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Editorial Results (free)

1. US home sales fell in July; some buyers see silver lining -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The housing market's comedown from its high-flying days early this year is deepening, with home sales in July falling for the sixth straight month.

Sharply higher mortgage rates, surging inflation and prices that remain near all-time highs are making homes less affordable. Sales fell 20.2% from July last year, reaching the slowest pace since May 2020, near the start of the pandemic.

2. Harbinger of normalcy: ‘Open house, 2-4 Sunday’ -

Things have changed. Realtors have begun to incorporate the “price improvement” verbiage into their vocabularies and their postings, and many of the nearly 2,000 new Realtors in the area are venturing into uncharted waters with a sales technique known as “open houses.”

3. How do you know how much rent you can afford? -

How do you make the numbers work when they don’t? An old housing rule of thumb says spend no more than 30% of gross income on housing, which includes both rent and utilities. People who pay more are said to be cost-burdened.

4. Heritage Foundation to open history center -

The Heritage Foundation of Williamson County plans to establish The History & Culture Center of Williamson County in the former McConnell House building in Downtown Franklin.

The historic building will be transformed into Williamson County’s first state-of-the-art, interactive exhibition space dedicated to telling its comprehensive countywide history.

5. Top Davidson County residential sales for January 2022 -

Top residential real estate sales, January 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

6. Convenience vs. quality: Oh, for an internet do-over -

Spotify has been in the news lately with Neil Young and Joni Mitchell pulling their music to protest COVID-19 misinformation being spread by Joe Rogan on his popular podcast, which Spotify hosts.

Down a little farther in those stories are details on how little artists are paid by streaming services. Some leaders of the Music Row community feel they overlooked Napster – which birthed the music-streaming industry – when it began pirating their material in the early days of the commercial internet.

7. Buyers vie for fewer homes as listings decline -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Hoping to buy a home that fits your needs and budget in the next few weeks? You might want to settle in for a long search.

The inventory of homes for sale nationally dropped to its lowest level in more than two decades last month. And a snapshot of this month so far isn't encouraging, with the number of homes on the market running well below year-ago levels.

8. Top Davidson County commercial sales for December 2021 -

Top commercial real estate sales, December 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

9. US home sales fall with available properties at a record low -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sales of previously occupied homes fell in December for the first time in four months as many would-be buyers were frustrated by a lack of available houses, which fell to the lowest level in more than two decades.

10. Top Davidson County residential sales for November 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, November 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

11. Zillow to stop home-flipping amid pricing 'unpredictability' -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Zillow Group said Tuesday that it will stop buying and selling homes, citing the "unpredictability" of forecasting housing prices.

The Seattle-based real estate information company said winding down its Zillow Offers homebuying and selling unit will take several quarters and will result in about a 25% reduction in the company's workforce, which is now at about 5,300.

12. Top Davidson County commercial sales for August 2021 -

Top commercial real estate sales, July 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

13. In a hot market, companies compete with would-be homeowners -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Soaring home prices and rents are fueling real estate companies' appetite for houses, adding unwelcome competition for many would-be homebuyers.

Residential real estate bought by companies or institutions hit an all-time high of 67,943 properties in the second quarter, according to Redfin, a Seattle-based online brokerage.

14. Landlords get some relief as Americans pay more for rent -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Americans are paying more to live in apartments, as demand for housing increases and many would-be homebuyers are forced to rent because prices for houses have gotten too steep.

15. US home prices jump at fastest pace in more than 15 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices soared in April at the fastest pace since 2005 as potential buyers bid up prices on a limited supply of available properties.

The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index, released Tuesday, jumped nearly 15% in April from the previous year. That is up from a 13.4% annual gain in March.

16. US average mortgage rates tick lower; 30-year loan at 2.96% -

Mortgage rates remained near historic lows this week. The benchmark 30-year home loan held below the 3% mark amid further signs of the economy's recovery from the pandemic recession.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday the average for the 30-year rate loan dipped to 2.96% from 2.99% last week.

17. Many Americans moved to less pricey housing markets in 2020 -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Many Americans who moved last year relocated to areas where homes were, on average, bigger and less expensive.

On average, people who moved to a different city in 2020 ended up in a ZIP code where average home values were nearly $27,000 lower than in their previous ZIP code, according to Zillow.

18. Study: Racial diversity stagnated on corporate boards -

NEW YORK (AP) — Many U.S. companies have rushed to appoint Black members to their boards of directors since racial justice protests swept the country last year.

But in the two preceding years, progress on increasing racial diversity on boards stagnated, a new study revealed Tuesday. Black men even lost ground.

19. Doing the right thing isn’t always best thing for clients -

There was a time when Realtors could trust one another to do what they said they would. But, then those pesky regulations of the Tennessee Real Estate Commission began to take precedent over courtesy and integrity, causing even more mayhem in a chaotic market.

20. US homebuyers increasingly willing to pay above asking price -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The red-hot U.S. housing market is widening the gap between what a home is objectively worth and what eager buyers are willing to pay for it.

Fierce competition amid an ultra-low inventory of homes on the market is fueling bidding wars, prompting a growing share of would-be buyers to sweeten offers well above what sellers are asking. Home prices have rocketed to new highs and many homes are selling for more than their appraised value.

21. In a chaotic market demand, prices for homes in US soar -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. housing market has gotten so out of whack, with demand far outpacing supply, that prices have risen to record levels and roughly half of all U.S. houses are selling for above their list price.

22. US home prices rose 11.9% in February, fastest since 2014 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices rose in February at the fastest pace in nearly seven years as strong demand for housing collided with a tight supply of homes on the market.

The February S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index, released Tuesday, rose 11.9% from a year earlier, the biggest gain since March 2014. The index had also surged — 11.1% — in January. The February gain was about what economists had expected.

23. Amazon to bring workers back to offices by fall -

SEATTLE (AP) — Amazon plans to have its employees return to the office by fall as the tech giant transitions away from the remote work it implemented for many workers due to the coronavirus pandemic.

24. U.S. home prices rise 10.1% in December, fastest since 2014 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices surged at the fastest pace in nearly seven years in December, fueled by low mortgage rates and Americans moving from crowded urban areas to houses in the suburbs.

25. Zillow now more embedded in local real estate offices -

Over the past 15 to 20 years, most real estate firms have transitioned to call centers to help schedule appointments for the firms’ listings. Many companies relied on either “Showing Time Appointment Center” or “Centralized Showing Service,” my personal favorite, as the telephone connections were better and the service provided by those answering the phone was more professional.

26. US stock indexes wobble as investor caution offsets optimism -

Another day of choppy trading on Wall Street left the major U.S. stock indexes nearly flat Thursday, even as the S&P 500 and Nasdaq composite hit all-time highs.

The S&P 500 rose 0.2% after wobbling between small gains and losses up until the final minutes of trading. Technology stocks led the gainers after two relatively weak days, almost single-handedly outweighing losses by energy stocks, banks and companies that rely on consumer spending.

27. HCA, new partner to produce PPE -

Nashville’s HCA Healthcare has announced it has entered into a new joint venture business with A Plus International Inc. to expand access to personal protective equipment by manufacturing surgical and procedure masks in the United States.

28. Biden inherits damaged economy, with signs of hope emerging -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has inherited a badly damaged economy pulverized by the pandemic, with 10 million fewer jobs than a year ago and as many as one in 6 small businesses shut down.

29. No relief from real estate heat in mountain retreats -

Many Nashville-area families are headed to the mountains as COVID-19 has changed long-distance travel plans. Prices in Highlands and nearby Cheshire, North Carolina, have increased by as much as 40% since February, and Monteagle and Sewanee are seeing similar activity.

30. Homebuyers' down payments rise as US home prices climb -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Even with mortgage rates hovering near all-time lows, rising home prices are putting more pressure on buyers to come up with a bigger down payment.

In the April-June quarter, the median down payment on a single-family U.S. home was $13,955, a 15.3% increase from a year earlier, according to industry tracker Attom Data Solutions. In the first three months of 2020, it vaulted 29% from the same period in 2019.

31. S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller: US home prices up 5.2% in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices posted a robust gain in August — another sign that the American housing market remains strong despite economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic.

The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index, released Tuesday, showed that home prices climbed 5.2% in August from a year earlier, accelerating from a 4.1% gain in July. The gain was stronger than economists had expected.

32. US long-term mortgage rates hit new low; 30-year at 2.80% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. long-term mortgage rates slipped this week as the key 30-year loan marked a new all-time low for the 11th time this year.

Home loan rates have notched a year-long decline amid economic anxiety in the recession set off by the coronavirus pandemic. Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday that the average rate on the 30-year benchmark loan edged down to 2.80% from 2.81% last week. By contrast, the rate averaged 3.75% a year ago.

33. Report: US home prices rise 3.9% in July -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices rose at a faster pace in July as the housing market continued to show strength in the midst of the coronavirus outbreak.

The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index, released Tuesday, rose 3.9% in July from a year earlier, up from a 3.5% annual gain in June. The July gain was slightly higher than economists had expected.

34. Low rates and heavy buyer demand send US home sales surging -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Spurred by ultra-low mortgage rates, home buyers rushed last month to snap up a limited supply of existing houses, causing the pace of purchases to jump by a record-high 24.7%.

35. Many Realtors in market but few achieve excellence -

The fall selling season is fast approaching, and many sellers who chose to sit out the spring market with the Safer at Home order in place are back in the game and ready to sell.

Many are looking for assistance in choosing their Realtors. The internet abounds with suggestions as the various sites such as Zillow and Trulia allow Realtors to advertise their skills.

36. Gone for good? Evidence signals many jobs aren't coming back -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Stark evidence of the damage the resurgent viral outbreak has caused the U.S. economy could come Friday when the government is expected to report that the pace of hiring has slowed significantly after a brief rebound in the spring.

37. S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller: US home prices rose 3.7% in May -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices grew more slowly in May, but continued to show resilience in the face of the coronavirus outbreak.

The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index rose 3.7% in from a year earlier. That's a drop from the 3.9% increase in April and it was a smaller gain than economists had expected. Still, home prices have risen steadily despite the pandemic and lockdowns that have badly damaged the American economy.

38. Vanderbilt center to aid online teaching -

Vanderbilt University is launching a new instructional design support service, available this summer and fall to all faculty, designed to provide concierge-level support to help faculty transition to teaching online.

39. Home loan refinancing surges as mortgage rates hit new lows -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — U.S. homeowners are seizing on the lowest average mortgage rates on record to refinance their mortgages.

Americans refinanced nearly 2 million home loans from January through April, more than double the same four-month stretch in 2019, according to real estate data company CoreLogic. And "cash-out" refinancing, when homeowners withdraw equity from their home's value, typically to pay down higher-interest debt or cover remodeling expenses, rose more than 70% from a year earlier.

40. Work remotely? How about $15K to do it in Topeka? -

It’s becoming more common for workers, stuck at home, to look for alternative work locations. For some fortunate individuals, it’s been their vacation home. Others have fled cities to live with family members in less-populated areas.

41. Zillow Offers returns to Nashville market -

Zillow Group, Inc. has resumed buying homes in five additional Zillow Offers markets, bringing the total to nine.

Homeowners in Nashville, Portland, Oregon, Denver, Fort Collins and Colorado Springs, Colorado, now have the option to sell their home directly to Zillow. Last week, the company restarted home buying in Phoenix, Tucson, Raleigh and Charlotte, North Carolina.

42. Homebuilders climb even as housing outlook remains cloudy -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The U.S. economy and housing market had set homebuilders up for a strong 2020.

That was before the efforts to stem the spread of the coronavirus pandemic knocked the economy into a skid, dimmed consumer confidence and left a record number of Americans unemployed.

43. US home construction drops 30.2% in April as virus rages -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home building plunged in April to the lowest level in five years, taken down by the economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic.

The Commerce Department said Tuesday that ground breakings plummeted 30.2% last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 891,000. That is the lowest level since February 2015. Construction of single-family homes dropped 25.4% to an annual rate of 650,000.

44. House divided: Village, Parks decide to ‘demerge’ -

In a world turned upside down, it’s good to know local real estate is going with the flow.

Two firms – Village and Parks – had announced their merger in January, making them the largest firm in the Nashville area. For those trying to keep score at home, Village had sold to the newly formed Central Real Estate in early 2019.

45. Real estate adapts to life with virus -

It’s business as usual – in some ways – at Wagon Wheel Title and Escrow in East Nashville. In other ways it is anything but.

The COVID-19 pandemic has rattled the real estate industry, causing multiple disruptions, changing business practices, adding new technologies, putting loans in jeopardy and canceling deals just as they were about to close as jobs are lost or income curtailed.

46. Virus casts a dark cloud over once-thriving home market -

BOSTON (AP) — When Rebeka McBride and her husband put their home in Washington state on the market in early March, the coronavirus outbreak was just taking hold in the United States. They managed to hold two open houses and a smattering of private viewings before accepting an offer.

47. Virus casts a dark cloud over once-thriving home market -

BOSTON (AP) — When Rebeka McBride and her husband put their home in Washington state on the market in early March, the coronavirus outbreak was just taking hold in the United States. They managed to hold two open houses and a smattering of private viewings before accepting an offer.

48. Disruption? Home sales increase as virus spreads -

With the COVID-19 pandemic reaching across the country and state, and beginning to claim lives in Nashville – recognizable names and treasured residents – many are concerned about real estate values.

49. Monday: Big layoffs, bigger hirings; Dollar General adding 50,000 -

The rapid spread of the coronavirus since it was first reported in China has dealt an unprecedented shock to the global economy.

Following are business developments Monday related to the outbreak as governments attempt to stabilize their economies, companies struggle to cope and millions of people face job losses and disruptions in supplies of goods and in services.

50. Buyers face more competition amid shortage of home listings -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Americans shopping for a home this spring may face more competition than they have in years.

A strong labor market and growing pool of would-be buyers as more millennials enter their 30s is expected to fuel demand for homes at a time when the inventory of properties for sale is at the lowest level in more than a decade.

51. DeanHouston opens Nashville Office -

DeanHouston, Inc., a leading full-service, business-to-business, integrated marketing communications firm, has opened a new office in The Nations.

DeanHouston has strategically expanded to lay the foundation for anticipated growth opportunities in the region. It also has offices in Cincinnati, Chicago, Los Angeles and Shanghai. Dana Arrasmith has been named general manager for Nashville.

52. US home prices gains accelerate in October for 2nd month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices rose faster in October than the previous month as many would-be buyers competed for a limited supply of available properties.

The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index rose 2.2% in October from a year ago, up from a 2.1% annual gain in September.

53. Housing ‘silver tsunami’ will see smaller impact here -

A newly released analysis by Zillow predicts a flood of homes will come on the market in the next 20 years as Baby Boomers age, creating a ‘silver tsunami’ of available houses.

Seniors 60 or older who will leave 920,000 owner-occupied homes between 2017 and 2027 and from 1.17 million per year 2027-2037.

54. Don’t make holiday buyers climb down the chimney -

With Thanksgiving in the taillights and a plethora of religious holidays on the horizon, anyone owning a home should be extremely grateful they are not forced to experience the homebuying process during this frenetic market.

55. US home prices rise a modest 2.1% in June -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices rose more slowly in June as some of the country's most expensive housing markets saw stagnant or even falling prices.

The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index rose 2.1% in June from a year earlier, down from a 2.4% gain in May.

56. US home sales fall 1.7% with prices high and supply low -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home sales tumbled 1.7% in June, with rising prices and a scarce supply locking out many Americans from ownership.

The National Association of Realtors said Tuesday that homes were sold last month at a seasonally adjusted annualized rate of 5.27 million units. Sales have shriveled 2.2% over the past 12 months, despite such positive trends as a robust job market and falling mortgage rates.

57. US home sales climbed 2.5% in May amid lower mortgage rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home sales jumped 2.5% in May, as lower mortgage rates appeared to help buyers overcome affordability challenges.

The National Association of Realtors said Friday that existing homes sold at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.34 million last month, up from 5.21 million in April.

58. In dog-eat-dog world, homes must have new-puppy smell -

One of the oldest myths in pet lore is that one year of a dog’s life is the equivalent of seven years of a human’s life. Hence a 5-year-old dog would be comparable in age to a 35-year-old human, and a 10-year-old dog would have the age comparable to a 70-year-old man or woman.

59. US home sales fell 0.4% in April amid limited supply -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home sales slipped 0.4% in April, as would-be homebuyers face affordability challenges and a limited supply of starter houses.

The National Association of Realtors said Tuesday that existing homes sold at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.19 million last month, down from 5.21 million in March.

60. Real estate frenzy shifts to those looking for rentals -

The uptick in residential property sales, in both condominium and single-family homes, has been well-documented, but the most active sector this spring is the rental market.

On any given Sunday, there are many more renters scouring the market than those seeking ownership, and there is no comparison to the speed of the game. In most cases, those seeking long-term rentals – six months or more – must rent the properties sight unseen.

61. Homebuying guide needs update for Nashville market -

The National Association of Realtors provides a simple 12-step guide for prospective homebuyers through its HomeLogic.com website. It’s fine, so far as it goes.

62. Low tax burden not only reason for Nashville influx -

The spring market is here, and houses are flowing onto the market as vigorously as last month’s rains flooded basements and crawl spaces. The real estate bubble is yet to burst, and sellers know it. Prices remain on the rise.

63. Educate yourself before searching for new home -

Spring break is over. It ended for Metro schools a couple of weeks ago, most of the private schools returned to the classrooms Monday and all the surrounding counties have their students back in school.

64. US housing starts slumped 8.7 percent in February -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of homes under construction fell 8.7 percent in February, as ground breakings for single-family houses plunged to their lowest level in nearly two years.

The Commerce Department said that builders started construction at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.16 million units last month, down from a 1.27 million pace in January. The setback stems from a 17 percent drop in the building of single-family houses, which posted the weakest pace since May 2017. Apartment construction increased in February.

65. US new-home sales fell 6.9 percent in January -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sales of new U.S. homes slumped 6.9 percent in January, a possible sign that buyers paused during the government shutdown.

The Commerce Department said Thursday that new homes sold at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 607,000 in January, down from 652,000 in December.

66. US housing starts climbed 18.6 percent in January -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. housing starts jumped 18.6 percent in January, as builders ramped up construction of single-family houses to the fastest pace in eight months.

The Commerce Department said Friday that January ground breakings occurred at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.23 million. Home construction rebounded sharply from December, when the annual rate was just 1.04 million.

67. Stocks climb, giving S&P 500 its 4th straight weekly gain -

Technology and health care companies led U.S. stocks higher Friday, giving the benchmark S&P 500 its fourth straight weekly gain.

The broad rally came as investors grew hopeful that the latest round of talks between the U.S. and China will lead to a resolution of the costly trade war that's unsettled markets and threatened the global economy.

68. Technology changing home buying -

Technology, consumer preferences and an influx of investor funding are changing the way people buy and sell houses across the country – and that includes Nashville’s sizzling market.

“Nashville is a thriving, growing city with a large number of real estate transactions,” says Jay Cherry, Nashville general manager for Opendoor, a California-based startup that offers buyers and sellers a tech-guided way to navigate the residential real estate market. Opendoor began service in Nashville in May.

69. Change is in the air -

Last year had something for everyone in Nashville’s residential real estate scene. There was a year-end flurry of sales and mergers among local firms, a reshuffling of real estate agents from one firm to another, near-record home sales volumes, continuing price appreciation and the arrival of new, tech-heavy national real estate businesses.

70. Microsoft pledges $500M to tackle Seattle housing crisis -

SEATTLE (AP) — Microsoft says it will devote $500 million to address a problem its own success helped create: the severe need for affordable housing in the Seattle area.

As the tech industry Microsoft brought to the region has boomed with the expansion of Amazon and other companies, the cost of housing has soared. Tent encampments packed with homeless people have become common, and even those with good middle-income jobs, such as teachers and nurses, have been priced out of the cities where they work.

71. US home sales rose 1.9% in November -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home sales increased in November for the second straight month, but sales plummeted 7 percent from a year ago amid growing affordability pressures.

The National Association of Realtors said Wednesday that sales of existing homes rose 1.9 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.32 million last month. But higher mortgage rates have caused sales over the past 12 months to plunge at the steepest pace since May 2011, when the real estate sector was still in the grips of the housing bust.

72. Rising rates, slowing home sales expected to hurt remodelers -

NEW YORK (AP) — General contractors and other small businesses in the home remodeling industry can expect revenue to slow in 2019, the result of rising mortgage rates and sluggish home sales.

73. US home sales fell in September to slowest pace in 3 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home sales fell for the sixth straight month in September, a sign that housing has increasingly become a weak spot for the economy.

The National Association of Realtors said Friday that sales declined 3.4 percent last month, the biggest drop in 2 ½ years, to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.15 million. That's the lowest sales pace since November 2015.

74. US mortgage rates fall slightly; 30-year at 4.85 percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Long-term U.S. mortgage rates dipped slightly this week, taking a pause after weeks of steady increases stoked by rising interest rates.

Home borrowing rates remain at their highest levels in more than seven years, with the key 30-year rate approaching 5 percent. Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday the rate on 30-year, fixed-rate mortgages declined to an average 4.85 percent this week from 4.90 percent last week.

75. US housing starts sank 5.3 percent in September -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home construction fell 5.3 percent in September, a sign that recent hurricanes and rising mortgage rates may be weighing on the market.

The Commerce Department said Wednesday that housing starts slipped last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.2 million, down from 1.27 million in August. So far this year, starts have increased 6.4 percent. But the pace of homebuilding has downshifted since May

76. A US privacy law could be good for Google - but bad for you -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress is taking the first steps toward setting national rules governing how companies use consumers data — although one of its goals might be to prevent states from enacting stronger privacy protections of their own.

77. Senate panel to hear from internet execs on privacy policies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is hoping Congress can come up with a new set of national rules governing how companies can use consumers' data that finds a balance between "privacy and prosperity."

78. US home prices jumped 6.3 percent from a year ago -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S home prices climbed 6.3 percent in June from a year earlier, as affordability is becoming a greater obstacle for would-be buyers.

The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index rose at a slightly slower pace than the 6.5 percent annual gain in May from a year earlier, according to a report Tuesday. But home values are increasing at more than double the pace of average wage growth, weighing down property sales despite solid demand because of accelerating economic growth and solid hiring.

79. Banks and technology lead stocks higher for 4th day in a row -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks climbed for the fourth straight day Tuesday as strong earnings continued to pull the market closer to the all-time high it set in late January.

Industrial companies rose Tuesday and banks moved higher as interest rates increased. Gains for Microsoft and Google's parent company Alphabet helped technology companies.

80. ‘Godzillow’ wrecks havoc on online home valuations -

Veteran real estate broker Linda Chancey was meeting with one of her clients last week when she proposed listing the client’s house for $3.5 million.

The seller, somewhat shocked, expressed her irritation that the home had been assigned a “zestimate” of slightly more than $1 million. The zestimate is Zillow’s estimate of home value.

81. US new-home sales climbed 6.7 percent in May -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sales of new U.S. homes jumped 6.7 percent in May, with purchases in the South accounting for all of the monthly gains.

The Commerce Department said Monday that new homes sold last month at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 689,000, up from 646,000 in April. The South reported monthly sales growth of 17.9 percent, while sales were flat in the Midwest and fell in the Northeast and West.

82. Goldilocks had the right idea about finding a Realtor -

Chris Elizer is a Realtor with Keller Williams in Lewisburg and has been in the real estate business since the Great Recession. Yes, he entered the industry as it lay dying.

He says that the day he ventured into the hallowed ground of the Tennessee Real Estate Commission to get his license there were 12 people in line ahead of him, all retiring their licenses.

83. Like dogs, houses can turn on unfriendly interlopers -

Houses are like dogs, and even more like horses. Really the entire animal kingdom. They can sense when people are afraid of them or do not like them and react accordingly.

With the Nashville market as it is – wild with activity – and homes selling within hours as opposed to days, buyers are forced to make important decisions that will affect years of their lives in painstakingly short order with little or no scrutiny. The houses know this.

84. US home prices rose in 2017 at fastest pace in 3½ years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices rose at the fastest 12-month pace in more than three years in 2017, as potential home buyers fought over a limited number of available properties.

Standard & Poor's said Tuesday that its S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller national home price index jumped 6.3 percent in 2017, the most since June 2014. Home prices are rising much faster than wages and overall measure of inflation.

85. Sales of US homes fall year over year by most in 3½ years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. sales of existing homes fell in January from a year earlier by the most in more than three years. Would-be buyers were stymied by rising prices and a shortage of homes for sale.

86. Unmarried couples beware when purchasing a home -

“Love and marriage, love and marriage” and so the song goes, but it makes no mention of home ownership, nor is there any mention of divorce. The number of marriages peaked in the United States in the period following the end of World War II. I suppose there was quite a bit of catching up as the number rose 33 percent over the next year.

87. US home sales tumbled 3.6 percent in December -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home sales slid 3.6 percent in December, as rising prices and a declining number of available properties stifled purchases.

The National Association of Realtors said Wednesday that sales of existing homes fell last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.57 million units. Despite the monthly setback, sales totaled 5.51 million in 2017. That was the highest level since 2006, yet it marked a slight 1.1 percent gain from 2016 as the months' supply of properties on the market fell to the lowest level ever recorded by the Realtors.

88. US home sales climb 5.6 percent in November to 11-year high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans purchased homes at the fastest pace in nearly 11 years, as sales climbed 5.6 percent in November.

The National Association of Realtors said Wednesday that sales of existing homes rose last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.81 million units. Home sales were last this strong in December 2006, when properties sold at annual pace of 6.42 million.

89. US home prices leapt in September by the most in 3 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices rose at the fastest pace in more than three years in September, lifted by a record-low supply of houses for sale.

The Standard & Poor's CoreLogic Case-Shiller national home price index released Tuesday rose 6.2 percent in September from a year earlier, the largest gain since June 2014.  In 13 of the 20 cities tracked by the index, yearly price gains in September were faster than in August.

90. US home sales rose in October as hurricane impact wanes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans bought more homes last month, as sales snapped back in hurricane-hit Texas and Florida. Yet the market is still suffering from a dwindling supply of available homes.

Sales rose 2 percent in October to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.48 million, the National Association of Realtors said Tuesday. That's the fastest pace since June.

91. Tech, housing boom creates homeless crisis on West Coast -

SEATTLE (AP) — In a park in the middle of a leafy, bohemian neighborhood where homes list for close to $1 million, a tractor's massive claw scooped up the refuse of the homeless - mattresses, tents, wooden frames, a wicker chair, an outdoor propane heater. Workers in masks and steel-shanked boots plucked used needles and mounds of waste from the underbrush.

92. US home sales ticked up in September as Houston recovers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home sales rose slightly last month as the Houston housing market quickly recovered from Hurricane Harvey. Still, a shortage of available homes is thwarting many would-be buyers and limiting sales.

93. How Trump tax plan would alter mortgage interest deduction -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Each year, taxpayers subsidize America's homeowners by roughly $70 billion, with the benefits flowing disproportionately to coastal areas with high incomes and pricey homes, from New York and Washington to Los Angeles and San Francisco.

94. US pending home sales fell 2.6 percent in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fewer people signed contracts to buy homes in August, marking the fifth decline in the past six months. The 2.6 percent fall continues to reflect the worsening shortage nationwide of homes being listed for sale.

95. Pace of US home sales in July reached lowest level of 2017 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans retreated from buying homes in July as sales sank to their lowest level of the year.

The National Association of Realtors said Thursday that sales of existing homes fell 1.3 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.44 million. Despite the second straight monthly drop, sales are 2.1 percent higher than a year ago. But purchases are starting to slow as fewer properties are coming onto the market.

96. US home prices reach record high for 6th straight month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices reached a new high in May for the sixth straight month, raising fears of another housing bubble roughly a decade after a previous one burst.

The Standard & Poor's CoreLogic national home price index, released Tuesday, increased 5.6 percent in May, the latest data available. It is now 3.2 percent higher than its July 2006 peak.

97. Average US 30-year mortgage rate slips to 4.02 percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Long-term U.S. mortgage rates inched lower this week. It was the fifth straight week that the benchmark 30-year rate hovered around the key threshold of 4 percent.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday the average rate on 30-year fixed-rate home loans slipped to 4.02 percent from 4.05 percent last week. The rate stood at 3.58 percent a year ago and averaged 3.65 percent in 2016, the lowest level in records dating to 1971.

98. Average US 30-year mortgage rate slips to 4.02 percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Long-term U.S. mortgage rates inched lower this week. It was the fifth straight week that the benchmark 30-year rate hovered around the key threshold of 4 percent.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday the average rate on 30-year fixed-rate home loans slipped to 4.02 percent from 4.05 percent last week. The rate stood at 3.58 percent a year ago and averaged 3.65 percent in 2016, the lowest level in records dating to 1971.

99. US home prices rise at the fastest pace in nearly 3 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices rose steadily upward in February as more homebuyers chased fewer available properties, a trend that many analysts say may not be sustainable.

The Standard & Poor's CoreLogic Case-Shiller national home price index, released Tuesday , increased 5.8 percent in February, the most in 32 months. Such strong price gains and slightly higher mortgage rates may eventually cool off demand.

100. Realtors survive tech advances that have hurt other professions -

Technology has a way of devastating industries, and as early as 1997 a national journal predicted a dire future for the real estate profession.

Incredible advances in technology would put Realtors – along with travel agents – on the endangered species list.