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Editorial Results (free)

1. Events -

Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce Member Orientation. An opportunity to learn about member benefits and involvement opportunities from Chamber staff. You’ll also learn how your business plays a role in the Chamber’s mission of creating regional economic prosperity. Lunch provided. 11:30 a.m. 211 Commerce Street. Fee: Free to new chamber members. Registration is requested. Information

2. Events -

Chancellor’s Lecture Series. Doris Kearns Goodwin and Jon Meacham, authors and presidential historians, will be featured in Ingram Hall at Blair School of Music. This fall’s Chancellor’s Lecture Series, led by interim Chancellor Susan R. Wente, is themed “Culture of Respect; Culture of Caring.” Langford Auditorium. Thursday, 6:30 p.m. Free. Additional dates: Nov. 21: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, author and MacArthur Fellow. Dec. 3: Journalists and authors Seven Pinker, Carl Zimmer and Amanda Little with Jon Meacham. Information

3. Legendary drummer Jimmy Otey dies -

 James “Jimmy” Otey Jr., 73, of Nashville, best-known as a drummer for the likes of Little Richard and Ray Charles, died Thursday.

Mr. Otey, a multi-instrumentalist and showman, was a product of the old Jefferson Street rhythm & blues scene and went on to perform around the world.

4. Princeton Review taps MTSU for best listing -

The Princeton Review has named Middle Tennessee State University one of the best places for an undergraduate degree.

It is the first time MTSU was awarded a spot in the review’s guide, “The Best 385 Colleges,” an honor given to roughly 13% of the nation’s approximately 3,000 four-year institutions.

5. Essra Mohawk lived sex, drugs and rock 'n roll life -

Uncle Meat leans back on the piano bench – arm-swept clear of the CDs and assorted implements of a musician’s life that fill it and the rest of the living room of the home in Bellevue – and sings a joyous, or at least joy-filled and powerful song titled “Rollin’ With The Punches.”

6. Tia Rose finds her dream at Twin Kegs: ‘Dive bar with great food’ -

Dark brown eyes and hair showcasing her Italian heritage, the namesake of Rosie’s International Famous Twin Kegs scans her business, where she promises Woodbine’s (and she hopes Nashville’s) best burger-and-beer selection.

7. ‘Roadhouse Rambler’ gets late start on country dream -

The Roadhouse Rambler – a guitar leaning against the nearest wall – looks across the kitchen table in the tidy home his phone company career helped buy. His smiling eyes wander back to dusty Oklahoma.

8. Before CMA Fest, ‘Nashville,’ the Titans or Preds, there was Hee Haw -

Nashville’s road to prominence didn’t begin with the ongoing demolition of historic buildings and gutting of neighborhoods. It began 50 years ago with animated dancing pigs and a braying donkey, plenty of big boobs – like Junior Samples and Gunilla Hutton’s – in a “Kornfield,” the greatest country comedians and musicians and guests like Johnny Cash, Mickey Mantle, Ray Charles, Ethel Merman, Garth Brooks and Billy Graham.

9. Out with the old: Treasured antique mall saying goodbye -

The “77 Sunset Strip” board game makes me smile, even as I’m immersed in commercial death throes while wandering the sprawling building on Eighth Avenue South where yet another longtime business – one where 73-year-old owner Pat Morris has toiled day and night to create something special – is going to close.

10. Coming to a neighborhood near you -

James Kelley has lived since 1988 in the historic Richland-West End neighborhood, a tree-lined, enclave located on land that was once part of John Brown Craighead’s 194-acre estate.

It’s an idyllic example of Nashville’s architectural past, a mix of bungalows and Craftsman houses in Colonial Revival, Tudor and American Foursquare styles, and was one of the city’s first planned subdivisions, created in 1905.

11. The amenities of downtown in laid-back Nolensville -

When she’s in the mood for a casual meal, Nathalie Burack can step out the door of her new townhome and stroll down the street for a gourmet hamburger. A shop selling spirits, wine and craft beer is opening nearby, along with a popular Mexican restaurant and a nail bar.

12. The secret life of Nashville drumming legend Jimmy Otey -

Before he was a successful chemical engineer and beloved MTA bus driver, Jimmy Otey was playing the drums for Little Richard in the legendary Cavern in Liverpool, England, when he noticed some “nice guys,” a former house band in the club, looking on.

13. In with new, enjoy the old this Valentine’s Day -

The classic day for passion could find you and your loved one embracing a new chef or cuisine or a new part of town. What could be more romantic than discovering the burgeoning food scene together?

14. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for December 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, December 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

15. Change and charm in Hillsboro Village -

Charm and change. Those two words come up often when talking about Hillsboro Village, the ever-trendy, four-block Nashville shopping district which is quickly approaching its 100th anniversary.

The charm has been there since Day One (so I’ve read; I’m not that old).

16. Don’t know WeHo? You will -

Wedgewood-Houston is having a moment. Once a South Nashville industrial area, nicknamed WeHo, it’s now an emerging neighborhood with local businesses, retail establishments, galleries and restaurants opening at a rapid pace. It’s catering to creatives, millennials, makers and local entrepreneurs.

17. Franklin Synergy opens new location -

Franklin Synergy Bank will open its newest branch in Franklin, 5040 Carothers Parkway, Suite 109 in the Carothers Crossing development.

The bank continues to expand the bank’s Middle Tennessee footprint. “Franklin Synergy Bank’s expansion in Franklin is an investment in our community,” says Richard Herrington, Franklin Synergy Bank Chairman and CEO. “While it adds to our convenient locations for our local clients, it also enhances our position as a key player in the development of the communities we serve.”

18. New Tesla chair must rein in CEO Musk at key moment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It won't be an easy job.

Whoever becomes the new chairman of Tesla Motors will face the formidable task of reining in Elon Musk, the charismatic, visionary chief executive with an impulsive streak, while also helping Musk achieve his dream of turning Tesla into a profitable, mass-market producer of environmentally-friendly electric cars.

19. ‘They keep coming and I can’t get them out’ -

When officers do hourly security checks at the Loudon County Jail, they’re often walking into a potent brew of danger.

Officially, the jail’s capacity is 91 inmates. But the actual population runs between 170 and 180 on average and was up to 210 inmates at one point this summer.

20. Stars' bars transform Lower Broadway -

Luke Bryan wants you to bite his sushi. Really. The progenitor of the bro-country movement invites all comers to his Lower Broadway bar and restaurant – Luke’s 32 Bridge Food + Bar – to see what he has to offer that may be different from the delicacies and/or bar food fans and diners can find at the more than half-dozen country star-fronted restaurants that have mushroomed on Lower Broadway.

21. Lloyd finds success playing the long game -

Sitting at a Greek restaurant and spooning raisins and brown sugar into 10:30 a.m. oatmeal, Bill Lloyd – one of Nashville’s nicest guys – gets only slightly sentimental when pondering the long road traveled since he was at the top of the charts, opening for heroes like Roy Orbison.

22. Tesla CEO's buyout bid raises eyebrows, legal concerns -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Tesla CEO Elon Musk is seeking relief from the pressures of running a publicly held company with a $72 billion buyout of the electric car maker, but he may be acquiring new headaches with his peculiar handling of the proposed deal.

23. Design Within Reach to open June 23 -

The Gulch is welcoming furniture studio Design Within Reach, retailer of authentic modern furniture and accessories, with a grand opening on June 23.

Studio in The Gulch is an 8,000-square-foot facility representing the company’s first-ever physical presence in the Nashville market.

24. Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off -

NEW YORK (AP) — Starting a food truck to sell tacos or barbecue on downtown streets may seem easy or fun, but owners are finding they need more sophisticated plans now that the novelty has worn off.

25. Shaw knows real stories behind guitar-shaped pool -

One of Music City’s great treasures is just over Owen Bradley’s bronze shoulder and the wooden fence behind it.

For those yet to learn about Nashville music history, Owen Bradley was one of the tuneful architects, along with my late friend Chet Atkins, of the gentlemanly “Nashville Sound.”

26. Events -

Power of the Purse Luncheon. Mia Hamm, five-time U.S. Soccer Player of the year, two-time Olympic Gold Medalist and Soccer Hall of Famer, will be the keynote speaker at the 20th annual Power of the Purse®, at the Music City Center. The Power of the Purse® luncheon and silent auction benefits The Women’s Fund of The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, which supports Middle Tennessee women and girls in need. Thursday, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Tickets: $200. Information

27. Starbucks to close stores for an afternoon for bias training -

NEW YORK (AP) — Starbucks, moving swiftly to confront a racially charged uproar over the arrest of two black men at one of its stores in Philadelphia, plans to close more than 8,000 U.S. stores for several hours next month to conduct racial-bias training for nearly 175,000 workers.

28. ‘Neon Angel’ still clinging to Nashville dream -

She’s adjusted her dreams of stardom a bit as calendar pages fly by, but this woman with the young heart and thick, red hair holds onto her Gretsch guitar and proclaims: “I am the Neon Angel.”

29. HealthStream forms ‘innovative’ partnership -

HealthStream, a Nashville-based platform in healthcare for workforce development, has announced a seven-year deal with Press Ganey Associates.

The Press Ganey company is a provider of performance improvement solutions for healthcare organizations.

30. Nashville's most romantic restaurants for 2018 -

Nashville has a restaurant for every mood. If you're looking for romance on Valentine’s Day or any night of the week, you can’t miss with these.

Restaurants new to the list are designated with an *.

31. Middle Tennessee's $1M-plus residential transactions for 2017 -

There were 690 commercial real estate transactions worth $1 million or more in Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Sumner and Wilson counties in 2017, according to Chandler Reports.

Davidson County had the most with 333, followed by Williamson (152), Rutherford (104), Sumner (51) and Wilson (50).

32. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's torrent of warped truths -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For all his errant swings at the facts, President Donald Trump sometimes gets it just right.

"There's been no first year like this," he told a Florida rally last month.

Were truer words ever spoken?

33. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's torrent of first-year warped truths -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For all his errant swings at the facts, President Donald Trump sometimes gets it just right.

"There's been no first year like this," he told a Florida rally last month.

34. Changes to who enforces state’s marijuana laws -

A law taking effect in January removes the Tennessee Alcoholic Beverage Commission from the Governor’s Task Force on Marijuana Eradication.

The push to remove the commission began in 2012, when WSMV-TV reported law enforcement discovered what they believed to be marijuana in the home of the commission’s director. Police never did a criminal investigation, and the director retired in 2012.

35. Hoke has a chance to get Vols to bowl game -

Brady Hoke makes his debut as Tennessee’s interim football coach Saturday at 7 p.m. EST (ESPN) against LSU in Neyland Stadium.

Perhaps it’s an audition for the head coaching vacancy left when Butch Jones was fired on Sunday morning, hours after the Vols (4-6, 0-6 SEC) returned to Knoxville from a 50-17 loss at Missouri.

36. Events -

Street Food Thursday. Enjoy a gathering of up to 20 local food trucks parked along Deaderick Street between 4th Avenue North and 5th Avenue North.

FRIDAY, OCT. 13

Nashville Steam Open House

Celebrate the Nashville Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway No 576 in Centennial Park, just west of the Parthenon, 27th Ave. North, at the train. Enjoy locomotive tours, vintage automobiles, food trucks, silent auction, kid’s activities and more. 4-9 p.m. Information: Nashvillesteam.org

37. Events -

Live on the Green: Weekend Festival Finale. Live music through Saturday at this free event at Public Square Park. Thursday: Main Stage: John Butler Trio, Dispatch, Iron & Wine. 6:15 Stage: Johnny P, Carl Broemel, Roots of a Rebellion 5-11 p.m. Friday: Main Stage: Sheryl Crow, Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors, Big Head Todd & The Monsters, SHEL. 6:15 Stage: The Whistles & The Bells, Ron Gallo, Goodbye June, 4-11 p.m. Saturday: 615 Stage: Kids Fest with Mr. Steve, Guthrie Brown, Elliot Root, Paper Route, Cordovas, Guthrie Brown. 1-11 p.m. Main Stage: Bahamas, Future Islands, The Lone Bellow, LP, The Record Company, The Delta Saints 2-11 p.m. https://www.liveonthegreen.com/

38. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for July 2017 -

Top commercial real estate sales, July 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

39. Songwriter’s education: Byrd learns from the best -

Even beneath his Acme Feed & Seed ball cap, Jon Byrd looks as much like a professor as any other white-haired, balding man in spectacles as he sips coffee and checks his smart phone while enjoying a warm afternoon in the al fresco dining area of a Vanderbilt-area caffeine and pastry dispensary.

40. Events -

Music on Main. Red Light 11 is a “dance band” with a little old school, a little new school and all the classes in between. Goodlettsville City Hall Lawn, 105 S. Main Street. Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Information: http://www.goodlettsvillechamber.com

41. Paying Fulmer $100K will pay dividends for UT athletics -

What does Phillip Fulmer’s hiring as special advisor to University of Tennessee president Joe DiPietro have to do with Vols football coach Butch Jones?

Not much.

If Jones continues to win enough games while avoiding issues that reflect poorly on the school, he’ll continue to be UT’s coach. If not, he’ll be jettisoned. Either way, there’s nothing Fulmer can do about it.

42. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for April 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, April 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

43. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for March 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, March 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

44. Events -

LGBT + College Conference Pre-Event, Cocktails and Conversation. Noted panelists share open dialogue on the capacity of our community to successfully navigate the intersection of diversity with education, commerce, community, government and each other. Thursday, Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP, 511 Union Street, 275h floor, Nashville. Cocktails & Networking: 6 p.m., Program: 6:30 – 7:45 p.m. Space is limited. Information: ron.snitker@wallerlaw.com

45. Events -

Notes Focus Group Thursday, Feb. 23: Notes Focus Group. Local investors meet to discuss investing in real estate-backed notes. The goal is to help each other stay motivated, analyze deals, and discuss strategies. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., First Watch, 1000 Meridian Blvd., Franklin.

46. Nashville's most romantic restaurants for 2017 -

No matter what romance means to you, Nashville has you covered – and then some. Here’s the list of where to go to celebrate love and some seriously good food.

360 Wine Bar Bistro

6000 Highway 100, 615 353-5604, www.360bistro.com

47. Haslam facing tough sell on tax hikes, cuts -

An interesting thing happened just a couple of hours before Gov. Bill Haslam unveiled his fuel-tax increase plan amid great fanfare at the State Capitol.

As the governor started explaining the proposed IMPROVE Act to reporters during a short media briefing, he apparently realized more people were poring over a handout than paying attention. They were trying to get a jump on writing stories while digesting the numbers combined with an array of tax breaks designed to make tax increases more palatable.

48. Fast-paced banter, pop allusions lift Gilmore Girls -

“Gilmore Girls,” a show that ran on the WB, and the CW, from 2000-2007, has been streaming on Netflix since July of this year. I like it. I like the fast-paced dialogue, the pop culture references and the less-burdened Lauren Graham.

49. Events -

Battle of Franklin – Little Known Facts. Lunch and Learn at Tennessee State Museum, 505 Deaderick Street. Thursday, 12:15 p.m.-12:45 p.m. Museum Curator Richard White presents “Five Things You Probably Don’t Know about the Battles of Franklin, But Should.” Bring your lunch to the museum and enjoy an interesting talk while you eat.

50. Bradley hires intellectual property attorney -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has hired Timothy L. Capria as an associate on the Intellectual Property team in Nashville. He previously was with Patterson Intellectual Property Law.

Capria focuses on acquiring intellectual property, patent opinion practice and enforcing intellectual property rights. He primarily prosecutes patents in the life sciences and medical device fields, and provides trademark counsel for clients operating in diverse sectors.

51. Ghirardelli’s, Boudin: San Francisco treats -

Don and I have been in San Francisco for the last week on a short vacation, and have been trying to enjoy everything the city has to offer. We haven’t done half bad, either.

We have spent two days in the city, just walking around and exploring all the little shops and restaurants. Fisherman’s Wharf is a whole other world, along with The Market and Ghirardelli’s Chocolate … um, village. I don’t know how many stores are located in that complex, and each one full of chocolate. It was a dream come true for me!

52. Where there’s smoke there’s an annoyance -

The following is a true story. It happened to my good friend John Doe. I stress this, so that no one else’s insurance agents will come snooping around with threats to cancel their homeowners’ coverage.

53. Events -

Americana Music Festival. The 17th annual Americana Music Festival, which runs through Sunday, features five nights of approximately 215 live performances at venues throughout Nashville at night. Plus, seminars, panels and networking opportunities will take place throughout the day. Downtown venues include 12th & Porter, 3rd and Lindsley, Acme Feed & Seed, Cannery Ballroom, City Winery, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, Downtown Presbyterian Church, George Jones Museum, High Watt at Mercy Lounge, Mercy Lounge, Riverfront Park and Ascend Amphitheater, Ryman Auditorium, Sheraton Nashville Downtown Hotel, Emma, Station Inn, Third Man Records and Union Station Hotel. A $60 wristband grants access to all of the venues every night of the festival. Information: http://americanamusic.org.

54. Retirement means little in Trotter’s shop -

A major shearing finished, neck hairs obliterated, retired barber Joe Trotter uses a cotton square to dab Cool Mint Antiseptic on the head of Sean Allen, who has dropped in at the retirement haven that is 1505 Jefferson Street.

55. Events -

Communicate Effectively for Maxium Creative Success. Award-winning filmmaker, lyricist and psycholtherapist Linnda Durre will be the featured speaker at a special event to be held at the Nashville Film Institute, 191 Polk Avenue, Nashville. Thursday, 6-8 p.m. Durre’ is a licensed psychotherapist, business consultant, corporate trainer, sports performance coach, author of two books, international speaker, expert witness, columnist, media guest, TV and screenwriter, book and script editor and consultant, award winning filmmaker, director, producer, actor, acting coach, cartoonist, standup comedian, celebrity interviewer, TV and radio talk show host, lyricist and songwriter. Information: www.twifm.org

56. Bringing the mission back home -

Crunching through an almost invisible gap in the fence and onto the rutted “road” of mostly loose gravel, I’m looking forward to meeting up with the produce and life nurturer I first met in a church parking lot on the other side of this very hill.

57. Events -

Night Out Against Crime. Goodlettsville Police Department and the National Association of Town Watch. Tuesday, Moss Wright Park shelter #3, 6-9 p.m. Entertainment provided by D.B. Chase & Friends. Food provided and door prizes. Please join us by attending and supporting our cause to reduce crime in our community. Information: acherry@goodlettsville.gov

58. Estate sale pickers get piece of picker’s life -

By the time the antique dealer from Leiper’s Fork finishes digging and winching to freedom the bronze statue that Tammy Wynette had installed decades ago in the red dirt of this Oak Hill front yard, I had talked about The Beverly Hillbillies, admired the office and desk where Louise Scruggs spent a day chasing Bob Dylan for me and culled through Earl Scruggs’ record collection with the thoughtful guidance of one of Nashville’s best upright bassists.

59. Events -

Nashville Chamber: Business After Hours. An opportunity to develop relationships, walk away with new connections and market your business to more than 150 attendees. Butler Snow LLP, 150 3rd Avenue South, Suite 1600. Thursday, 5-7 p.m. Cost: Chamber Member $25, future member $50. Chamber member display table $250. Pre-registration is required. Registration includes hors d’oeuvres and two drinks tickets. Information: 743-3063

60. Guy Clark, Grammy-winning musician, dead at 74 -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Texas singer-songwriter Guy Clark, who helped mentor a generation of songwriters and wrote hits like "L.A. Freeway" and "Desperados Waiting for a Train," has died. He was 74.

Clark died Tuesday at his home in Nashville, Tennessee, according to his manager, Keith Case. He'd been in poor health, although Case didn't give an official cause of death.

61. Back to Cuba? No, Martinez happy in Nashville -

When Chuchi hugs me after his black beans and rice, I mentally thank Barack Obama (I’ll get back to him much later) for leading me to one of Nashville’s most urban intersections, where I sit at an alfresco café table, watching the traffic whip by and listening to sirens and parking-lot conversation conducted, for the most part, in a foreign language.

62. Oil prices lift the market again as energy stocks rally -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks jumped Monday as the price of oil surged again, lifting energy stocks as well as mining and chemicals companies. Indexes in Europe and Asia also rose as investors hoped for stimulus to strengthen the economies of those regions and boost sales of energy, building materials and other goods.

63. The Big Uh-Oh: Global economy shaky and cavalry may not come -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Eight years after the financial crisis, the world is coming to grips with an unpleasant realization: serious weaknesses still plague the global economy, and emergency help may not be on the way.

64. Cancer survivor Scott builds Narus on lessons learned -

Whether it was building models from an erector set, writing a cookbook at age 10 or starting a catering company at age 13, Sloane Scott’s parents knew early on that she was “made of different stuff” and, to their credit, never sought to tame it.

65. Cupcake pioneer Sprinkles finally hits market -

You certainly don’t have to look far to find amazing baked goods in Nashville.

Scratch-made pies, cobblers and banana pudding can be found at any meat-n-three or barbecue joint worth its salt; upscale bakeries, heritage bakeries and even vegan bakeries make their homes here. The pastry game in this town is worth paying attention to.

66. Food for the soul, work for the homeless -

“Jesus is all over this place,” I scribble in my reporter’s notebook as I sit back in a chair inside The Cookery.

And that’s before I witness the glistening shine of a true believer in the deep, brown eyes of Brett Swayn, the owner, operator, instructor, chef and dreamer who helped found this place at 1827 12th Avenue South.

67. Events -

Real Estate Investors Network. Davidson County Lunch. Join active, experienced investors to discuss deals you’d like to sell or buy, as well as discuss real estate trends and topics of interest with seasoned pros. Today, 11:15 a.m., Anatolia’s Restaurant, 48 White Bridge Rd, Nashville. Information: www.rein.org. Additional October opportunities:

68. Shop owner finds right fit in Crieve Hall -

“You can catch me here every day, but you gotta call during the right 12-hour shift,” says the mechanic with the gray goatee and mustache who fled 12th Avenue South – decades before corporate profiteers and the generally chichi overran that neighborhood – because of safety issues like gunfire and armed robbery.

69. Rekindling the flame that was Jefferson Street -

Lorenzo Washington pushes “pause” on his conversation so he doesn’t have to compete with the scream of a fire engine as it roars past his Jefferson Street recording empire and into the barbecue-flavored haze of this steamy, storm-threatened mid-summer’s day.

70. ‘The Fighting 26’ Democrats work to stay relevant -

Sometimes Tennessee Democrats must feel like a tree that falls in the forest: Does anyone hear them?

When Democratic legislative leaders called for a special session this summer on Insure Tennessee, Gov. Bill Haslam’s market-based plan to use federal dollars to catch 280,000 working people in a coverage gap, they found themselves alone.

71. McDonald's to shrink in US, 1st time in decades -

NEW YORK (AP) — The burger chain that put "supersize" into the American vernacular is slimming down: For the first time in more than 40 years, and perhaps ever, McDonald's says the number of U.S. restaurants it has is shrinking.

72. Events -

Real Estate Professionals for a Cause. The event will benefit Brides Against Breast Cancer Nationwide Tour of Gowns. Today, 6:30-9:30 p.m., Nelson Andrews Leadership Lodge, 3088 Smith Springs Road, Nashville. Tickets: $35 online, $45 at the door. Information: https://events.babcmobile.com/index.php?event=43, Events@Bridesabc.org

73. Lipscomb-area jewelers dazzle both sides of Granny White -

When the blonde left-fielder skidded across the outfield grass attempting in vain to catch a tricky hit, she likely didn’t know she was “visiting” – belly down – a well-fertilized, close-cropped living memorial to the man who spread love of Lipscomb from his jewelry store a couple hundred yards away.

74. Wendell Smith’s: Charlotte Avenue's safe zone for sinners, saints -

Other than the fact the roads outside – 53rd and Charlotte – are paved, not much has changed at Wendell Smith’s Corner, a monument to a short life well lived.

“He started it sometime in the ‘40s,” says Jakie Cook, Wendell Smith’s son-in-law, who at 81 still works “300 days a year” at the liquor store built by “a really smart businessman. He worked hard and made a lot of money.”

75. Sounds like a hit for neighbors -

For months, sounds of construction surrounded the Nashville Sounds’ sparkling new First Tennessee Park in Germantown.

The constant thump-thump-thump of pounding jackhammers competed with the irritating, high-pitched beeps of vehicles backing up. Ka-ching! Cranes lifted steel beams into place, keeping time with a syncopated thrumming of never-ending drilling. Ka-ching!

76. McWhorter is new president, CEO of NEC -

Stuart McWhorter, chairman and co-founder of Clayton Associates, has been named president & CEO of the Nashville Entrepreneur Center.

The announcement follows a months-long national search, according to John R. Ingram, chairman of the board of directors of the NEC.

77. Traveling for Thanksgiving? Be prepared for stress -

Do you plan on traveling over the Thanksgiving holiday? You’re not alone. Airlines for America has projected 24.6 million passengers will travel globally on U.S. airlines during the 12-day Thanksgiving travel period.

78. Cost of Thanksgiving is going up, but not by much -

Giving thanks will be a little costlier this year, but — and here's something you can be truly thankful for — it probably won't empty your wallet.

The price for putting Thanksgiving dinner on the table for 10 people is expected to rise slightly this year, clocking in at $49.41. That's 37 cents higher than in 2013. For that, you can blame dairy products, coffee and that all-important marshmallow-topped sweet potato casserole, according to the annual informal survey of consumer grocery prices performed by the American Farm Bureau Federation.

79. Not so sweet: Chocolate prices are set to rise -

NEW YORK (AP) — That bowl of chocolates for ninjas and ghosts won't cost you more this Halloween. Picking the perfect sweet for your Valentine could.

The cost of ingredients in chocolate bars is rising, and the nation's biggest candy makers have already warned of price hikes next year. And it's not just costs that are pushing up prices. A growing sweet tooth around the world means more demand for chocolate.

80. Events -

Nashville Farmers' Market Farmhand Dinner: Thursday, Oct. 23. Join Nashville Farmers’ Market and 11 of Nashville’s top chefs for this interpretation of a traditional dinner that would be served to farm workers. Inspired by fifth-generation NFM farmer, Troy Smiley of Smiley’s Farm, and featuring a locally-sourced menu and the culinary talents of:

81. Take a right at Candyland, cruise down memory lane -

Bill Decker has confessed to committing an “old Nashville” act. The founder of Decker Wealth Management admits he recently gave a friend directions to a certain destination that included a turn at a now-demolished Nashville landmark.

82. Events -

Real Estate Investors Network. Wholesaling Subgroup. Network with wholesalers and buyers of single-family and multi-family real estate. Today, 6 p.m., REIN Center - 4525 Harding Rd., Suite 200, Nashville. Information: www.reintn.org. Upcoming events:

83. 'Infill King’ John Brittle has a plan to curb urban sprawl. You might not like it -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

84. Events -

Live on the Green. Spanish Gold, The Weeks, City and Colour kick off the concert series at 6 p.m. Thursday. Since its inception in 2009, more than 200,000 fans from 29 states and 10 countries have attended the free outdoor music festival. It also has hosted more than 70 artists, including Alabama Shakes, Local Natives, Band of Horses, Matt & Kim, Michael Franti & Spearhead, Matt Nathanson, The Wallflowers, Citizen Cope, Dr. John, The Wailers and more. This year’s lineup:

85. As US job market strengthens, many don't feel it -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For millions of workers, happy days aren't quite here again.

Though the U.S. unemployment rate has plunged since the start of last year to a five-year low of 6.1 percent, the Gallup Organization has found that consumers' view of the economy is the glummest it's been in seven months.

86. Events -

Summer of Street Food. A gathering of 15 to 20 local food trucks. This event will take place every other Thursday through August 21. Trucks will be parked on Deaderick Street between 4th Avenue North and 5th Avenue North. Information: www.nashvillefoodtruckassociation.com.

87. Ninth inning arrives for Nashville Sounds neighbors -

The ear-popping, eye-dazzling flurry of the fireworks’ finale will signal the end of a season of melancholy, or at least uncertainty, for Abby Buter and her neighbors.

Abby – like all folks in this swath of South Nashville – has become reconciled to the fact the sultry nights when she can sit on her porch and watch fireworks will die with summer, Herschel Greer Stadium’s last as home of the Sounds.

88. Many seek new homes near cities but are priced out -

WASHINGTON (AP) — City living has been a blessing for Tim Nelson.

The Phoenix lawyer moved downtown a few months ago into a new $389,000 home with a warehouse-style floor plan, a Jacuzzi tub and kitchen counters made of Caesarstone quartz. His favorite coffee spot is three blocks away. When the Arizona Diamondbacks play on Friday nights, he can watch postgame fireworks from his deck.

89. Top Midstate residential real estate transactions for April 2014 -

Top April 2014 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

90. S&P 500 flirts with 1,900, but falls short -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Standard & Poor's 500 index is flirting with a new milestone: 1,900.

The index briefly climbed above that level on Tuesday before dropping back to close just below it. Still, it set an all-time closing high by a fraction of point.

91. Music and art mesh in Veda’s storied life -

Introduced to the Grand Ole Opry crowd as “The Spanish Hank Williams” back in 1962, there remains a sense of music, of rhythm in the voice of Gil Veda as he sits in his adopted hometown’s busiest coffee house named for a dog and raises his soft voice as much as possible to be heard above the din.

92. Census: Rural US loses population for first time -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rural America is losing population for the first time ever, largely because of waning interest among baby boomers in moving to far-flung locations for retirement and recreation, according to new census estimates.

93. FACT CHECK: Overreaching in State of Union speech -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama did some cherry-picking Tuesday night in defense of his record on jobs and laid out a conditional path to citizenship for illegal immigrants that may be less onerous than he made it sound.

94. Mountain Dew introduces a breakfast drink -

NEW YORK (AP) — If you don't like coffee or tea, Mountain Dew has a new breakfast drink that might perk you up.

PepsiCo Inc. is rolling out a new drink called Kickstart this month that has Mountain Dew flavor but is made with 5 percent juice and Vitamins B and C, along with an extra jolt of caffeine.

95. Events -

Martin Luther King Jr. Day tribute. The Rev. James Lawson, Diane Nash and Earnest “Rip” Patton, who, as leaders in the renowned Nashville Movement of the 1960s employed nonviolent resistance against discrimination that ultimately ended legal segregation in the U.S., are reuniting for a panel discussion to share their experiences and discuss the state of diversity in America today, during Waller’s “It’s Our Turn” Martin Luther King Jr. Day tribute. The discussion will be moderated by John L. Seigenthaler, distinguished journalist, civil rights activist and founder of the First Amendment Center at Vanderbilt University, at the DoubleTree hotel, 11:30 a.m. today.

96. Voter disdain spreads as 'fiscal cliff' looms -

HOOKSET, N.H. (AP) — Fear and frustration course through the lunch crowd at Robie's Country Store and Deli, a popular outpost 500 miles from where Washington is again locked in tense negotiations over taxes and spending as a critical deadline looms.

97. Dow closes up 107 points on hopes for deal on "cliff" -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks gained on signs that lawmakers are edging toward a deal that would help the U.S. avoid the "fiscal cliff."

Indexes shrugged off an early loss and rose in afternoon trading Wednesday. The Dow Jones industrial average closed up 106.98 points at 12,985.11. It had been down as much as 112 points in early trading.

98. Schapiro's SEC successor likely to follow her lead -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The leadership of the Securities and Exchange Commission will change next month. Its approach to regulation probably won't.

Mary Schapiro will step down as chairwoman after a tumultuous tenure in which she helped lead the government's regulatory response to the 2008 financial crisis.

99. Gas rationing begins in NY; power outages persist -

NEW YORK (AP) — A gasoline rationing plan that lets motorists fill up every other day went into effect in New York on Friday morning, as utility crews made some progress erasing outages that put thousands of new homes and businesses in the dark in a region still reeling from Superstorm Sandy.

100. Cuomo: NY superstorm damage could total $33B -

NEW YORK (AP) — Damage in New York state from Superstorm Sandy could total $33 billion when all is said and done, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Thursday as the state began cleaning up from a nor'easter that dumped snow, brought down power lines and left hundreds of thousands of new customers in darkness.