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Editorial Results (free)

1. Kohl's cuts 2022 outlook, closing mixed week for retailers -

Kohl's slashed its sales and profit expectations for the year as the department store chain stepped up price cutting to get rid of unwanted merchandise.

The department store also cut back on orders ahead of the critical holiday period, spooking investors and sending shares, down 35% this year, falling another 5%.

2. Companies facing 1st tax on stock buybacks in Biden bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats have pulled off a quiet first in their just-passed legislation addressing climate change and health care: the creation of a tax on stock buybacks, a cherished tool of Corporate America that had long seemed untouchable.

3. Altria's $13B investment in Juul e-cigarettes vaporizes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Cigarette maker Altria's $13 billion investment in the troubled vaping company Juul has gone up in smoke — now worth less than 5% of its original value as U.S. regulators move to ban its e-cigarettes.

4. How to budget realistically for home repairs -

If you’re a homeowner and haven’t faced a big repair bill yet, just wait. Stuff will wear out or break even in the best-maintained homes.

Budgeting for these inevitable bills isn’t always easy. One commonly cited rule of thumb – to save 1% to 4% of your home’s value each year for maintenance and repairs – can give homeowners sticker shock as real estate prices soar.

5. United Airlines 2Q profit of $329M misses Wall Street target -

United Airlines said Wednesday that it earned $329 million in the second quarter as summer vacationers packed planes, but the results fell far short of Wall Street expectations due largely to soaring fuel prices.

6. Biden holds off on climate emergency declaration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will travel to Massachusetts on Wednesday to promote his efforts to combat climate change but will stop short of issuing an emergency declaration that would unlock federal resources to deal with the issue, according to a person familiar with the president's plans.

7. Judges keeping Capitol riot trials in DC amid bias claims -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For some of the Washington, D.C., residents who reported for jury duty last month, a pro-Trump mob's assault on the U.S. Capitol felt like a personal attack.

Ahead of a trial for a Michigan man charged in the riot, one prospective juror said a police officer injured during the melee is a close friend. Another has friends who are congressional staffers or journalists who worked at the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. A woman whose boyfriend lived near the Capitol recalled the terror she felt that day.

8. Hard-line conservative Reps. Boebert, Miller win primaries -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two of Congress' staunchest conservatives repelled more centrist alternatives to lock up Republican nominations on Tuesday, even as the party's voters chose to turn out a six-term incumbent in Mississippi.

9. Wall Street ticks higher as recession watch remains murky -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks ticked higher Monday as Wall Street keeps wrestling with whether the economy will successfully avoid a recession amid rising interest rates and high inflation. The S&P 500 edged up 0.3% and the Nasdaq rose 0.4%. Both started the day with even bigger gains, following up on strength across European and Asian markets after China relaxed some tough anti-COVID measures. But stocks fell back a bit as Treasury yields continued to climb, putting downward pressure on stocks. The yield on the 10-year Treasury, which helps set interest rates on mortgages and other loans, jumped back above 3%.

10. US stocks got close to a bear market. Here's what that means -

NEW YORK (AP) — The bear came close to Wall Street but then backed off.

The stock market's slump this year briefly pulled the S&P 500 into what's known as a bear market Friday, before a late rally put the index in the green. The prevailing sentiment among investors remains negative, however, so the relief may be temporary.

11. EXPLAINER: Why is Wall Street close to a bear market? -

NEW YORK (AP) — The bears are rumbling toward Wall Street. The stock market's skid this year has pulled the S&P 500 close to what's known as a bear market. Rising interest rates, high inflation, the war in Ukraine and a slowdown in China's economy have caused investors to reconsider the prices they're willing to pay for a wide range of stocks, from high-flying tech companies to traditional automakers.

12. War Crimes Watch: Targeting schools, Russia bombs the future -

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — As she lay buried under the rubble, her legs broken and eyes blinded by blood and thick clouds of dust, all Inna Levchenko could hear was screams. It was 12:15 p.m. on March 3, and moments earlier a blast had pulverized the school where she'd taught for 30 years.

13. DoorDash's sales soar in Q1 but its costs also grow -

DoorDash sales soared in the first quarter as it added new customers, putting to rest any question of whether delivery demand will continue as the pandemic wanes.

The San Francisco company said its revenue jumped 35% to $1.46 billion in the January-March period. That was well ahead of Wall Street's forecast of $1.38 billion, according to analysts polled by FactSet.

14. Small businesses still struggle to find enough workers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Some small businesses are still struggling to hire qualified workers, even as Americans return to the U.S. job market in droves.

Hiring and retaining employees remains the top challenge for small businesses, according to a survey of 1,100 businesses by Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business Voices out last week. Ninety percent of businesses that are hiring are finding it difficult to recruit qualified candidates for open positions.

15. Wall Street, tech investors back Musk Twitter bid with $7B -

Elon Musk has strengthened the equity stake in his $44 billion offer to buy Twitter with commitments of more than $7 billion from a diverse group of investors including Silicon Valley heavy hitters like Oracle co-founder Larry Ellison.

16. Indexes end mixed, Netflix plunges on subscriber losses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street's major stock indexes ended mixed Wednesday after another day of choppy trading, while Netflix lost more than a third of its value after reporting its first subscriber loss in more than a decade and predicting more grim times ahead.

17. Russia's Chernobyl seizure seen as nuclear risk 'nightmare' -

CHERNOBYL, Ukraine (AP) — Here in the dirt of one of the world's most radioactive places, Russian soldiers dug trenches. Ukrainian officials worry they were, in effect, digging their own graves.

Thousands of tanks and troops rumbled into the forested Chernobyl exclusion zone in the earliest hours of Russia's invasion of Ukraine in February, churning up highly contaminated soil from the site of the 1986 accident that was the world's worst nuclear disaster.

18. DoorDash added users, surpassed sales forecasts in Q4 -

DoorDash on Wednesday posted better-than-expected sales for its fourth quarter thanks to its growing active-user base and new offerings like deliveries from groceries and pet stores.

The San Francisco-based delivery company said its revenue grew 34% to $1.3 billion in the October-December period. That topped Wall Street's forecast of $1.28 billion, according to analysts polled by FactSet.

19. Top Davidson County commercial sales for December 2021 -

Top commercial real estate sales, December 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

20. J&J tops 4Q earnings forecasts but misses on revenue -

Johnson & Johnson edged past Wall Street's fourth quarter earnings expectations, helped by growing pharmaceutical sales, but revenue fell short.

The world's biggest maker of health care products also debuted a strong 2022 forecast of per-share earnings between $10.40 and $10.60. That's better than the $10.35 Wall Street had been projecting, according to FactSet.

21. Snow, ice blast through South with powerful winter storm -

ATLANTA (AP) — A dangerous winter storm combining high winds and ice swept through parts of the U.S. Southeast on Sunday, knocking out power, felling trees and fences and coating roads with a treacherous, frigid glaze.

22. Indexes end mostly higher, but still log another losing week -

A late-afternoon recovery in technology stocks helped erase most of the market's losses Friday, though it wasn't enough to keep major indexes from posting their second straight losing week.

The S&P 500 eked out a 0.1% gain in the final minutes of trading after having been down about 1% earlier in the day. The tech-heavy Nasdaq came back from a 0.8% slide to post a 0.6% gain. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 0.6%.

23. Senate passes stopgap funding bill, avoiding shutdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate has passed a stopgap spending bill that avoids a short-term shutdown and funds the federal government through Feb. 18 after leaders defused a partisan standoff over federal vaccine mandates. The measure now goes to President Joe Biden to be signed into law.

24. Biden doesn't think weekend federal shutdown will happen -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional leaders reached agreement Thursday on a spending bill that would keep the government running through mid-February, though a temporary federal shutdown was still possible this weekend as some Republican senators threatened to slow-walk passage because of the Biden administration's COVID-19 vaccine mandates.

25. Peloton hits the wall after sprinting through pandemic -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Peloton suffered its worst day as a publicly traded company Friday after telling investors that it will likely lose more money than it had expected in fiscal 2022.

The exercise bike and treadmill company thrived during the pandemic, recording its first and only profitable quarters. It benefited from Americans, unable to hit the gym, instead setting up places to work out at home. Sales of its high-end bikes and treadmills soared, as did subscriptions for its online, interactive classes.

26. US employers shrugged off virus, stepped up hiring -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's employers boosted their hiring last month, adding a solid 531,000 jobs, the most since July and a sign that the recovery from the pandemic recession is overcoming a virus-induced slowdown.

27. Biden, world leaders try to hammer out next steps on climate -

Washington (AP) — President Joe Biden tried to hammer out the world's next steps against rapidly worsening climate change in a private, virtual session with a small group of other global leaders Friday, and announced a new U.S.-European pledge to cut climate-wrecking methane leaks.

28. Cuba opens door to more private business, but red tape looms -

HAVANA (AP) — Opening a small business is a bureaucratic headache in many parts of the world. In Cuba, it's an adventure in largely unknown territory.

Most sorts of private businesses have been banned for more than 50 years, even if hundreds of thousands of Cubans in recent years have taken advantage of reforms that opened up cracks for small private enterprise in the once-solid wall of the state-dominated socialist economy.

29. Scientists fear UK COVID cases may surge after summer lull -

LONDON (AP) — As Britain enjoyed a summertime lull in COVID-19 cases, the nation's attention turned to the end of pandemic-related restrictions and holidays in the sun.

But scientists are warning the public not to be complacent, saying high levels of infection in the community are likely to lead to another spike in cases this fall.

30. After rocket ride of growth, Robinhood heads to the market -

NEW YORK (AP) — After a rocket rise where it introduced millions of people to investing and reshaped the brokerage industry, all while racking up a long list of controversies in less than eight years, Robinhood is about to take the leap itself into the stock market.

31. Coke sales surge in Q2 as re-openings gain momentum -

Coca-Cola Co.'s sales rebounded faster than expected as the impact of the pandemic abated.

The Atlanta-based soft drink giant said its revenue jumped 42% to $10.1 billion in the April-June period. That was well ahead of the $9.3 billion in sales that Wall Street had forecast, according to analysts polled by FactSet.

32. With taxpayers' help, Delta posts $652 million profit in 2Q -

Delta Air Lines is reporting a $652 million profit in the second quarter, helped by hordes of vacation travelers in the U.S. and money from taxpayers, positioning the airline for stronger results once business and international flying recover from the pandemic.

33. Analysis: Breaking down the College World Series teams -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A look at the eight teams competing in the College World Series, which starts Saturday at TD Ameritrade Park. (Capsules in order of CWS opening games. Coaches' records through super regionals):

34. Analysis: Breaking down the College World Series teams -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A look at the eight teams competing in the College World Series, which starts Saturday at TD Ameritrade Park. (Capsules in order of CWS opening games. Coaches' records through super regionals):

35. Factory boss defiant as sanctions bite in China's Xinjiang -

AKSU, China (AP) — A backlash against reports of forced labor and other abuses of the largely Muslim Uyghur ethnic group in Xinjiang is taking a toll on China's cotton industry, but it's unclear if the pressure will compel the government or companies to change their ways.

36. House narrowly approves $1.9B to fortify Capitol after riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House on Thursday narrowly approved $1.9 billion to fortify the Capitol after the Jan. 6 insurrection, as Democrats pushed past Republican opposition to try to harden the complex with retractable fencing and a quick-response force following the most violent domestic attack on Congress in history.

37. Biden's 'Jobs Cabinet' to sell infrastructure as GOP resists -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden set about convincing America it needs his $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan on Thursday, deputizing a five-member "jobs Cabinet" to help in the effort. But the enormity of his task was clear as Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell's vowed to oppose the plan "every step of the way."

38. Yes, that’s my listing, but if you have any questions ... -

Window treatments remain with the property in most real estate transactions, largely because it is written into the boiler plate language in the contract.

As the contracts have evolved, the term was more defined and included curtains – draperies in the more expensive homes – and the hardware, including the rods and equipment that hold the curtains to the walls.

39. Building boom’s dark cloud -

One year into the coronavirus pandemic, Nashville builders and homeowners are holding on to the bucking bronco that is the construction industry.

Prices for some much-used wood products have doubled and even tripled over the past year. Lead times for windows, appliances and more have stretched into weeks and months. Prices of other materials are rising or in short supply as well, and mortgage rates have been edging up.

40. Overstimulated? Stocks soar 75% in historic 12-month run -

NEW YORK (AP) — It was one year ago that the terrifying free fall for the stock market suddenly ended, ushering in one of its greatest runs.

On March 23, 2020, the S&P 500 fell 2.9%. In all, the index dropped nearly 34% in about a month, wiping out three years' worth of gains for the market.

41. Vigorous preparation returns as Biden calls other leaders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new-old ritual is taking shape in the Biden White House, one that starts with bulky briefing packages, war-gaming the "what-ifs," and Oval Office discussions about how to talk to this or that particular U.S. ally or adversary.

42. Selling out or seeing the future? -

When much-honored songwriter, publisher, producer, Music Row Renaissance Man Craig Wiseman is asked about the ongoing flurry of big-name artists like Bob Dylan and Neil Young selling their song catalogs, there is wonder mixed with mirth in his voice.

43. General Motors sets goal of going largely electric by 2035 -

General Motors has set a goal of making the vast majority of the vehicles it produces electric by 2035, and the entire company carbon neutral, including operations, five years after that.

The Detroit automaker's push into electric vehicles has gone into overdrive this year.

44. Who were they? Records reveal Trump fans who stormed Capitol -

WASHINGTON (AP) — They came from across America, summoned by President Donald Trump to march on Washington in support of his false claim that the November election was stolen and to stop the congressional certification of Democrat Joe Biden as the victor.

45. GOP unveils $1.4T spending bill amid post-election turmoil -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans controlling the Senate unveiled a government-wide, $1.4 trillion spending bill on Tuesday, a largely bipartisan measure that faces uncertain odds during this period of post-election tumult in Washington.

46. AP VoteCast: Trump wins white evangelicals, Catholics split -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump won support from about 8 in 10 white evangelical Christian voters in his race for reelection, but Catholic voters split almost evenly between him and Democratic opponent Joe Biden, according to AP VoteCast.

47. Lockdowns, business rollbacks threatened amid surging virus -

The alarming surge in coronavirus cases in Europe and the U.S. is wiping out months of progress against the scourge on two continents, prompting new business restrictions, raising the threat of another round of large-scale lockdowns and sending a shudder through financial markets.

48. High court to review two cases involving Trump border policy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday agreed to hear two cases involving Trump administration policies at the U.S.-Mexico border: one about a policy that makes asylum-seekers wait in Mexico for U.S. court hearings and a second about the administration's use of money to fund the border wall.

49. Tech giants lead gains as S&P 500 closes 4th winning month -

NEW YORK (AP) — Big Tech continues to steamroll through the pandemic, and strong gains for some of the market's most influential companies on Friday helped Wall Street close out its fourth straight winning month.

50. Ford posts surprise profit on autonomous vehicle unit gain -

DETROIT (AP) — Ford Motor Co. on Thursday surprised Wall Street by posting a $1.12 billion second-quarter net profit due to gains on its stake in the Argo AI autonomous vehicle operation.

51. Pandemic hits Comcast 2Q; Peacock service has 10M sign-ups -

NEW YORK (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic took a toll on Comcast in the second quarter as movie theaters closed, theme parks shut down and advertisers cut back.

The company reported Thursday that its NBCUniversal TV, film and theme park divisions, as well as its Sky unit in Europe, all suffered steep drops in revenue in the April-June quarter.

52. Pandemic hits Comcast 2Q; new Peacock service has 10M users -

NEW YORK (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic took a toll on Comcast in the second quarter as movie theaters closed, theme parks shut down and advertisers cut back.

The company reported Thursday that its NBCUniversal TV, film and theme park divisions, as well as its Sky unit in Europe, all suffered steep drops in revenue in the April-June quarter.

53. GOP tucks $8 billion for military weaponry in virus bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new $1 trillion COVID-19 response package by Senate Republicans is supposed to give the government more weapons to battle the surging coronavirus pandemic. But GOP lawmakers have more than just the "invisible enemy" in mind.

54. Plant closings send GM to 2Q loss, but signs of improvement -

DETROIT (AP) — Even though General Motors was able to reopen its U.S. factories for the last half of the second quarter, the company still lost $806 million from April through June.

The Detroit automaker closed its plants on March 18 and they remained closed for two months due to the coronavirus. Production didn't resume fast enough to stem the losses.

55. Kroger says isn't pulling back bonuses; airlines see uptick -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Tuesday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

56. Vast cutbacks in jobs and spending before any summer rebound -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Wednesday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

57. 'It's gone haywire': When COVID-19 arrived in rural America -

DAWSON, Ga. (AP) — The reverend approached the makeshift pulpit and asked the Lord to help him make some sense of the scene before him: two caskets, side by side, in a small-town cemetery busier now than ever before.

58. Stocks climb after two drops; oil prices crawl off the floor -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rallied on Wednesday, and the S&P 500 clawed back a chunk of this week's sharp losses as a bit of oxygen pumped through markets around the world.

Even oil gained ground, pulling further away from zero after earlier getting turned upside down amid a collapse in demand. Stocks rose from Seoul to Spain, and winners outnumbered losers in New York by more than two to one. Treasury yields also pushed higher in a sign of a bit less pessimism among investors.

59. Stocks fall as investors brace for earnings hit from virus -

Stocks fell on Wall Street Monday, erasing some of the market's big gains from last week, as investors braced for a sobering first look at how the coronavirus pandemic has hurt company earnings.

The S&P 500 fell 1% after cutting its early losses by more than half toward the end of the day. The benchmark index surged 12% last week, its best gain since 1974.

60. Car sales crash, and so does crude, as virus seizes markets -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments on Wednesday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

61. A cruel paradox: Beating virus means causing US recession -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The coronavirus is dealing a death blow to the longest U.S. economic expansion on record, triggering layoffs and putting intense strain on the nation's financial system.

In a cruel paradox, the very steps that are needed to contain the outbreak — quarantines, travel restrictions and business closures — are bringing everyday business to a halt and shoving the U.S. economy into recession for the first time since 2009.

62. A look at what happens when stocks enter a bear market -

Stocks' staggering skid that began less than three weeks ago has pulled Wall Street into what's known as a bear market.

The collapse fueled by uncertainty surrounding the coronavirus has officially ended the bull market for stocks that began more than a decade ago.

63. A look at what happens when stocks enter a bear market -

Wall Street's staggering skid that began less than three weeks ago has pulled the Dow Jones Industrial Average into what's known as a bear market.

After a string of sharp losses, the Dow has now fallen more than 20% from its last peak on Feb. 12.

64. Corporate debt loads a rising risk as virus hits economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A gyrating stock market is seizing headlines as the coronavirus threatens corporate profits and economic growth. Yet it's in the normally temperate bond market, where companies go to borrow money, where the gravest dangers may lurk.

65. Biden nabs Klobuchar, Buttigieg backing on Super Tuesday eve -

SELMA, Ala. (AP) — Rivals no more, Amy Klobuchar and Pete Buttigieg united behind Joe Biden's presidential bid on Monday as the Democratic Party's moderate wing scrambled to boost the former vice president just hours before voting began across a series of high-stakes Super Tuesday states.

66. Congress warns Pentagon not to move money to fund Trump wall -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers from both parties told Pentagon leaders on Wednesday that the Defense Department is undermining its own efforts to get military money by diverting billions of dollars for the construction of President Donald Trump's U.S.-Mexico border wall

67. Dow drops 879, bonds soar on fears virus will stunt economy -

Stocksfell sharplyagain on Wall Street Tuesday, piling on losses a day after the market's biggest drop in two years as fears spread that the growing virus outbreak will put the brakes on the global economy.

68. Dow drops over 1,000 as outbreak threatens global economy -

The Dow Jones Industrial Average slumped more than 1,000 points Monday in the worst day for the stock market in two years as investors worry that the spread of a viral outbreak that began in China will weaken global economic growth.

69. Stocks sink, Treasury prices soar as investors seek safety -

Stocks fell and bond prices rose sharply on Wall Street Friday amid fresh signs that the viral outbreak that originated in China is weighing on U.S. companies.

The yield on the 30-year Treasury reached a record low as investors sought the safety of U.S. government bonds. The price of gold also rose.

70. Tech-starved government seeks industry's best, brightest -

Denver (AP) — In this post-impeachment era of divisiveness and deadlock in the nation's capital, Uncle Sam has a message for top U.S. technologists:

I Still Want You.

A Washington-based nerd strike force called the U.S. Digital Service is seeking private-sector coders, programmers and software engineers to make government user-friendly for a tech-savvy U.S. public.

71. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's exaggerations on Roger Stone sentence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is misrepresenting the Justice Department's handling of the legal case of his confidant, Roger Stone.

He's suggesting rampant bias in the department's initial recommendation to a federal court that Stone be sentenced between seven and nine years in prison, claiming that all four prosecutors are former members of special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia team. That's not true.

72. Trump to transfer $3.8B from military to fund his wall -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is transferring $3.8 billion in recently passed military funding to finance construction of the president's long-sought U.S.-Mexico border wall, angering not just Democrats but also GOP defense hawks.

73. Stocks post modest gains at end of a wobbly day of trading -

Major U.S. stock indexes finished higher Thursday after a late burst of buying led by technology and financial companies reversed an early slide.

News of a spike in the number of confirmed cases and fatalities from a virus outbreak in China put investors in a selling mood for most of the day, overshadowing a batch of mostly solid company earnings reports.

74. Burger-selling Iranians celebrate general’s death -

Sitting on a needing-paint picnic bench behind his iconic South Nashville giant-hamburger-to-go joint, the native Iranian almost cheers when I bring up the topic of the general whose execution-by-drone has stirred the pot in his native land.

75. Chiefs shut down Henry, Titans game plan in AFC title game -

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — The Tennessee Titans hoped to follow the same game plan against the Kansas City Chiefs that had carried them to playoff wins in Baltimore and New England, giving the ball to running back Derrick Henry as much as possible.

76. Mahomes' feet, arm lift Chiefs to Super Bowl over Titans -

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — With his best imitation of a tightrope walker, Patrick Mahomes high-wired the Kansas City Chiefs into their first Super Bowl since 1970.

Oh sure, Mahomes did his usual superb job passing, but it was his 27-yard tap dance down the left sideline late in the first half that gave the Chiefs their first lead. From there, they outran the run-oriented Tennessee Titans and star back Derrick Henry for a 35-24 victory Sunday in the AFC championship.

77. AP FACT CHECK: Trump distorts data, Dems cut some corners -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rallying in swing-state Wisconsin, President Donald Trump used misleading economic data to claim he's created a "blue collar boom" while Democrats vying to replace him cut some corners on the facts in their latest presidential debate.

78. Stocks close out best year since 2013; S&P 500 soars 28.9% -

Wall Street closed the books Tuesday on a blockbuster 2019 for stock investors, with the broader market delivering its best returns in six years.

The S&P 500 finished with a gain of 28.9% for the year, or a total return of 31.5%, including dividends. The Nasdaq composite rose 35.3%. For both indexes it was the best annual performance since 2013. Technology stocks helped power those gains by vaulting 48%.

79. Senate advances $1.4T spending deal in drive to adjourn -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate has voted to advance a $1.4 trillion government spending package in a last, bipartisan burst of legislating before bolting for the holidays from a Capitol that's toxic with impeachment.

80. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for November 2019 -

Top commercial real estate sales, November 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

81. House leaders racing the clock on government spending bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate's top Republican issued a downbeat assessment of talks on a government spending bill Wednesday, warning that it will require a "laser focus from both parties and both chambers" to meet next week's deadline and avert a federal shutdown.

82. Target bursts into the holiday season with a bang -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target is bursting into the critical holiday season with strong third-quarter earnings as the company pushes faster delivery and invests heavily in stores, on technology and on new brands.

83. House Democrats propose stopgap bill to prevent shutdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats have released a temporary government-wide funding bill to forestall a shutdown and give negotiators through Dec. 20 to try to hash out details of more than $1.4 trillion worth of unfinished spending legislation.

84. S&P 500 ekes out record high after listless day of trading -

A day of listless trading on Wall Street ended Thursday with another record high for the S&P 500.

The benchmark index notched its third consecutive gain after spending most of the day wavering between small gains and losses. The Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq composite also budged little, capping the day with miniscule drops.

85. Impeachment aside, federal budget remains a pressing matter -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Impeachment hearings for President Donald Trump come at the very time that Capitol Hill usually tends to its mound of unfinished business.

The politically explosive hearings and the possibility of impeachment and a trial create yet another layer of complications for senior lawmakers pressing for an agreement on $1.4 trillion worth of federal agency budgets or finalizing a rewrite of the North American trade rules.

86. Why Trump tariffs haven't revitalized American steelmakers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's move last year to tax imported steel triggered jeers but also cheers. Its goal — to raise steel prices — threatened to hurt the legions of U.S. manufacturers that depend on steel.

87. Border wall, impeachment battle imperil budget progress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate passed a long-overdue, $209 billion bundle of bipartisan spending bills Thursday, but a bitter fight over funding demanded by President Donald Trump for border fencing imperils broader Capitol Hill efforts to advance $1.4 trillion worth of annual Cabinet agency budgets.

88. Border wall, impeachment battle imperil budget progress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bitter fight over funding for border fencing is imperiling Capitol Hill efforts to forge progress on more than $1.4 trillion worth of overdue spending bills, one of the few areas in which divided government in Washington has been able to deliver results in the Trump era.

89. Stocks post gains on solid earnings, US-China trade optimism -

The S&P 500 closed just short of an all-time high Friday as investors welcomed solid company earnings reports and an encouraging update on trade talks between the U.S. and China.

Technology, communications services and financial stocks powered the rally. The index ended within 0.1% of its record set July 26. It also notched its third straight weekly gain.

90. Amazon's profit falls as costs for faster shipping soar -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon's push for faster delivery is hurting its profits.

The online retailer said its third-quarter net income fell 26% from a year ago, missing Wall Street expectations. Its sales outlook for the holiday shopping season also disappointed analysts, and its stock sank 7% in after-hours trading.

91. Supreme Court steps into consumer agency case -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is stepping into a yearslong, politically charged fight over the federal consumer finance watchdog agency that was created in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis.

92. US stocks fall, bond prices rise as investors turn cautious -

Stocks ended modestly lower and bond prices rose on Wall Street Thursday as investors turned cautious, shifting money into lower-risk holdings.

The selling, which lost some of its momentum toward the end of the day, came as traders weighed the implications of the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump and new government data showing slower U.S. economic growth.

93. Back to basics: Congress tries to keep government lights on -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The good news is that it doesn't look like a bitterly polarized Washington will stumble into another government shutdown.

But as Democrats controlling the House unveil a stopgap, government-wide spending bill to keep the lights on and pay the troops, there's scant evidence that power sharing in the Capitol will produce further legislative accomplishments anytime soon.

94. Boeing CEO raises possibility of pausing Max production -

DALLAS (AP) — Boeing's CEO says the company will consider temporarily shutting down production of the 737 Max if the plane's return is significantly delayed beyond the company's October forecast.

The comment by Chairman and CEO Dennis Muilenburg underscores the uncertainty swirling around the company and its best-selling plane, which has been grounded since March after two deadly crashes.

95. US economy dodges the threat of painful spending cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The budget agreement that congressional leaders and President Donald Trump forged late Monday lifted a big potential drag on the U.S. economy for this year and next.

Under the agreement, the economy was spared from a series of deep spending cuts that were set to take effect under a far-reaching budget law enacted in 2011. Monday's agreement nullified those cuts and increased spending by $320 billion over two years.

96. AP FACT CHECK: Obama is a silent partner in Trump's boasts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has a silent partner behind several of the accomplishments he likes to boast about: Barack Obama.

Despite assailing his Democratic predecessor for waging a "cruel and heartless war on American energy," for example, Trump can brag about U.S. energy supremacy thanks to the sector's growth in the Obama years.

97. The legends who made 'endangered' Music Row are gone -

More than a decade and a half ago I took a beloved poet, picker, prophet and pilgrim down to “Music City Row,” as he likes to refer to that stretch of Nashville. He hadn’t been there really for 30 years, and he lamented what he saw. Or didn’t see.

98. Vanderbilt advances to College World Series, routs Duke 13-2 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Vanderbilt Commodores finally are headed back to Omaha and the College World Series for the first time since stringing together a national title in 2014 and a runners-up finish in 2015.

99. 50-year survivor in a city of teardowns -

Bear Bryant could tell me about the Vandy game-day meetup he had with a U.S. president at this historic West End hotel. He’s dead, of course, as is that president, so I can ask neither about that day or their reflections as the Holiday Inn by Vanderbilt celebrates its 50th birthday.

100. Trump border emergency survives as House veto override fails -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democratic-led House failed Tuesday to override President Donald Trump's first veto, salvaging his effort to steer billions of extra dollars to erecting border barriers and delivering a victory to the White House in a constitutional and political clash that's raged for months.