» Subscribe Today!
The Power of Information
Home
The Ledger - EST. 1978 - Nashville Edition
X
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search

Name & Property Search

Search results for 'Weibo' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:0
Editorial:21
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:0
East Tennessee:0
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

TNLedger Knoxville Edition subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. ANALYSIS: China extends control with online gaming crackdown -

BEIJING (AP) — Hugely popular online games and celebrity culture in China are the latest targets in the ruling Communist Party's campaign to encourage the public to fall in line with its vision for a powerful, more wholesome country.

2. EXPLAINER: Risks underlie tumbling Chinese company shares -

BEIJING (AP) — Foreign shareholders in China's tech companies are learning what its entrepreneurs have long known: The ruling Communist Party's decisions about what is good for the economy can hurt your business.

3. China fines tech giants for content exploiting children -

HONG KONG (AP) — China's internet watchdog said Wednesday it has fined platforms operated by e-commerce company Alibaba and gaming firm Tencent for spreading sexually suggestive content involving children, as regulators seek to clean up content harmful to minors.

4. China blocks Clubhouse, app used for political discussion -

BEIJING (AP) — Zeng Jiajun, a former tech worker, fell in love with social media app Clubhouse, a window through the ruling Communist Party's pervasive censorship, after listening to a freewheeling discussion between members of China's Uighur minority and Han majority that wound up lasting 12 hours.

5. World watches US chaos with shock, dismay and some mockery -

PARIS (AP) — As the world watched American institutions shaken to the core by an angry mob, officials and ordinary citizens wondered: How fragile is democracy, and how much stress could their own political systems withstand?

6. Shock, sympathy, criticism: World reacts to Trump infection -

TOKYO (AP) — News that the world's most powerful man was infected with the world's most notorious disease dominated screens large and small, drawing instant reactions of shock, sympathy, undisguised glee and, of course, the ever-present outrage and curiosity surrounding President Donald Trump.

7. Virus stretches limits of strained public health systems -

BANGKOK (AP) — The virus outbreak that began in China and has spread to more than 20 countries is stretching already-strained public health systems in Asia and beyond, raising questions over whether everyone can get equal access to treatment.

8. China's Communist Party faces recriminations over virus -

BEIJING (AP) — China's ruling Communist Party faced public anger and recrimination Friday over the death of a doctor who was threatened by police after trying to sound the alarm about the new coronavirus back in December. The death toll, meanwhile, rose to nearly 640, and the number of people infected worldwide climbed past 31,400.

9. A grim preview of a trade war takes shape -

In what could be a grim preview of how investors might react to a full-out trade war between the world's two largest economies, shares in multinational corporations sank Monday after President Donald Trump threatened new tariffs on China.

10. 'A monopoly on information': Russia closes grip on internet -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian lawmakers approved Thursday a bill that would expand government control over the internet and whose opponents fear heralds a new era of widespread censorship.

The bill would install equipment to route Russian internet traffic through servers in the country. That would increase the power of state agencies to control information and block messaging applications, while users would find it harder to circumvent government restrictions.

11. Microsoft's Bing blocked in China, prompting grumbling -

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese internet users have lost access to Microsoft Corp.'s Bing search engine, setting off grumbling about the ruling Communist Party's increasingly tight online censorship.

12. Dolce&Gabbana fiasco shows importance, risks of China market -

BEIJING (AP) — Don't mess with China and its growing cadre of powerful luxury consumers.

Dolce&Gabbana learned that lesson the hard way when it faced a boycott after Chinese expressed outrage over what were seen as culturally insensitive videos promoting a major runway show in Shanghai and subsequent posts of insulting comments in a private Instagram chat.

13. Trump wants China to reduce trade deficit by $200B by 2020 -

BEIJING (AP) — The Trump administration has asked China to reduce its trade deficit with the U.S. by $200 billion by the end of 2020, striking an assertive stance in talks aimed at averting a trade war between the world's two-largest economies.

14. United passenger's removal sparks outrage in China -

BEIJING (AP) — Images of a bloodied man being forcibly removed from a United Airlines flight in Chicago drew widespread condemnation in China, where state media fueled the public's anger with reports that noted the unidentified victim was an "Asian passenger."

15. US cites Chinese Internet filters as trade barrier -

BEIJING (AP) — The American government has cited Chinese Internet controls as a trade barrier in a report that comes as Beijing tries to block its public from seeing news online about the finances of leaders' families.

16. US stocks edge higher in afternoon trading -

Stocks held on to modest gains in afternoon trading Thursday, building on the prior day's rebound. Investors were encouraged by reports on Chinese manufacturing, U.S. home sales and some positive earnings from Best Buy, Dollar Tree and other retailers.

17. Apple apologizes in China after service criticism -

BEIJING (AP) — Apple apologized to Chinese consumers after government media attacked its repair policies for two weeks in a campaign that reeked of economic nationalism.

A statement Apple posted in Chinese on its website Monday said the complaints had prompted "deep reflection" and persuaded the company of the need to revamp its repair policies, boost communication with Chinese consumers and strengthen oversight of authorized resellers.

18. Microsoft finds malware on new computers in China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A customer in Shenzhen, China, took a new laptop out of its box and booted it up for the first time. But as the screen lit up, the computer began taking on a life of its own. The machine, triggered by a virus hidden in its hard drive, began searching across the Internet for another computer.

19. Microsoft finds malware on new computers in China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A customer in Shenzhen, China, took a new laptop out of its box and booted it up for the first time. But as the screen lit up, the computer began taking on a life of its own. The machine, triggered by a virus hidden in its hard drive, began searching across the Internet for another computer.

20. New York Times starts Chinese site; microblogs go offline -

BEIJING (AP) — The New York Times started a Chinese-language website Thursday that generated so much interest in China two of its microblog accounts drew thousands of followers and then were apparently taken offline for several hours.

21. China official tells Web firms to control content -

BEIJING (AP) — A Communist Party leader has told China's Internet companies to tighten control over material online as Beijing cracks down on dissent and tries to block the rise of Middle East-style protests.