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Editorial Results (free)

1. US retail sales were flat in July as inflation takes a toll -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The pace of sales at U.S. retailers was unchanged last month as persistently high inflation and rising interest rates forced many Americans to spend more cautiously.

Retail purchases were flat after having risen 0.8% in June, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday. Economists had expected a slight increase.

2. Amazon to buy vacuum maker iRobot for roughly $1.7B -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon on Friday announced it has agreed to acquire the vacuum cleaner maker iRobot for approximately $1.7 billion, scooping up another company to add to its collection of smart home appliances amid broader concerns about the company's market power.

3. Amazon to buy primary care provider One Medical for $3.9B -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon will acquire the primary care organization One Medical in a deal valued roughly at $3.9 billion, marking another expansion for the retailer into health care services.

The Seattle-based e-commerce giant said Thursday it is buying One Medical for $18 per share cash. Its one of Amazon's biggest acquisitions, following its $13.7 billion deal to buy Whole Foods in 2017 and its $8.5 billion purchase of Hollywood studio MGM, which closed earlier this year.

4. Amazon to close all its bookstores in the US, UK -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon is confirming it's closing all of its bookstores as well as its 4-star shops and pop up locations as the online behemoth reworks its physical footprint.

The Seattle-based company said Wednesday that the move, which affects 66 stores in the U.S. and two in the United Kingdom, enables it to concentrate its efforts on Amazon Fresh, Whole Foods Market, its convenience concept called Amazon Go and its upcoming Amazon Style stores. Amazon Style, which will sell fashion and accessories, is set to open in a Southern California mall later this year.

5. Amazon plans a clothing store for a Southern California mall -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon says it plans to open a clothing store in a Southern California mall later this year, a first for the online behemoth and a fresh challenge for already struggling traditional retailers.

6. US shoppers find some groceries scarce due to virus, weather -

Benjamin Whitely headed to a Safeway supermarket in Washington D.C. on Tuesday to grab some items for dinner. But he was disappointed to find the vegetable bins barren and a sparse selection of turkey, chicken and milk.

7. Thinking bigger -

Predicting U.S. retail spending and consumer confidence trends right now is a headache-inducing exercise.

Breathless headlines predict nightmarish inventory shortfalls, lack of workers and soaring prices for the 2021 holiday shopping season. They are followed by counterpoint data showing consumers shopping and spending with gusto despite those headwinds.

8. Nashville law firms announce merger -

MTR Family Law, PLLC, is merging with Gullett, Sanford, Robinson & Martin, PLLC, and establishing the new Family Law Practice Group of GSRM, effective Jan. 1.

“We feel privileged to combine two long-standing, Nashville-based law firms who share similar values, commitment to client service, and investment in the Nashville community,” says Phillip P. Welty, managing member, GSRM Law. “Our combined resources and experience will benefit our clients significantly. MTR Family Law has an excellent reputation. It is a win for all.”

9. At many companies, changes from COVID-19 are now permanent -

NEW YORK (AP) — The vending machine outside Pinch Spice Market dispensing packets of herbs and seasonings isn't a sales gimmick — it helped cater to customers as the company struggled through the COVID-19 pandemic.

10. Genetically modified salmon head to US dinner plates -

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The inaugural harvest of genetically modified salmon began this week after the pandemic delayed the sale of the first such altered animal to be cleared for human consumption in the United States, company officials said.

11. Food of the future? EU nations put mealworms on the menu -

BRUSSELS (AP) — Dried yellow mealworms could soon be hitting supermarket shelves and restaurants across Europe.

The European Union's 27 nations gave the greenlight Tuesday to a proposal to put the Tenebrio molitor beetle's larvae on the market as a "novel food."

12. From local farms to many tables -

Eric Wooldridge, a manager at Bells Bend Farms in the Scottsboro/Bells Bend community, plants spinach throughout the fall and winter season. Several varieties – arrowhead leaf and savoy – do particularly well and remain tender and sweet during the cold months.

13. Retailers brace for flood of returns from online shopping -

NEW YORK (AP) — A huge surge in online shopping during the pandemic has been a savior for retailers, but it comes at a price.

Shoppers are expected to return twice as many items as they did during last year's holiday period, costing companies roughly $1.1 billion, according to Narvar Inc., a software and technology company that manages online returns for hundreds of brands.

14. Walmart drops $35 minimum for its members' online orders -

NEW YORK (AP) — Shoppers on Walmart.com who pay a $98-a-year membership fee will get free shipping on orders of any size starting Friday.

Walmart announced the membership perk on Wednesday, doing away with a previous requirement that orders amount to at least $35 to qualify for free shipping.

15. Carrying grandma’s legacy to new height -

North Nashville has always held a special place in Jason Word’s heart, and now his journey truly has come full circle. Word, 49, the new owner of Nashville’s four Save A Lot discount grocery stores, recalls many good times in the Brooklyn Heights area – between Trinity Lane and the Cumberland River – where his late grandmother, Ethel Watkins, ran the family grocery store, Watkins and Sons, following the death of her husband.

16. Thanksgiving dinner: Is it worth the risk? -

The 20-pound turkey comes out of the oven, its skin perfectly browned and crisp. The sideboard is lined with bounteous platters of dressing, macaroni and cheese, sweet potato casserole and creamed onions. The pies – apple, pecan and pumpkin – rest on the dessert table nearby. A houseful of family and friends head to the table to give thanks and dig in.

17. Amazon: Nearly 20,000 workers tested positive for COVID-19 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon said Thursday that nearly 20,000 of its front-line U.S. workers have tested positive or been presumed positive for the virus that causes COVID-19.

But the online retail behemoth, revealing the data for the first time, said that the infection rate of its employees was well below that seen in the general U.S. population. The disclosure comes after months of pressure from Amazon workers and labor groups calling for the company to divulge the COVID-19 numbers.

18. Amazon sees its palm recognition tech in stadiums, offices -

SEATTLE (AP) — Amazon has introduced new palm recognition technology in a pair of Seattle stores and sees broader uses in places like stadiums and offices.

Customers at the stores near Amazon's campus in Washington can flash a palm for entry and to buy goods.

19. 15 years later, Walmart launches its answer to Amazon Prime -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart is launching a new membership service that it hopes can compete with Amazon Prime.

Called Walmart+, it will cost $98 a year, or $12.95 a month, and give members same-day delivery on 160,000 items, a fuel discount at certain gas stations and a chance to check out at Walmart stores without having to wait at a register.

20. Ford temporarily halts work at 2 plants; Rolls cuts jobs -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Wednesday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

21. America's business of prisons thrives even amid a pandemic -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — As factories and other businesses remain shuttered across America, people in prisons in at least 40 states continue going to work. Sometimes they earn pennies an hour, or nothing at all, making masks and hand sanitizer to help guard others from the coronavirus.

22. Searching for a new job during a pandemic -

Remember last year’s great job market? We all knew it would slow at some point, but who could have imagined the economy would come to a screeching halt because of a global pandemic?

My heart goes out to you if you’ve lost your job to this crisis. You might wonder when in the world you’ll be able to look for jobs again. When will companies be hiring?

23. A pause on Wall Street; furloughs ramp up, travel winds down -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Monday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

24. With spreading virus comes fears -- and lots of stockpiling -

NEW YORK (AP) — As an Arizonan, Gregory Cohen has never had to stock up ahead of a hurricane or other natural disaster.

25. No checkout needed: Amazon opens cashier-less grocery store -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon is aiming to kill the supermarket checkout line.

The online retailing giant is opening its first cashier-less supermarket, the latest sign that Amazon is serious about shaking up the $800 billion grocery industry.

26. Tourism even locals can sink their teeth into -

Locals are accustomed to seeing tour buses slowly wind their way through Nashville, the guide pointing out where Dolly records when she’s in town or where Tammy Wynette lived.

But who’s in that small group of determined people resolutely marching down Broadway with a slightly peckish look on their faces? It’s the food tour people. They don’t care where country music stars hang out. They only have one question: What’s on the menu?

27. Giarratana: Think vertical to help preserve non-urban neighborhoods -

Tony Giarratana has for decades devoted himself to transforming downtown Nashville into a vibrant, walkable community for residents and office workers, building such landmarks as The Cumberland, the Bennie Dillon Lofts, Viridian and 505 on Church Street.

28. FDA food sampling finds contamination by 'forever chemicals' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration's first broad testing of food for a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds found substantial levels in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake, according to unreleased findings FDA researchers presented at a scientific conference in Europe.

29. Blue Apron latest to suffer in tough meal kit market -

Meal kit companies face an ultimatum: Adapt or die.

The business is still in its infancy, with the biggest players — Blue Apron and HelloFresh — less than a decade old. But they're facing serious challenges from restaurant and grocery delivery services, smaller niche players and even home chefs.

30. Is it really authentic Indian? Just relax, enjoy the meal -

I recently heard a couple of food fanatic friends arguing about the relative authenticity of two Indian restaurants. Neither of the two was from India nor had any Indian family, but both were fairly well-acquainted with the cuisines of that part of the world and even some of the regional variations.

31. S&P 500 snaps 3-day losing streak as US stocks close higher -

Health care and technology companies helped lift U.S. stocks higher Friday, breaking a three-day losing streak for the S&P 500 and giving the benchmark index its fifth consecutive weekly gain.

Renewed optimism for a potential resolution to the U.S.-China trade conflict helped put investors in a buying mood following a Bloomberg story saying U.S. officials are preparing a deal that could be signed within a month.

32. Retailers are shopping for ways to get rid of checkout lines -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Get ready to say good riddance to the checkout line.

A year after Amazon opened its first cashier-less store, startups and retailers are racing to get similar technology in stores throughout the world, letting shoppers buy groceries without waiting in line.

33. Retailers up their game after Toys R Us closures -

NEW YORK (AP) — When Toys R Us closed its doors, customers mourned the loss of a beloved brand that conjured memories of their own childhood.

Retailers, on the other hand, saw an opportunity.

34. Amazon jumps out ahead of its rivals and raises wages to $15 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon, the business that upended the retailing industry and transformed the way we shop for just about everything, is jumping out ahead of the pack again, announcing a minimum wage of $15 an hour for its U.S. employees that could force other big companies to raise their pay.

35. Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off -

NEW YORK (AP) — Starting a food truck to sell tacos or barbecue on downtown streets may seem easy or fun, but owners are finding they need more sophisticated plans now that the novelty has worn off.

36. Need an entry-level job at a store? It can be harder now -

NEW YORK (AP) — Asia Thomas knew she was at a disadvantage. It had been 16 years since she quit a job at McDonald's to raise her kids. When she left, restaurants didn't have kiosks to take orders, people didn't use smartphones to pay, and job seekers did applications on paper.

37. Tennessee’s economy at risk in this battle of wills -

In an escalating back and forth over trade, Tennessee farmers like John Neal Scarlett are caught in the middle, worrying if politicians are keeping their best interests at heart when talking tough on trade issues.

38. As Trump tweets, Amazon seeks to expand its business empire -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Amazon is spending millions of dollars on lobbying as the global online retailer seeks to expand its reach into a swath of industries that President Donald Trump's broadsides haven't come close to hitting.

39. After a day of wobbling, indexes end down -

NEW YORK (AP) — After a jittery afternoon of trading, major U.S. stock indexes fell Wednesday while smaller companies fared better. The Federal Reserve raised interest rates, as investors expected, and said it could raise rates at a quicker pace next year.

40. Walmart's online same-day grocery ready for prime-time -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart is expanding its same-day online grocery delivery service to more than 40 percent of U.S. households, or 100 metro areas, by year-end as it tries to keep pace with online leader Amazon.com.

41. Amazon CEO's wealth soars to new heights while Trump's sinks -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has become the first $100 billion mogul to top Forbes' annual rankings of the world's richest people. But President Donald Trump's fortune sank during his first year in office despite a surging stock market.

42. Target's reinvention is humming along, at a cost -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target's reinvention plan is driving more people to its stores and its website, where they are spending more for everything from fashion to towels. But the cost of such a massive overhaul is extensive, and it took some of the shine off a strong quarter of sales.

43. Kale to go: Amazon to roll out delivery at Whole Foods -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon is bringing its speedy delivery to Whole Foods. The online retail giant plans to roll out two-hour delivery at the organic grocer this year to those who pay for Amazon's $99-a-year Prime membership. It is the company's biggest move since it bought the organic grocer last year.

44. Losses for US stocks continue as industrials and banks slide -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are lower Thursday morning as losses from the previous day continue. Major indexes are off about 1 percent. Banks, industrial and technology companies are faring the worst. Companies including Hanesbrands, Yelp and Roomba maker iRobot are down sharply following disappointing quarterly reports, but Twitter is soaring after it reported a quarterly profit for the first time. Bond prices are falling and yields are rising.

45. Nashville's most romantic restaurants for 2018 -

Nashville has a restaurant for every mood. If you're looking for romance on Valentine’s Day or any night of the week, you can’t miss with these.

Restaurants new to the list are designated with an *.

46. Amazon, Buffett and JPMorgan join forces on health care -

Three of corporate America's heaviest hitters — Amazon, Warren Buffett and JPMorgan Chase — sent a shudder through the health industry Tuesday when they announced plans to jointly create a company to provide their employees with high-quality, affordable care.

47. Delivery dash: Grocery chain Sprouts teams up with Instacart -

NEW YORK (AP) — Natural grocery chain Sprouts is teaming up with Instacart to expand its delivery options, a strategy many chains have been racing to adopt since Amazon's purchase of Whole Foods last year.

48. 2017 winners and losers: Amazon, Boeing soared; GE plunged -

NEW YORK (AP) — It was a strong year for the stock market, but 2017 was a great year if you made airplanes (think Boeing), were an online juggernaut (Amazon) or built homes (KB Homes). It was a year to forget if you were an energy company (Chesapeake) made Barbie dolls (Mattel) or if you were a storied industrial conglomerate about to go on a radical slim-down program (General Electric).

49. 2017 winners and losers: Amazon, Boeing soared; GE plunged -

NEW YORK (AP) — It was a strong year for the stock market, but 2017 was a great year if you made airplanes (think Boeing), were an online juggernaut (Amazon) or built homes (KB Homes). It was a year to forget if you were an energy company (Chesapeake) made Barbie dolls (Mattel) or if you were a storied industrial conglomerate about to go on a radical slim-down program (General Electric).

50. Walmart lifts profit outlook on strong third-quarter results -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart raised its annual profit outlook Thursday after the world's largest retailer reported third-quarter results that topped Wall Street projections.

The report shows that Walmart's aggressive discounting and its moves to spiff up its stores and increase online services are working to attract shoppers. It also underscores the efforts the discounter is making to narrow the gap between itself and Amazon, but it still faces challenges this holiday shopping season. The online leader has been building its network of services on its own, using its $99-a-year Prime membership with same-day and even one-hour shipping options to develop loyalty. And Amazon's purchase of Whole Foods Market this past summer has raised the competitive stakes in the food business.

51. Kroger to sell own line of clothing aimed at the family -

NEW YORK (AP) — Kroger is launching its own fashion line starting next fall.

The nation's largest supermarket chain said Friday that the brand will first make its debut at Fred Meyer and Kroger Marketplace stores, totaling 300 locations across the country. The casual collection will span from children to teens to adults.

52. Corporate deal-making driven by fast technological change -

LONDON (AP) — The appetite for mergers and acquisitions remains near a record high as firms try to adapt to fast technological changes and despite a welter of geopolitical concerns, a survey of executives found Monday.

53. Tech giants lead rally as stocks near records; Amazon surges -

NEW YORK (AP) — Some of the biggest companies in the world had their best day in years Friday as Microsoft and Alphabet soared following strong third-quarter reports, as did online retail giant Amazon. U.S. stocks set more records as their winning streak extended to a seventh week.

54. Walmart sees the future and it is digital -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart is all about online, anticipating digital sales next fiscal year will rise about 40 percent and that it will double the number of U.S. curbside locations for online grocery shoppers at its stores.

55. Walmart armors up for food fight with Amazon -

NEW YORK (AP) — Just over a year after Walmart spent more than $3 billion for the fast-growing online retailer Jet.com, it will launch a higher-end grocery line targeting millennials as it tries to contain Amazon.com.

56. Toys R Us joins bankruptcy list as Amazon exerts influence -

NEW YORK (AP) — In filing for bankruptcy, Toys R Us joins a list of dozens of store chains that have done so already this year as online leader Amazon increasingly exerts its influence over a huge part of the retailing world.

57. US stocks waver again as energy companies fall -

NEW YORK (AP) — Technology and energy companies skidded Friday while banks and insurers recovered some of their recent losses, leaving major U.S. indexes little changed on the day and slightly lower for the week.

58. Amazon to cut prices on Whole Foods staples like eggs, beef -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon is moving swiftly to make big changes at Whole Foods, saying it plans to cut prices on bananas, eggs, salmon, beef and more as soon as it completes its $13.7 billion takeover next week.

59. Walmart joins forces with Google on voice-activated shopping -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart is diving into voice-activated shopping. But unlike online leader Amazon, it's not doing it alone.

The world's largest retailer said Wednesday it's working with Google to offer hundreds of thousands of items from laundry detergent to Legos for voice shopping through Google Assistant. The capability will be available in late September.

60. Whole Foods shareholders say yes to Amazon deal -

NEW YORK (AP) — Whole Foods shareholders voted Wednesday to bless a $13.7 billion union with Amazon that the organic grocery chain's CEO had called "love at first sight."

That approval is one step required to close the deal, which is a bold move into physical stores for Amazon and has the possibility of making big changes to the supermarket industry and online grocery ordering. The deal also needs the go-ahead from government regulators.

61. Amazon hiring spree includes Chattanooga -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon plans to make thousands of job offers in just one day as it holds a giant job fair next week at nearly a dozen warehouses across the U.S., including Chattanooga.

Those offered jobs on the spot will pack or sort boxes and help ship them to customers. Nearly 40,000 of the 50,000 jobs will be full time. Most of these jobs will count toward Amazon's previously announced goal of adding 100,000 full-time workers by the middle of next year.

62. Amazon isn't technically dominant, but it pervades our lives -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon is already a huge part of many people's lives. And its $13.7 billion deal for the organic grocer Whole Foods will likely bind its customers even more tightly.

The acquisition could easily hurt both Amazon's existing rivals and future startups that might one day challenge it. Yet experts don't believe U.S. antitrust regulators will oppose the deal. After all, it doesn't create anything resembling a traditional monopoly.

63. From Main Street to Mars -

Renee Bell enjoyed some serious success during her 30 years in the music industry.

She worked with Carrie Underwood, Martina McBride, Brooks & Dunn and other stars, for example, during the 20 years she spent as an A&R executive at Sony Music.

64. Mayor names Cole Metro’s first chief resilience officer -

Nashville Mayor Megan Barry has appointed Erik Cole as chief resilience officer in the new Office of Resilience.

The new position and office were created to lead citywide efforts to help Nashville prepare for, withstand and bounce back from catastrophic events including floods, tornadoes and fires and slow-moving disasters like unemployment, affordable housing and poverty and inequality.

65. Grocery store stocks plummet after Amazon-Whole Foods deal -

Amazon's acquisition of Whole Foods Market is sending the stocks of grocery store operators and other companies that compete with Whole Foods plunging.

Investors worry that Amazon, which has already won over hordes of shoppers of clothing, electronics and many other kinds of goods, wreaking havoc on department stores and other brick-and-mortar retailers, will do the same thing with groceries.

66. Amazon buying Whole Foods in bold move into brick and mortar -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon is buying Whole Foods in a stunning move that gives it hundreds of stores across the U.S. — a brand-new laboratory for radical retail experiments that could revolutionize the way people buy groceries.

67. Amazon-Whole Foods deal hammers grocery stores; Dow ticks up -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon's $13.4 billion deal for Whole Foods sent grocery stores, big retailers, and food makers and distributors plunging Friday. Energy companies rose while other stocks were little changed.

68. US stocks slide in morning trading; oil heads higher -

U.S. stocks were broadly lower in morning trading Thursday as investors sized up the latest batch of earnings reports from retailers and other companies. Real estate stocks fell the most. Oil prices headed higher.

69. Nashville's most romantic restaurants for 2017 -

No matter what romance means to you, Nashville has you covered – and then some. Here’s the list of where to go to celebrate love and some seriously good food.

360 Wine Bar Bistro

6000 Highway 100, 615 353-5604, www.360bistro.com

70. Google launches home delivery service in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Google has launched its home delivery service across Tennessee.

The Tennessean (http://tnne.ws/2dFa2qc) reports that Google Express launched Tuesday and will connect shoppers with select retailers across the state.

71. Whole Foods reaches $3.5M environmental waste settlement -

DALLAS (AP) — Whole Foods Market Inc. has reached a $3.5 million settlement with regulators over its improper identification or mishandling of hazardous waste at stores.

72. Marshall takes once-tiny Puckett’s to new heights -

Andy Marshall is one of Middle Tennessee’s most dynamic restaurateurs.

The former grocer, who launched Puckett’s Gro. & Restaurant in 2002 with a winning combination of Southern comfort food and live music, has grown his company, A. Marshall Family Foods, into a multi-concept restaurant group that employs more than 500 people and just landed on Inc. magazine’s list of fastest-growing private companies for the third consecutive year.

73. Lighting up Broadway -

If you see a lot of construction cranes in Nashville now, just wait. More are on the way, and they’re heading to Broadway.

The Tennessean’s parent company is selling its 10 acres in and around 1100 Broadway, home to the daily since the 1930s. One block east, a Hyatt Regency Hotel is in the works for the corner of 10th and Broadway, part of nearly 15 acres that LifeWay Christian Resources sold to developers last year for $125 million.

74. US stock indexes mixed; Nasdaq ekes out another record high -

Even on a day when the major U.S. stock indexes barely budged, the market notched another milestone.

The Nasdaq composite eked out a gain, pushing the tech-heavy index to its second record-high close in a row. The Dow Jones industrial average and Standard & Poor's 500 index drifted in the opposite direction, closing slightly in the red.

75. Events -

SALON@615. Glennnon Melton in conversation with Ann Patchett, War Memorial Auditorium, 301 6th Ave. N., 6:30 p.m. $28.50 plus $5.50 ticket fee. Book: Love Warrior Information: library.nashville.org

76. Farmers markets growing in number, hanging around longer -

Watch out now. Those farmers markets that shoppers are increasingly depending on for their produce might not be disappearing altogether as the season changes. At least not anytime soon.

A seeming bumper crop of farmers markets have continued to sprout since the early spring harvests and, at least until the frost covers the pumpkins, there is no slowdown in sight. And the way things are going, it won’t be long before the markets flourish year-round (more on that later).

77. Stocks hesitate as investors work through earnings -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks were edging slightly higher Thursday, as investors worked through another batch of mixed earnings' results, including results from Facebook, Ford and Whole Foods.

Investors wait to hear from the Bank of Japan tomorrow, where the bank is expected to announce more stimulus for the world's third-largest economy.

78. Got a food crisis? Blue Bell shows how to regain public trust -

If food recalls seem to have you cross-checking your pantry or freezer more often, it’s likely you are.

A quick look at the latest listings on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration website shows 108 recalls from May 11 through July 9 this year. The list includes items you could find in any home in Tennessee – Krusteaz Pancake Mix at Kroger that may be contaminated with E.coli, macadamia nuts from Whole Foods Market with salmonella – even Dollywood Cajun Mix with listeria.

79. A late decline erases gains for US stock market indexes -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market fell for a fifth straight day Wednesday as investors set aside the Federal Reserve's interest rate decision and remained focused on next week's vote on whether Britain will remain in the European Union.

80. Investigator: FDA still taking months to recall tainted food -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal health officials failed to force a recall of peanut butter and almond products for three months after advanced DNA testing confirmed salmonella contamination, government investigators reported Thursday.

81. Investigator: FDA still taking months to recall tainted food -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal health officials failed to force a recall of peanut butter and almond products for three months after advanced DNA testing confirmed salmonella contamination, government investigators reported Thursday.

82. Community supported agriculture provides direct link from farmers to table -

In 2009, all Stephanie Bradshaw wanted to do was get her family back to cleaner eating. Running a business around the pickup and delivery of farm-fresh produce wasn’t in the picture. But it soon would be.

83. Dodging a disaster with Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

84. ‘Comfy’ foods a perfect way to beat the chill -

All the snowy, cold weather we’ve had left me in search of warm, cozy recipes. And just watching the news of all the blizzards in the rest of the States leaves me bundled up by the fire.

This past week, I made a large pot of chili, a large pot of beef-barley vegetable soup, and a casserole of creamy, cheesy enchiladas, all great dishes for staying inside and watching the snow and ice, hurricanes, tornadoes and earthquakes. And there was plenty of all of that throughout the world.

85. US stocks slip as Wal-Mart earnings hit retailers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are edging mostly lower Thursday morning, led by declines in consumer stocks after Wal-Mart reported disappointing results and cut its sales projections. The market is coming off a three-day rally, its longest so far this year. The price of crude oil continued to recover.

86. LocalShares expands with new leadership, divisions -

LocalShares Inc., a community-focused investment firm, has attracted veteran leadership to head new divisions of the company.

Margaret O. Dolan, a Nashville business and community leader and formerly president and CEO of the Saint Thomas Health Foundations, has been named the president of the new Knowledge Division.

87. Music City has chocolate to soothe any sweet tooth -

If you’ve ever seen someone at a local meat and three restaurant order sweet tea and still add sugar, then Nashville’s sweet tooth is no surprise.

And like health care and high tech, this has become the place to be for those looking to satisfy those calorie-dense cravings.

88. Robertson helps busy clients make better choices -

It’s January and that means Amber Robertson’s schedule is maxed out with clients anxious to start the New Year on a positive note.

Robertson is an integrative health coach who specializes in working with entrepreneurs and busy professionals. She advises them on everything from how to avoid the energy-draining 3 p.m. crash at work to how to lose weight and keep it off.

89. Stocks edge lower for second day; Valeant falls sharply -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are edging slightly lower following mixed quarterly results from companies like Facebook and Whole Foods Market. Investors are also preparing for the release of the government's monthly jobs report Friday.

90. Wal-Mart HQ cuts with "need to become a more agile company" -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wal-Mart laid off 450 workers at its headquarters Friday as the world's largest retailer attempts to become more nimble so that it can better compete with the likes of Amazon.com.

91. Whole Foods to cut about 1,500 jobs over next 8 weeks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Grocery chain Whole Foods is cutting about 1,500 jobs over the next eight weeks as it looks to lower prices and keep up with competition.

The cuts represent about 1.6 percent of its workforce.

92. Karlen Evins finds her ‘most authentic self’ in farming -

A diminutive Karlen Evins walks from her vegetable garden to the reassembled church in which she lives, her arms full of just-picked corn, tomatoes, herbs and okra, and drops them on her kitchen counter.

93. Target tests grocery delivery service -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Target is testing the online grocery delivery waters. The Minneapolis-based discounter has teamed with Instacart, the online grocery delivery service that started in 2012, to let shoppers in the Minneapolis area order fruits and other perishables, as well as household, pet and baby products, and have them delivered to their homes in as little as an hour.

94. Stocks mostly lower in US after some weaker company results -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks were slightly lower Thursday, following disappointing results from several big companies including Procter & Gamble, Whole Foods and Facebook. A positive report on U.S. economic growth did little to help the market.

95. Whole Foods: New concept to take name of '365' house brand -

NEW YORK (AP) — Whole Foods says it will name its new chain of smaller stores with lower prices after its "365 Everyday Value" house brand.

Co-CEO Walter Robb tells The Associated Press that the chain will be named "365 by Whole Foods Market," a nod to the brand already sold by the grocery chain.

96. US stocks drift mostly lower; Treasury rates rise -

NEW YORK (AP) — Major stock indexes are drifting mostly lower in afternoon trading Tuesday. Bond prices fell, driving a benchmark interest rate to its high for the year. Crude oil closed higher.

97. US stock indexes are slightly higher a day after a drop -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks edged higher in morning trading Thursday as investors remained cautious following comments a day earlier from Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, who suggested that stock prices might be overvalued.

98. Nashville’s most romantic restaurants -

Romance means something different for everyone, but most people can agree that if there is low lighting, soft music, a charming companion and something delicious to eat, you’ve already got the makings of one outstanding evening.

99. US company outlooks worry investors, sending stocks lower -

U.S. stocks slumped Tuesday after some of the market's largest companies reported disappointing earnings, taking investors on a turbulent ride that deepened the losses for the year.

The companies that rattled the market included Microsoft, Caterpillar and Procter & Gamble. Some also forecast weaker results in months ahead.

100. Nashvillians offer resolutions and hopes for the new year -

About 45 percent of Americans make New Year’s resolutions – or so says the Journal of Clinical Psychology. And one of the best ways to ensure they stick? Make them public.

So, we asked a few Nashvillians in various fields – some of whom we spoke with earlier in the year – to share their resolutions, goals or intentions for both their personal lives or businesses as well as hopes they have for the city.