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VOL. 42 | NO. 2 | Friday, January 12, 2018

2 KPD officers honored for life-saving actions

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Armstrong

Knoxville police officers Michael Dabbelt and Wallace Armstrong have been honored by the department for saving a life.

Officer Armstrong has been with the department since January 1993 while Officer Dabbelt has been an officer since September 2009.

Dabbelt

During a disturbance call at a home, the officers were told by residents that the situation was in hand, but the officers asked if they could check the residence to be certain.

The came to a bathroom door that was locked. The occupants then stated that they had forgotten that their friend was also staying at the residence. The officers attempted to make contact with the female through the door, but could only hear muffled sounds from inside.

After several attempts were made to make contact with the female, the officers utilized the pin override on the door knob and made entry. They discovered a victim who was attempting to commit suicide. The officers helped the victim, and she was transported to the hospital.

“Officers Dabbelt and Armstrong responded to a simple disturbance call without even having a confirmed address,” Chief David Rausch explains. “Their thoroughness resulted in them finding a suicidal victim in the active process of killing herself and interceding in her doing so successfully.

“She later stated that a broken romantic relationship and strained relations with her parents were the reason behind her depression. Excellent work on the part of both officers saved the life of the female when the other occupants of the residence did not even realize she was in crisis and had forgotten she was even present.

“The officers could have simply taken the word of the occupants that everything was all right and left the area, but they went beyond the easy response to ensure that all subjects in the home were okay. Their diligence is what made the difference in this young woman’s life and now she will have the opportunity to move forward and get her life in better shape,” Rausch adds.

UT law professor named outstanding mentor

Heminway

Joan Heminway, a University of Tennessee College of Law professor, has been recognized by the Association of American Law Schools with its Business Associations Outstanding Mentor award.

Heminway is considered an outstanding mentor and is a standout among the “community of legal scholars,” the nomination states.

Heminway “seems to have dozens of folks that she has mentored in real depth,” her nominator wrote. “Simply put, she is one of our stars, and the standing she has in our community of legal scholars is due in no small part to the time and energy she puts into mentoring others.

“Her ability to push for excellence while communicating that she cares deeply about the success of others is the hallmark of a truly outstanding mentor.”

Heminway joined the UT College of Law faculty in 2000 after nearly 15 years of corporate practice in transactional business law in the Boston office of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom.

She has served as an expert witness and consultant on corporate finance and federal and state securities law matters and is a frequent academic and continuing legal education presenter on business law issues.

Maryville’s Winstead vies for national honor

Winstead

Maryville’s Mike Winstead, the 2018 Tennessee Superintendent of the Year, is now a finalist for the School Superintendents Association’s 2018 National Superintendent of the Year award. Winstead, along with three other honorees, will be interviewed at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., in January. The organization’s final selection will be announced at the National Conference on Education in mid-February.

Honorees are selected from the list of superintendents named in all 50 states.

“Mike’s strategic and forward-thinking approach to education is what helps set Maryville City Schools apart,’’ says Bethany Pope, Maryville board of education chair.

“We are thrilled to have Dr. Winstead as our district leader and honored he is receiving this national recognition.”

The National Superintendent of the Year will have the opportunity to present a $10,000 scholarship to the high school from which he or she graduated. Should he receive this ultimate honor, Cherokee High School in Rogersville, Tennessee, would receive the monitory reward.

Winstead has a Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee and a master’s degree in applied mathematics from the University of Virginia.

He worked for many years in the Knoxville public schools as a teacher, school administrator and central office administrator, before moving to Maryville as assistant director of schools in 2008. He has served as director of Maryville Schools since 2014.

Long-time Oak Ridge employees retire

Fallon

Pat and Susan Fallon have retired from the Public Works Department with a combined service to the City of Oak Ridge of more than 58 years.

Susan began working for the City in 1989 in the Finance Department. During her career, she served in many roles, including budget, grants, housing (CDBG administrator), contracts, purchasing and served as staff liaison for the Industrial Development Board.

She worked in the Finance Department for fifteen years until 2004 when she transferred to the Public Works Department where she became the administrative manager and worked closely with the EPA Administrative Order and Infor software implementation along with her other administrative duties.

Susan served the citizens of Oak Ridge for more than 28 years.

Pat began working for the City in 1987 as a drafter for the Engineering Division which was then part of the Community Development Department. He became an inspector and was promoted to senior inspector after graduating from Pellissippi State Community College.

He served as an inspector until 2010 when he became the manager of streets and facilities in Public Works. He was later promoted to Division Manager and assumed the management of the fleet maintenance and stormwater along with the streets and facilities.

Pat served the citizens of Oak Ridge for 30 years.

Susan and Pat have now moved to Goodyear, Arizona, where Pat has accepted a position with the City of Glendale and Susan plans to enjoy retirement.

Thompson lauded as state Supervisor of the Year

The Tennessee Principals Association has named Julie Thompson, executive director of elementary education for Knox County Schools, as the 2017 Tennessee Supervisor of the Year.

Thompson has served in her current role since 2015. She previously worked as an elementary supervisor.

She joined the Knox County Schools in 1993 as a teacher at Corryton Elementary School and has also served as an administrative intern at Christenberry Elementary School. From 2003 through 2012, she served as the principal of Carter Elementary School.

In addition, the Knox County School District has made several administrative appointments.

-- Michael Toth has been appointed principal of Bearden Middle School. He joined Knox County Schools in 2003 as a teacher upon completing graduate school from the University of Tennessee.

Toth taught at Green Magnet Academy until 2010 when he was appointed assistant principal at Karns High School. He was previously assistant principal at Halls High School/North Knox Vocational Technology Center.

-- Melinda Russell is the new Interim principal of A.L. Lotts Elementary.

She joined Knox County Schools in 2010 as a teacher upon graduating from Tusculum College and taught at Shannondale Elementary School until 2015 when she was appointed assistant principal at A.L. Lotts.

-- Tina Holt is the new principal of Rocky Hill Elementary.

She joined Knox County Schools in 1995 and has worked for 17 years as an elementary education teacher, instructional coach and master teacher at several Knox County elementary schools. She was selected to be part of the Leadership Academy in 2012.

-- Jessica Holman has been appointed principal at Green Magnet Academy.

She joined Knox County Schools in 2003 as a teacher at Dogwood Elementary School, served for two years as president of the Knox County Education Association, is a graduate of the Principals Leadership Academy and has previously served as an assistant Principal at Christenberry Elementary School.

-- Ina Langston has been appointed principal of Fountain City Elementary School. She joined Knox County Schools in 1994 as an experienced teacher. She previously taught at several schools in Texas, Washington and Europe.

Langston taught at Karns Intermediate School before joining Hardin Valley Elementary School, where she served as a teacher, administrative assistant and assistant principal. She was appointed principal of West Haven Elementary in 2008 and West Hills Elementary in 2013.

-- Lynn Jacomen has been appointed princpal of Inskip Elementary School. She joined Knox County Schools in 2016 after more than 20 years of working in education in Virginia.

Jacomen spent nine years as a classroom teacher before joining the Virginia Department of Education. She has worked as an RTI coordinator and instructional specialist and began her career in administration in 2013 serving as an assistant principal and principal.

-- Paula Brown has been appointed principal of West Haven Elementary School. She joined Knox County Schools in 1994 as a teacher at Cedar Bluff Intermediate School, where she served until elected President of the Knox County Education Association in 2001. She has also worked with Project GRAD Knoxville.

She began her career in administration in 2008 as assistant principal at Austin East High School. She was selected to be part of the Leadership Academy in 2011 and placed at Bearden High School as an assistant principal.

-- Joann Bost has been appointed principal of Whittle Springs Middle School. She joined Knox County Schools in 2000 upon graduating from Carson-Newman University.

Bost taught at Whittle Springs Middle School for eight years before joining Project GRAD Knoxville. She worked as a math coach at Carter Middle School and a master teacher at South-Doyle Middle School prior to being appointed assistant principal at Carter Middle School.

-- Kim Harrison is now principal of West Hills Elementary School. She joined Knox County Schools in 1986 upon graduating from UT.

She taught for 24 years at Karns and Sequoyah elementary schools. She was selected to be part of the Leadership Academy in 2010 and placed at Lonsdale Elementary School as an assistant principal. She served as an assistant principal at Rocky Hill Elementary School before being appointed assistant principal at Karns Elementary.

-- Casey Cutter has been appointed principal of Mt. Olive Elementary School, having joined Knox County Schools in 2010 as a teacher from Colorado.

Cutter has taught at Adrian Burnett and Ball Camp elementary schools. He was selected to be part of the Leadership Academy in 2012 and placed at Copper Ridge Elementary School as an assistant principal and then became assistant principal at Norwood Elementary.

-- Alisha Hinton has been appointed principal of Sequoyah Elementary School.

She returns to Knox County Schools and to Sequoyah Elementary, where she served for three years as the school’s principal until taking an administrative position in 2015 with Grace Christian Academy.

Hinton joined Knox County Schools in 2003 upon graduating from UT. She taught at New Hopewell and Brickey-McCloud elementary schools before serving as assistant principal at A.L. Lotts Elementary School in 2009. She was selected to be part of the inaugural Leadership Academy class in 2011. Hinton holds a degree in psychology and a master’s degree in elementary education from UT and an educational specialist degree in administration from Lincoln Memorial University.