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VOL. 43 | NO. 44 | Friday, November 1, 2019

Nostalgia Nashville isn’t coming back

5 area leaders look ahead to how we should handle our hard-fought & envied success

By Hollie Deese

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Everyone seems to have a version of what Nashville used to be, the city that drew them or where they grew up. All of those versions are different, but they all have one thing in common – they don’t exist anymore.

Certainly not the Nashville from 2003 when I first moved here from Chicago for a job at The Tennessean in a building that has been reduced to rubble to make way for the Highwoods development.

It certainly isn’t the Nashville of 2005 when one of my first assignments was for the young reader publication called All the Rage, which also no longer exists, looking at the fairly new concept of downtown living. It isn’t the Nashville of 2010 when the flood changed the landscape, literally and figuratively, for many neighborhoods.

And it isn’t even the Nashville of 2012 when “Nashville’’ premiered on ABC and introduced the city to a whole new crew of fans.

We all have to adapt as we move through life to our jobs and families and circumstances. The city is doing that, too, growing and changing as its identity evolves.

Some of Nashville’s biggest supporters, stakeholders and residents are participating in Nashville Design Week through Nov. 8, a chance to discuss Future Nashville and look at how tomorrow’s developments affect today’s neighborhoods.

On Friday, a Future Nashville panel, sponsored in part by The Ledger, will include Chris Cobb of Exit/In, Tifinie Capehart, land use consultant and professor, Bob Bernstein of Fido, Lucy Kempf, Metro Planning Department, Butch Spyridon of the Nashville Chamber and developer Tony Giarratana.

“All of these panelists have been highly influential in our built environment of Nashville in their own ways,” says Nashville Design Week co-founder Fuller Hanan, director of programming for the event and director of communications and project manager at Pfeffer Torode Architecture

“I think this is a meeting of the minds of the different perspectives of design, and how powerful decision-makers can be. But it is also an opportunity to involve the public in decision making because that only makes design better, because it becomes reflective of a city and of a neighborhood and not just applied.”

All of these panelists love Nashville and have built their lives and careers and families here. They all want to see it grow and flourish, though what that means and how to achieve it for each of them varies.

“We can all think of those places that resonate that we want to return to because we felt the connection to them. I think that’s especially important in neighborhood design because that’s where a sense of pride comes from, a sense of place, a sense of belonging,” Hanan explains. “All of those only make us a stronger Metro region. There’s just this sense of empathy that can come from being more connected to your neighbors and how your decisions impact them.”

Read about the panelists and discover what they think on how to grow Nashville from here, and then see them in person Friday, Nov. 8, 1:30 p.m. at the Exit/In, 2208 Ellison Place.

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