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Editorial Results (free)

1. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for May 2019 -

Top commercial real estate sales, May 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

2. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for December 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, December 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

3. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for November 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, November 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

4. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for September 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, September 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

5. Notable firings and resignations from Trump's White House -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Notable firings and resignations from President Donald Trump's White House since he took office on Jan. 20, 2017.

— Oct. 9: Trump announces U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley's resignation, effective at end of the year.

6. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for August 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, August 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

7. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for July 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, July 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

8. $1 million-plus Middle Tennessee commercial sales for Q2 2018 -

Commercial real estate sales, Second quarter 2018, of $1 million of more for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

9. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for June 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, June 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

10. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for April 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, April 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

11. Legal Aid Society names Waller executive director -

Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands has named attorney DarKenya W. Waller as its new executive director. Waller, who previously served as managing attorney of the firm’s Nashville office, replaces Gary Housepian, who served as executive director for the last decade.

12. Dodson Parker names Yarbro managing partner -

The law firm of Dodson Parker Behm & Capparella, PC, has selected Tyler Chance Yarbro as managing partner of the firm.

Founding member Margaret L. Behm previously served as managing partner and will continue her full-time practice of law as Yarbro assumes administrative responsibilities.

13. Middle Tennessee's $1M-plus residential transactions for 2017 -

There were 690 commercial real estate transactions worth $1 million or more in Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Sumner and Wilson counties in 2017, according to Chandler Reports.

Davidson County had the most with 333, followed by Williamson (152), Rutherford (104), Sumner (51) and Wilson (50).

14. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for August 2017 -

Top commercial real estate sales, August 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

15. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for July 2017 -

Top commercial real estate sales, July 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

16. Top Midstate residential transactions for second quarter 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, second quarter 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

17. $1 million-plus Middle Tennessee residential transactions for 2016 -

Residential real estate sales of $1 million or more for for Davidson (308 total), Williamson (241), Rutherford (4), Wilson (5) and Sumner (3) counties in 2016, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

18. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for July 2016 -

Top commercial real estate sales, July 2016, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

19. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for May 2016 -

Top residential real estate sales, May 2016, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

20. Bone is now president, CEO of Bone McAllester Norton -

Charles Robert Bone has been elected president and CEO of Bone McAllester Norton PLLC, Nashville’s sixth-largest law firm. He succeeds the late founding member, Mike Norton.

Charles W. Bone continues as chairman of the firm, and Sam J. McAllester III will continue serving as vice chairman.

21. The bounce in search of a rally -

The lugubrious sentiment that we described in our Oct. 2 commentary, coupled with the collapse in earnings and economic expectations, coiled the market for a well-broadcasted bounce.

Since Oct. 2, the S&P 500 has sprung 7 percent higher, led by the year’s most reviled performers.

22. A September to forget is perfect cap to 3rd quarter -

September typically delivers negative performance, and this September was no exception. September’s poor performance punctuated a dismal third quarter. Using MSCI stock indices, the USA, Europe and the emerging markets fell 7 percent, 9 percent and 18 percent respectively. Feeling down? You are not alone…

23. Raising rate now not the correct move -

Entering 1998, the U.S. economy was on a tear. U.S. GDP growth was running 4-plus percent and the unemployment rate was 4.5 percent.

Stocks gained 29 percent in 1997 after gaining 38 percent in 1995 and 23 percent in 1996. To cool things down, the Federal Reserve raised the Federal Funds rate to 5.5 percent.

24. The end of the Fed’s up-market guarantee program -

A week ago, the European Central Bank committed to do even more of “whatever it takes,” driving European stocks up 2.5 percent. Conversely, after Friday’s strong U.S. job report, Fed tightening fears pushed American stocks down 1.5 percent.

25. Loss of confidence or loss of overconfidence? -

As you already know, markets have gyrated wildly over the last two weeks. While suspicions of crisis have developed, the market has behaved as if crisis were already upon us.

Broad measures of volatility recorded record gains last week, market mechanics fractured at the Monday, Aug. 24 open and ETF prices became dramatically disconnected from underlying value.

26. Parting thoughts before leaving Asia -

This entry will be my last submission penned while living in Asia, so rather than discuss the market’s recent wiggles, I thought I would share some top of mind takeaways as I prepare to depart Hong Kong.

27. Top residential real estate transactions for May 2015 -

Top residential real estate transactions, May 2015, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

28. Is it finally time for Fed to hike interest rates? -

We have now entered the Fed’s target time zone to raise rates.

Clearly, the Fed wants to hike rates as a way to signal that the economy no longer requires “emergency assistance.”

29. Economic factors merit concern. But don’t worry -

There are factors conspiring in the market’s industrial kitchen right now that might lead to a fit of indigestion for investors. This week, we will look at the three main ingredients and discuss how to medicate.

30. Do not fear Europe’s recovery -

Interest rates determine the cost of capital for corporations, directly influence the capitalized value of corporate earnings and establish relative value positions within the currency markets.

Simply stated, meaningful shifts in interest rates create meaningful shifts in the investment marketplace.

31. Who’s to blame for lame Q1? Look to the Fed -

The U.S. economy grew 0.2 percent in the first quarter, well below analyst consensus. The fairly typical excuses followed the release, from weather to port strikes, to the first quarter growth curse that has stifled Q1 numbers since the financial crisis.

32. Pays to be selective in today’s market -

Last week, the Nasdaq, the S&P 500 and the New York Stock Exchange composite indexes all hit new historic highs, bolstered by falling rate hike expectations.

In the market environment of the day, economic softness causing falling revenues and falling prices (see Q1 earnings season) holds less influence than falling interest rates.

33. Why the market has fallen in 2015 -

The stock market overreached in 2013, expecting big things from 2014. Earnings estimates for 2014 were for growth of 10 percent-plus. High expectations boosted valuations above long-term averages.

When the Fed announced the reduction of its quantitative easing program in 2013, the market reacted with higher yields and lower stock prices.

34. The Currency war is on! Here are the players -

War sounds scary. In the traditional sense, war evokes casualties and loss. For investors, currency wars simply convey economic redistribution.

For instance, if there were only two stores in town selling identical items, and one store raised prices while the other store lowered prices, demand would certainly follow the discount … but overall demand would be the same.

35. Don’t be a hero, leave interest rates at zero -

As if we needed further evidence that investment markets price off of central bank soliloquies, markets worldwide rallied 4.5 percent last week in reaction to a short press release from the U.S. Fed.

36. Fear drives US stocks higher -

In 2014, more than 600 hedge funds have disbanded. Even accounting for the carnage of 2009, this amounts to a record pace of “smart money” failures.

In the more pedestrian mutual fund realm, active money managers are having their worst year ever of relative performance.

37. US riding high compared to other economies -

The Eurozone, Japan and select emerging markets all seem to be struggling economically with low inflation levels, poor policy responses and low demand.

Meanwhile, the U.S. keeps posting surprisingly strong economic numbers.

38. Dollar, S&P Levels Point to 1996 -

As trading becomes more mechanized, investors must consider not only market fundamentals but also what‘s driving the algorithms. With the proliferation of ETFs, less analysis occurs at the security level, and more analysis occurs on the technical level.

39. Rising GDP allows Feds to fold quantitative easing -

Nearly five years after the conclusion of the Great Recession, the U.S. Federal Reserve has chosen to conclude its quantitative easing program.

Ben Bernanke thought long and hard about the potential for Central Bank “emergency measures” like QE throughout his academic career. His devotion to Milton Freidman and the quantity theory of money (money supply * velocity = GDP) provided the orthodoxy for the U.S. response to the financial crisis.

40. China’s growth expectations met -

The global economy is a symphony of regional and local economies interconnected by trade, interest rates and currency movements. We can generalize the influence of our leading instrumentalists in the following ways:

41. The return of King Dollar -

The market’s game ball in the third quarter goes to the U.S. dollar.

The U.S. dollar rose 7 percent, boosted by the comparative hawkishness of the U.S. Fed. The currency has now advanced for 11 consecutive weeks, its longest winning streak in nearly 20 years (although the uptrend actually started in mid-2011).

42. The robotic rise of the S&P 500 -

The S&P 500 hit a new all-time high again last week for the 34th time so far this year. However, U.S. stocks appear increasingly detached.

While the S&P 500 has risen nearly 10 percent year-to-date, stocks outside the US have returned less than 3 percent. In fact, U.S. stocks have pummeled their international competition by an astounding 70 percent over the last five years.

43. Government for the prosperity of the people -

The reporting out of the U.S. on China is uniformly downbeat. By applying our western perspectives, China appears inhumane, politically oppressive, over-indebted and fragile.

From the American perspective, functional nations should look more, well, like us.

44. Woeful period for US markets -

September 8, 2014, S&P 2000 = 11 + 4 percent + 11 percent + 1.5 percent + 2.5 percent. The last five years have been consistently wonderful for the U.S. markets. Over the time period, the S&P 500 has advanced more than 17 percent annually. Only four bull markets (advances uninterrupted by a 20 percent decline) have lasted longer and returned more. What has this bull been eating?

45. Dollar stronger as Yen, Euro struggle -

Movements between the dollar, euro, and yen profoundly impact global flows of goods and capital. Given recent language and policy shifts from the US Federal Reserve (FED), the European Central Bank (ECB) and the Bank of Japan (BOJ), let’s re-examine global currency trends.

46. Top Middle Tennessee commercial real estate transactions July 2014 -

Top July 2014 commercial real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

47. Welcome to rapidly changing Hong Kong -

I have now lived in Hong Kong for nearly a month and just realized that I have failed to properly introduce you. Allow me to give you the tour.

Between 1842 and 1997, the British controlled the 425-square-mile territory of Hong Kong, which includes Kowloon, the New Territories and over 200 smaller islands.

48. Even in bull market, time is right for defense -

Downturns, while painful, can be very useful for the information they provide.

The S&P 500, representative of U.S. large cap stocks, declined 4 percent between July 24 and Aug. 7, and limiting our data set to this time period produces a couple of interesting observations.

49. Asia’s growth depends on US -

Ni hao! I write to you this week from Hong Kong. For the next 12 months I will be working remotely from China in order to closely evaluate conditions within the Asian economies.

In addition to my usual market musings I will share my Asian insights and inspirations as they arise … like this one.

50. Watkins welcomes Papel, Warfield as Trustees -

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film has added two members to its Board of Trustees, attorney Laurence M. (Larry) Papel and William (Bill) Warfield, president of Brookside Properties, Inc. Each will serve a three-year term.

51. What in the world could go wrong? -

The most commonly cited indicator of complacency, the VIX or volatility index, recently hit a low of 10.73, a level not seen since early 2007.

Now a low VIX does not in any way signal an imminent crisis, but it does indicate a very complacent consensus susceptible to even slightly unpleasant surprises. Sadly, when the markets cannot find a reason to sell, Murphy’s Law always provides one.

52. Russia returns but does it have ability to sustain? -

The $2 trillion Russian economy has a problem.

The amount of wealth that can be extracted from the ground distracts attention from otherwise productive economic endeavors. This concentrates economic rewards in the hands of the few and leads to development malaise as labor skills languish.

53. Shouldn’t bond rates be rising? -

As 2013 drew to a close, investors bid up “risky” assets and sold “safe” assets in anticipation of a robust 2014. “Risky” stocks rose 30 percent and the “safe” 10-year Treasury bond lost 4 percent.

54. How Low Can We Go? -

With the S&P 500 back at all-time highs, investors may be experiencing a bit of altitude sickness. With the S&P 500 now up 180 percent from the bottom, it’s right to question how much upside remains. However, the better question might be how much downside lies below.

55. Low expectations catch up to reality -

There is no better propellant for a market than low expectations. The S&P 500 has gained roughly 3.5 percent during this earnings season as expectations recalibrated with reality.

According to Factset, the S&P 500 collectively will earn .2 percent less than they did a year ago, versus pre-earnings season expectations of a 1.5 percent decline. So, don’t confuse this rally in sentiment with a rally in fundamentals.

56. Fall in tech stocks a return to reality -

Last week, we discussed that the wrestling match between stimulus and global debt deleveraging will continue to create anxiety and volatility for investors. Viewing the world through this prism helps to clarify seemingly baffling market movements.

57. Renewing Our Vows -

Last week, U.S. indices ascended briefly back into record territory on supportive comments from global powerbrokers.

In Europe, Mario Draghi, the head of the European Central Bank, initiated a bold conversation on monetary stimulus measures. Reality has set in across the Eurozone that the euro is too strong and inflation too weak for enduring economic expansion.

58. Now Tack! -

In sailing, when the wind shifts direction, you must move your sails or risk losing the wind. The first indication of a shifting breeze comes from the telltales, strips of lightweight material attached to the sails that foreshadow a change in conditions. Recently, the market telltales have been active.

59. Investors react to Fed policy, world events with yawn -

Fed testimony last week addressed burning economic and policy questions for investors.

How did they respond?

Fearfully, joyfully and indifferently. Just as they have to nearly every news item so far this year.

60. Muddling through an atypical recovery -

Last week’s December jobs number was billed as an economic tiebreaker after a string of mixed data.

The release depicted a softening employment environment, with the U.S. economy created 113,000 jobs in January against expectations of 185,000.

61. How to survive what could be a volatile 2014 -

Last week, the government released GDP statistics for the fourth quarter of 2013 showing the economy expanded at a 3.2 percent clip, which was above.

For the full year, the economy grew a less-impressive 1.9 percent, but momentum was clearly built into the back half of the year. Expectations for 3 percent annual growth in 2014 remain intact.

62. What to Expect When You’re Expecting -

S&P 500 corporate earnings in 2013 likely grew about 6 percent. The S&P 500 price index, however, grew 29.6 percent. The difference between the growth in earnings and the growth in the price index amounts to P/E expansion.

63. Consider selling momentum, buying contrarian -

The S&P 500 has been the world’s performance bell cow since the great recession on the relative strength of the U.S. economic recovery.

The S&P 500 has outperformed the MSCI All World ex USA All Cap Index by 17 percent over the last year, 11 percent annualized over the last three years, and 5 percent annualized over the last five years.

64. Top Midstate residential real estate transactions for 2013 -

Top 2013 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

65. Looking forward to low inflation -

The thundering herd that carried the equity markets into the record books in 2013 seemed spooked by the first few trading days of 2014. Should we read into this?

Perhaps, but it more likely indicates portfolio rebalancing rather than a widespread repositioning of wagers. Those rebalancing their portfolios need to sell stocks to provide currency to replenish underperforming asset classes. For those that shifting wagers, what new bets might pay off in 2014?

66. Top Midstate residential real estate transactions for Dec. 2013 -

Top December 2013 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

67. Helicopter Fed: Something for all -

Ben Bernanke announced a tapering of the Federal Reserve’s asset purchase program from $85 billion to $75 billion at his final Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meeting on December 18, and contrary to pundit fears, the Dow Jones Industrial Average threw him a going away celebration by rallying to new highs. What he said:

68. The Economy in 2013: Naughty and Nice -

Thanks to the Federal Reserve’s dedication to increasing your net worth, 2013 will go down as one of the most prosperous years on file. Stock prices have increased more than 20 percent and U.S. home prices have increased nearly 15 percent.

69. The healing continues -

With another successful earnings season in the books, earnings news will move to the backburner for financial market observers. In the midst of this earnings vacuum, economic news moves to the forefront, as investors try to determine if the strong earnings will be sustainable via a healing economy. Or, if the economic support is beginning to deteriorate, perhaps earnings have peaked.

70. Keep your eye on the bouncing ball -

Markets bounced around a bit last week due to the continued volley between economic/earnings expectations and interest rate expectations. As a market observer, you must fully grasp this dynamic to translate daily volatility.

71. Markets keep moving up -

Markets continued their record march this week as a tepid jobs report reinforced expectations for further Fed stimulus.

In anticipation of “print it” Janet’s reign, the 10-year Treasury yield has frozen at 2.5 percent. With a valuation of 17x trailing operating earnings, S&P 500 earnings yield nearly 6 percent. Obviously 6 percent is more than 2.5 percent, making stocks more attractive than bonds. To wit, equity mutual funds have added $32 billion in assets since May 31, while bond mutual funds have shed $128 billion.

72. Avoid the blogs, place trust in data -

Last week, the keystone cops in Washington signed yet another procrastination resolution to our festering debt and deficit issues. No matter. The market rallied into our fiscal D-Day and emerged right after to new, all-time highs.

73. A dose of fiscal truth: Important, not urgent -

I recently received an email from a client asking how in the world the U.S. would overcome its bulging debt pile. There are three parts to this answer.

First, the annual deficits we run (tax receipts – spending) tend to correlate more with economic activity than policy. Through August, bolstered by an expanding economy, government revenues have increased 13 percent, contributing to a 35 percent reduction in the deficit.

74. The Fed sets Fed policy -

The Fed has two primary job descriptions. First, keep prices stable. Second, promote an environment of economic growth that provides employment opportunities. Which is more important?

Economic crises at their core typically consist of disruption in financial and currency markets. Once the financial transmission mechanisms fail, hard recessions and unemployment spikes follow.

75. Time for a rally gut check -

A couple of weeks ago, we discussed the lack of unanimity in the emerging markets sell-off. While the emerging markets index suggested distress within the class, a closer look revealed that only a few countries were truly under fire.

76. The Data Have Spoken -

Each new month delivers a flurry of economic data. The current deluge will weigh heavily on the Federal Reserve’s decision to maintain or reduce quantitative easing. Let’s quickly review the recent releases and handicap the Fed’s taper temptation.

77. Rates are rising, rates are rising -

On July 22, 1981, the federal funds rate (the interbank overnight benchmark rate) hit a historic high of 22.36 percent.

On Dec. 11, 2011, it bottomed at .04 percent. Between 1981 and today, large company stocks returned nearly 11 percent on an annualized basis. As consensus suggests, falling interest rates undoubtedly make stocks more valuable.

78. Mark Sept. 18 on 2013 calendar -

Last week, we discussed the recent upshift in the global economy. The next major moment for the market will occur on Sept. 18 when 65 percent of economists expect that the Fed will announce a “tapering” of its quantitative easing program. The movement in the 10-year Treasury bond interest rate confirms this expectation as rates have now climbed to 2.84 percent, up from 1.6 percent three months ago.

79. Leading indicators to watch this fall -

Now that earnings season has essentially ended, the stock market needs a new muse.

The next earnings season begins in early October. In between, analysts will tweak models and revise forecasts, but real data releases overpower estimate releases.

80. Watkins welcomes 4 new trustees to board -

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film has named William H. Braddy III, Deborah G. Crowder, Marci Mason, and Cano A. Ozgener to its board. Each will serve three-year terms.

81. State rules get tighter scrutiny -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Gov. Bill Haslam took office with a 45-day freeze on implementing any new government rules.

Since that time, the administration is using less dramatic and less direct ways of affecting the bureaucratic regulatory process.

82. Two acts remain in Bernanke’s screenplay -

After weeks of volatility, driven by complex Fed speculation after a chorus of mixed messages, Chairman Bernanke re-focused marketplace attention on the Fed’s core purpose.

As per Congress, The Federal Reserve Act directs: “the Federal Reserve...shall maintain long run growth of the monetary and credit aggregates commensurate with the economy’s long run potential…to promote the goals of maximum employment, stable prices and moderate long-term interest rates.”

83. In times like these, it might be best to get out of the way -

Among attentive investors, the recent bout of market volatility has reprised fears of country, currency, economic decline and general market collapse.

When global macro-market events occur, large trading positions that have been spooling quickly unspool, leading to jarring movements like those we are witnessing in Japan. These environments become a bit of a predator’s ball, as short-term traders feast on volatility that only amplifies volatility further.

84. Glacial job creation equals glacial stimulus reduction -

This has been the weakest job recovery on record. The 175,000 new jobs created in May did slightly exceed analyst estimates, but also slightly trailed population growth.

The percentage of the U.S. adult population with a job equals 58.6 percent. This number hit 67 percent back in 2000.

85. Playing it safe can be risky business -

Ever since the Federal Reserve began its zero interest rate policies, investors have searched for higher yielding assets.

This makes sense. If you need income to run your household or make your pension distributions, you must locate investments that provide yield. If Treasury bonds will not, what will?

86. Reacting to Fed dread -

In an otherwise exceptionally dull trading week, markets worldwide reacted violently last Wednesday to Ben Bernanke’s mixed congressional testimony and the Fed meeting minutes released later in the day. Why so skittish?

87. How high can we go? Watch hiring -

Total stock market returns combine dividends with a change in earnings and a change in multiples. Right now, the dividend yield on the S&P 500 is 2 percent.

The earnings estimate for the S&P 500, for year-end 2014 as projected by Standard and Poor’s, approximates $120, as trailing earnings equal $100 per share.

88. Rotten golden apples in a can -

It has been a particularly tough stretch for sage taxicab investors. My recent taxi tips have centered on three clear winners. Gold, Apple and Cash. Let’s evaluate.

Cab Tip #1: Central Bank Money Printing = Gold Prices Rising

89. The Cyprus is falling! -

The Cyprus economy is $23 billion. (The Vermont economy is $26 billion.) Bank loans in Cyprus are eight times the size of GDP, compared with 3.5 times in the Eurozone and 1 times U.S. GDP. With leverage ratio’s that high, a small deterioration in loan performance can render the banking system insolvent.

90. Look at the facts, ignore the rhetoric -

In human psychology, fear seems more legitimate than hope. Claims of “impending doom,” and “bursting bubbles” elicit fast emotional responses that seem impervious to critique. So many programs, speeches and advertisements prey on this phenomenon today.

91. Urbanization equals global opportunities -

The worldwide adoption of competition and capitalistic principles has unlocked tremendous prosperity growth. At the core of this prosperity movement are the unique advantages created by urbanizing the world’s population.

92. Quiet period could lead to frisky phase -

Buyer Intent Building By some analysis, the last two weeks have exhibited the lowest stock market volatility since 1986.

While sideways markets are boring, they also reduce anxieties. On average, since 1980, the S&P 500 experienced intra-year declines of 15 percent.

93. Strong January portends good 2013 economy -

As Goes January: Many market observers state that as goes January, so goes the rest of the year. Mathematically, one-twelfth of the year has now passed, and the S&P 500 has tacked on 5 percent.

94. Just for fun, let’s start a currency war -

Prior to Pres. Nixon’s closing of the gold window in 1971, world currencies traded in value relative to the U.S. dollar, which was tethered to gold at $35 an ounce. Following the divorce, currencies began trading relative to the dollar, but the dollar in turn began trading relative to other currencies.

95. Three keys to determining stock success -

Forecasting 2013 The fiscal cliff episode proved bullish for stocks. Fearful asset owners facing tax code uncertainty pulled outsized income and capital gains into 2012.

Sellers quickly became buyers to complete the tax arbitrage.

96. CapWealth names Venable president, COO -

Independent investment advisory firm CapWealth Advisors LLC has selected Phoebe J. Venable to be its president and chief operating officer.

97. Be careful of cashing out before 2013 tax increases -

While we may not know the details of next year’s tax increases, we do know that taxes will increase.

This has created a rush of year-end tax planning to sell assets, issue dividends and claw compensation forward.

98. Concerns won’t end at edge of ‘cliff’ -

Please recognize that the “fiscal cliff” debate will not end with current compromise.

This debate has just begun, so get used to it. Our long-term fiscal situation is toxic and entirely a function of Medicare and Medicaid.

99. Fiscal equality vs. efficiency -

Beneath the “fiscal cliff” debate is a fundamental battle of philosophy. Liberal economics prioritizes equality, while conservative economics prioritizes efficiency. Migration toward either of these polls contains costs and benefits. Below is an excerpt from a tax study of developed nations commissioned by the Paris based OECD:

100. East vs. West: Firsthand look an eye opener -

Yin and Yang Since Election Day, stock indices have fallen sharply, reflecting the Washington non-consensus. As we enter another legislative sausage session, investors can’t help but recall the 20 percent drawdown that marked the last high-stakes negotiation.