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Editorial Results (free)

1. Justices signal they'll OK new abortion limits, may toss Roe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court's conservative majority on Wednesday signaled it would uphold Mississippi's 15-week ban on abortion and may go much further to overturn the nationwide right to abortion that has existed for nearly 50 years.

2. Supreme Court set to take up all-or-nothing abortion fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Both sides are telling the Supreme Court there's no middle ground in Wednesday's showdown over abortion. The justices can either reaffirm the constitutional right to an abortion or wipe it away altogether.

3. Justices' views on abortion in their own words and votes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When the Supreme Court hears arguments Wednesday over whether Mississippi can ban abortions after 15 weeks, the justices will be focused on an issue that has dominated the term. Not only is there Mississippi's call to overrule Roe v. Wade, but justices are already considering a Texas law banning abortion at roughly six weeks and written to make it difficult to mount legal challenges against it.

4. Supreme Court won't hear case involving transgender rights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is declining to wade into a case involving transgender rights and leaving in place a lower court decision against a Catholic hospital that wouldn't allow a transgender man to have a hysterectomy there.

5. Justices' views on abortion in their own words and votes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Abortion already is dominating the Supreme Court's new term, months before the justices will decide whether to reverse decisions reaching back nearly 50 years. Not only is there Mississippi's call to overrule Roe v. Wade, but the court also soon will be asked again to weigh in on the Texas law banning abortion at roughly six weeks.

6. Supreme Court Notebook: Don't stand so close to us -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Get tested. Wear a mask. Don't get too close. Not your typical court orders, but that was the word from the Supreme Court to lawyers and reporters who returned to the high court this week for the first in-person arguments in more than a year and a half.

7. What's old is new again: Justices back at court for new term -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court returned to the courtroom Monday for the start of a momentous new term, after a nearly 19-month absence because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Abortion, guns and religion all are on the agenda for a court with a rightward tilt, including three justices appointed by former President Donald Trump.

8. Supreme Court hanging up phone, back to in-person arguments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The justices are putting the "court" back in Supreme Court.

The high court announced Wednesday that the justices plan to return to their majestic, marble courtroom for arguments beginning in October, more than a year and a half after the in-person sessions were halted because of the coronavirus pandemic.

9. Justices turn away florist who refused same-sex wedding job -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Friday declined to take up the case of a florist who refused to provide services for a same-sex wedding, leaving in place a decision that she broke state anti-discrimination laws.

10. Unusually agreeable justices end term with conservative wins -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An unusually agreeable Supreme Court term ended with conservative-driven decisions on voting rights and charitable-donor disclosures that offered a glimpse of what the coming years of the right's dominance could look like for the nation's highest court.

11. Supreme Court leaves CDC eviction moratorium in place -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is leaving a pandemic-inspired nationwide ban on evictions in place, over the votes of four objecting conservative justices.

The court on Tuesday rejected a plea by landlords to end the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention moratorium on evicting millions of tenants who aren't paying rent during the coronavirus pandemic. Last week, the Biden administration extended the moratorium by a month, until the end of July. It said then it did not expect another extension.

12. High court rejects New Hampshire-Massachusetts tax dispute -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday refused to allow New Hampshire to sue neighboring Massachusetts over an income tax dispute involving people who have been working from home during the coronavirus pandemic.

13. Supreme Court won't revive school's transgender bathroom ban -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected a Virginia school board's appeal to reinstate its transgender bathroom ban, handing a victory to transgender rights groups and a former high school student who fought in court for six years to overturn the ban.

14. Transgender rights, religion among cases justices could add -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A closely watched voting rights dispute from Arizona is among five cases standing between the Supreme Court and its summer break. But even before the justices wrap up their work, likely later this week, they could say whether they'll add more high-profile issues to what already promises to be a consequential term, beginning in October.

15. Justices rule for student in 'cursing cheerleader' case -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the case of the cursing cheerleader, the Supreme Court notched a victory for the free speech rights of students Wednesday, siding with a high school student whose vulgar social media post got her kicked off the junior varsity squad.

16. High court backs Nestle, Cargill in child slave labor suit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Thursday sided with food giants Nestle and Cargill in a lawsuit that claimed they knowingly bought cocoa beans from farms in Africa that used child slave labor.

17. Another victory at the Supreme Court for religious groups -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In another victory for religious groups at the Supreme Court, the justices on Thursday unanimously sided with a Catholic foster care agency that says its religious views prevent it from working with same-sex couples. The court said the city of Philadelphia wrongly limited its relationship with the group as a result of the agency's policy.

18. 'Obamacare' survives: Supreme Court dismisses big challenge -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court, though increasingly conservative in makeup, rejected the latest major Republican-led effort to kill the national health care law known as "Obamacare" on Thursday, preserving insurance coverage for millions of Americans.

19. Justices rule against low-level crack cocaine offenders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled unanimously Monday that low-level crack cocaine offenders convicted more than a decade ago can't take advantage of a 2018 federal law to seek reduced prison time.

20. Justices defer Harvard case on race in college admissions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With abortion and guns already on the agenda, the conservative-dominated Supreme Court is considering adding a third blockbuster issue — whether to ban consideration of race in college admissions.

21. Supreme Court limits prosecutors' use of anti-hacking law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Thursday limited prosecutors' ability to use an anti-hacking law to charge people with computer crimes.

Conservative and liberal justices joined to vote 6-3 to overturn the conviction of a police sergeant who used a work database to run a license plate search in exchange for money. The justices ruled prosecutors had overreached in using the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act to charge him. The case is important guidance in narrowing the scope of the law.

22. Conservatives push big issues to fore at Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Abortion. Guns. Religion. A Trump-fortified conservative majority is making its presence felt at the Supreme Court by quickly wading into high-profile social issues that have been a goal of the right for decades.

23. AP FACT CHECK: Yes, Trump lost election despite what he says -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Seeking to shame Republicans who are disloyal to him, former President Donald Trump distorted the Constitution's meaning in asserting widespread voter fraud and insisting that state legislatures could overturn Joe Biden's presidential win.

24. Over Thomas dissent, high court rejects West Point case -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday rejected an appeal from a woman who says she was raped as a West Point cadet, with Justice Clarence Thomas alone arguing that the court should have heard her case.

25. An unusual coalition as Supreme Court rules for immigrant -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An unusual coalition of Supreme Court justices joined Thursday to rule in favor of an immigrant fighting deportation in a case that the court said turned on the meaning of the shortest word, "a."

26. Judicial nominees, perhaps a potential justice, face Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ketanji Brown Jackson is heading to Capitol Hill for an audition of sorts. Lawmakers will be grilling her about her nomination to become a federal appeals court judge. But if the hearing goes well, the 50-year-old could someday get a callback for an even bigger role: Supreme Court justice.

27. Supreme Court rejects Texas suit over California travel ban -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday refused to consider Texas' challenge to California's ban on state-funded business trips to Texas and other states deemed to discriminate against LGBTQ people.

28. Supreme Court to take up right to carry gun for self-defense -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court agreed on Monday to hear an appeal to expand gun rights in the United States in a New York case over the right to carry a firearm in public for self-defense.

The case marks the court's first foray into gun rights since Justice Amy Coney Barrett came on board in October, making a 6-3 conservative majority.

29. 'How many of us will be left?' Catholic nuns face loss, pain -

GREENSBURG, Pa. (AP) — The nuns' daily email update was overtaken by news of infections. Ambulances blared into the driveways of their convents. Prayers for the sick went unanswered, prayers for the dead grew monotonous and, their cloistered world suddenly caving in, some of the sisters' thoughts were halting.

30. Supreme Court case could change the nature of college sports -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Supreme Court case being argued this week amid March Madness could erode the difference between elite college athletes and professional sports stars.

If the former college athletes who brought the case win, colleges could end up competing for talented student athletes by offering over-the-top education benefits worth tens of thousands of dollars. And that could change the nature of college sports.

31. Guns are on Supreme Court's agenda days after mass shootings -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A possible expansion of gun rights is on the Supreme Court's agenda, days after mass shootings in Colorado and Georgia.

The justices are meeting in private Friday to discuss adding new cases to their docket for the fall. Among the prospects is an appeal from gun rights advocates that asks the court to declare a constitutional right to carry a handgun outside the home for self-protection.

32. High court: More police excessive force suits can go forward -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is siding with a New Mexico woman who was shot by police as she drove away from them, in a case that will allow more excessive force lawsuits against police to go forward.

33. Breyer mum as some liberals urge him to quit Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Forgive progressives who aren't looking forward to the sequel of their personal "Nightmare on First Street," a Supreme Court succession story.

The original followed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's decision to forgo retirement from the high court, located on First Street in Washington, when Democrats controlled the White House and the Senate during six years of Barack Obama's presidency, until 2015.

34. Traditions on hold, justices near a year of phone arguments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawyers arguing in jeans and hoodies. A justice who has been silent for years regularly talking. A sound like a toilet flushing during the discussion of a case.

Arguments at the Supreme Court have looked and sounded a lot different over the past year since the justices closed their marble-columned courtroom to the public and began hearing cases by telephone because of the coronavirus pandemic.

35. High court revives ex-student's suit against Georgia college -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is reviving a lawsuit brought by a Georgia college student who sued school officials after being prevented from distributing Christian literature on campus.

36. Second high court hearing for Florida-Georgia water war -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court tried Monday to inject some mystery into its second consideration of a long-running dispute between Georgia and Florida over water that flows from the Atlanta suburbs to the Gulf of Mexico.

37. High court formally rejects Trump election challenge cases -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday formally rejected a handful of cases related to the 2020 election, including disputes from Pennsylvania that had divided the justices just before the election.

38. Religion, death penalty collide at the Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is sending a message to states that want to continue to carry out the death penalty: Inmates must be allowed to have a spiritual adviser by their side as they are executed.

39. Top Davidson County residential sales for fourth quarter 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, fourth quarter 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

40. Top Davidson County residential sales for December 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, December 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

41. Supreme Court won't take ex-Assembly Speaker Silver's case -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is declining to take up the case of former New York Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, who is serving a 6.5-year prison sentence after being convicted in a corruption case.

42. Top Davidson County residential sales for December 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, December 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

43. Supreme Court won't hear PA abortion clinic free speech case -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is declining to get involved in a case about free speech outside a Pittsburgh abortion clinic.

The high court turned away the case Monday. The court's decision not to hear the case leaves in place a 2019 appeals court decision that upheld a Pittsburgh ordinance creating a 15-foot "buffer zone" where protests are barred around entrances to health care facilities. The decision by the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals allowed "sidewalk counseling" within that zone.

44. Top Davidson County residential sales for 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

45. Justices rule Muslim men can sue FBI agents over no-fly list -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A unanimous Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Muslim men who were placed on the government's no-fly list because they refused to serve as FBI informants can seek to hold federal agents financially liable.

46. Klain brings decades of DC experience to Biden White House -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ron Klain has checked all the boxes of a classic Washington striver: Georgetown, Harvard Law, Supreme Court clerk and Capitol Hill staffer, White House adviser and, along the way, of course, lobbyist and lawyer.

47. Supreme Court seems skeptical of Trump's census plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court sounded skeptical Monday that President Donald Trump could categorically exclude people living in the country illegally from the population count used to allot seats among the states in the House of Representatives.

48. 'Obamacare' likely to survive, high court arguments indicate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A more conservative Supreme Court appears unwilling to do what Republicans have long desired: kill off the Affordable Care Act, including its key protections for pre-existing health conditions and subsidized insurance premiums that affect tens of millions of Americans.

49. Without Ginsburg, high court support for health law in doubt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Until six weeks ago, defenders of the Affordable Care Act could take comfort in some simple math. Five Supreme Court justices who had twice preserved the Obama-era health care law remained on the bench and seemed unlikely votes to dismantle it.

50. High court could halt move toward leniency for kids who kill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Tuesday suggested it could halt what has been a gradual move toward more leniency for children who are convicted of murder.

In cases over more than a decade, the court has concluded that children should be treated differently from adults, in part because of their lack of maturity. But the court, which has become more conservative over the last few years, could decide not to go any further.

51. Election emerges as referendum on race relations in America -

DETROIT (AP) — Every day feels like a raw wound for Omari Barksdale.

His sister, Laneeka Barksdale, died of COVID-19 in late March in Detroit — and since then, so have more than 228,000 Americans. Many were Black Americans whose communities were disproportionately devastated by the virus.

52. Supreme Court leaves NC absentee ballot deadline at Nov. 12 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court will allow absentee ballots in North Carolina to be received and counted up to nine days after Election Day.

The justices, by a 5-3 vote Wednesday, refused to disturb a decision by the State Board of Elections to lengthen the period from three to nine days because of the coronavirus pandemic, pushing back the deadline to Nov. 12. The board's decision was part of a legal settlement with a union-affiliated group.

53. Barrett confirmed by Senate for Supreme Court, takes oath -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Amy Coney Barrett was confirmed to the Supreme Court late Monday by a deeply divided Senate, with Republicans overpowering Democrats to install President Donald Trump's nominee days before the election and secure a likely conservative court majority for years to come.

54. Barrett sworn in at court as issues important to Trump await -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Amy Coney Barrett was formally sworn in Tuesday as the Supreme Court's ninth justice, her oath administered in private by Chief Justice John Roberts. Her first votes on the court could include two big topics affecting the man who appointed her.

55. Barrett ads tied to interest groups funded by unnamed donors -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The expected confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday is the culmination of a decadeslong coordinated effort by a constellation of conservative groups, fueled by tens of millions of dollars from wealthy anonymous donors, to tilt the high court farther to the right.

56. Democrats: Justices' 4-4 tie in election case ominous sign -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With Amy Coney Barrett expected to join the Supreme Court as early as next week, the court's action in a Pennsylvania voting case has heightened fears among Democrats about the court being asked to decide a post-election dispute and with it, the winner of the White House.

57. High court allows 3-day extension for Pennsylvania ballots -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court will allow Pennsylvania to count mailed-in ballots received up to three days after the Nov. 3 election, rejecting a Republican plea in the presidential battleground state.

58. GOP pushes Barrett's nomination ahead, Dems decry 'sham' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Judge Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination cleared a key hurdle Thursday as Senate Judiciary Committee Republicans powered past Democrats' objections in the drive to confirm President Donald Trump's pick before the Nov. 3 election.

59. Barrett to face senators on health care, legal precedent -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett will face senators' questions over her approach to health care, legal precedent and even the presidential election during a second day of confirmation hearings on track to lock in a conservative court majority for years to come.

60. Politics has way of finding Supreme Court eager to avoid it -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court might prefer to avoid politics, but politics has a way of finding the court.

President Donald Trump wants the court to keep his taxes from being turned over to New York's top prosecutor and allow his administration to exclude non-citizens from the census count. He wants the justices to counteract an order making it easier for women to get abortion pill and rein in voting by mail.

61. 2 justices slam court's 2015 decision in gay marriage case -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court, already poised to take a significant turn to the right, opened its new term Monday with a jolt from two conservative justices who raised new criticism of the court's embrace of same-sex marriage.

62. Barrett could be Ginsburg's polar opposite on Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Amy Coney Barrett paid homage to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in her White House speech Saturday as a shatterer of glass ceilings. She said she would be mindful of the woman whose place she would take on the Supreme Court.

63. Biden urges pause on Trump court pick until after election -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is pushing for quick confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett while his Democratic rival, Joe Biden, implored the Republican-led Senate to hold off on voting on her nomination until after the Nov. 3 election to "let the people decide."

64. Ginsburg remembered as prophet for justice, American icon -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With crowds of admirers swelling outside, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was remembered Wednesday at the court by grieving family, colleagues and friends as a prophet for justice who persevered against long odds to become an American icon.

65. Romney OKs voting on court nominee, all but assures approval -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah said Tuesday he supports voting to fill the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's  seat on the Supreme Court, all but ensuring President Donald Trump has the backing to push his choice to confirmation over Democratic objections that it's too close to the November election.

66. Top contenders for Ginsburg's seat on Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has said he would nominate a woman to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died Friday at the age of 87 and was a champion of gender equality. A look at the top contenders:

67. Graham: GOP has votes to confirm Trump court pick by Nov. 3 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans have the votes to confirm President Donald Trump's Supreme Court pick before the Nov. 3 presidential election, according to the Senate Judiciary chairman who will shepherd the nomination through the chamber.

68. High court front-runner hailed by right, feared by left -

CHICAGO (AP) — A front-runner to fill the Supreme Court seat vacated by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is a federal appellate judge who has established herself as a reliable conservative on hot-button legal issues from abortion to gun control.

69. Trump to make court pick by Saturday, before Ginsburg burial -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Monday he expects to announce his pick for the Supreme Court by week's end, before Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg  is buried, launching a monumental Senate confirmation fight over objections from Democrats who say it's too close to the November election.

70. Supreme Court to stick with arguments via telephone, for now -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court said Wednesday it will start its new term next month the way it ended the last one, with arguments by telephone because of the coronavirus pandemic and live audio available to the public.

71. Trump Supreme Court list includes Sens. Ted Cruz, Tom Cotton -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hoping to replicate a strategy that has long been seen as key to his appeal among conservative voters, President Donald Trump on Wednesday announced he is adding 20 names to a list of Supreme Court candidates that he's pledged to choose from if he has future vacancies to fill.

72. Top Davidson County residential sales for August 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, August 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

73. Trump readying potential Supreme Court nominee list -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is preparing to again release a list of potential Supreme Court nominees, one that voters can compare to rival Joe Biden's promise to nominate a Black woman to the high court if given the chance.

74. District Attorneys General Conference names deputy director -

Former Davidson County prosecutor Zoe K. Sams has been named deputy director of the Tennessee District Attorneys General Conference. Most recently, she served as the director of legislation and Safe Baby Court statewide coordinator for the Tennessee Department of Children Services.

75. Trump gives credence to false, racist Harris conspiracy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Thursday gave credence to a false and racist conspiracy theory about Kamala Harris' eligibility to be vice president, fueling an online misinformation campaign that parallels the one he used to power his rise into politics.

76. High court: Rhode Island mail-in voters don't need witnesses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday left in place an agreement that allows Rhode Island residents to vote by mail in two upcoming elections without signing their ballots in the presence of two witnesses or a notary.

77. Thomas spoke, Roberts ruled in unusual Supreme Court term -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Justice Clarence Thomas spoke and Chief Justice John Roberts ruled.

78. No peeking, voters: Court keeps Trump taxes private for now -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rejecting President Donald Trump's complaints that he's being harassed, the Supreme Court ruled Thursday in favor of a New York prosecutor's demands for the billionaire president's tax records. But in good political news for Trump, his taxes and other financial records almost certainly will be kept out of the public eye at least until after the November election.

79. Court OK's limiting free birth control on religious grounds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More employers who cite religious or moral grounds can decline to offer cost-free birth control coverage to their workers, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday, upholding Trump administration rules that could leave more than 70,000 women without free contraception.

80. 2 female firsts at the Supreme Court announce retirements -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court said Tuesday that the first-ever women to hold two prominent positions at the court, handling the justices' security and overseeing publication of the court's decisions, are retiring.

81. Supreme Court strikes down Louisiana abortion clinic law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A divided Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Louisiana law regulating abortion clinics, reasserting a commitment to abortion rights over fierce opposition from dissenting conservative justices in the first big abortion case of the Trump era.

82. Supreme Court rules SEC can recoup money in fraud cases -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday preserved an important tool used by securities regulators to recoup ill-gotten gains in fraud cases.

By an 8-1 vote, the justices ruled that the Securities and Exchange Commission can seek to recover the money through a process called disgorgement. Last year, the SEC obtained $3.2 billion in repayment of profits from people who have been found to violate securities law.

83. Court rejects Trump bid to end young immigrants' protections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Thursday rejected President Donald Trump's effort to end legal protections for 650,000 young immigrants, the second stunning election-season rebuke from the court in a week after its ruling that it's illegal to fire people because they're gay or transgender.

84. Supreme Court: Gay, transgender workers protected by law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Monday that a landmark civil rights law protects gay, lesbian and transgender people from discrimination in employment, a resounding victory for LGBT rights from a conservative court.

85. Supreme Court stays out of police immunity debate – for now -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is for now declining to get involved in an ongoing debate by citizens and in Congress over policing, rejecting cases Monday that would have allowed the justices to revisit when police can be held financially responsible for wrongdoing.

86. Supreme Court rejects Trump bid to void California sanctuary law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday rejected the Trump administration's bid to throw out a California immigrant-sanctuary law that limits local police cooperation with federal immigration authorities.

87. Justices revive permit for pipeline under Appalachian Trail -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday paved the way for a critical permit for a proposed natural gas pipeline that would cross under the Appalachian Trail, siding with energy companies and the Trump administration.

88. Supreme Court rejects several gun rights cases for next term -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday passed up several challenges to federal and state gun control laws, over the dissent of two conservative justices.

Gun rights advocates had hoped the court would expand the constitutional right to "keep and bear arms" beyond the home.

89. Pandemic means a silent June at the Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's the time of the year when Supreme Court justices can get testy. They might have to find a new way to show it.

The court's most fought-over decisions in its most consequential cases often come in June, with dueling majority and dissenting opinions. But when a justice is truly steamed to be on a decision's losing side, the strongest form of protest is reading a summary of the dissent aloud in court. Dissenting justices exercise what a pair of scholars call the "nuclear option" just a handful of times a year, but when they do, they signal that behind the scenes, there's frustration and even anger.

90. Supreme Court upholds Puerto Rico financial oversight board -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday upheld the oversight board established by Congress to help Puerto Rico out of a devastating financial crisis that has been exacerbated by the coronavirus outbreak, recent earthquakes and damage from Hurricane Maria in 2017. The justices reversed a lower court ruling that threatened to throw the island's recovery efforts into chaos.

91. Justices fear 'chaos' if states can't bind electors' votes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court justices invoked fears of bribery and chaos Wednesday to suggest they think states can require presidential electors to back their states' popular vote winner in the Electoral College.

92. AP Courtside: Trump tax cases resemble Nixon, Clinton cases -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is holding its second week of arguments by telephone because of the coronavirus pandemic, with audio available live to audiences around the world.

The court has heard four days of arguments that had been postponed because of the virus outbreak and has two more days to go. Decisions are expected by early summer.

93. Supreme Court appears divided in Catholic schools case -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday seemed divided over how broadly religious institutions including schools, hospitals and social service centers should be shielded from job discrimination lawsuits by employees.

94. Ginsburg, from hospital, joins in on 'Obamacare' arguments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in a dispute involving Trump administration rules that would allow more employers who cite a religious or moral objection to opt out of providing no-cost birth control to women.

95. AP Courtside: Supreme Court wraps up its 1st phone arguments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic has forced the tradition-bound Supreme Court into some big changes. Starting Monday, the justices are hearing arguments by telephone for the first time.

96. Black robes or bathrobes? Virus alters high court traditions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic is forcing big changes at the tradition-bound Supreme Court. The justices will hear arguments this month by telephone for the first time since Alexander Graham Bell patented his invention in 1876.

97. Supreme Court tosses NY case that could have expanded gun rights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court sidestepped a major decision on gun rights Monday in a dispute over New York City's former ban on transporting guns.

The justices threw out a challenge from gun rights groups, including the National Rifle Association's New York affiliate. The court ruled that the city's move to ease restrictions on taking licensed, locked and unloaded guns outside the city limits, coupled with a change in state law to prevent New York from reviving the ban, left the court with nothing to decide. The court asked a lower court to consider whether the city's new rules still pose problems for gun owners.

98. Supreme Court rejects EPA's narrow view of Clean Water Act -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that sewage plants and other industries cannot avoid environmental requirements under landmark clean-water protections when they send dirty water on an indirect route to rivers, oceans and other navigable waterways.

99. Supreme Court backs police in traffic stops -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Police can pull over a car when they know only that its owner's license is invalid, even if they don't know who's behind the wheel, the Supreme Court ruled Monday.

The court said in an 8-1 decision that unless there's reason to believe otherwise, it's common sense for an officer to think the car's owner will be driving.

100. Justices rule for federal employee in age discrimination case -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Well, OK, boomer. The Supreme Court made it easier Monday for federal employees 40 and older to sue for age discrimination.

The justices ruled 8-1 that federal workers have a lower hurdle to overcome than their counterparts in the private sector. The decision came in the case in which Chief Justice John Roberts, a 65-year-old baby boomer, invoked the "OK, boomer" meme during arguments in January for the first time in high-court records.