» Subscribe Today!
The Power of Information
Home
The Ledger - EST. 1978 - Nashville Edition
X
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search

Name & Property Search

Search results for 'whole food market' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:0
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:37
East Tennessee:0
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

TNLedger Knoxville Edition subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. US economy shrank by 1.5% in Q1 but consumers kept spending -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy shrank in the first three months of the year even though consumers and businesses kept spending at a solid pace, the government reported Thursday in a slight downgrade of its previous estimate for the January-March quarter.

2. EXPLAINER: Why US inflation is so high, when it might ease -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Another month, another four-decade high for inflation.

For the 12 months that ended in March, consumer prices rocketed 8.5%. That was the fastest year-over-year jump since 1981, far surpassing February's mark of 7.9%, itself a 40-year high.

3. Efforts to make protective medical gear in US falling flat -

UNIVERSITY CITY, Mo. (AP) — When the coronavirus pandemic first hit the U.S., sales of window coverings at Halcyon Shades quickly went dark. So the suburban St. Louis business did what hundreds of other small manufacturers did: It pivoted to make protective supplies, with help from an $870,000 government grant.

4. Bradley adds Chaloner to intellectual property group -

Aaron Chaloner has joined Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP as a senior attorney in the Intellectual Property Practice Group.

Chaloner focuses his practice on patent prosecution in the life science and biotechnology industry. He is experienced in all stages of intellectual property prosecution and provides strategic counsel to his clients regarding copyright, trademark, patent and trade secret concerns.

5. Russia-Ukraine war: Key things to know about the conflict -

Ukraine's cities stood under relentless Russian fire on Thursday, as President Volodymyr Zelenskyy asked NATO leaders gathered in Brussels to provide unlimited aid — including planes, tanks and other weapons — saying his country is "defending our common values."

6. Invest what you can afford to lose in friend’s business -

Ben & Jerry’s was started by childhood best friends. Four grad school buddies founded Warby Parker. A long friendship-turned-partnership brought Clear to TSA security lines across the U.S. A shopping trip between two pals launched size-inclusive clothing brand Universal Standard.

7. EXPLAINER: What would a Russian bond default mean? -

Ratings agencies say Russia is on the verge of defaulting on government bonds following its invasion of Ukraine, with billions of dollars owed to foreigners. That prospect recalls memories of a 1998 default by Moscow that helped fuel financial disruption worldwide.

8. Not all Western companies sever ties to Russia over Ukraine -

A shrinking number of well-known companies are still doing business in Russia, even as hundreds have announced plans to curtail ties.

Burger King restaurants are open, Eli Lilly is supplying drugs, and PepsiCo is selling milk and baby food, but no more soda.

9. Amazon to close all its bookstores in the US, UK -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon is confirming it's closing all of its bookstores as well as its 4-star shops and pop up locations as the online behemoth reworks its physical footprint.

The Seattle-based company said Wednesday that the move, which affects 66 stores in the U.S. and two in the United Kingdom, enables it to concentrate its efforts on Amazon Fresh, Whole Foods Market, its convenience concept called Amazon Go and its upcoming Amazon Style stores. Amazon Style, which will sell fashion and accessories, is set to open in a Southern California mall later this year.

10. Key inflation gauge hit 6.1% in January, highest since 1982 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An inflation gauge that is closely monitored by the Federal Reserve jumped 6.1% in January compared with a year ago, the latest evidence that Americans are enduring sharp price increases that will likely worsen after Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

11. US shoppers find some groceries scarce due to virus, weather -

Benjamin Whitely headed to a Safeway supermarket in Washington D.C. on Tuesday to grab some items for dinner. But he was disappointed to find the vegetable bins barren and a sparse selection of turkey, chicken and milk.

12. Supply shortages and emboldened workers: A changed economy -

Employees at a fast-food restaurant in Sacramento, California, exasperated over working in stifling heat for low wages, demanded more pay and a new air conditioner — and got both.

Customer orders poured in to an Italian auto supplier, which struggled to get hold of enough supplies of everything from plastic to microchips to meet the demand.

13. Thinking bigger -

Predicting U.S. retail spending and consumer confidence trends right now is a headache-inducing exercise.

Breathless headlines predict nightmarish inventory shortfalls, lack of workers and soaring prices for the 2021 holiday shopping season. They are followed by counterpoint data showing consumers shopping and spending with gusto despite those headwinds.

14. Biden to keep Powell as Fed chair, Brainard gets vice chair -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said Monday he is nominating Jerome Powell for a second four-year term as Federal Reserve chair, endorsing his stewardship of the economy through a brutal pandemic recession in which the Fed's ultra-low rate policies helped bolster confidence and revitalize the job market.

15. Japan game maker Nintendo sees no quick fix for chips crunch -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's employers stepped up their hiring in October, adding a solid 531,000 jobs, the most since July and a sign that the recovery from the pandemic recession may be overcoming a virus-induced slowdown.

16. Fed pulls back economic aid in face of rising uncertainties -

WASHINGTON (AP) — If you find the current economy a bit confusing, don't worry: So does the nation's top economic official, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell.

17. US consumer spending up a modest 0.6% with inflation high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — American consumers slowed their spending to a gain of just 0.6% in September, a cautionary sign for an economy that remains in the grip of a pandemic and a prolonged bout of high inflation.

18. US economy slowed to a 2% rate last quarter in face of COVID -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hampered by rising COVID-19 cases and persistent supply shortages, the U.S. economy slowed sharply to a 2% annual growth rate in the July-September period, the weakest quarterly expansion since the recovery from the pandemic recession began last year.

19. Apple once threatened Facebook ban over Mideast maid abuse -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Two years ago, Apple threatened to pull Facebook and Instagram from its app store over concerns about the platform being used as a tool to trade and sell maids in the Mideast.

20. Nashville law firms announce merger -

MTR Family Law, PLLC, is merging with Gullett, Sanford, Robinson & Martin, PLLC, and establishing the new Family Law Practice Group of GSRM, effective Jan. 1.

“We feel privileged to combine two long-standing, Nashville-based law firms who share similar values, commitment to client service, and investment in the Nashville community,” says Phillip P. Welty, managing member, GSRM Law. “Our combined resources and experience will benefit our clients significantly. MTR Family Law has an excellent reputation. It is a win for all.”

21. US slightly revises up its GDP estimate for Q2 to 6.7% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy expanded at a 6.7% annual pace from April through June, the Commerce Department said Thursday, slightly upgrading its estimate of last quarter's growth in the face of a resurgence of COVID-19 in the form of the delta variant.

22. Landlords look for an exit amid federal eviction moratorium -

NEW YORK (AP) — When Ryan David bought three rental properties back in 2017, he expected the $1,000-a-month he was pocketing after expenses would be regular sources of income well into his retirement years.

23. Dollar General thrives despite ‘retail apocalypse' -

Don’t blink! You might miss the grand opening of another Dollar General store. OK, that’s an exaggeration. But not by much.

In the 14 years since an investment group purchased the family owned business and took it public again two years later, the Goodlettsville-based chain has added nearly 10,000 stores to boast more retail locations than any other company in the United States – quickly closing on 18,000 stores in 46 states.

24. Shipping snags prompt US firms to mull retreat from China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Game maker Eric Poses last year created The Worst-Case Scenario Card Game, making a wry reference to the way the coronavirus had upended normal life.

He had no idea.

In a twist that Poses never could have predicted, his game itself would become caught up in the latest fallout from the health crisis: a backlogged global supply chain that has delayed shipments around the world and sent freight costs rocketing.

25. US consumers boost spending 1% as inflation remains high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — American consumers increased their spending by 1% in June — a dose of energy for an economy that is quickly rebounding from the pandemic recession but is facing new risks led by the delta variant of the coronavirus.

26. Fewer working-age people may slow economy. Will it lift pay? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As America's job market rebounds this summer and the need for workers intensifies, employers won't likely have a chance to relax anytime soon. Worker shortages will likely persist for years after the fast-reopening economy shakes off its growing pains.

27. Genetically modified salmon head to US dinner plates -

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The inaugural harvest of genetically modified salmon began this week after the pandemic delayed the sale of the first such altered animal to be cleared for human consumption in the United States, company officials said.

28. What now for retailers? -

When Tennessee communities shuttered in March 2020, small businesses with a model that relies on heavy in-person traffic – restaurants, retail stores, etc. – were hit particularly hard. Now some of them are cautiously pursuing more normal operations and putting into place the hard lessons learned over the last 13 months.

29. Food of the future? EU nations put mealworms on the menu -

BRUSSELS (AP) — Dried yellow mealworms could soon be hitting supermarket shelves and restaurants across Europe.

The European Union's 27 nations gave the greenlight Tuesday to a proposal to put the Tenebrio molitor beetle's larvae on the market as a "novel food."

30. From local farms to many tables -

Eric Wooldridge, a manager at Bells Bend Farms in the Scottsboro/Bells Bend community, plants spinach throughout the fall and winter season. Several varieties – arrowhead leaf and savoy – do particularly well and remain tender and sweet during the cold months.

31. Knoxville partners race in to bolster Music City Grand Prix -

Teddy Phillips knows a good investment opportunity when he hears it. But the chief executive officer of the Knoxville-based heavy civil construction firm Phillips & Jordan needed some questions answered before committing.

32. From job cuts to online commerce, virus reshaped US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At first, it was expected to be brief. At least that was the hope.

Instead, a once-in-a-century pandemic has ground on for a year, throwing millions out of work and upending wide swathes of the American economy. Delivery services thrived while restaurants suffered. Home offices replaced downtown offices. Travel and entertainment spending dried up.

33. Biden inherits damaged economy, with signs of hope emerging -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has inherited a badly damaged economy pulverized by the pandemic, with 10 million fewer jobs than a year ago and as many as one in 6 small businesses shut down.

34. Retailers brace for flood of returns from online shopping -

NEW YORK (AP) — A huge surge in online shopping during the pandemic has been a savior for retailers, but it comes at a price.

Shoppers are expected to return twice as many items as they did during last year's holiday period, costing companies roughly $1.1 billion, according to Narvar Inc., a software and technology company that manages online returns for hundreds of brands.

35. Santa’s got a brand new bag -

David Levy’s family’s clothing business goes back generations, so he has plenty of history from which to draw and family experience to guide him.

That history includes the 1918 flu pandemic, which swept through the country about 30 years after Levy’s opened and killed 7,721 Tennesseans, Tennessee Historical Society records show, though he has no records for how it affected business.

36. Carrying grandma’s legacy to new height -

North Nashville has always held a special place in Jason Word’s heart, and now his journey truly has come full circle. Word, 49, the new owner of Nashville’s four Save A Lot discount grocery stores, recalls many good times in the Brooklyn Heights area – between Trinity Lane and the Cumberland River – where his late grandmother, Ethel Watkins, ran the family grocery store, Watkins and Sons, following the death of her husband.

37. Thanksgiving dinner: Is it worth the risk? -

The 20-pound turkey comes out of the oven, its skin perfectly browned and crisp. The sideboard is lined with bounteous platters of dressing, macaroni and cheese, sweet potato casserole and creamed onions. The pies – apple, pecan and pumpkin – rest on the dessert table nearby. A houseful of family and friends head to the table to give thanks and dig in.

38. Amazon: Nearly 20,000 workers tested positive for COVID-19 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon said Thursday that nearly 20,000 of its front-line U.S. workers have tested positive or been presumed positive for the virus that causes COVID-19.

But the online retail behemoth, revealing the data for the first time, said that the infection rate of its employees was well below that seen in the general U.S. population. The disclosure comes after months of pressure from Amazon workers and labor groups calling for the company to divulge the COVID-19 numbers.

39. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's dubious claims on health care, court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump isn't providing all the facts when he promises that people with preexisting medical problems will always be covered by health insurance if "Obamacare" is ruled unconstitutional.

40. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's baseless claim of 'deep state' at FDA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is leveling unfounded attacks on his Food and Drug Administration and distorting the science on effective treatments for COVID-19.

Heading this week into the Republican National Convention, he asserted that the agency is slow-walking vaccines and treatments for the coronavirus in a bid to undermine his November reelection effort. There's no evidence of that, and one of his former FDA commissioners on Sunday rejected the accusation as groundless.

41. Goodwill benefits from virus-induced decluttering -

Even though the COVID-19 pandemic is far from over, themes have emerged: Resilience, flexibility, initiative. And in those early days in March and April: Housecleaning, so much housecleaning.

So what to do with that third set of silverware that never got used or the boxes of toddler clothes that belonged to the high-school senior ready for college? Or the sofa that finally was liberated from the junk room and hauled to the driveway?

42. Forced to adapt, businesses rethink how they make money -

NEW YORK (AP) — Many business owners are changing the way they make money as they attempt to recoup revenue lost to the coronavirus outbreak.

The changes can look subtle; for example, when owners of clothing stores decide to beef up their internet business. But often such adjustments involve an entire rethinking of the business model — the blueprint that encompasses the key aspects of running a company — with significant changes to staffing, technology and inventory.

43. Ford temporarily halts work at 2 plants; Rolls cuts jobs -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Wednesday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

44. From boom to bust to survival mode -

Three months ago there was no doubt that Andy Mumma was one of Nashville’s brightest hospitality stars, and 2020 was set to be one of his best years ever.

His flagship Barista Parlor coffee shop in East Nashville was about to celebrate eight years in business, and his Tiki bar, Chopper, was approaching its first anniversary. His roasting company and Barista Parlor locations in Golden Sound, Germantown and Marathon Village were thriving. Later this year he was set to open locations at the airport, at the new W Hotel downtown and at Sylvan Supply in West Nashville.

45. America's business of prisons thrives even amid a pandemic -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — As factories and other businesses remain shuttered across America, people in prisons in at least 40 states continue going to work. Sometimes they earn pennies an hour, or nothing at all, making masks and hand sanitizer to help guard others from the coronavirus.

46. A pause on Wall Street; furloughs ramp up, travel winds down -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Monday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

47. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's misfires on virus death rates, tests -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing a grim reality of surging coronavirus cases, President Donald Trump is making premature assertions about relatively low death rates in the U.S. and revising history about how seriously he viewed the threat, including the need for ventilators.

48. Monday: Big layoffs, bigger hirings; Dollar General adding 50,000 -

The rapid spread of the coronavirus since it was first reported in China has dealt an unprecedented shock to the global economy.

Following are business developments Monday related to the outbreak as governments attempt to stabilize their economies, companies struggle to cope and millions of people face job losses and disruptions in supplies of goods and in services.

49. Trump urges states to do more as hospitals sound alarms -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Insisting the federal government is not a "shipping clerk," President Donald Trump on Thursday called on states to do more to secure their own critically needed masks, ventilators and testing supplies as the pressure mounted on hospitals struggling to cope with a rising number of coronavirus patients.

50. MNPS board appoints Battle director of schools -

The Board of Education for Metro Nashville Public Schools has selected Adrienne Battle as director of schools. Battle, who has led the district as interim director for the past 11 months, is the first woman to serve in this role for Metro Schools.

51. $2M house finally sells after 3 deals fall through -

The number of COVID-19 cases is growing, and the stock market is shrinking. Of those considering home ownership, many have 20% less cash to invest than they had last month.

With more testing kits becoming available, the number of confirmed cases will grow, and the markets could decline further.

52. With spreading virus comes fears -- and lots of stockpiling -

NEW YORK (AP) — As an Arizonan, Gregory Cohen has never had to stock up ahead of a hurricane or other natural disaster.

53. No checkout needed: Amazon opens cashier-less grocery store -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon is aiming to kill the supermarket checkout line.

The online retailing giant is opening its first cashier-less supermarket, the latest sign that Amazon is serious about shaking up the $800 billion grocery industry.

54. EU approves tough negotiating mandate for UK trade talks -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union on Tuesday gave its chief negotiator Michel Barnier a robust negotiating mandate to get a free trade deal with Britain, which counters several of the red lines that London has set.

55. Beware of these overhyped, pricey financial strategies -

A good rule of thumb when you’re trying to eat healthy is to beware of any food you see advertised. The most beneficial fare – whole grains, fruits, vegetables – tends not to have a marketing budget.

56. Tourism even locals can sink their teeth into -

Locals are accustomed to seeing tour buses slowly wind their way through Nashville, the guide pointing out where Dolly records when she’s in town or where Tammy Wynette lived.

But who’s in that small group of determined people resolutely marching down Broadway with a slightly peckish look on their faces? It’s the food tour people. They don’t care where country music stars hang out. They only have one question: What’s on the menu?

57. China announces tariff cuts, more competition in markets -

BEIJING (AP) — China said Monday it will reduce tariffs Jan. 1 on more than 850 foreign products including frozen pork, asthma medications and some high-tech components to spur economic development.

58. Farmers’ Market a great place to find local products -

Selecting that perfect gift for a loved one or friend can take considerable thought and even more time to track down.

But if you think Tennessee for all your presents this year, you can narrow the focus to artisans right here in your home state and contribute to local economies.

59. Shop local: Give gifts that also help your neighbors -

What to buy this holiday season for the person who has everything? How about food, the gift that never disappoints.

The Nashville area is blessed with plenty of food purveyors making everything from hot cheddar biscuits to small-batch gourmet chocolates. Most of them also provide swoon-worthy containers, so all you need to add is a bow.

60. The gift who keeps on giving -

The phone rings about 15 minutes after Stacie Huckeba lets me out the door of her East Nashville home, her eyes slightly moist from cursing the health woes forcing her to give up her annual Christmas Day treks into homeless encampments to deliver backpacks filled with good tidings of great joy and McDonald’s gift certificates, lip balm, socks and so much more.

61. Easing the squeeze in Bordeaux -

The days of going out the back door and down two flights of steps to the basement to do the laundry or take food from the freezer are over for East Nashville resident Ivy McGee.

An affordable-housing nonprofit, Rebuilding Together Nashville, helped her repair her cozy cottage-style home, starting with a wheelchair ramp for her brother’s use in 2015. Now, she can live safely for years to come in the house she bought almost 20 years ago.

62. Quest for authentic dim sum -

In Chinese, dim sum roughly translates to “lightly touch your heart.” And it does. Eating dim sum around a shared table with everyone taking samples off multiple plates is one of the happiest ways to build community through food.

63. Events -

Mayor's Night Out. Nashville Mayor John Cooper is hosting Mayor’s Night Out event on the second Thursday of each month. Nashville residents are invited to voice their concerns in one-on-one conversations with the mayor and Metro department leaders. The first event is being held at Creswell Middle School, 3500 John Mallette Dr., 6-8:30 pm.

64. Why would you cook? -

It’s the countdown to the biggest eating day of the year. But an afternoon of overindulgence also means a whole lot of cooking. There are onions to chop, potatoes to boil, cans of cream of mushroom soup to open for the ubiquitous green bean casserole and, of course, a plump turkey that will consume all your oven space for at least four hours.

65. Despair in Burgundy and beyond, as US tariffs hit EU goods -

CHABLIS, France (AP) — French vintners are begging for government aid. Italian farmers are scrambling for new export markets. And American shoppers are about to face supermarket sticker shock on European products.

66. Johnson says he'll tell Trump: Hands off UK health service -

NEW YORK (AP) — Britain's prime minister has promised to tell U.S. President Donald Trump that any notion of American firms buying parts of the U.K.'s beloved, state-funded health service will be off the table in future trade negotiations, and that the United States will have to open its markets to British goods if it wants to make a deal.

67. Walmart rolls out unlimited grocery delivery subscription -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart is rolling out an unlimited grocery delivery subscription service this fall as it races to gain an advantage in the competitive fresh food business.

The service will charge an annual membership fee of $98 for subscribers to access unlimited same-day delivery, which will be offered in 1,400 stores in 200 markets. By year-end, it will extend to a total of 1,600 stores — or more than 50% of the country.

68. Events -

The Tennessee State Fair is open through Sept. 15. Agricultural fairs are a tradition in Tennessee. Among the state fair highlights are entertainment and music, pageants, livestock and equine competitions, food, arts and crafts, midway rides and games. 500 Wedgewood Avenue, Nashville. Information: http://tnstatefair.org

69. Events -

State Fairs: Agricultural fairs are a tradition in Tennessee, and the annual Tennessee State Fair will open Friday.

The Fair Association promotes the education of agriculture, horticulture, the creative arts, performing arts, industry, commerce, recreation, economic development, natural resources, and related areas to the public, through the planning, promotion, conduct, and operation of an annual fair. Among the state fair highlights are entertainment and music, pageants, livestock and equine competitions, food, arts and crafts, midway rides and games.

70. Market brings sweet and sour to neighborhood -

We’d already bought some two-toned hybrid squash, green beans and tomatoes, and just needed some corn to fill out the evening meal.

“Sweet corn?” asked Paul Lassiter, of Lost Weekend Farms.

71. Events -

Through Sept. 22: Shakespeare Festival A summer production of Shakespeare’s best-known works The Tempest & Pericles. One C1ty, 8 City Blvd. The Tempest: August  29, 31, September 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12, 14, 15, 19, 21, & 22 Pericles: August 30, September 1 (late show), 6, 13, 20

72. Franchising is the future -

Ever eat at a Captain D’s or a Shoney’s restaurant? Grab a cupcake from Gigi’s or a latte at Just Love Coffee?

People who do so every day are fueling the success of many new and longtime franchise brands which started in and around Nashville, and who still call Tennessee home.

73. Sound investment? -

The founders of Nashville’s Live on the Green music festival weren’t sure what to expect. It was 2009, their first year, and startup festivals are a risky, expensive venture that can either be a talked-about triumph or a practically ignored footnote in any given summer’s agenda.

74. Tia Rose finds her dream at Twin Kegs: ‘Dive bar with great food’ -

Dark brown eyes and hair showcasing her Italian heritage, the namesake of Rosie’s International Famous Twin Kegs scans her business, where she promises Woodbine’s (and she hopes Nashville’s) best burger-and-beer selection.

75. Events -

Williamson, Inc. Young Professionals Luncheon. This event is tailored to individuals who are interested in furthering their leadership aspirations, cultivating relationships and growing professionally. Network and connect to learn from some of the most experienced business leaders in Williamson County. Williamson County Association of Realtors, 1646 Westgate Circle, Ste. #104. Thursday, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Members $20, Non-members $30. Information

76. Facebook's digital currency might flourish where banks don't -

NEW YORK (AP) — Europeans and Americans have their Visa and Mastercards. For everyone else, here comes ... Libra?

Facebook's new Libra digital currency is aimed at a huge potential market for financial services — the entire developing world, with billions of people in areas such as India and Sub-Saharan Africa, where financial services are often less sophisticated and many people don't use traditional banking accounts.

77. FDA food sampling finds contamination by 'forever chemicals' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration's first broad testing of food for a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds found substantial levels in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake, according to unreleased findings FDA researchers presented at a scientific conference in Europe.

78. Blue Apron latest to suffer in tough meal kit market -

Meal kit companies face an ultimatum: Adapt or die.

The business is still in its infancy, with the biggest players — Blue Apron and HelloFresh — less than a decade old. But they're facing serious challenges from restaurant and grocery delivery services, smaller niche players and even home chefs.

79. TN facing longterm shortage of health care workers -

Samantha Rooks, a registered respiratory therapist at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt, says she always wanted to work in health care, though no one in her family had ever chosen that path. She loves what she does, she adds, and has been at Vanderbilt for nearly 20 years, working exclusively with children.

80. Lodge lives on despite shifting food trends -

Cast iron carries the weight of history. It remains largely made the same way it has been for hundreds of years, and short of violent neglect, cast iron cookware should last for generations, which makes the story of Lodge Manufacturing in South Pittsburg all the more incredible.

81. Do James Beard Awards still matter? Should they? -

On May 6, the top toques of American dining will gather in Chicago for a celebration of all things food, drink and hospitality at the annual paean to cookery called the James Beard Foundation Awards.

82. Is it really authentic Indian? Just relax, enjoy the meal -

I recently heard a couple of food fanatic friends arguing about the relative authenticity of two Indian restaurants. Neither of the two was from India nor had any Indian family, but both were fairly well-acquainted with the cuisines of that part of the world and even some of the regional variations.

83. In with new, enjoy the old this Valentine’s Day -

The classic day for passion could find you and your loved one embracing a new chef or cuisine or a new part of town. What could be more romantic than discovering the burgeoning food scene together?

84. Prince’s pilgrims disappointed to discover fire damage -

The biology professor from a small Illinois college and his family are visibly upset after pulling off Dickerson Pike onto Ewing Drive to find their desired hot chicken shack dark, disheveled, smoke-stained and empty.

85. Auto parts firm picks Antioch for HQ -

LKQ Corporation has opened its North American headquarters in Antioch.

LKQ Corporation, with operations in Europe and Taiwan, is a provider of alternative and specialty parts to repair and accessorize automobiles and other vehicles.

86. Brother Z has church service, Sunday lunch covered -

Brother Z isn’t bothered that his homeless congregation members gather across Dickerson Pike, generally not even coming near the door into the carport-turned-church snuggled behind his takeout shack specializing in 15 spicy flavors of chicken wings.

87. You won’t miss the pizza at Ed’s Fish & Pizza House -

Don’t expect to get a New York-style slice with pepperoni at Ed’s Fish & Pizza House. Nor with just cheese. Certainly not even a sniff of unfairly pilloried anchovies. Fact is, there’s been no pizza at Ed’s since 1993, when Big Anthony bought the place from his Uncle Ed Morris.

88. Amazon's growing pains in Seattle offer lessons to new hosts -

SEATTLE (AP) — As Amazon turns its attention to setting up new homes in Long Island City, New York and Arlington, Virginia, experts and historians in Seattle say both places can expect a delicate relationship with the world's hottest online retailer.

89. Eurozone inflation near 6-year high as oil price spikes -

LONDON (AP) — Consumer prices across the 19-country eurozone rose at their fastest rate in nearly six years in October, largely on the back of higher energy costs, official figures showed Wednesday.

90. Retailers up their game after Toys R Us closures -

NEW YORK (AP) — When Toys R Us closed its doors, customers mourned the loss of a beloved brand that conjured memories of their own childhood.

Retailers, on the other hand, saw an opportunity.

91. Amazon jumps out ahead of its rivals and raises wages to $15 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon, the business that upended the retailing industry and transformed the way we shop for just about everything, is jumping out ahead of the pack again, announcing a minimum wage of $15 an hour for its U.S. employees that could force other big companies to raise their pay.

92. Events -

Williamson Chamber Leads Exchange. A facilitated, casual, members-only networking opportunity. Limited to 30 participants. Bring business cards, brochures and product samples to share with other participants. Lunch meeting option, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Williamson, Inc., 5005 Meridian Blvd, Suite #150. Lunch provided by Buffalo Wild Wings. Afternoon meeting off-site, Provision CARES Proton Therapy, 4588 Carothers Parkway, Franklin. Wednesday, 3:30-5 p.m. Registration required. This is a free, members-only event. Information

93. Leaders ignore calls to drop out of Obamacare lawsuit -

A Christian group pleading with Tennessee leaders to drop out of a lawsuit seeking to overturn the Affordable Care Act could be compared to a tree falling in the forest.

If nobody’s listening, what chance do they have of being heard?

94. AP FACT CHECK: Trump wrong on judges, 'plummeting' poverty -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the midterm elections draw near, President Donald Trump's tendency to declare his campaign promises fulfilled when they aren't has come into starker relief.

He insists poverty in the U.S. is "plummeting," even though the number of poor people has barely declined under his watch and income inequality is climbing.

95. Pinnacle is top bank in Nashville area for deposits -

Pinnacle Financial Partners is the No. 1 bank in the Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin MSA by deposit market share, data from the FDIC reveals.

The firm leapt ahead of a large regional bank and one of the biggest banks in the nation to earn the top spot. Last year, Pinnacle was at No. 3 behind Bank of America and Regions, respectively.

96. Events -

REIN’s Williamson County Lunch Meeting. Rehabbers, new construction builders, commercial, mini-storage, wholesalers, private lenders, transaction funders, hard-money lenders, bankers, title attorneys, Realtors and vendors discuss deals, the state of the market, and how they can help each other prosper. First Watch, 1000 Meridian Blvd. Thursday, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Information

97. When your job is what you love ... -

So many amazing and innovative things began in a garage. Grunge music. The Apple computer. Disney. Amazon. And 20 years ago, the beginnings of Nashville’s now-exploding brewery scene.

When Carl Meier moved to Nashville in 1999 from upstate New York, his wife was working on her master’s degree at Vanderbilt, leaving him with some time on his hands. With her encouragement, he joined a local homebrew club, the Music City Brewers, to meet some new friends who shared his love for home brewing.

98. What statewide candidates say about health care - According to Think Tennessee’s State of Our State dashboard, the state ranks near the bottom in the number of adults with heart disease, obesity and diabetes. It also ranks near the bottom of all states for the health of senior citizens, infant mortality and number of adults who smoke, and at the absolute bottom in childhood obesity. Tennesseans are, on the whole, not healthy. What can and should our next political leaders do about it?

99. Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off -

NEW YORK (AP) — Starting a food truck to sell tacos or barbecue on downtown streets may seem easy or fun, but owners are finding they need more sophisticated plans now that the novelty has worn off.

100. Need an entry-level job at a store? It can be harder now -

NEW YORK (AP) — Asia Thomas knew she was at a disadvantage. It had been 16 years since she quit a job at McDonald's to raise her kids. When she left, restaurants didn't have kiosks to take orders, people didn't use smartphones to pay, and job seekers did applications on paper.