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Editorial Results (free)

1. EXPLAINER: Why is Chinese builder's debt struggle rattling investors? -

BEIJING (AP) — Global investors are watching nervously as one of China's biggest real estate developers struggles to avoid defaulting on tens of billions of dollars of debt, fueling fears of possible wider shock waves for the financial system.

2. Stocks drop the most since May on worries over China, Fed -

Stocks on Wall Street closed sharply lower Monday, mirroring losses overseas and handing the S&P 500 index its biggest drop in four months.

Worries about debt-engorged Chinese property developers — and the damage they could do to investors worldwide if they default — rippled across markets. Investors are also concerned that the U.S. Federal Reserve could signal this week that it's planning to pull back some of the support measures it's been giving markets and the economy.

3. Study: Pentagon reliance on contractors hurt US in 9/11 wars -

Up to half of the $14 trillion spent by the Pentagon since 9/11 went to for-profit defense contractors, a study released Monday found. It's the latest work to argue the U.S. reliance on private corporations for war-zone duties that used to be done by troops contributed to mission failure in Afghanistan.

4. Billions spent on Afghan army ultimately benefited Taliban -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Built and trained at a two-decade cost of $83 billion, Afghan security forces collapsed so quickly and completely — in some cases without a shot fired — that the ultimate beneficiary of the American investment turned out to be the Taliban. They grabbed not only political power but also U.S.-supplied firepower — guns, ammunition, helicopters and more.

5. Billions spent on Afghan army ultimately benefitted Taliban -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Built and trained at a two-decade cost of $83 billion, Afghan security forces collapsed so quickly and completely — in some cases without a shot fired — that the ultimate beneficiary of the American investment turned out to be the Taliban. They grabbed not only political power but also U.S.-supplied firepower — guns, ammunition, helicopters and more.

6. EXPLAINER: What happens after foreclosure moratorium ends -

NEW YORK (AP) — Since early 2020, banks across the U.S. have been banned from foreclosing on homes as part of the federal government's efforts to assist families feeling economic pain caused by the pandemic. On Saturday, the ban will end, potentially putting thousands of families at risk.

7. US consumer prices surged in past year the most since 2008 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prices for U.S. consumers jumped in June by the most in 13 years, extending a run of higher inflation and fueling concerns that the rapidly rebounding economy is making goods and services increasingly expensive.

8. Analysis: Breaking down the College World Series teams -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A look at the eight teams competing in the College World Series, which starts Saturday at TD Ameritrade Park. (Capsules in order of CWS opening games. Coaches' records through super regionals):

9. Analysis: Breaking down the College World Series teams -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A look at the eight teams competing in the College World Series, which starts Saturday at TD Ameritrade Park. (Capsules in order of CWS opening games. Coaches' records through super regionals):

10. Pandemic or no, CEO pay rises again. Typical package: $12.7M -

NEW YORK (AP) — As COVID-19 ravaged the world last year, CEOs' big pay packages seemed to be under as much threat as everything else.

Fortunately for those CEOs, many had boards of directors willing to see the pandemic as an extraordinary event beyond their control. Across the country, boards made changes to the intricate formulas that determine their CEOs' pay — and other moves — that helped make up for losses created by the crisis.

11. High inflation? A generation of investors has never felt it -

NEW YORK (AP) — The central question gripping Wall Street is whether the burst of inflation hitting the economy as it recovers from the pandemic is just temporary or the start of a real problem. The answer threatens to crack the stock market's incredible, record-setting run that began in March 2020.

12. Stocks sink again on Wall Street as inflation worries mount -

Inflation worries rattled Wall Street Wednesday, pulling the Dow Jones Industrial Average more than 680 points lower and placing the major stock indexes on track for their worst week in more than six months.

13. Challenger hits Liz Cheney, says GOP must work with Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rep. Elise Stefanik stated her case Thursday for replacing Rep. Liz Cheney as the No. 3 House Republican leader, implicitly lambasting Cheney's battles with former President Donald Trump by saying, "We are one team and that means working with the president."

14. Biden's first 100 days: Where he stands on key promises -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As he rounds out his first 100 days in office, President Joe Biden's focus on reining in the coronavirus during the early months of his administration seems to have paid off: He can check off nearly all his campaign promises centered on the pandemic.

15. Senate OKs tough former regulator as market watchdog chief -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate has approved President Joe Biden's choice of Gary Gensler to head the Securities and Exchange Commission, signaling an emphasis on investor protection for the Wall Street watchdog agency after a deregulatory stretch during the Trump administration.

16. Building boom’s dark cloud -

One year into the coronavirus pandemic, Nashville builders and homeowners are holding on to the bucking bronco that is the construction industry.

Prices for some much-used wood products have doubled and even tripled over the past year. Lead times for windows, appliances and more have stretched into weeks and months. Prices of other materials are rising or in short supply as well, and mortgage rates have been edging up.

17. Report: DOJ investigating Visa over debit card business -

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Visa is under investigation by the Department of Justice's antitrust division over whether the company pushes merchants into more expensive forms of debit card payments, The Wall Street Journal reported Friday.

18. Fed to end relaxed capital requirements for large banks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve says it will restore capital requirements for large banks that were relaxed as part of the Fed's efforts to shore up the financial system during the early days of the pandemic.

19. From job cuts to online commerce, virus reshaped US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At first, it was expected to be brief. At least that was the hope.

Instead, a once-in-a-century pandemic has ground on for a year, throwing millions out of work and upending wide swathes of the American economy. Delivery services thrived while restaurants suffered. Home offices replaced downtown offices. Travel and entertainment spending dried up.

20. Biden's pick for SEC flags trading app gimmicks for scrutiny -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's choice to head the Securities and Exchange Commission told Congress on Tuesday that the agency should address how to protect investors who use online stock-trading platforms with flashy tech gimmicks that entice them to trade more.

21. US consumers rebound to boost spending 2.4% as income jumps -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bouncing back from months of retrenchment, America's consumers stepped up their spending by a solid 2.4% in January, the sharpest increase in seven months and a sign that the economy may be poised to sustain a recovery from the pandemic recession.

22. Jeff Bezos, Amazon's founder, will step down as CEO -

NEW YORK (AP) — Jeff Bezos, who founded Amazon and turned into an online shopping behemoth, is stepping down as the company's CEO, a role he's had for nearly 30 years.

He'll be replaced in the fall by Andy Jassy, who runs Amazon's cloud-computing business. Bezos, 57, will then become the company's executive chair.

23. It's not just GameStop worrying Wall Street about a bubble -

NEW YORK (AP) — Now, even the pros on Wall Street are asking if the stock market has shot too high.

U.S. stocks have been on a nearly nonstop rip higher since March, up roughly 70% to record heights and causing outsiders to say the market had lost touch with the pandemic's reality. But Wall Street kept justifying the gains by pointing to massive support from the Federal Reserve, lifesaving deliverance from COVID-19 vaccines and efforts by Congress to pump more stimulus into the economy.

24. Biden picks Chopra, Gensler for financial oversight roles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden is set to nominate Rohit Chopra as the director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, tapping a progressive ally of Sen. Elizabeth Warren to helm the agency whose creation she championed.

25. Las Vegas Sands founder, CEO, GOP megadonor Adelson dies -

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Sheldon Adelson, the billionaire mogul and power broker who built a casino empire spanning from Las Vegas to China and became a singular force in domestic and international politics has died after a long illness.

26. Trump leaves mark on immigration policy, some of it lasting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When President Donald Trump was running for reelection, foreign-born U.S. residents were rushing to get their American citizenship before it might be too late.

"I didn't know what would happen if Trump got a second term," said Victoria Abramowska, who became a citizen in Maine this fall, "after all the crazy things he did already."

27. In Wall Street years, 2020 felt like a decade for markets -

NEW YORK (AP) — While lockdown life has kept time standing still for nearly everyone through 2020, Wall Street has been locked in at super fast-forward.

The stock market tumbled through years' worth of losses in just over a month this spring, only to turn around and pack an entire bull market's worth of gains into less than nine months. Even within the span of a few hours, the market in 2020 would sometimes careen to a loss that would have been remarkable for a full year.

28. Ex-Homeland Security official Mayorkas returns under Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden is turning to a veteran of the Department of Homeland Security to lead the agency created after the Sept. 11 attacks, but reshaped by President Donald Trump to carry out his hardline immigration and law enforcement agenda.

29. SEC Chair Clayton leaving post as top financial regulator -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jay Clayton, a former Wall Street lawyer who has headed the Securities and Exchange Commission as the financial markets' top regulator during the Trump administration, is leaving the position at year's end, the SEC announced Monday.

30. PNC to buy US unit of Spain's BBVA bank for $11.6B -

NEW YORK (AP) — PNC Financial Services Group Inc. said Monday it is buying the U.S. subsidiary of Spain's BBVA bank for $11.6 billion in cash.

BBVA's U.S. operations, which are based in Houston, Texas, have $104 billion in assets and operate 637 branches, mainly in the south and southwest of the country.

31. Biden goes on offense in Georgia while Trump targets Midwest -

WASHINGTON (AP) — One week until Election Day, Joe Biden is going on offense, heading Tuesday to Georgia — which hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1992 — and pushing into other territory where President Donald Trump was once expected to easily repeat his wins from four years ago.

32. Stocks have their worst day in a month as virus cases surge -

U.S. stocks fell sharply Monday, deepening last week's losses, as a troubling increase in coronavirus counts put investors in a selling mood. The skid came as doubts mount on Wall Street that Washington will come through with more stimulus for the economy before Election Day.

33. Wells Fargo posts $2 billion profit in 3Q, reversing 2Q loss -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Wells Fargo says it earned $2 billion in the third quarter, less than half of what it made in the same period last year but a significant improvement from this year's second quarter, when it posted a loss as the coronavirus swept through the U.S.

34. Trump vs. Biden: Where they stand on health, economy, more -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Amid the tumult of the 2020 presidential campaign, one dynamic has remained constant: The Nov. 3 election offers voters a choice between substantially different policy paths.

President Donald Trump, like many fellow Republicans, holds out tax reductions and regulatory cuts as economic imperatives and frames himself as a conservative champion in the culture wars. The president has offered few details about how he would pull the levers of government in a second term. His most consistent argument focuses on stopping Democratic opponent Joe Biden and his party from pushing U.S. policy leftward.

35. Morgan Stanley still shopping, buys Eaton Vance for $7B -

NEW YORK (AP) — Morgan Stanley will buy the investment management firm Eaton Vance in a deal valued at about $7 billion.

36. Morgan Stanley still shopping, buys Eaton Vance for $7B -

NEW YORK (AP) — Morgan Stanley will buy the investment management firm Eaton Vance in a deal valued at about $7 billion.

Morgan Stanley has actively gone after potential targets this year. The prosed acquisition Thursday comes just days after it closed on one of the biggest deals on Wall Street since the 2008 financial crisis, the $13 billion takeover of E-Trade Financial.

37. Ethics experts see national security concern in Trump's debt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Revelations that President Donald Trump is personally liable for more than $400 million in debt are casting a shadow that ethics experts say raises national security concerns he could be manipulated to sway U.S. policy by organizations or individuals he's indebted to.

38. Titans top winless Vikes 31-30; Gostkowski has 6 FGs -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Ryan Tannehill and the Tennessee Titans have had little reason to sweat these tight finishes.

That shaky start with his new team now a distant memory, Stephen Gostkowski had this late-game part down a long time ago.

39. Is Wilson another first-round mistake for Titans? -

The happy-happy, joy-joy of Jadeveon Clowney signing with the Tennessee Titans last week was rudely interrupted Saturday morning with the news that first-round pick Isaiah Wilson had been arrested on a DUI charge.

40. Jane Fraser to become Citi CEO; 1st woman to lead major bank -

NEW YORK (AP) — Citigroup's Jane Fraser will become the first woman to ever lead a Wall Street bank when she succeeds CEO Michael Corbat in February.

41. Jane Fraser to become Citi CEO; 1st woman to lead major bank -

NEW YORK (AP) — Citigroup's Jane Fraser will become the first woman to ever lead a Wall Street bank when she succeeds CEO Michael Corbat in February.

42. In 3 big states, Biden looks to rebuild Democrats' Blue Wall -

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — In 2016, Donald Trump tore down Democrats' "blue wall," winning the White House with surprise victories in Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

This year, Joe Biden is trying to rebuild.

43. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's errant views on voting, Biden miscues -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has been putting forth convoluted guidance to his supporters on submitting double votes in the November election, an act that would be illegal and risk public safety in the pandemic.

44. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's baseless claim of 'deep state' at FDA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is leveling unfounded attacks on his Food and Drug Administration and distorting the science on effective treatments for COVID-19.

Heading this week into the Republican National Convention, he asserted that the agency is slow-walking vaccines and treatments for the coronavirus in a bid to undermine his November reelection effort. There's no evidence of that, and one of his former FDA commissioners on Sunday rejected the accusation as groundless.

45. A US WeChat ban could hurt many in America, not just China -

For millions of people in the U.S. who use the Chinese app WeChat, it's a lifeline to friends, family, customers and business contacts in China.

That lifeline is now under attack by an executive order from President Donald Trump that could ban the app in the U.S. as early as mid-September, potentially severing vital relationships.

46. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's flawed justification for postal cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is misrepresenting the U.S. Postal Service's financial problems as his postmaster general defends cuts that have slowed mail delivery in advance of the November election.

47. Scowcroft, national security adviser to 2 presidents, dies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A lifetime before he served two presidents as national security adviser, Brent Scowcroft was just 12 when he decided to become a West Point cadet after reading about cadet life. After he graduated with the Class of 1947, he decided to join the Army Air Corps and train to be a fighter pilot. He achieved that goal, too, but then fate shot down his plans.

48. Stocks rally worldwide, S&P 500 back to within 3% of record -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks started August with more gains, and a worldwide rally on Monday sent Wall Street back to where it was just a couple days after it set its record earlier this year.

The S&P 500 tacked 0.7% more onto its four-month winning streak, and Big Tech once again led the way. The index rose 23.49 points to 3,294.61 to get within 3% of its record for the first time since February.

49. Banks set aside billions, bracing for more economic pain -

NEW YORK (AP) — With tens of millions of Americans out of work and many businesses shut down or operating under restrictions due to the coronavirus, three of the nation's biggest banks set aside nearly $30 billion in the second quarter to cover potentially bad loans that were fine only a few months ago.

50. Wells Fargo loses $2.4 billion in 2Q, first loss since 2008 -

Silver Spring, Md. (AP) — Wells Fargo lost $2.4 billion in the second quarter, the first quarterly loss for the bank since the real estate crash of 2008.

Wells said it set aside an additional $8.4 billion for loan loss provisions — the money set aside to cover potentially bad loans — more than double last quarter's $3.83 billion as the effects of the coronavirus pandemic ravaged almost every aspect of its business.

51. Stocks slam into reverse as virus keeps scarring economy -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street got a painful reminder that the coronavirus pandemic isn't going away, and a big early gain for stocks suddenly flipped to losses after California showed how it's still scarring the economy.

52. 2Q earnings to show how virus menaced Corporate America -

NEW YORK (AP) — Like that last roll of ultra-thin toilet paper left on the shelves or the latest Star Wars movies, it's tough to be disappointed in something when expectations were low to begin with. That's how Wall Street is approaching the upcoming earnings season for companies.

53. S&P 500 index notches another gain on a mixed day for stocks -

Stocks are winding up with a mixed finish on Wall Street, even as gains for technology stocks pushed the Nasdaq to another record close.

The Dow edged lower Wednesday but the S&P 500 rose 0.5%, a day after wrapping up its best quarter since 1998. That, however, came after its worst quarter since 2008 in the first three months of the year.

54. Stocks close out best quarter since 1998 with more gains -

Wall Street capped its best quarter since 1998 Tuesday with more gains, a fitting end to a stunning three months for investors as the market screamed back toward its record heights after a torrid plunge.

55. Wall Street stocks claw back a chunk of last week's losses -

Stocks shrugged off a wobbly start to finish solidly higher on Wall Street Monday, as the market clawed back half its losses from last week.

The S&P 500 rose 1.5% after having been down 0.3%. The market rallied after a much healthier-than-expected report on the housing market put investors in a buying mood. Technology, industrial and communications stocks accounted for much of the market's broad gains. European stocks also closed higher. Treasury yields were mixed and oil prices rose.

56. Court says president can fire Consumer board head 'at will' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday made it easier for the president to fire the head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

The justices struck down restrictions Congress had written on when the president can remove the bureau's director.

57. Banks lead gains for stocks on Wall Street in jumpy trading -

Financial companies led stocks broadly higher on Wall Street Thursday as traders welcomed news that the Federal Reserve and other regulators are removing some limits on the ability of banks to make investments.

58. Federal banking agencies ease Volcker Rule restrictions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve and four other regulatory agencies announced on Thursday that they have finalized a rule that will ease restrictions curtailing the ability of banks to make investments in such areas as hedge funds.

59. Wall Street dips as global rally eases off the accelerator -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks mostly fell in another day of wobbly trading on Wall Street Wednesday, as markets eased off the accelerator following their big rally.

The S&P 500 dipped 0.4% to break a three-day winning streak, after bouncing between small gains and losses for much of the day. Stocks in Asia and Europe made modest gains, while Treasury yields edged lower.

60. You're not the only one skeptical of the stock market rally -

Just because stocks have scrambled nearly all the way back to their record heights doesn't necessarily mean the market is in the clear.

Stocks have a long history of making big gains within long-term down markets, only for the bottom to give out again. Such mini-, ultimately futile rallies were regular occurrences during the Great Depression, and they've been recurring in some of the most recent downturns. They've happened often enough that Wall Street has a name for them: bear market rallies.

61. Congress weighs choice: 'Go big' on virus aid or hit 'pause' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress is at a crossroads in the coronavirus crisis, wrestling over whether to "go big," as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi wants for the next relief bill, or hit "pause," as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell insists.

62. Pandemic job losses hit new high, antiviral tests disappoint -

NEW YORK (AP) — Discouraging results from a study into a possible coronavirus treatment and fresh data showing one in six American workers have lost their jobs tempered relief Friday over the passage by Congress of a nearly $500 billion spending package to help embattled businesses and hospitals.

63. Former Senate staffer accuses Joe Biden of sexual assault -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A former aide to Joe Biden is accusing the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee of sexually assaulting her during the early 1990s when he was a senator. Biden's campaign denies the charges.

64. Stocks skid as physical, economic toll of virus worsens -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street and markets around the world fell sharply Wednesday as the economic and physical toll caused by the coronavirus outbreak mounts — and as experts say they still can't predict when it will end.

65. Stocks fall, capping Wall Street's worst quarter since 2008 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks fell Tuesday to close out Wall Street's worst quarter since the most harrowing days of the 2008 financial crisis.

The S&P 500 dropped a final 1.6%, bringing its loss for the first three months of the year to 20% as predictions for the looming recession caused by the coronavirus outbreak got even more dire. Stocks haven't had this bad a quarter since the last time economists were talking about the worst downturn since the Great Depression, when the S&P 500 lost 22.6% at the end of 2008.

66. Companies find a new purpose; workplace rules have changed -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments on Tuesday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

67. Business fallout: National bills coming due, with risk; consumers see it -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

68. Q&A: What did the Fed do Monday and who will it help? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve took several aggressive steps Monday to support an economy ravaged by the effects of the coronavirus. The amount of money involved is huge and the Fed's ambitions are vast: It wants to make loans available to companies and governments so they can pay bills and potentially avoid layoffs. It also committed to buy as much government debt and mortgage-backed securities it deems necessary to ensure those markets will function.

69. Fallout of '08 bailout looms over Washington negotiations -

Fallout of '08 bailout looms over Washington negotiations

By JULIE PACE and STEVEN SLOAN Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the fall of 2008, an unlikely alliance of lawmakers, regulators and Bush administration officials banded together to rescue an economy they feared was hours away from collapse. They also unwittingly reshaped American politics, unleashing a populist furor that lingers in both parties to this day.

70. Dow drops more than 900 points, ending worst week since 2008 -

Wall Street ended the week the same way it began: in full retreat from the coronavirus.

Stocks fell sharply and the price of oil sank Friday as federal and state governments moved to shut down bigger and bigger swaths of the nation's economy in the hope of limiting the spread of the outbreak.

71. Virus poses a test: Can fractured Washington still 'go big'? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The fast-moving coronavirus upending every facet of American life is testing whether Washington, a capital city fractured by years of bitter partisanship and inaction, can still do big things.

72. Stocks drop as recession fears take hold; Dow loses 1,300 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks tumbled more than 5% on Wall Street Wednesday, and the Dow erased virtually all its gains since President Donald Trump's 2017 inauguration. Even prices for investments seen as safe during downturns fell as the coronavirus outbreak chokes the economy and investors rush to raise cash.

73. Fed launches 2 emergency programs last seen in 2008 crisis -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve put in motion two emergency lending programs Tuesday that were last deployed in response to the 2008 financial crisis, aiming to ease the flow of credit to businesses and households struggling amid the viral outbreak.

74. Govts pledge aid as global commerce seizes in face of virus -

Governments and central banks are scrambling to find ways to keep businesses from going bankrupt as the virus outbreak grinds the world economy to a halt.

A day after Wall Street endured its worst daily drop since the crash of 1987, European markets wavered, as did U.S futures markets. There is tremendous volatility, with the extent of economic damage from the pandemic still anyone's guess. Factories are closed, retail stores are closed, travel has ground almost to a halt and billions of people are sheltering at home, going outside only to find essential supplies.

75. Dow dives 2,997 points on fears virus will cause recession -

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. stock market plunged more than 12% Monday for its worst day in more than three decades as voices from Wall Street to the White House said the coronavirus is likely dragging the economy into a recession.

76. AP FACT CHECK: The Dems on pandemic, Social Security, more -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders sparred one-on-one Sunday in a Democratic debate held without a live audience in the shadow of the coronavirus pandemic. The growing crisis prompted some questionable statements from the presidential rivals, as did issues they argued about for months on once-crowded stages.

77. 'Bigger than any one of us': Biden, Sanders tackle pandemic -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders sought in the Democratic debate to cast themselves as best-positioned to lead the nation through a global pandemic, uniting in their criticism of President Donald Trump's response to the fast-moving coronavirus but diverging in how they would confront the spiraling public health and economic crisis.

78. Fed may take boldest steps in a decade to ease virus impact -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is all but sure to take its most drastic steps Wednesday since the depths of the 2008 financial crisis to try to counter the coronavirus' growing damage to the U.S. economy and the financial markets.

79. AP FACT CHECK: Trump, Dems and politics of the pandemic -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans normally hear from President Donald Trump when he is opining on Twitter, riffing from a rally stage or otherwise improvising. This past week was different as he sat in the Oval Office with a script laid out for him to read on a matter grave enough for a prime-time address to the nation.

80. Stocks roar back from big losses after emergency declaration -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street roared back from its worst day in 30 years Friday with a broad rally that sent the Dow Jones Industrial Average nearly 2,000 points higher — its biggest point gain ever — after President Donald Trump declared the coronavirus pandemic a national emergency.

81. Analyst: Best way to fix market swoon is to contain virus -

NEW YORK (AP) — The severity of Wall Street's rout this week may echo the swoons for stocks at the height of the 2008 financial crisis, but that's where the parallels end.

Back then, investors were rattled as Lehman Brothers, Bear Stearns and other big financial institutions either failed or nearly did under the weight of bad mortgages as the housing market bubble burst.

82. Fed intervenes to try to calm markets but investors shrug -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve moved Thursday to try to ease disruptions in the financial markets stemming from the coronavirus by announcing that it will sharply increase its purchases of short-term Treasury bonds.

83. Analysis: Facing virus outbreak, Trump's tactics fall short -

NEW YORK (AP) — The escalating coronavirus crisis is presenting President Donald Trump with a challenge for which he appears ill-equipped, his favorite political tactics ineffective and his reelection chances in jeopardy.

84. Corporate debt loads a rising risk as virus hits economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A gyrating stock market is seizing headlines as the coronavirus threatens corporate profits and economic growth. Yet it's in the normally temperate bond market, where companies go to borrow money, where the gravest dangers may lurk.

85. Dow surges 4.9% in another wild day on hopes for virus aid -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks on Tuesday recouped most of their historic losses from the prior day as hopes rose, faded and then bloomed again on Wall Street that the U.S. government will try to cushion the economic pain from the coronavirus.

86. Michigan primary could make or break Sanders' campaign -

DETROIT (AP) — Bernie Sanders proved his 2016 presidential bid was serious with an upset victory in Michigan powered by his opposition to free trade and appeal among working-class voters. Four years later, the state could either revive the Vermont senator's campaign or relegate him to the role of protest candidate.

87. Virus upends life in Italy as China vows to defeat epidemic -

BEIJING (AP) — Starkly illustrating the global east-to-west spread of the new coronavirus, Italy began an extraordinary, sweeping lockdown Tuesday while in China, the diminishing threat prompted the president to visit the epicenter and declare: "We will certainly defeat this epidemic."

88. Dow drops 7.8%, 2,013 points as free-fall slams markets -

Stocks took their worst one-day beating on Wall Street since the global financial crisis of 2008 as a collapse in oil prices Monday combined with mounting alarm over what the coronavirus could do to the world economy.

89. Plunging yields force investors and Fed to rethink strategy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The response in stock markets to the growing risk from the coronavirus has been swift and fierce. But a better gauge of fear on Wall Street may be the bond market, where the moves over the past few weeks have been even more breathtaking.

90. Dow sinks 2.9%, 785 pts. after rate cut fails to stem market's dread -

NEW YORK (AP) — Fear and uncertainty continue to control Wall Street, and stocks fell sharply Tuesday after an emergency interest-rate cut by the Federal Reserve failed to reassure markets wracked by worries that a fast-spreading virus will cause a recession.

91. Fed might not be able to save markets this time -

NEW YORK (AP) — As stocks around the world tumble on worries about a fast-spreading virus, investors have been clamoring for the superheroes of the financial world to ride to the rescue once again.

92. Wall Street has worst week since 2008 as S&P 500 drops 11.5% -

Stocks sank around the globe again Friday as investors braced for more economic pain from the coronavirus outbreak, sending U.S. markets to their worst weekly finish since the 2008 financial crisis.

93. Investors shy away from risk as coronavirus rattles markets -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — This week's big sell-off on Wall Street suggests stocks have finally caught up to the bond market, where fear of an economic slowdown has been evident for months.

Signs that the new coronavirus that originated in China is now spreading to other parts of the world rattled investors, intensifying worries about the damage that the outbreak could cause to the global economy and corporate profits.

94. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for January 2020 -

Top commercial real estate sales, January 2020, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

95. Twisting religion to fit argument against refugees -

It’s worrisome when officials try to turn their private religious principles into public policy. Turns out it can also be worrisome when they ignore those principles.

Take the refugee resettlement program, a federal program designed to offer a haven for people who flee war, persecution or other dangers in their home countries.

96. AP FACT CHECK: Trump distorts data, Dems cut some corners -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rallying in swing-state Wisconsin, President Donald Trump used misleading economic data to claim he's created a "blue collar boom" while Democrats vying to replace him cut some corners on the facts in their latest presidential debate.

97. Life’s a blast for CMAC post attack -

CMAC & The Heart Attack, a show band raising a ruckus in joints from Leiper’s Fork to Douglas Corner and beyond and between, has its roots – lifeblood really – in a near-fatal occurrence for a luminary in Nashville sports broadcasting history.

98. After ebullient 2019, Wall Street warns of slower road ahead -

NEW YORK (AP) — After a year of nirvana, investors may need to get ready for something a little more normal.

Markets are coming off a fabulous 2019, where stocks and bonds around the world climbed in concert. But for the next year — and decade, in fact — Wall Street is telling investors to set their expectations considerably lower.

99. After ebullient 2019, Wall Street warns of slower road ahead -

NEW YORK (AP) — After a year of nirvana, investors may need to get ready for something a little more normal.

Markets are coming off a fabulous 2019, where stocks and bonds around the world climbed in concert. But for the next year — and decade, in fact — Wall Street is telling investors to set their expectations considerably lower.

100. Average Wall Street salary dropped to $399K last year -

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York state's comptroller says salaries on Wall Street dropped by 5.6% last year.

Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli reports Friday that the average 2018 salary, including bonuses, for securities industry employees in New York City was $398,600. That's down from $422,500 in 2017, which was the highest level since the 2008 financial crisis.