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VOL. 35 | NO. 38 | Friday, September 23, 2011




Musicians not as easy to play as they once were

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“Have you seen my listing on Inconvenient Street?” the listing agent asks.

When the music biz agent responds she has not, the listing agent explains it would be absolutely perfect for someone in the music industry, “You know, the creative type, someone with some imagination.”

The bad news for the listing agent is that creative types don’t like ugly houses any more than those with no vision. And, as witnessed by Taylor Swift and others, location matters. Inconvenient doesn’t work.

Additionally, with the development of high-rise condos in the city, music types can enjoy security and privacy without having to maintain 100 acres, all while partaking in all of the frivolity offered by the burgeoning downtown funscape.

I wonder what the Realtors in Los Angeles do when they have ugly listings. Do they call their peers with connections in the film industry?

“Say, Ziggy, I have just the house for your movie star clients. They could act like they like it. It would be the perfect opportunity to develop that character that is miserable with the exterior surroundings, but can search the soul and find peace within.”

The best part here, however, is when the musically connected agent asks Music City agent the price of the “perfect listing” for the music person. “Five million dollars,” comes the response, “But it has 100 acres. Those people like land, don’t they?” I guess news of the woes of the music industry somehow escaped them.

With evidence mounting every day of an industry in peril, as evidenced by the “for sale” and “for lease” signs on Music Row, many only notice John Rich’s personal skyscraper, Mount Richmore, on Love Circle. Or that his partner, Big Kenny, has bought most of Green Hills and has constructed a complex that would put Tara to shame.

Meanwhile, most denizens of Music Row office buildings cannot write a $5 million check or get their hands on that kind of cash.

Another consistent remark made by well-meaning listing agents to Realtors with creative, musical clients is their determination that a particular room in a house would be “perfect for a studio.” Sure, if the person wants to take Mickey Newberry’s place as the writer of train songs, since many times these “perfect’ studio opportunities are next to train tracks complete with vibrating walls. Perhaps the reverberation could save some time on the effects.

Back to Hollywood. Perhaps, the agents say they have the home with the perfect sound stage where they can have their décor from the Wild West one day and a party on the moon the next.

Richard Courtney is the principal broker for Pilkerton Realtors and can be reached at www.RichardCourtney.com. And is the author of Come Together: The Business Wisdom of the Beatles.

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