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1. Scarlett Johansson, Disney settle lawsuit over 'Black Widow' -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Scarlett Johansson and the Walt Disney Co. on Thursday settled her lawsuit over the streaming release of "Black Widow," bringing a swift end to what had begun as the first major fight between a studio and star over recent changes in rollout plans for films.

2. Biden, CEOs, biz leaders meet on COVID-19 vaccine mandates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden met Wednesday with the CEOs of Walt Disney and Columbia Sportswear, and other business executives and leaders, to discuss  his recently announced vaccine requirement for companies  that employ at least 100 people.

3. What can employers do if workers avoid COVID-19 vaccines? -

What can employers do if workers avoid COVID-19 vaccines? They can require vaccination and fire employees who don't comply, or take other actions such as withholding company perks or charging extra for health insurance.

4. Poll: Half of US workers favor employee shot mandate -

NEW YORK (AP) — Half of American workers are in favor of vaccine requirements at their workplaces, according to a new poll, at a time when such mandates gain traction following the federal government's full approval of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine.

5. From CVS to Chevron, FDA decision triggers vaccine mandates -

From Walt Disney World and Chevron to CVS and a Michigan university, a flurry of private and public employers are requiring workers to get vaccinated after the federal government gave full approval to Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine. And the number is certain to grow much higher.

6. Scarlett Johansson sues Disney over 'Black Widow' release -

Scarlett Johansson is suing the Walt Disney Co. over its streaming release of "Black Widow," which she said breached her contract and deprived her of potential earnings.

7. Netflix confirms move into video games as its growth slows -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Netflix reported its worst slowdown in subscriber growth in eight years as people emerge from their pandemic cocoons. So it's adding a new attraction to its marquee: Video games.

8. Video games coming to Netflix? Latest hiring offers a clue -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Netflix has hired veteran video game executive Mike Verdu, signaling the video streaming service is poised to expand into another fertile field of entertainment.

Verdu's addition as Netflix's vice president of game development, confirmed Thursday, comes as the company seeks to sustain the momentum it gathered last year when people turned to the video streaming service to get through lockdowns imposed during the pandemic.

9. Disneyland opening highlights California's COVID turnaround -

ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) — Four months ago, America's most populous state was struggling to combat a surge in coronavirus hospitalizations that packed patients into outdoor tents and killed hundreds of people each day.

10. Netflix scores streaming rights to new top Sony films -

NEW YORK (AP) — Netflix further beefed up its film catalog on Thursday in a multi-year deal that will make it the new streaming home to Sony Pictures' top releases in the U.S.

Beginning next year, Sony's new films will exclusively stream domestically on Netflix after their theatrical runs. That includes movies in popular franchises like "Spider-Man," "Venom" and "Jumanji," and 2022 releases including "Morbius," "Where the Crawdads Sing," "Uncharted" and "Bullet Train."

11. Disney 1Q profit falls but beats expectations due to Disney+ -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Walt Disney Co.'s net income fell sharply in its most-recent quarter, as the coronavirus pandemic still weighs heavily on many of its businesses, from theme parks to movies.

12. Netflix's big 4Q lifts video service above 200M subscribers -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Netflix's video streaming service has surpassed 200 million subscribers for the first time as its expanding line-up of TV series and movies continues to captivate people stuck at home during the ongoing battle against the pandemic.

13. Calamity? Anomaly? 2020 was a box office year like no other -

When the sun sets on the 2020 film box office, it'll be difficult to look at the numbers as anything but disastrous.

After five consecutive years of North American revenues exceeding $11 billion, this year they're expected to cap out at an almost 40-year low of around $2.3 billion. That'll be down 80% from last year according to data firm Comscore. Globally, where markets have been able to recover more fully, ticket sales will likely end up somewhere between $11 and $12 billion. Last year, that total hit $42.5 billion. But of course, 2020 is a year with a big asterisk.

14. Winter travel raises more fears of viral spread -

Tens of millions of people are expected to travel to family gatherings or winter vacations over Christmas, despite pleas by public health experts who fear the result could be another surge in COVID-19 cases.

15. Disney unveils plans to stream a galaxy of new series, films -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Walt Disney Co.'s streaming plans shifted into hyper speed Thursday, as the studio unveiled a galaxy's worth of new streaming offerings including plans for 10 "Star Wars" series spinoffs and 10 Marvel series that will debut on Disney+.

16. Warner Bros. to release all 2021 films on HBO Max, theaters -

NEW YORK (AP) — In the most seismic shift by a Hollywood studio yet during the pandemic, Warner Bros. Pictures on Thursday announced that all of its 2021 film slate — including a new "Matrix" movie, "Godzilla vs. Kong" and the Lin-Manuel Miranda adaptation "In the Heights" — will stream on HBO Max at the same time they play in theaters.

17. The pandemic is changing Hollywood, maybe forever -

NEW YORK (AP) — "No New 'Movies' Till Influenza Ends" blared a New York Times headline on Oct. 10, 1918, while the deadly second wave of the Spanish Flu was unfolding.

A century later, during another pandemic, movies — quotes no longer necessary — are again facing a critical juncture. But it's not because new films haven't been coming out. By streaming service, video-on-demand, virtual theater or actual theater, a steady diet of films have been released under COVID-19 every week. The Times has reviewed more than 460 new movies since mid-March.

18. EXPLAINER: Why the Dow topped 30,000 for the first time -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street busted through its latest milestone Tuesday, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average topped 30,000 for the first time.

It's an attention-grabbing psychological threshold, and it's an encouraging signal that the market's rally is broadening beyond the handful of stocks that carried Wall Street through the pandemic. But the Dow at 30,000 means less to most investors' 401(k) accounts than the fact that broader market indexes are also at record highs.

19. Rally fades on Wall Street, pulling indexes below records -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks closed mostly higher on Wednesday, helped by big technology stocks, but news of tighter restrictions in New York State helped dent an earlier rally.

The S&P 500 closed up 27.13 points, or 0.8%, to 3,572.66. The technology-heavy Nasdaq composite, meanwhile, rose by 2%.

20. Stocks rally worldwide with hopes for a return to "normal" -

NEW YORK (AP) — Brimming hopes that people will again return to office buildings, shopping centers and normal life sent markets rallying worldwide on Monday, following encouraging data about a potential coronavirus vaccine.

21. Netflix raising US streaming prices amid booming growth -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Netflix is raising most of its U.S. prices by 8% to 13% as its video streaming service rides a wave of rising popularity spurred by government-imposed lockdowns that corralled people at home during the fight against the pandemic.

22. 8,800 part-time workers in Florida Disney parks face layoffs -

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — About 8,800 part-time union workers at Walt Disney World in Florida will be part of the 28,000 layoffs in Disney's parks division in California and Florida, union officials said Wednesday.

23. Stocks tick up as Wall Street waits for aid from Washington -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks climbed on Thursday, but only after pinballing through another shaky day of trading, as Wall Street waits to see if Washington can get past its partisanship to deliver another economic rescue package.

24. US layoffs remain elevated as 837,000 seek jobless aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits declined last week to a still-high 837,000, evidence that the economy is struggling to sustain a tentative recovery that began this summer.

25. Wall Street rallies to close out strong, but wild quarter -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rallied on Wednesday, but only after zooming up, down and back up again in a fitting end to what was a wild month and quarter for Wall Street.

Prospects for additional support from Congress for the economy helped drive the day's trading, as they have for weeks. The S&P 500 shot to a gain of as much as 1.7% after Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told CNBC that he would talk with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi about a potential deal in the afternoon, "and I hope we can get something done."

26. Disney to lay off 28,000 at its parks in California, Florida -

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Squeezed by limits on attendance at its theme parks and other restrictions due to the pandemic, The Walt Disney Co. said Tuesday it planned to lay off 28,000 workers in its parks division in California and Florida.

27. Disney delays 'Black Widow,' Spielberg's 'West Side Story' -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Walt Disney Co. has further postponed its next mega-movies from Marvel, including "Black Widow," while also postponing Steven Spielberg's "West Side Story" a full year in the company's latest recalibration due to the pandemic.

28. Business owners tap into savings to withstand pandemic -

New York (AP) — When the coronavirus outbreak forced cruise lines to cancel trips to Alaska, it wiped out Midgi Moore's tour business, leaving her with thousands of dollars in deposits to refund.

Moore's company, Juneau Food Tours, didn't have enough cash on hand. So, she withdrew $30,000 from her retirement account — a painful decision for a 56 year old starting to look forward to the day when she can stop working.

29. Nashville SC, FC Dallas play to 0-0 draw -

FRISCO, Texas (AP) — FC Dallas and Nashville SC played to a scoreless draw Sunday night in a game that started more than 3 1/2 hours late because of lightning.

Scheduled for 7:30 p.m., the game stated at 11:07 p.m.

30. Nashville defeats Dallas 1-0 as MLS restarts the season -

FRISCO, Texas (AP) — David Accam scored in the 86th minute to give Nashville SC a 1-0 victory over FC Dallas on Wednesday night in the first match for both teams since Major League Soccer shut down the season in March because of the coronavirus.

31. Actors and Disney World reach deal after virus testing fight -

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Walt Disney World and the union for its actors and singers reached an agreement on Wednesday that will allow them to return to work, more than a month after they said they were locked out of the reopening of the theme park resort for publicly demanding coronavirus tests.

32. Nashville defeats Dallas 1-0 as MLS restarts the season -

FRISCO, Texas (AP) — David Accam scored in the 86th minute to give Nashville SC a 1-0 victory over FC Dallas on Wednesday night in the first match for both teams since Major League Soccer shut down the season in March because of the coronavirus.

33. Nashville SC, FC Dallas prepare to restart the MLS season -

Having watched the MLS is Back tournament from afar because of coronavirus cases, FC Dallas and Nashville SC are grateful for the chance to play again when they meet Wednesday for the resumption of Major League Soccer's regular season.

34. Wall Street keeps rallying; S&P 500 back within 2% of record -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street's big rally keeps rolling, and the S&P 500 rose for a fourth straight day Wednesday to sit just 1.7% below its record.

The S&P 500 climbed 21.26 points, or 0.6%, to 3,327.77, echoing gains for stocks across Europe and Asia. If the U.S. market has just a few more days like that, it will erase the last of the historic losses it's taken since February because of the coronavirus pandemic and the recession it caused.

35. Disney 3Q revenue drops 42%, missing expectations -

BURBANK, Calif. (AP) — Walt Disney Co. on Tuesday reported that its net income fell dramatically in the three-month period that ended in June when it most of its theme parks were shuttered and theatrical movie releases were postponed.

36. Movie theaters implore studios: Release the blockbusters -

NEW YORK (AP) — A long time ago in a pre-COVID universe far, far away, blockbusters opened around the globe simultaneously or nearly so. In 1975, "Jaws" set the blueprint. Concentrate marketing. Open wide. Pack them in.

37. Report: Disney cuts back on Facebook, Instagram ads -

MENLO PARK, California (AP) — The Walt Disney Co. has "dramatically" slashed its advertising budget on Facebook and Facebook-owned Instagram, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal.

38. 'Human element' confounds control of COVID-19 in US -

ST. PETERSBURG, Florida (AP) — The United States was grappling with the worst coronavirus outbreak in the world on Monday, as Florida shattered the national record for a state's largest single-day increase in new confirmed cases.

39. Nashville out of MLS tourney after 9 players test positive -

Nashville SC has withdrawn from Major League Soccer's MLS is Back tournament in Florida after nine players tested positive for the coronavirus, the league announced Thursday.

Nashville is the second team to withdraw from the tournament. FC Dallas had to pull out after 10 players and a coach tested positive for COVID-19.

40. MLS to resume season minus Dallas amid growing virus concern -

Major League Soccer is about to resume its season — in a state that has seen a huge spike in coronavirus infections, with one team absent because of a COVID-19 outbreak, and with plenty of worry about what will happen next.

41. TikTok to leave Hong Kong as security law raises questions -

HONG KONG (AP) — TikTok said Tuesday it will stop operations in Hong Kong, joining other social media companies in warily eyeing ramifications of a sweeping national security law that took effect last week.

42. Sunbelt states rush to line up hospital beds, not barstools -

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — Florida and other states across the Sunbelt are thinning out the deck chairs, turning over the barstools and rushing to line up more hospital beds as they head into the height of the summer season amid a startling surge in confirmed cases of the coronavirus.

43. Europe restricts visitors from the US amid virus resurgence -

The European Continent on Tuesday decided to reopen to visitors from 14 countries but not the U.S., where some of the states that pushed hardest and earliest to reopen their economies are now in retreat because of an alarming surge in confirmed coronavirus infections.

44. Persistently high layoffs suggest a slow US economic rebound -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Three months after the viral outbreak shut down businesses across the country, U.S. employers are still shedding jobs at a heavy rate, a trend that points to a slow and prolonged recovery from the recession.

45. 1.5 million more laid-off workers seek unemployment benefits -

WASHINGTON (AP) — About 1.5 million laid-off workers applied for U.S. unemployment benefits last week, a historically high number, even as the economy increasingly reopens and employers bring some people back to work.

46. Amusement parks opening with temperature checks at the gate -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to the national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

47. Brands weigh in on national protests over police brutality -

As thousands of protesters take to the streets in response to police killings of black people, companies are wading into the national conversation but taking care to get their messaging right.

Netflix's normally lighthearted Twitter account took on a more somber tone on Saturday: "To be silent is to be complicit. Black lives matter. We have a platform, and we have a duty to our Black members, employees, creators and talent to speak up." That got retweeted over 216,000 times and "liked" over a million times.

48. US layoffs climb to 41 million despite business reopenings -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An estimated 2.1 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week despite the gradual reopening of businesses around the country, bringing the running total since the coronavirus shutdowns took hold in mid-March to about 41 million, the government said Thursday.

49. US death toll from coronavirus surges past 100,000 people -

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — The U.S. surpassed a jarring milestone Wednesday in the coronavirus pandemic: 100,000 deaths.

That number is the best estimate and most assuredly an undercount. But it represents the stark reality that more Americans have died from the virus than from the Vietnam and Korean wars combined.

50. Disney, SeaWorld announce plans for Florida parks to reopen -

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — SeaWorld and Walt Disney World will reopen in Orlando, Florida, in June and July after months of inactivity because of the coronavirus pandemic, according to plans a city task force approved Wednesday.

51. CEO pay has topped $12.3M. Can it keep rising post-pandemic? -

The typical pay package for CEOs at the biggest U.S. companies topped $12.3 million last year, and the gap between the boss and their workforces widened further, according to AP's annual survey of executive compensation.

52. Video app TikTok names top Disney streaming exec as new CEO -

TikTok, the popular short-video app that has also drawn national-security and privacy concerns, has a new high-profile CEO from Disney, Kevin Mayer.

53. Virus-shocked Hollywood gets break with streaming services -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Sports are on hold, theaters are closed and so are amusement parks, a disaster-movie scenario that has Hollywood reeling. But Americans held captive at home by the coronavirus can turn to Netflix, Amazon, Hulu and other streaming services, outliers in an entertainment industry brought to an unprecedented standstill.

54. Cinemas close nationwide, studios push new movies into homes -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. movie theaters have closed nationwide due to the coronavirus pandemic, turning dark nearly all of the country's 40,000-plus screens in an unprecedented shutdown.

The largest chains had tried to remain open even as Hollywood postponed its upcoming release plans and guidelines for social distancing steadily diminished the recommended size of crowds. But after President Donald Trump on Monday urged against gatherings of more than 10 people, AMC Theaters, the nation's largest chain, said Tuesday its theaters would close altogether.

55. What now? Facing life without the entertainment world -

NEW YORK (AP) — Overheard as the entertainment world stalled in response to the coronavirus outbreak: "What are we gonna do now, read books?"

That's exactly what Pamela Milam will be doing, and lots of them.

56. Vegas casinos and resorts to close amid pandemic -

The owners of iconic Las Vegas casinos such as Bellagio and Wynn Las Vegas are shutting down as the coronavirus pandemic prompts authorities to lock down public gathering places.

MGM Resorts' operations in Las Vegas include the MGM Grand and Mandalay Bay. The company said it will suspend operations at casinos and hotels indefinitely by Tuesday. It will not be taking reservations for arrivals prior to May 1.

57. Disney to close hotels, all retail stores due to COVID-19 -

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Walt Disney World will close all of its hotels in Florida due to growing concern over the new coronavirus, the company announced early Monday.

In a tweet, the company said the hotels would not close until 5 p.m. on Friday to give guests time to arrange other accommodations. The company also said all Disney stores nationwide will close on Tuesday, including in Disney Springs in Orlando, Florida, and Downtown Disney in Anaheim, California. To help contain the spread of the disease, Walt Disney World, Universal Orlando Resort, SeaWorld and Busch Gardens closed on Sunday night for at least two weeks.

58. Virus seizes markets; it's no longer business as usual -

Global markets and businesses big and small opened the week to a landscape seemingly altered by the coronavirus pandemic. National retail chains have closed all stores. Banks are taking steps to keep cash on hand, lots of it. Markets in Asia, Europe and the U.S. are plunging. Following is a quick look at how the outbreak is impacting the financial and business sector, as well as millions of workers and customers.

59. Stites & Harbison elects 3 to management committee -

Stites & Harbison, PLLC recently elected three members to the firm’s six-member management committee, replacing three attorneys who completed their terms of service. The new committee members are Erika Barnes of Nashville and Carol Dan Browning and Richard Wehrle of Louisville. The members rotating off the committee include attorneys Janet Craig and Mandy Wilson Decker (Lexington) and Marjorie Farris (Louisville). The new committee members will serve a two-year term.

60. Economic toll of outbreak deepens, duration remains unknown -

The Dow over the past five days: up 1,293, down 786, up 1,173, down 967. The Dow tumbled 800 points at the opening bell Friday. The VIX, an index known as Wall Street's fear barometer, is hovering at levels not seen since banks began to fall during the financial crisis.

61. Disney CEO Bob Iger steps down in surprise announcement -

NEW YORK (AP) — Disney CEO Bob Iger, who steered the company through successful purchases of Star Wars, Marvel and Fox's entertainment businesses and the launch of a Netflix challenger, is stepping down immediately, the company said in a surprise announcement Tuesday.

62. Virus impact: Automakers look at restarting China operations -

BEIJING (AP) — Automakers are considering whether to resume operations in China amid efforts to contain a virus outbreak while the impact on other companies spreads.

The latest developments as of Wednesday:

63. ABC News to bolster streaming service with live programming -

NEW YORK (AP) — ABC News is moving aggressively to boost its streaming service with the belief that these products will change the news business over the next decade the way cable channels CNN, Fox News and MSNBC did a generation ago.

64. California targets companies with highly paid execs -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California is considering raising taxes on some of the country's largest companies, but the size of the tax increase would depend on how much its highest-paid executive makes compared to its employees.

65. The box office belonged to Disney in 2019 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Every movie year offers up a parade of hits and flops. But in 2019, no winner was in the same galaxy as the Walt Disney Co. And the biggest loser might have been anyone less thrilled about the box-office domination of franchise films.

66. US stocks set more records after quiet pre-Christmas trading -

Stocks closed modestly higher on Wall Street Monday, extending the major indexes' milestone-shattering run.

The S&P 500 index notched its third-consecutive all-time high. The Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq composite also set record highs.

67. Stocks push past latest trade-war confusion to more records -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market capped another week of healthy gains on Friday, but it ended on more of a befuddled note than a bang as confusion about the U.S.-China trade war hung over the market.

68. Netflix's US subscriber growth slowing as competition looms -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Netflix's subscriber growth is bogging down even before the leading video streaming service confronts high-powered threats from Apple and Walt Disney Co.

69. California bans hotels from using tiny plastic bottles -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Hotels in the nation's most populous state will have to stop giving guests small plastic shampoo bottles under a new law set to take effect starting in 2023.

Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Wednesday he had signed a law banning hotels from giving guests plastic bottles filled with shampoo, conditioner or soap. It takes effect in 2023 for hotels with more than 50 rooms and 2024 for hotels with less than 50 rooms.

70. Apple takes on Netflix with a $5-a-month streaming service -

CUPERTINO, Calif. (AP) — Apple is finally taking on Netflix with its own streaming television service and, uncharacteristically for the company, offering it at a bargain price — $5 a month beginning on Nov. 1.

71. Dorian creeps up US coast; near-record storm surge feared -

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Weakened but still deadly, Hurricane Dorian crept up the Southeastern coast of the United States on Wednesday and millions were ordered to evacuate as forecasters said near-record levels of seawater and rain could inundate the area.

72. Report: Facebook offering 'millions' to publishers for news -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook is reportedly in talks with news publishers to offer "millions of dollars" for the rights to publish their material on its site. The move follows years of criticism over its growing monopolization of online advertising to the detriment of the struggling news industry.

73. Netflix's subscriber growth drops in 2Q, stock tumbles -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Netflix's video streaming service suffered a dramatic slowdown in growth during its traditionally sluggish spring season, a drop-off coming as it girds for even stiffer competition.

74. Big business to Supreme Court: Defend LGBTQ people from bias -

NEW YORK (AP) — More than 200 corporations, including many of America' best-known companies, are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that federal civil rights law bans job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.

75. US stocks notch gains, snap short losing streak -

Gains in energy and internet companies helped drive stocks broadly higher on Wall Street Thursday, snapping a two-day losing streak for the market in an otherwise choppy week of trading.

The gains were initially fueled by rising oil prices, which boosted energy companies following a suspected attack on two oil tankers in the strategic Strait of Hormuz. The sector sustained its gains as a mix of media, internet and consumer-oriented companies took the lead in pushing every major index higher. Small company stocks rose more than the rest of the market.

76. CEO Pay: When investors say "nay" on spiraling packages -

NEW YORK (AP) — Shareholders are still voting overwhelmingly in favor of big pay packages for CEOs, but there are more pockets of resistance eight years after "Say on Pay" became a mandatory exercise at annual meetings.

77. Disney takes over Hulu from Comcast as stream wars heat up -

NEW YORK (AP) — Disney is taking full control of Hulu from Comcast, as both companies prepare to launch their own streaming services in response to declining audiences for traditional TV.

The companies said Tuesday that Comcast, which owns a third of Hulu, can sell its stake to Disney starting in 2024, for a minimum of $5.8 billion. Until then, Comcast will be a silent investor.

78. 'Avengers: Endgame' obliterates records with $1.2B opening -

NEW YORK (AP) — The universe belongs to Marvel. "Avengers: Endgame" shattered the record for biggest opening weekend with an estimated $350 million in ticket sales domestically and $1.2 billion globally, reaching a new pinnacle in the blockbuster era that the comic-book studio has come to dominate.

79. Netflix adds 9.6M subscribers in 1Q as competition heats up -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Netflix's popularity is still booming, even as the video streaming service rolls out it biggest U.S. price increases and girds for new challenges from Walt Disney and Apple, two of the world's most popular brands.

80. Disney, Comcast now Hulu's only owners as AT&T exits -

NEW YORK (AP) — AT& has sold its 9.5% share in Hulu back to the streaming TV company, leaving Disney and Comcast as its owners.

Hulu said Monday that AT&T sold its stake for $1.43 billion, valuing the unprofitable Hulu at $15 billion.

81. Apple details new magazine, news app at services event -

CUPERTINO, California (AP) — Apple on Monday laid out the details of its news subscription service, Apple News Plus, at an event Monday. It's also expected to launch a video service that could compete with Netflix, Amazon and cable TV itself.

82. S&P 500 win streak marks 5th day on solid company earnings -

Technology companies helped lead stocks broadly higher on Wall Street Tuesday as strong earnings reports from several companies put investors in a buying mood.

The rally, which briefly wavered around midday, extended the benchmark S&P 500 index's winning streak to five days.

83. Netflix joins MPAA lobbying group, its 1st streaming member -

NEW YORK (AP) — On the same day Netflix scored its first best picture nomination from the Oscars, the streaming company is also joining the lobbying group the Motion Picture Association of America.

84. Comcast loses cable users, but internet subscribers surge -

NEW YORK (AP) — Comcast is still losing U.S. cable customers but is racking up more internet subscribers and has gotten a revenue boost from Sky, its big bet on European TV.

The Philadelphia company said Wednesday that it lost 29,000 U.S. cable customers in the fourth quarter but added 351,000 internet subscribers. It also gained customers in its new cellphone-plan business.

85. Netflix raising prices for 58M US subscribers as costs rise -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Netflix is raising its U.S. prices by 13 to 18 percent, its biggest increase since the company launched its video streaming service 12 years ago.

Its most popular plan will see the largest hike, to $13 per month from $11. That option offers high-definition streaming on up to two different internet-connected devices simultaneously. Even at the higher price, that plan is still a few dollars cheaper than HBO, whose streaming service charges $15 per month.

86. What air travelers should know about the government shutdown -

DALLAS (AP) — The partial government shutdown is starting to affect air travel. Over the weekend, some airports had long lines at checkpoints, apparently caused by a rising number of security officers calling in sick while they are not getting paid.

87. Hertz, Clear partner to speed rentals with biometric scans -

Biometric screening is expanding to the rental car industry.

Hertz said Tuesday it is teaming up with Clear, the maker of biometric screening kiosks found at many airports, in an effort to slash the time it takes to pick up a rental car. Clear hopes it will lead more travelers to its platform, which has 3 million members in the U.S.

88. Young Leaders Council honors Snitker, Day -

Ron Snitker, executive director of business development at Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP, has been named the 2018 Young Leader of the Year, and Jaynee Day, president & CEO of Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee, received the 2018 Hero of the Year Award from Young Leaders Council, a Nashville-based nonprofit organization that has trained more than 2,500 men and women to effectively participate on the boards of nonprofit agencies since 1985.

89. ABC to join ESPN, NFL Network in broadcasting NFL draft -

ABC is joining the NFL draft broadcast business and will televise all three days of picks next April.

The network will join ESPN, also part of Walt Disney Company's TV properties, for prime-time coverage on Thursday and Friday nights, April 25 and 26, from Nashville. NFL Network also will televise those two nights, which include the opening three rounds of the draft.

90. Stocks skid as oil plunge continues; tech sector also falls -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are falling Friday as technology and internet companies take steep losses.

Energy companies are also lower as crude oil heads for its 10th drop in a row. The price of oil has been falling steadily since early October and is now trading at its lowest price since March, causing steep losses for energy companies in recent weeks.

91. Netflix to borrow another $2B to pay its programming bills -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Netflix plans to borrow another $2 billion to help pay for the exclusive series and movies that its management credits for helping its video streaming service reel in millions of new subscribers during the past five years.

92. Former Trump aide Hope Hicks to work at Fox company -

NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump's former communications chief Hope Hicks has been hired as communications director at the newly revamped Fox company.

93. Fox plans to sell stake in Sky to Comcast for $15B -

NEW YORK (AP) — 21st Century Fox will sell its remaining stake in British pay TV provider Sky to Comcast in the latest financial wrangling as Disney prepares to acquire Fox's entertainment assets.

Over the weekend, Comcast won a rare bidding auction for 61 percent of Sky offering 17.28 pounds per share, almost 30 billion pounds ($39 billion). Fox will sell its 39 percent stake to for 11.6 billion pounds ($15.25 billion).

94. Disney workers approve new contract raising minimum wage -

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Thousands of Walt Disney World workers on Thursday overwhelmingly approved a new contract that increases the starting minimum wage to $15 an hour over the next three years while enabling Disney to use more part-time workers and require new workers to stay in their positions longer before transferring.

95. Disney offers 46 percent raises, could use more part-timers -

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The proposed contract Walt Disney World's unionized workers will vote on next week would increase the starting minimum wage by at least 46 percent over three years to $15 an hour, while enabling Disney to use more part-time workers and require new workers to stay in their positions longer before transferring, according to new details released Monday.

96. Disney offers tuition for hourly workers in tight job market -

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Disney is offering to pay full tuition for hourly workers who want to earn a college degree or finish a high school diploma.

The Walt Disney Co. said Wednesday it will pay upfront tuition to workers who want to take classes starting in the fall.

97. US stock indexes dip as oil prices sink energy companies -

NEW YORK (AP) — A late gain for U.S. stocks slipped away Wednesday as a four-day winning streak ended. Energy companies sank along with the price of oil.

The price of crude oil fell more than 3 percent Wednesday. Big dividend payers and industrial companies slipped. Gains for Microsoft, Facebook and Alphabet helped technology companies finish higher. Banks and health care companies also rose.

98. Comcast tops profit forecasts; cable TV subscriptions fall -

NEW YORK (AP) — Comcast is reporting a stronger-than-expected second-quarter profit even as it struggles to keep cable TV subscribers.

On Thursday, the company reported a 22 percent jump in earnings to $3.22 billion, or 69 cents per share. Earnings, adjusted for non-recurring gains, were 65 cents per share, which, according to a survey by Zacks Investment Research, was 4 cents better than expected.

99. Comcast drops Fox bid, paving way for sale to Disney -

NEW YORK (AP) — Comcast is dropping its bid for Fox's entertainment businesses, paving the way for Disney to boost its upcoming streaming service by buying the studios behind "The Simpsons" and X-Men.

100. In the battle for Twenty-First Century Fox, Comcast blinks -

NEW YORK (AP) — In a battle among media giants for control of Twenty-First Century Fox's entertainment business, Comcast has blinked.

The cable and media company said Thursday that it is dropping its bid, instead focusing on its pursuit of the European pay-TV operator Sky. Fox owns 39 percent of Sky and has also been trying to buy the 61 percent it doesn't own.