makers and fighters to lead a climate team he'll ask to remake and clean up the nation's transportation and power-plant systems, and as fast as politically possible.

40. At tiny rural hospitals, weary doctors treat friends, family -

MEMPHIS, Mo. (AP) — As Dr. Shane Wilson makes the rounds at the tiny, 25-bed hospital in rural northeastern Missouri, many of his movements are familiar in an age of coronavirus. Masks and gloves. Zippered plastic walls between hallways. Hand sanitizer as he enters and exits each room.

41. Report: Millions of full-time US workers get government aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Millions of Americans who are working full-time jobs still rely on federal health care and food assistance programs because of low wages, a bipartisan congressional watchdog says.

42. Mother Nature saves 2020 -

Tourism officials love gaudy economic-impact numbers. Tennessee’s most recent report on travel doesn’t disappoint, offering up record-breaking figures that are the envy of many other states. Unfortunately, the report is for calendar year 2019.

43. Uber, Lyft spend big, win in California vote about drivers -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Uber, Lyft and other app-based ride-hailing and delivery services spent $200 million in a winning bet to circumvent California lawmakers and the courts to preserve their business model by keeping drivers from becoming employees eligible for benefits and job protections.

44. Justice Dept. to file landmark antitrust case against Google -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department on Tuesday sued Google for antitrust violations, alleging that it abused its dominance in online search and advertising to stifle competition and harm consumers.

45. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's dubious claims on health care, court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump isn't providing all the facts when he promises that people with preexisting medical problems will always be covered by health insurance if "Obamacare" is ruled unconstitutional.

46. Justice Dept. expected to file antitrust action vs. Google -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is expected to bring an antitrust action against Google in coming weeks, focusing on its dominance in online search and whether it was used to stifle competition and hurt consumers, a person familiar with the matter told The Associated Press Thursday.

47. Australian bank agrees to $919M fine for money laundering -

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Westpac, Australia's second-largest bank, agreed to pay a 1.3 billion Australian dollar ($919 million) fine for breaches of anti-money laundering and counterterrorism financing laws, the largest ever civil penalty in Australia, a financial crime regulator said on Thursday.

48. DOJ nearing antitrust action on Google; Trump eyes tech curb -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the Trump administration moves toward antitrust action against search giant Google, it's campaigning to enlist support from sympathetic state attorneys general across the country.

49. AP-NORC poll: Majority plan to vote before Election Day -

DENVER (AP) — A majority of President Donald Trump's supporters plan to cast their ballot on Election Day, while about half of Joe Biden's backers plan to vote by mail, a sign of a growing partisan divide over how best to conduct elections in the United States.

50. Google exec on hot seat in Congress over advertising power -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Senate panel put a top Google executive on the defensive Tuesday over the company's powerful position in online advertising as some lawmakers look hopefully toward an expected antitrust case against the tech giant by the Trump administration.

51. AP FACT CHECK: Is Trump's America great again or hellscape? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican National Convention begged this question: Why are President Donald Trump's most fervent supporters describing the state of his union as a hellscape?

It was perhaps the central paradox for voters wondering what to believe in the rhetoric, because it defied logic to believe it all. Are Americans living in a dystopia or in an America made great again by Trump?

52. AP FACT CHECK: GOP taps distortions to heap praise on Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Eric Trump echoed falsehoods of his father, Melania Trump credited her husband with a dubious religious first, and the president's economic adviser wholly distorted the conditions Donald Trump inherited as Republicans stepped up to praise him at their national convention Tuesday.

53. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's baseless claim of 'deep state' at FDA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is leveling unfounded attacks on his Food and Drug Administration and distorting the science on effective treatments for COVID-19.

Heading this week into the Republican National Convention, he asserted that the agency is slow-walking vaccines and treatments for the coronavirus in a bid to undermine his November reelection effort. There's no evidence of that, and one of his former FDA commissioners on Sunday rejected the accusation as groundless.

54. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's flawed justification for postal cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is misrepresenting the U.S. Postal Service's financial problems as his postmaster general defends cuts that have slowed mail delivery in advance of the November election.

55. State Department watchdog resigns after predecessor's ouster -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The State Department's acting inspector general resigned abruptly on Wednesday following the firing of his predecessor in circumstances now being investigated by Congress.

Stephen Akard announced his resignation just two days after Democrats issued subpoenas for several of Secretary of State Mike Pompeo's top aides to answer questions about the shakeup in the watchdog's office. The department said Akard would return to the private sector but offered no other reason for his departure.

56. House committees subpoena top Pompeo aides over IG firing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats have subpoenaed four top aides to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, saying that the Trump administration is stonewalling their investigation into the firing of the State Department's top independent watchdog earlier this year.

57. Trump donors among early recipients of coronavirus loans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As much as $273 million in federal coronavirus aid was awarded to more than 100 companies that are owned or operated by major donors to President Donald Trump's election efforts, according to an Associated Press analysis of federal data.

58. UK firms slash jobs to cope with outbreak's long-term impact -

LONDON (AP) — Companies linked to hospitality and travel in Britain have announced thousands of more job cuts as the longer term consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic take hold, choosing to slim down for survival rather than await potential government handouts.

59. Nominee to be CIA watchdog says he'll stand up to Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee to be the CIA's chief watchdog is pledging independence, saying he will perform his role "in an unbiased and impartial manner, free of undue or inappropriate influences" by Trump or anyone else.

60. Fired State Dept watchdog says he was bullied by officials -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The independent State Department watchdog fired by President Donald Trump says top department officials tried to bully him and dissuade his office from conducting a review of a multibillion-dollar arms sale to Saudi Arabia.

61. Ousted State watchdog confirms investigations into Pompeo -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ousted State Department Inspector General Steve Linick on Wednesday told members of three congressional committees that before he was abruptly fired, he was investigating Secretary of State Mike Pompeo's use of government resources as well as the secretary's decision to approve a multibillion-dollar arms sale to Saudi Arabia.

62. VW spending $2.2B to expand in China's electric car market -

BEIJING (AP) — Volkswagen is spending 2 billion euros ($2.2 billion) to expand its presence in China's electric car industry in the biggest foreign investment announced since the country's economy began to reopen following the coronavirus pandemic.

63. Pompeo denies retaliation but won't explain watchdog ouster -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Wednesday adamantly denied that he recommended firing the State Department's independent watchdog in retaliation for investigations into Pompeo's conduct as America's top diplomat. But Pompeo again declined to provide specific reasons for Steve Linick's dismissal as inspector general.

64. Who got what? Details scant on small-business relief effort -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A small, overlooked federal agency is shouldering a massive relief effort for the nation's small businesses and their workers left reeling by the pandemic.

The Small Business Administration has committed to auditing every sizable emergency loan it approves.

65. SBA leaves businesses still hoping for more leeway on loans -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small businesses hoping for more leeway in using coronavirus loan money were disappointed as the government released instructions for seeking forgiveness for the loans.

Forms the Small Business Administration released late Friday didn't address two concerns shared by many owners about the $659 billion Paycheck Protection Program. According to the instructions, loans can still be forgiven in full only if the money is spent within eight weeks of receiving it. And businesses must use at least 75% of it for workers' pay, with the remaining amount limited to rent, mortgage interest and utility expenses.

66. Pandemic brings fortunes – and headaches – to Amazon -

Amazon has spent years honing the business of packing, shipping and delivering millions of products to doorsteps around the world.

Now it has a captive audience.

With much of the globe in various stages of a lockdown because of the coronavirus pandemic, the world's largest online retailer has become a lifeline to many shoppers. But it is also grappling with delivery delays and mounting complaints from workers who worry about contagion while on the job.

67. Pandemic squeezes finances of Democratic grassroots donors -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Well-to-do donors gathered last August at the sprawling Charlotte, North Carolina, home of Erskine Bowles, a former chief of staff to President Bill Clinton, where they nibbled finger food, sipped wine and listened to Joe Biden.

68. As $2 trillion starts to flow, oversight of virus cash lags -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress unleashed about $2 trillion to deal with the coronavirus crisis. So far, only two people are working to oversee how it is spent.

Bharat Ramamurti started out as a watchdog of one, the sole appointee to a five-member Congressional Oversight Commission. The Democratic Senate aide was joined Friday by Republican Rep. French Hill of Arkansas.

69. Feds seek breakup of Altria-Juul deal on antitrust grounds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. business regulators are suing to break up the multibillion-dollar deal between tobacco giant Altria and e-cigarette startup Juul Labs, saying their partnership amounted to an agreement not to compete in the U.S. vaping market.

70. Stocks skid as physical, economic toll of virus worsens -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street and markets around the world fell sharply Wednesday as the economic and physical toll caused by the coronavirus outbreak mounts — and as experts say they still can't predict when it will end.

71. Two Lebanon medical office buildings sold -

Marcus & Millichap, a leading commercial real estate investment services firm, has sold two medical office buildings located in Lebanon.

The two-property portfolio sold for $1.55 million, says Jody McKibben, vice president and regional manager of the firm’s Nashville office.

72. Some Instacart, Amazon workers strike as jobs get riskier -

NEW YORK (AP) — Some Instacart and Amazon warehouse workers walked off the job Monday demanding greater safeguards against the coronavirus, even as both companies are speed-hiring hundreds of thousands of new workers to handle a surge in delivery orders.

73. In coronavirus pandemic, Nashville's homeless need shelter -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Outside the black gates at Room In The Inn, more than 100 members of Nashville's homeless community stand waiting for their lunch ticket numbers to be called.

The process is organized and orderly — turn in your number, get a squirt of hand sanitizer, pick up your aluminum tray of mac 'n' cheese and baked apples, then disperse — but it is not how the homeless are normally treated here.

74. Coronavirus deals one-two financial punch to state budgets -

The coronavirus is pounding state governments with a financial one-two punch, costing them many millions to try to contain the disease just as businesses are shutting down and tax revenue is collapsing. The sharp drop in revenue could jeopardize some states' ability to provide basic services.

75. Monday: Big layoffs, bigger hirings; Dollar General adding 50,000 -

The rapid spread of the coronavirus since it was first reported in China has dealt an unprecedented shock to the global economy.

Following are business developments Monday related to the outbreak as governments attempt to stabilize their economies, companies struggle to cope and millions of people face job losses and disruptions in supplies of goods and in services.

76. Joe Biden, nominee-in-waiting, with a long wait -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the three weeks since his blowout win in the South Carolina primary, Joe Biden has emerged as the Democratic presidential nominee-in-waiting. But, amid the uncertainty of the coronavirus pandemic, put the emphasis on waiting.

77. 2020 campaigns go digital amid fears of coronavirus spread -

WASHINGTON (AP) — No more rallies. No more door-knocking. And no more in-person fundraisers, raking in dollars from dozens of millionaires at once.

The coronavirus has disrupted American life, and the 2020 presidential campaign is no exception. Amid calls for social distancing to stop the pandemic's spread, President Donald Trump and Democrats Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders have had little choice but to call off large-scale public events in favor of politicking online and over the airwaves.

78. Central banks deploy trillions to keep economy running -

It was less than 11 weeks ago that the first cases of pneumonia were detected in Wuhan, China. The speed at which what would soon be named COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, knocked the global economy askew is unparalleled in our lifetimes.

79. Govts pledge aid as global commerce seizes in face of virus -

Governments and central banks are scrambling to find ways to keep businesses from going bankrupt as the virus outbreak grinds the world economy to a halt.

A day after Wall Street endured its worst daily drop since the crash of 1987, European markets wavered, as did U.S futures markets. There is tremendous volatility, with the extent of economic damage from the pandemic still anyone's guess. Factories are closed, retail stores are closed, travel has ground almost to a halt and billions of people are sheltering at home, going outside only to find essential supplies.

80. Dollar General's first hour each day will be seniors only -

GOODLETTSVILLE (AP) — Dollar General is dedicating the first hour of its daily store operations to senior citizens in response to the new coronavirus.

The Goodlettsville-based discount retailer announced Monday that starting Tuesday, it is strongly encouraging younger customers to let senior citizens get needed supplies and avoid busier and more crowded shopping periods later in the day.

81. Analysis: Biden's stunning turnabout remakes Democratic race -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Less than a month ago, Joe Biden's campaign was in free fall. Even after he mounted a comeback in South Carolina, he confronted the reality of competing in crucial Super Tuesday contests with little money and no discernible campaign infrastructure.

82. Warren bets on brokered convention. Will she last that long? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As her rivals head to the exits, Elizabeth Warren is vowing to press on to a contested convention.

83. 'A world of hurt': 39 states to investigate Juul's marketing -

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A coalition of 39 states – including Tennessee – will look into the marketing and sales of vaping products by Juul Labs, including whether the company targeted youths and made misleading claims about nicotine content in its devices, officials announced Tuesday.

84. Tesla offers $2B in added shares, stock up despite dilution -

DETROIT (AP) — Shares of Tesla rose a bout 1.5% i n trading Thursday morning after the electric vehicle and solar panel maker said it would sell over $2 billion worth of additional shares.

The sale takes advantage of the company's meteoric stock rise in the past eight months. It comes just two weeks after CEO Elon Musk said the company had enough cash to fund its capital programs and it didn't need to raise any more money.

85. Genesco announces new corporate headquarters -

Genesco Inc. has announced plans for its new corporate headquarters in Nashville at 535 Marriott that will occupy approximately two thirds of the facility’s 310,000 square feet of space. Relocation is targeted for a early 2021.

86. In fight to survive, US dairy farmers look for any tech edge -

PICKETT, Wis. (AP) — At Rosendale Dairy, each of the 9,000 cows has a microchip implanted in an ear that workers can scan with smartphones for up-to-the-minute information on how the animal is doing — everything from their nutrition to their health history to their productivity. Feed is calibrated to deliver a precise diet and machines handle the milking. In the fields, drones gather data that helps bump up yields for the row crops grown to feed the animals.

87. Stocks post modest gains at end of a wobbly day of trading -

Major U.S. stock indexes finished higher Thursday after a late burst of buying led by technology and financial companies reversed an early slide.

News of a spike in the number of confirmed cases and fatalities from a virus outbreak in China put investors in a selling mood for most of the day, overshadowing a batch of mostly solid company earnings reports.

88. Stocks give up early gains and end mixed on Wall Street -

Major U.S. stock indexes ended mixed Wednesday after an early rally powered by strong gains in technology companies faded in the final minutes of trading.

The wobbly finish left the benchmark S&P 500 with a 0.1% loss. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed with a gain of less than 0.1%, while the Nasdaq composite inched 0.1% higher. Bond prices rose, pulling yields lower.

89. US stocks close lower amid jitters over virus outbreak -

Banks led a slide in U.S. stocks Tuesday as a virus outbreak in China rattled global markets, prompting investors to shift assets into bonds and defensive sector companies.

The sell-off snapped a three-day winning streak by the S&P 500. The benchmark index ended last week at an all-time high.

90. Google CEO calls for regulation of artificial intelligence -

LONDON (AP) — Google's chief executive called Monday for a balanced approach to regulating artificial intelligence, telling a European audience that the technology brings benefits but also "negative consequences."

91. Stocks climb ahead of trade deal, sending S&P 500 to record -

Technology companies led stocks to broad gains on Wall Street Monday, driving the S&P 500 and Nasdaq composite indexes to more record highs.

Financial, communications services and industrial stocks also notched solid gains. Health care stocks were the only decliners. Bond prices fell, sending yields higher, and the price of gold fell, signs that investors were favoring higher-risk holdings.

92. AP FACT CHECK: Trump says Pelosi, Dems defended Iran general -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's relentless attacks on the impeachment investigation and Democrats' stance on Iran strained the truth on various fronts, from claiming that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi defended Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani to asserting that even Ukraine's president said Trump did nothing wrong in withholding military aid.

93. US stocks set records as fear recedes from market; gold dips -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks around the world climbed on Thursday, and U.S. indexes hit records as markets continued a rally sparked after the United States and Iran appeared to step away from the edge of war.

94. US stocks jump, oil reverses course as markets exhale -

NEW YORK (AP) — Markets unclenched on Wednesday, and U.S. stocks neared records on hopes that the United States and Iran are backing away from the edge of war.

95. US stock indexes slip, but rush for safety slows -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks mostly fell on Tuesday, but the big rush for safety that coursed through global markets after the United States killed a top Iranian general on Friday slowed.

Gold's momentum eased a day after touching its highest price in nearly seven years, several Asian and European stock markets clawed back much of their losses from Monday and benchmark U.S. crude dropped for the first time in four days. The S&P 500 dipped but remains within 0.6% of its record, and a measure of fear in the stock market moved lower.

96. Oil prices surge after US kills Iran general -

BEIJING (AP) — Oil prices surged and most major global stock markets declined Friday after an Iranian general was killed by U.S. forces in Iraq.

Stock indexes in London, Frankfurt and Paris fell, as did Hong Kong's earlier. Shanghai was little-changed and Japanese markets were closed.

97. Modest rally for stocks is mostly gone by the closing bell -

A last-minute burst of selling pulled the major U.S. stock indexes mostly lower Wednesday, ending the market's five-day winning streak.

The S&P 500 index and Dow Jones Industrial Average finished with tiny losses that left them just below their all-time highs set a day earlier. The Nasdaq composite eked out a slight gain, giving it its fifth-straight record high.

98. Recognize your money biases, make them work for you -

The way our brains work can cost us a lot of money. But some of our mental quirks can be turned to our advantage.

Cognitive biases are the faulty ways of thinking that can persuade us to run up debt, save too little and make stupid investment decisions.

99. The gift who keeps on giving -

The phone rings about 15 minutes after Stacie Huckeba lets me out the door of her East Nashville home, her eyes slightly moist from cursing the health woes forcing her to give up her annual Christmas Day treks into homeless encampments to deliver backpacks filled with good tidings of great joy and McDonald’s gift certificates, lip balm, socks and so much more.

100. 10 ex-NFL players charged with defrauding health care program -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ten former NFL players were charged in a multimillion-dollar scheme to defraud the league's health care benefit program by submitting false claims for medical equipment, including devices used on horses, the Justice Department said Thursday.