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Editorial Results (free)

1. Pressure on Fed's Powell is rising as inflation worsens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell surely expected to have some breathing room after taking the first step this month to dial back the Fed's emergency aid for the economy.

2. Biden's nominee for bank regulator faces hostile opposition -

NEW YORK (AP) — A fierce battle is being waged in Washington over President Biden's choice to lead a typically low-profile agency that oversees the banking industry.

Saule Omarova, 55, was nominated in September to be the nation's next comptroller of the currency. If confirmed, she would be the first woman and person of color to run the 158-year-old agency. But her nomination has drawn intense opposition from Republicans and the banking industry, with the criticism at times echoing the Red Scare that plagued the U.S. after World War II.

3. US home construction dips 0.7% in October, but permits jump -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Construction of new homes in the U.S. fell 0.7% in October, but a big jump in the number of permits last month points to anticipation by builders that supply chain problems that have dogged them for much of the year will soon ease.

4. Defying inflation, Americans ramped up spending last month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Many Americans have taken a darker view of the economy as inflation has worsened. Yet so far, they appear no less willing to spend freely at retailers — an encouraging sign for the crucial holiday shopping season.

5. EXPLAINER: Why US inflation is so high, and when it may ease -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation is starting to look like that unexpected — and unwanted — houseguest who just won't leave.

For months, many economists had sounded a reassuring message that a spike in consumer prices, something that had been missing in action in the U.S. for a generation, wouldn't stay long. It would prove "transitory,'' in the soothing words of Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell and White House officials, as the economy shifted from virus-related chaos to something closer to normalcy.

6. Soaring prices a heavy burden for consumers as holidays near -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A worsening surge of inflation for such bedrock necessities as food, rent, autos and heating oil is setting Americans up for a financially difficult Thanksgiving and holiday shopping season.

7. US home construction declines 1.6% in September -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — U.S. home construction fell 1.6% in September as builders continue to be tripped up by supply chain bottlenecks.

The Commerce Department reported Tuesday that the decline in September left home construction at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.56 million units, 7.4% above the rate one year ago. August's number was revised upward to 1.72 million from 1.62 million.

8. Bank profits soar, helped by merger frenzy, fewer bad loans -

NEW YORK (AP) — It's good to be a bank right now.

Four of the largest U.S. banks said their profits grew by double-digits last quarter, as a healthier U.S. economy has helped reduce the number of loans in default or that the bank won't likely recoup. The results for Citigroup, Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Morgan Stanley also show that all four benefitted from various one-time boosts to their profits.

9. Modest gain breaks a 3-day losing streak for S&P 500 index -

Major U.S. stock indexes closed mostly higher Thursday, snapping a three-day losing streak for the S&P 500 despite another choppy day of trading.

The benchmark index rose 0.3% after having been down 0.5% in the early going. It's still on pace for a 0.6% weekly loss. The Dow Jones Industrial Average ended flat, while the Nasdaq rose 0.7%.

10. 5 key takeaways from the September jobs report -

WASHINGTON (AP) — September wasn't exactly the robust month for hiring that many had expected and hoped for.

With the delta variant still disrupting the economy and employers struggling to find enough workers, the gain for the month amounted to 194,000 jobs — not even half of what economists had expected. In August, the economy had added a modest 366,000 jobs. Taken together, hiring for the past two months marked a steep drop-off from the 962,000 jobs that were added in June and the 1.1 million in July.

11. Under pressure, Powell says Fed to revamp its trading rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said Wednesday that the central bank will overhaul its financial ethics policies in response to growing questions about investing and trading decisions by high-ranking Fed officials that raise potential conflicts of interest.

12. US home construction up 3.9% in August after July drop -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home construction increases 3.9% in August with the strength coming in apartment construction.

The August increase left home construction at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.62 million units, 17.4% above the pace of a year ago, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday. Housing starts had fallen 6.2% in July.

13. Elizabeth Holmes' trial to dissect downfall of a tech star -

Just six years ago, Elizabeth Holmes seemed destined to fulfill her dream of becoming Silicon Valley's next superstar. She was the subject of business magazine cover stories describing her as the youngest self-made female billionaire in history, former President Bill Clinton was reverently quizzing her about her thoughts on technology, and then Vice President Joe Biden was hailing her ideas as an inspiration.

14. US hiring slows as delta variant weakens travel and tourism -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's employers added just 235,000 jobs in August, a surprisingly weak gain after two months of robust hiring and the clearest sign to date that the delta variant's spread has discouraged some people from flying, shopping and eating out.

15. PNC to raise base wages to $18 an hour, latest bank to do so -

NEW YORK (AP) — PNC Bank is the latest large U.S. financial services company to increase wages in a bid to keep and attract employees, raising its minimum wage to $18 an hour while also giving higher-paid workers a bump in pay.

16. US slightly upgrades GDP estimate for last quarter to 6.6% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy grew at a robust 6.6% annual rate last quarter, slightly faster than previously estimated, the government said Thursday in a report that pointed to a sustained consumer-led rebound from the pandemic recession. But worries are growing that the delta variant of the coronavirus is beginning to cause a slowdown.

17. Housing construction slumps 7% in July to 1.53 million units -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Home construction fell a sharp 7% in July as homebuilders struggled to cope with a variety of headwinds.

The July decline put home construction at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.53 million units, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday. It was the slowest pace since April but was 2.5% higher than a year ago.

18. Strong jobs report sends most stocks, bond yields higher -

Wall Street capped a choppy week of trading Friday with broad gains, which helped push the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Average to new highs.

The S&P 500 rose 0.2%, a day after setting another all-time high. Every major index notched a weekly gain after slipping last week.

19. Wells Fargo beats expectations with $6 billion profit in 2Q -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Wells Fargo had its most profitable quarter in two years, easily beating Wall Street estimates as the global economy continues its rapid improvement in the wake of the virus pandemic.

20. Stock indexes notch more records ahead of earnings reports -

Banks led stocks to modest gains on Wall Street Monday, nudging the major stock indexes to more record highs ahead of a busy week of corporate earnings reports from big U.S. companies.

The S&P 500 gained 0.3% after bouncing back from an early stumble. The benchmark index, which has notched three straight weekly gains, hit a new high, as did the Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq composite. The indexes have managed multiple new highs despite choppy trading in recent weeks.

21. Stocks close higher, capping a 3rd consecutive week of gains -

Stocks closed with solid gains on Wall Street Friday, ending a holiday-shortened week with their third straight weekly gain.

The S&P 500 rose 1.1% to another record high, led by banks and technology stocks.

22. Stocks again post records following encouraging jobs data -

Wall Street capped a milestone-shattering week Friday with stock indexes hitting more record highs as investors welcomed a report showing the nation's job market was even stronger last month than expected.

23. Freed from COVID restrictions, big US banks hike dividends -

NEW YORK (AP) — Recently freed from regulators' coronavirus restrictions, the largest U.S. banks on Monday announced plans to return tens of billions of dollars to their shareholders over the next year in the form of dividends and stock buybacks.

24. Tech gains nudge S&P 500, Nasdaq further into record heights -

NEW YORK (AP) — Strength for tech stocks nudged U.S. indexes a bit further into record heights Monday, more than making up for losses across much of the rest of Wall Street.

The S&P 500 rose 9.91 points, or 0.2%, to 4,290.61 after drifting between small gains and losses for much of the day. It added to its all-time high set Friday as optimism builds about the strengthening economy and expectations that the Federal Reserve will keep interest rates low for a while longer.

25. Infrastructure spending promises boost for industry -

Plans to pump money into rebuilding the nation's roads, bridges and other infrastructure could give companies that make machinery and materials a solid foundation for growth.

Caterpillar, with its heavy machinery, and construction materials company Vulcan Materials could see years of additional business as roads and bridges are rebuilt and buildings are modernized. The benefits would be even broader, impacting Sherwin-Williams, United Rentals and others that make, sell, or rent anything used for construction.

26. US stocks slump; S&P 500 has its worst week since February -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks sank again on Wall Street Friday, knocking the S&P 500 to its worst weekly loss since February, as more steam comes out of banks and other stocks that soared earlier this year with expectations for the economy and inflation.

27. US home construction up a moderate 3.6% in May -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home construction rose 3.6% in May as builders battled a surge in lumber prices that have made homes more expensive

The May increase left construction at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.57 million units, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday.

28. Ally Bank ends all overdraft fees, first large bank to do so -

NEW YORK (AP) — Ally Financial is ending overdraft fees entirely on all of its bank products, the company said Wednesday, being the first large bank to end overdraft fees across its entire business.

29. Bank CEOs tell Congress they'll work to avoid foreclosures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The chief executives of the nation's largest banks went in front of Congress for a second day Thursday, facing questions ranging from bitcoin to their efforts to keep Americans in their homes after government aid to pandemic-hit mortgage holders expires this summer.

30. High inflation? A generation of investors has never felt it -

NEW YORK (AP) — The central question gripping Wall Street is whether the burst of inflation hitting the economy as it recovers from the pandemic is just temporary or the start of a real problem. The answer threatens to crack the stock market's incredible, record-setting run that began in March 2020.

31. Buffett's firm sells off financials, halves Chevron stake -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Investor Warren Buffett's company pared back its holdings in financial firms further during the first quarter and also halved its new investment in Chevron.

Berkshire Hathaway Inc. provided an update on its U.S. stock holdings in a filing with regulators Monday. Many investors follow Berkshire's holdings closely because of Buffett's remarkably successful record.

32. Stocks climb after three days of losses, led by Big Tech -

Wall Street put the brakes on a three-day losing streak with a broad stock market rally Thursday powered by Big Tech companies and banks.

The S&P 500 notched a 1.2% gain, clawing back almost half of its loss from a day earlier, when it had its biggest one-day drop since February. Even so, the benchmark index is on track for a 2.8% weekly decline, which would be its largest since January. The other major indexes were also on pace for sharp weekly declines, despite recouping some of their losses.

33. March US home construction jumps to fastest pace since 2006 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. housing construction rebounded strongly in March to the fastest pace since 2006 as home builders recovered from an unusually frigid February that shut down projects.

Builders began construction on new homes and apartments at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.74 million units in March, the Commerce Department reported Friday, a 19.4% increase over February when housing construction fell by 11.3%. It was the fastest pace for home building since a level of 1.8 million in June 2006 during the last housing boom.

34. Bank of America profit doubles in 1Q to $8.1 billion -

NEW YORK (AP) — Bank of America's profits doubled in the first quarter, the bank said Thursday, as the improving economy allowed it to release billions from its loan-loss reserves that it originally set aside in the early days of the pandemic.

35. Most US stocks rise, indexes end mixed as earnings kick off -

NEW YORK (AP) — Most U.S. stocks rose on Wednesday, but indexes petered out to a mixed finish as momentum weakened following an encouraging start to what's expected to be a thunderous earnings reporting season.

36. Wells Fargo earned $4.74 billion in Q1, topping estimates -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Wells Fargo had its best quarter in a year and a half, posting a profit of $4.74 billion and freeing up more than a billion dollars that had been set aside for potential loan defaults at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic.

37. Stocks end slightly below latest record highs as tech slips -

Stocks ended just below the latest record highs they hit last week as technology companies slipped.

The S&P 500 edged down less than 0.1% Monday and the tech-heavy Nasdaq gave up 0.4%.

Investors are continuing to focus on the economic recovery as well as concerns about inflation and rising bond yields.

38. Tech companies help lift stocks, push S&P 500 to record high -

Wall Street capped another week of gains with more milestones Friday, as strength in technology and health care stocks helped push the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Average to all-time highs.

39. Fed to end relaxed capital requirements for large banks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve says it will restore capital requirements for large banks that were relaxed as part of the Fed's efforts to shore up the financial system during the early days of the pandemic.

40. Wall Street closes lower, pulled down by IT and energy -

Stocks fell broadly on Wall Street Thursday, as rising bond yields once again pulled down shares of technology companies and the energy sector sold off on a sharp drop in oil prices.

The S&P 500 index fell 1.5%, on track for its first weekly loss in three weeks. Technology companies accounted for a big swath of the sell-off, which contributed to the tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite dropping 3%, its second-worst loss of the year.

41. Stocks extend gains for fifth day, led by technology shares -

Stocks shook off an early stumble and closed broadly higher Monday, nudging some of the major U.S. indexes to more all-time highs as the market added to its recent string of gains.

The S&P 500 rose 0.7% after having been down 0.5% in the early going, extending its winning streak to a fifth day. Technology stocks, airlines, cruise operators and other companies that rely on consumer spending helped lift the market. Banks and energy stocks were the only laggards.

42. A bumpy day leaves stocks mostly lower; bond yields ease -

A choppy day on Wall Street ended with stocks mostly lower Friday, helping push the S&P 500 to its second straight weekly loss.

Investors continued to watch the bond market, where Treasury yields eased lower, as well as Washington, where Congress is expected to vote on President Joe Biden's stimulus package.

43. Openings begin March 4 at Fifth + Broadway -

Brookfield Properties’ mixed-use project Fifth + Broadway in downtown Nashville will begin its first tenant openings March 4.

The event culminates a multiyear effort by the company and local developer Pat Emery on the former site of the Nashville Convention Center.

44. Buffett's firm reveals new investments in Verizon, Chevron -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Warren Buffett's company made major new investments in Verizon and Chevron and again trimmed its huge stake in Apple while making several other adjustments to its stock portfolio last year.

45. S&P 500 closes wobbly week at new record high -

Technology companies led a late-afternoon rally on Wall Street Friday that capped a week of wobbly trading with the major stock indexes hitting all-time highs.

The S&P 500 rose 0.5% after spending most of the day wavering between small gains and losses. The gain nudged the benchmark index to a record high for the second day in a row. The tech-heavy Nasdaq composite and the Dow Jones Industrial Average also set new highs.

46. S&P 500 climbs again, closing out best week since November -

Wall Street closed out a winning week Friday as the S&P 500 notched its fifth gain in a row and its biggest weekly increase since November.

The benchmark index rose 0.4% and ended the week 4.6% higher, more than making up for its decline in January. The latest gain nudged the S&P 500 to another all-time high. The Nasdaq composite also capped the week with a record high. Small -company stocks fared even better than the broader market, a sign that investors are feeling more optimistic about the economy.

47. Big Tech leads stocks to broad gains; GameStop collapses -

Big Tech companies and banks helped power a broad rally on Wall Street Tuesday, though shares in GameStop and other recent high-flying stocks hyped by online traders plunged.

The S&P 500 rose 1.4%, extending gains from a day earlier, as investors sized up the latest batch of company earnings reports. Rising crude oil prices and solid earnings results helped lift energy companies, including Exxon Mobil and Marathon Petroleum. Treasury yields rose and the VIX, a measure of fear in the market, fell sharply, a sign volatility was easing.

48. It's not just GameStop worrying Wall Street about a bubble -

NEW YORK (AP) — Now, even the pros on Wall Street are asking if the stock market has shot too high.

U.S. stocks have been on a nearly nonstop rip higher since March, up roughly 70% to record heights and causing outsiders to say the market had lost touch with the pandemic's reality. But Wall Street kept justifying the gains by pointing to massive support from the Federal Reserve, lifesaving deliverance from COVID-19 vaccines and efforts by Congress to pump more stimulus into the economy.

49. GameStop saga makes Wall Street an issue for Biden team -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The drama surrounding the trading in shares of GameStop, AMC Entertainment, Blackberry and other beaten-down companies has suddenly thrust Wall Street near the top of a crowded list of issues that President Joe Biden's regulatory team needs to tackle early in its term.

50. Goldman Sachs' profits more than double, despite pandemic -

NEW YORK (AP) — Goldman Sachs said its profits more than doubled from a year earlier thanks to a surge in both trading and advising revenue.

The New York-based investment bank said it earned a profit of $4.36 billion, or $12.08 per share, up from a profit of $1.72 billion, or $4.69 a share, in the same period a year earlier. The earnings were significantly better than the $7.45-per-share profit that analysts were expecting.

51. Biden's test: Engineering economic boom in a partisan divide -

BALTIMORE (AP) — When Joe Biden entered the White House as vice president, the economy was cratering. Job losses were mounting. Stocks were crashing. Millions of Americans were in the early stages of losing their homes to foreclosure as the housing bubble burst.

52. Stocks fall as economic pain deepens, rally runs out of gas -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street closed out its first losing week in three with another drop on Friday after reports showed the pandemic is deepening the hole for the economy, as Washington prepares to throw it another lifeline.

53. U.S. retail sales fell in December for 3rd straight month -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans cut back on spending in December for the third-straight month as a surge in virus cases kept people away from stores during the critical holiday shopping season.

The U.S. Commerce Department said Friday that retail sales fell a seasonally adjusted 0.7% in December from the month before, a decline Wall Street analysts weren't expecting. Sales also fell in October and November, even as retailers tried to get people shopping for Christmas gifts early by offering deals before Halloween.

54. In Wall Street years, 2020 felt like a decade for markets -

NEW YORK (AP) — While lockdown life has kept time standing still for nearly everyone through 2020, Wall Street has been locked in at super fast-forward.

The stock market tumbled through years' worth of losses in just over a month this spring, only to turn around and pack an entire bull market's worth of gains into less than nine months. Even within the span of a few hours, the market in 2020 would sometimes careen to a loss that would have been remarkable for a full year.

55. Stock indexes end mixed as damage to the economy piles up -

U.S. stock indexes closed mostly lower Thursday following more evidence that the pandemic is tightening its grip on the economy while Congress remains in a stalemate over how to do something about it.

56. With US in COVID-19 panic, Georgia Sen. Perdue saw stock opportunity -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the ravages of the novel coronavirus forced millions of people out of work, shuttered businesses and shrank the value of retirement accounts, the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged to a three-year low.

57. With US in COVID-19 panic, Georgia Sen. Perdue saw stock opportunity -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the ravages of the novel coronavirus forced millions of people out of work, shuttered businesses and shrank the value of retirement accounts, the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged to a three-year low.

58. Stocks rise on Wall Street on latest hopes for virus vaccine -

More encouraging news on the development of coronavirus vaccines and treatments helped power stocks higher on Wall Street Monday, as the market clawed back most of its losses from last week.

The S&P 500 index rose 0.6%, led by banks, energy and industrial companies, sectors that have been beaten down during the pandemic. Health care and technology stocks, which traders have bid up sharply this year, closed lower. Treasury yields mostly rose, another sign of optimism among investors.

59. Stocks close a blistering week, even as uncertainty lingers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street took a breather Friday after a blistering rally that gave the market its biggest weekly gain since April and indicated investors see plenty of benefits from more gridlock in Washington.

60. NAACP files suit against Trump's diversity training order -

New York (AP) — Three civil rights groups filed a lawsuit Thursday challenging President Donald Trump's executive order that restricts federal agencies, as well as contractors and grant recipients, from offering certain diversity training that the president deems "anti-American."

61. Stocks end another wobbly day lower as virus cases rise -

Wall Street's losses mounted for the second straight day Tuesday as momentum slows on worries about rising virus counts and Washington's inability to deliver more aid to the economy.

The S&P 500 fell 0.3% after spending much of the day swinging between small gains and losses. Most of the stocks in the index fell, particularly banks, oil producers and other companies whose profits tend to track the strength of the economy. Those losses outweighed gains in technology stocks and companies that rely on consumer spending. Traders also welcomed news that AMD has agreed to buy fellow chipmaker Xilinx for $35 billion.

62. Stocks fall on Wall Street as coronavirus spreads in Europe -

U.S. stock indexes erased much of their early losses and closed modestly lower Thursday, extending the S&P 500's losing streak to a third day.

The S&P 500 fell 0.2% after having been down 1.4%. Technology, health care and communications stocks accounted for most of the selling, outweighing slight gains in banks and elsewhere in the market.

63. Stocks fall on Wall Street as hopes fade for stimulus deal -

Stocks gave up early gains and closed lower Wednesday, adding to Wall Street's losses from a day earlier.

The S&P 500 fell 0.7% after spending the morning swaying between small gains and losses. Companies that rely on consumer spending, banks and technology and communication stocks bore the brunt of the selling. Trading in stock markets overseas was subdued as coronavirus counts climb around the world, raising the risk of more government restrictions on businesses. Treasury yields fell, while prices for crude oil and gold rose.

64. Wells Fargo posts $2 billion profit in 3Q, reversing 2Q loss -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Wells Fargo says it earned $2 billion in the third quarter, less than half of what it made in the same period last year but a significant improvement from this year's second quarter, when it posted a loss as the coronavirus swept through the U.S.

65. Trump administration targets diversity hiring by contractors -

American companies promising to hire more Black employees in leadership roles and teach their workforce about racism are getting a message from President Donald Trump's administration: Watch your step if you want to keep doing business with the federal government.

66. JPMorgan puts $30B toward fixing banking's 'systemic racism' -

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — JPMorgan Chase said Thursday it will extend billions in loans to Black and Latino homebuyers and small business owners in an expanded effort toward fixing what the bank calls "systemic racism" in the country's economic system.

67. Survey: Business economists see coronavirus as biggest risk -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy faces risks from a potential resurgence of the coronavirus and from the failure so far of Congress to provide additional financial support for struggling individuals and businesses.

68. Stocks tick up as Wall Street waits for aid from Washington -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks climbed on Thursday, but only after pinballing through another shaky day of trading, as Wall Street waits to see if Washington can get past its partisanship to deliver another economic rescue package.

69. US stocks end higher as market volatility continues -

Stocks eked out modest gains Thursday even as volatility continued to be the dominant force in Wall Street's tumultuous September.

The S&P 500 rose 0.3% after earlier swinging between a loss of 0.9% and a gain of 1.3%. The market notched widespread gains, though technology stocks powered much of the turnaround. Out of the S&P 500's 11 sectors, only health care ended the day lower.

70. August US home building slides 5.1% after months of gains -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. housing construction fell a surprising 5.1% in August after three months of strong gains when home builders ramped up projects following a pandemic-induced shutdown in March and April.

71. August US home building slides 5.1% after months of gains -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. housing construction fell a surprising 5.1% in August after three months of strong gains when home builders ramped up projects following a pandemic-induced shutdown in March and April.

72. Tesla announces plans to sell up to $5B in new stock shares -

DETROIT (AP) — A day after its 5-for-1 stock split took effect, Tesla is announcing plans to sell up to $5 billion worth of common shares.

The electric car and solar panel maker says in a filing with securities regulators that it intends to sell up to 10.03 million shares and use the proceeds for unspecified general corporate purposes.

73. S&P 500 shakes off a bumpy start, pushes to another record -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks were mixed on Wall Street Tuesday, but gains were strong enough for tech companies and other pockets of the market to carry the S&P 500 to its fourth straight gain and another record high.

74. Gains for tech stocks nudge S&P 500 even closer to record -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street nudged a bit higher on Monday, and the S&P 500 teased even closer to its record high.

The benchmark index rose 9.14 points, or 0.3%, to 3,381.99. Earlier in the day, it briefly crossed above its record closing level of 3,386.15, which was set on Feb. 19 before the pandemic  shut down businesses worldwide and created the worst recession in decades. It's the third time in the last four trading days the index has risen above that record, only to fade later in the day.

75. Wall Street rallies as Fed keeps rates pinned at record low -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street rallied on Wednesday, and the S&P 500 climbed 1.2% for its best day in two weeks after the Federal Reserve kept the accelerator floored on its support for the economy.

76. Tech drives indexes higher on Wall Street after choppy start -

Big technology companies powered stocks higher on Wall Street Monday, adding to the market's gains after a three-week winning streak.

The S&P 500 rose 0.8% after being down 0.3% in the early going. Gains by technology and communication stocks and companies that rely on consumer spending outweighed losses elsewhere in the market. The rally, which gained strength in the final hour of trading, nudged the benchmark S&P 500 index to a slight gain for the year and drove the Nasdaq composite to an all-time high.

77. US home construction jumps 17.3% in June -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Construction of U.S. homes jumped 17.3% in June as some states reopened, but the pace still lags last year after this spring's massive slowdown in building activity due to the coronavirus outbreak.

78. Stocks dip on Wall Street as global rally fades, led by tech -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street stumbled on Thursday after a report showed layoffs continue to sweep the country at a stubbornly steady pace, one of several mixed reports to highlight the uncertain path ahead for the economy.

79. Wall Street rebounds after yet another yo-yo day of trading -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street rebounded on Tuesday, and the S&P 500 more than made up all its losses from the day before, after stocks pinballed through another day of erratic trading.

The S&P 500 climbed 1.3%, led by energy producers and other companies whose profits would benefit greatly from a strengthening economy. It was a sharp turnaround from the morning, when the index was down 0.9%, and from Monday's last-hour slide after California shut bars and reinstated other restrictions amid a jump in coronavirus counts.

80. Banks set aside billions, bracing for more economic pain -

NEW YORK (AP) — With tens of millions of Americans out of work and many businesses shut down or operating under restrictions due to the coronavirus, three of the nation's biggest banks set aside nearly $30 billion in the second quarter to cover potentially bad loans that were fine only a few months ago.

81. Wells Fargo loses $2.4 billion in 2Q, first loss since 2008 -

Silver Spring, Md. (AP) — Wells Fargo lost $2.4 billion in the second quarter, the first quarterly loss for the bank since the real estate crash of 2008.

Wells said it set aside an additional $8.4 billion for loan loss provisions — the money set aside to cover potentially bad loans — more than double last quarter's $3.83 billion as the effects of the coronavirus pandemic ravaged almost every aspect of its business.

82. JPMorgan profit hit hard by pandemic, as consumers struggle -

NEW YORK (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic is weighing heavily on the financial health of JPMorgan Chase, as the nation's largest financial company set aside billions in the second quarter to cover potential losses from all the businesses and consumers who are unable to pay their debts due to the slumping economy.

83. Stocks slam into reverse as virus keeps scarring economy -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street got a painful reminder that the coronavirus pandemic isn't going away, and a big early gain for stocks suddenly flipped to losses after California showed how it's still scarring the economy.

84. Bed Bath & Beyond closing stores, cruises prepare to sail -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to the national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

85. 5 key takeaways from a strong June jobs report -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At first glance, the June employment report was a blockbuster.

The U.S. economy produced a record 4.8 million added jobs last month, walloping expectations. And the unemployment rate sank from 13.3% all the way to 11.1%.

86. As virus roars back, so do signs of a new round of layoffs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The reopening of Tucson's historic Hotel Congress lasted less than a month.

General manager Todd Hanley on June 4 ended a two-month coronavirus lockdown and reopened the 39-room hotel at half-capacity, along with an adjoining restaurant for outdoor dining. Yet with reported COVID-19 cases spiking across Arizona, Hanley made the painful decision last weekend to give up, for now.

87. Wall Street stocks claw back a chunk of last week's losses -

Stocks shrugged off a wobbly start to finish solidly higher on Wall Street Monday, as the market clawed back half its losses from last week.

The S&P 500 rose 1.5% after having been down 0.3%. The market rallied after a much healthier-than-expected report on the housing market put investors in a buying mood. Technology, industrial and communications stocks accounted for much of the market's broad gains. European stocks also closed higher. Treasury yields were mixed and oil prices rose.

88. Wall Street-owned loans tricky for hoteliers in virus era -

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Hotel owner and developer Danny Gaekwad survived steep drops in business after the 9/11 attacks and the recession of the late 2000s, but nothing prepared him for the revenue tailspin that followed lockdowns and travel restrictions in March to stop the spread of the new coronavirus.

89. Stocks slide on Wall Street as new coronavirus cases surge -

Wall Street's recent rally hit a snag Wednesday as new coronavirus cases in the U.S. climbed to the highest level in two months, dimming investors' hopes for a relatively quick economic turnaround.

90. House demands coronavirus loan info from Treasury, banks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A House subcommittee investigating billions of dollars in coronavirus aid is demanding that the Trump administration and some of the nation's largest banks turn over detailed information about companies that applied for and received federal loans intended for small businesses.

91. US stocks bounce higher, still end the week with a loss -

Wall Street managed to end a bumpy day broadly higher Friday but still finished with its worst week in nearly three months.

The S&P 500 rose 1.3% a day after dropping nearly 6% in its biggest rout since mid-March. It lost 4.8% for the week, snapping a three-week winning streak for the benchmark index. Small-company stocks and bond yields rose, meaning investors were a bit more willing to take on risk again a day after the sell-off.

92. Survey: Business economists expect worst US slump since 1940s -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Business economists expect the United States to suffer its worst downturn this year in more than seven decades before growth resumes sometime next year.

Overhanging that forecast, though, is the risk that a second wave of the coronavirus could threaten the economy once again.

93. Too much TV? Enter HBO Max, the latest streaming wannabe -

Is a pandemic the perfect time to launch a new and relatively expensive streaming service? AT&T sure hopes so.

The phone company is investing billions in HBO Max, its first big entertainment venture since it spent $85 billion for Time Warner in 2018. The good news for its timing: millions are stuck at home, watching more video than ever. The bad news: many of them also out of work and carefully watching their incomes. The service launches Wednesday in the U.S.

94. Stocks close higher as investors regain some more confidence -

Stocks closed broadly higher on Wall Street Wednesday, clawing back all of its losses from a day earlier and extending its strong gains for the week.

The S&P 500 rose 1.7% as the market bounced back from a sudden drop on Tuesday that snapped the index's three-day winning streak. Crude oil prices posted their fifth straight gain.

95. Cagle is appointed counsel to CASE -

Charles W. “Chuck” Cagle, shareholder and chair of the education law and government relations practice group at Lewis Thomason, has been appointed as Tennessee representative and counsel to the Council of Administrators in Special Education.

96. Another late reversal upends Wall Street, this time higher -

Wall Street rallied back from a sharp morning drop on Thursday, led by a resurgence for some of the year's most beaten-down stocks.

The S&P 500 climbed 1.2% in another scattershot day of trading, with many stocks flipping from the bottom of the leaderboard to the top following a few sharp reversals in momentum. The zig-zag trading followed up on earlier losses for Asian and European stocks, while Treasury yields sank in a sign of increased pessimism.

97. Wall Street dips to week's first loss despite tech's efforts -

Stocks fell on Wall Street Wednesday, sending the market to its first loss in three days, after more depressing data rolled in on the devastation sweeping the global economy.

The S&P 500 dropped 0.7%, and three out of four stocks in the index sank. But the market's losses would have been much worse if not for continued gains for technology stocks. Momentum for Microsoft, Apple and other tech stocks has proven to be nearly unstoppable this year, even in the face of the coronavirus pandemic, and more gains for them almost singlehandedly kept Wall Street steady for much of Wednesday's trading.

98. NRA cutting staff and salaries amid coronavirus pandemic -

The National Rifle Association has laid off dozens of employees, canceled its national convention and scuttled fundraising, membership and shooting events that normally would be key to rallying its base in an election year.

99. Commodities ripe for a rebound -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The near shutdown of the economy in response to COVID-19 has reduced demand for commodities like oil, lumber and copper and triggered sharp drops in their prices, but some analysts predict the stage is set for a rebound.

100. Stocks charge higher on hopes for progress in fighting virus -

Stocks around the world whipped higher Wednesday, riding a wave of optimism on encouraging data about a possible treatment for COVID-19.

The upswell of hope was so strong that investors completely sidestepped a report showing the outbreak drove the U.S. economy to its worst quarterly performance since the Great Recession. The S&P 500 vaulted 2.7% higher and extended a rally that's brought the U.S. stock market to the brink of its best month in 45 years.