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Editorial Results (free)

1. US lawmakers skeptical grocery merger will mean lower prices -

U.S. senators from both parties expressed skepticism Tuesday that a proposed merger between grocery giants Kroger and Albertsons would result in lower prices for consumers.

"Fewer local options mean less competition to keep prices low," said Sen. Alex Padilla, a California Democrat, in a hearing before the antitrust subcommittee of the Senate Judiciary Committee. Padilla said Kroger and Albertsons compete in many California cities.

2. Cyber Monday deals lure in consumers amid high inflation -

NEW YORK (AP) — Days after flocking to stores on Black Friday, consumers are turning online for Cyber Monday to score more discounts on gifts and other items that have ballooned in price because of high inflation.

3. Elizabeth Holmes faces judgment day for her Theranos crimes -

A federal judge on Friday will decide whether disgraced Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes should serve a lengthy prison sentence for duping investors and endangering patients while peddling a bogus blood-testing technology.

4. US retail sales rose 1.3% last month, a sign of resilience -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans stepped up their spending at retailers, restaurants, and auto dealers last month, a sign of consumer resilience as the holiday shopping season begins amid painfully high inflation and rising interest rates.

5. Rising food costs take a bite out of Thanksgiving dinner -

In early November, Hays Culbreth's mother sent a poll to a few family members. She said she could only afford to make two sides for their group of 15 this Thanksgiving and asked them each to vote for their favorites.

6. Target's 3Q profit drops 52% as shoppers force price cuts -

NEW YORK (AP) — An unexpected and potentially ominous pullback in customer spending ahead of the holiday shopping season pushed third-quarter profits at Target down 52% after it was forced to slash prices with Americans feeling the squeeze of inflation.

7. Walmart puts up strong Q3, announces opioid settlement -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart reported higher sales in its fiscal third quarter as more Americans look for deals, particularly in groceries, in the face of high inflation.

The nation's largest retailer raised its full-year earnings outlook on the strong quarterly results.

8. CVS Health agrees to $5B settlement of opioid lawsuits -

CVS Health has announced an agreement in principle that would make it the first major pharmacy chain to reach a nationwide settlement of lawsuits over how it handled prescriptions for powerful and addictive prescription opioid painkillers that are linked to an overdose epidemic.

9. Biden nominates 7 for US attorney, judge and marshal slots -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is putting forth seven new Justice Department and judicial nominations covering three U.S. attorney's offices in Texas and other senior posts. One is a prosecutor who vowed to seek the death penalty for a man who killed nearly two dozen people in a racist attack at a Walmart.

10. Kroger seeks to create grocery giant in $20B Albertsons bid -

Two of the nation's largest grocers have agreed to merge in a deal they say would help them better compete with Walmart, Amazon and other major companies that have stepped into the grocery business.

11. Retail sales flat in September as inflation takes a bite -

NEW YORK (AP) — The pace of sales at U.S. retailers was unchanged in September from August as rising prices for rent and food chipped away at money available for other things.

Retail sales were flat last month, down from a revised 0.4% growth in August, the Commerce Department reported Friday. Retail sales fell 0.4% in July.

12. Amazon's holiday sales event sees lower sales, group says -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon said Thursday its Prime members ordered more than 100 million items during a sales event this week that analysts are expecting to be a bellwether for the holiday shopping season.

13. Parkland school shooter to get life sentence for killing 17 -

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Florida school shooter Nikolas Cruz will be sentenced to life without parole for the 2018 murder of 17 people at Parkland's Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, after the jury said Thursday that it could not unanimously agree that he should be executed — a decision that left some parents in tears as they exited the courtroom.

14. Worsening inflation will pressure Fed to keep raising rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation in the United States accelerated in September, with the cost of housing and other necessities intensifying pressure on households, wiping out pay gains and ensuring that the Federal Reserve will keep raising interest rates aggressively.

15. TikTok going big on US e-commerce? Job listings offer clues -

NEW YORK (AP) — TikTok appears to be deepening its foray into e-commerce with plans to operate its own U.S. warehouses, the kind of packing and shipping facilities more associated with Amazon or Walmart than the social media platform best known for addictive short videos.

16. EXPLAINER: How do we know when a recession has begun? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The economy shrank in the first half of this year, the government confirmed in a report Thursday, underscoring fears of a broad-based slowdown that could lead to a recession.

At the same time, the number of people seeking unemployment benefits — a figure that often reflects the pace of layoffs — fell to a five-month low. The drop suggests that companies are holding onto their staffs, despite the slowdown in growth, and that those who do get laid off are quickly finding new jobs.

17. Walmart to cover fertility treatments under insurance plan -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart is teaming up with a fertility startup to offer benefits under its insurance plan that will help its workers expand their families.

The nation's largest retailer and private employer said Tuesday it's partnering with New York-based Kindbody to offer benefits such as in vitro fertilization as well as fertility testing regardless of sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or marital status.

18. Amazon to hold holiday shopping event in October -

Amazon said Monday that next month it will hold a second Prime Day-like shopping event, making it the latest major retailer to offer holiday deals earlier this year to entice cautious consumers struggling with tighter budgets.

19. Walmart, Target begin holiday early to ease inflation sting -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart and Target plan to begin offering deals and price matching offers earlier this year to keep up with Americans pressed by soaring inflation and looking for ways to ease the potential sting of holiday shopping.

20. Walmart takes a cautious approach to holiday hiring -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart is taking a cautious approach to the holiday shopping season, announcing it will hire 40,000 U.S. workers for the holidays, a majority of them seasonal workers.

The move, announced Wednesday, comes as the nation's largest retailer and largest private employer said it's in a stronger staffing position heading into the holidays than last year and is now focusing on hiring only seasonal workers, rather than permanent workers. Just like in past years, the company will first offer current workers the opportunity to pick up additional shifts if they want to earn extra money for the holidays.

21. Gap slashes 500 corporate jobs in cost-cutting move -

NEW YORK (AP) — Gap is slashing 500 corporate jobs in San Francisco and New York as it looks to reduce expenses amid languishing sales, a company spokesperson confirmed on Tuesday.

The job cuts follow years of struggles at the San Francisco-based retailer, which operates stores under its namesake brand as well as Old Navy, Banana Republic and Athleta. But the pandemic as well as surging supply chain costs have exerted even more of a financial toll on the retailer. And last week, Gap and Kanye West ended their partnership to distribute the rap artist's clothing line under the Yeezy name. The partnership was announced two years ago with much fanfare.

22. Biden: Hate-fueled violence 'has no place in America' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A grocery store in Buffalo. A nightclub in Orlando. A Walmart in El Paso: All sites of hate-fueled violence against Black, Hispanic or LGBTQ Americans over the past five years. And all somber symbols of a "through line" of hate that must be rooted out, President Joe Biden said Thursday.

23. Samsung sets goal to attain 100% clean energy by 2050 -

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Samsung Electronics is shifting away from fossil fuels and aiming to entirely power its global operations with clean electricity by 2050, a challenging goal that experts say could be hampered by South Korea's modest climate change commitments.

24. California sues Amazon, alleging antitrust law violations -

NEW YORK (AP) — California is suing Amazon, accusing the company of violating the state's antitrust and unfair competition laws by stifling competition and engaging in practices that push sellers to maintain higher prices on products on other sites.

25. Target drops mandatory CEO retirement age, Cornell to stay -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target is dropping the mandatory retirement age for its CEO, allowing its Chief Executive Brian Cornell to stay on for three more years.

Cornell, 63, would have passed the age of 65 in that span.

26. Bed Bath & Beyond to close stores, cut jobs in rebound bid -

NEW YORK (AP) — Bed Bath & Beyond said Wednesday that it will shutter stores and lay off workers in a bid to turn around its beleaguered business.

The home goods retailer based in Union, New Jersey, said it will close about 150 of its namesakes stores and slash its workforce by 20%. It estimated those cuts would save $250 million in the company's current fiscal year. It also said it is considering selling more of its stock to shore up its finances and had lined up more than $500 million of new financing.

27. Labor board rules Tesla must let workers wear union clothing -

DETROIT (AP) — The National Labor Relations Board has reversed a Trump-era decision by finding that Tesla can't stop factory employees from wearing clothing with union insignia while on the job.

The board, in a 3-2 decision released Monday, overruled a 2019 NLRB decision involving Walmart and union clothing. The board wrote that a 1945 Supreme Court decision established the precedent for allowing the clothing.

28. Walmart seeks to dismiss lawsuit by FTC over money transfers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart filed a motion on Monday to dismiss a lawsuit by the Federal Trade Commission in June that accused the nation's largest retailer of allowing its money transfer services to be used by scam artists, calling it an "egregious instance of agency overreach."

29. Macy's cuts outlook with inflation, inventory elevated -

NEW YORK (AP) — Macy's trimmed its expectations for the year Tuesday despite topping second quarter expectations as it faces a glut of unsold inventory that has afflicted almost the entire retail sector.

30. Walmart expands abortion coverage for employees -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart, the nation's largest employer, is expanding its abortion coverage for employees after staying largely mum on the issue for months following the Supreme Court ruling that scrapped a nationwide right to abortion.

31. Kohl's cuts 2022 outlook, closing mixed week for retailers -

Kohl's slashed its sales and profit expectations for the year as the department store chain stepped up price cutting to get rid of unwanted merchandise.

The department store also cut back on orders ahead of the critical holiday period, spooking investors and sending shares, down 35% this year, falling another 5%.

32. US retail sales were flat in July as inflation takes a toll -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The pace of sales at U.S. retailers was unchanged last month as persistently high inflation and rising interest rates forced many Americans to spend more cautiously.

Retail purchases were flat after having risen 0.8% in June, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday. Economists had expected a slight increase.

33. Target takes a hit after heavy discounts to clear inventory -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target reported solid sales for the fiscal second quarter but its profit plunged nearly 90% after it was forced to slash prices to clear unwanted inventories of clothing, home goods and electronics.

34. After another bumpy day, Wall Street ends mostly higher -

Stocks ended mostly higher on Wall Street Tuesday after another bumpy day as investors cautiously reviewed mostly encouraging financial results from major retailers.

The S&P 500 index wound up with a modest gain of 0.2%, while the tech-heavy Nasdaq fell. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose, mostly due to gains in Walmart and Home Depot following encouraging financial updates.

35. Walmart deal with Paramount gives members streaming perks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart Inc. said Monday it has signed a deal with Paramount Global to offer the entertainment company's streaming service as a perk to subscribers of the discounter's shipping subscription service.

36. Hot dogs vs deli meat; rising costs shape choices at Walmart -

NEW YORK (AP) — With inflation hovering near levels not seen in 40 years, higher income Americans turned to Walmart to cut costs on groceries while its lower income customers swapped out deli meats for less expensive hot dogs and canned tuna.

37. Best Buy trims jobs after it cuts sales and profit outlook -

NEW YORK (AP) — Best Buy, the nation's largest consumer electronics chain, is trimming jobs in an effort to adjust to new changes in consumer behavior as the virus wanes.

Best Buy declined to say how many jobs it was cutting, but The Wall Street Journal, which was first to report the news, estimated it involved hundreds of jobs at the store level.

38. EXPLAINER: How do we know when a recession has begun? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy has contracted for two straight quarters, intensifying fears that the nation is on the cusp of a recession — if not already in one — barely two years after the pandemic recession officially ended.

39. Inflation and wage data suggest US prices will keep climbing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation surged in June and workers' average wages accelerated in the spring — signs that Americans won't likely feel any relief from rising prices anytime soon and that the Federal Reserve will feel compelled to further raise borrowing costs.

40. Amazon posts 2Q loss but revenue tops estimates, stock jumps -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon on Thursday reported its second-consecutive quarterly loss but its revenue topped Wall Street expectations, sending its stock sharply higher.

The Seattle-based e-commerce giant also said it is making progress in controlling some of the excess costs from its massive expansion during the COVID-19 pandemic.

41. EXPLAINER: How do we know when a recession has begun? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy has contracted for two straight quarters, intensifying fears that the nation is on the cusp of a recession — if not already in one — barely two years after the pandemic recession officially ended.

42. Best Buy cuts sales forecast as inflation tempers spending -

NEW YORK (AP) — Best Buy, the nation's largest consumer electronics chain, cut its annual sales and profit forecast Wednesday, citing surging inflation that has dampened consumer spending on gadgets.

43. Grim news from Walmart sends US markets lower -

Stocks are closing lower on Wall Street Tuesday after Walmart warned that inflation is negatively impacting American consumers' spending power.

The S&P 500 index lost 1.2%, the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 0.8% and the Nasdaq Composite dropped 1.9%.

44. EXPLAINER: How do we know when a recession has begun? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — By one common definition, the U.S. economy is on the cusp of a recession. Yet that definition isn't the one that counts.

On Thursday, when the government estimates the gross domestic product for the April-June period, some economists think it may show that the economy shrank for a second straight quarter. That would meet a longstanding assumption for when a recession has begun.

45. Unilever hikes prices for products but expects strong sales -

LONDON (AP) — Unilever, the consumer goods giant that owns brands ranging from Ben & Jerry's ice cream to Dove skin care, raised prices by more than 11% between April and June as inflation surged around the world.

46. US economy sending mixed signals: Here's what it all means -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy is caught in an awkward, painful place. A confusing one, too.

Growth appears to be sputtering, home sales are tumbling and economists warn of a potential recession ahead. But consumers are still spending, businesses keep posting profits and the economy keeps adding hundreds of thousands of jobs each month.

47. Walmart cuts profit outlook as shoppers adapt to inflation -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart Inc. on Monday lowered its profit outlook for the second quarter and the full year, saying rising prices on food and gas are forcing shoppers to cut back on discretionary items, particularly clothing, that carry higher profit margins.

48. Hobbled by chip, other shortages, GM profit slides 40% in Q2 -

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors' second-quarter net income fell 40% from a year ago as computer chip and parts shortages hobbled factory output and drove the company's U.S. sales down more than 15%.

49. US inflation surges again in June, raising risks for economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. inflation surged to a new four-decade high in June because of rising prices for gas, food and rent, squeezing household budgets and pressuring the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates aggressively -- trends that raise the risk of a recession.

50. Big-ticket purchases looming? Here’s how to plan -

When Brandy Baxter needed to replace her home’s entire heating and air conditioning system several years ago, she asked contractors if they offered deals at certain times of the year. She learned that if she waited until February, the slow season for such work, she could get a lower price. Baxter, a financial coach based in Dallas, says she saved around $6,000 as a result.

51. A robust June jobs report clouds outlook for US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A strong hiring report for June has assuaged fears that the U.S. economy might be on the cusp of a recession — and highlighted the resilience of the nation's job market.

52. Retailers scale back hiring as worry about a slowdown grows -

NEW YORK (AP) — After going on a frenzied hiring spree for a year and a half to meet surging shopper demand, America's retailers are starting to temper their recruiting.

The changing mindset comes as companies confront a pullback in consumer spending, the prospect of an economic downturn and surging labor costs. Some analysts suggest that merchants have also learned to do more with fewer workers.

53. Amazon, Rite Aid cap purchase of emergency contraceptives -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon is limiting how many emergency contraceptives consumers can buy, joining other retailers who put in place similar caps following the Supreme Court decision overruling Roe v. Wade.

54. Bed Bath & Beyond CEO ousted after another dour quarter -

The top executive at Bed Bath & Beyond's CEO was ousted Wednesday as the home goods retailer continues to struggle to figure out what people want to buy.

Board member Sue Gove will take over as interim CEO, the company said Wednesday, replacing Mark Tritton. Bed Bath & Beyond hired Tritton in late 2019. He'd previously been the chief merchandising officer at Target where the more than 30 new brands he introduced were key in that company's revitalization.

55. FTC sues Walmart for scammers' use of money transfer unit -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Federal Trade Commission said Tuesday that it has sued Walmart for allegedly allowing its money transfer services to be used by scam artists who stole "hundreds of millions of dollars" from customers.

56. How to afford your medications, support your health -

The cost of prescription drugs in the U.S. can be enough to make you sick. What you pay varies enormously depending on the drug, the pharmacy, your insurance plan and your deductible, among many other factors.

57. US inflation at new 40-year high as price increases spread -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The cost of gas, food and most other goods and services jumped in May, pushing inflation to a four-decade high and offering Americans no respite.

Consumer prices surged 8.6% last month from a year earlier, faster than April's year-over-year increase of 8.3%, the Labor Department said Friday. The new inflation figure, the biggest increase since December 1981, heightens pressure on the Federal Reserve to continue raising interest rates aggressively.

58. White supremacists are riling up thousands on social media -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The social media posts are of a distinct type. They hint darkly that the CIA or the FBI are behind mass shootings. They traffic in racist, sexist and homophobic tropes. They revel in the prospect of a "white boy summer."

59. Stocks rise as uncertainties keep Wall Street wobbly -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rallied Tuesday as Treasury yields eased, but Wall Street remains wobbly as investors wait for more clarity on where interest rates, inflation and the economy are heading.

60. Facing huge inventory, Target cuts vendor orders, prices -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target is canceling orders from suppliers, particularly for home goods and clothing, and it's slashing prices further to clear out amassed inventory ahead of the critical fall and holiday shopping seasons.

61. Inflation divide: The wealthy splurge, the poorest pull back -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans at the low end of the income rung are once again struggling to make ends meet.

A confluence of factors — the expiration of federal stimulus checks and surging inflation on staples like gas and food — are driving an even bigger wedge between the haves and have-nots.

62. More job gains point to a solid economy and Fed rate hikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added 390,000 jobs in May, extending a streak of solid hiring that has bolstered an economy under pressure from high inflation and rising interest rates.

Last month's gain reflects a resilient job market that has so far shrugged off concerns that the economy will weaken in the coming months as the Federal Reserve steadily raises interest rates to fight inflation. The unemployment rate remained 3.6%, just above a half-century low, the Labor Department said Friday.

63. O'Rourke bets shooting will shake up Texas governor's race -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Still mourning a Texas mass shooting, Democrat Beto O'Rourke gave his long-shot campaign a jolt by imploring a national audience that it was finally time for real action to curb the proliferation of high-powered guns in his home state and across America.

64. Better results from retailers help send stock market higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are ending higher on Wall Street Thursday as investors cheered a strong set of quarterly results from Macy's and other retailers.

The S&P 500 rose 2% and is solidly in the green for the week following a choppy few days of trading. The gains have positioned the benchmark index for its first weekly gain after seven straight losses.

65. Retailers' troubles sound the alarm for rest of economy -

NEW YORK (AP) — The fastest inflation in 40 years squeezed retailers during the first quarter, alarming investors worried about the broader economy's outlook.

Earnings reports from Walmart, Target and Amazon this month showed higher costs are hurting retailers' operations. While profits for all companies in the benchmark S&P 500 index grew by about 9% last quarter, retailers' profits contracted more than 30% from a year ago. They blamed rising costs for raw materials, shipping and labor for the slump.

66. Macy's raises annual profit outlook on strong Q1 results -

NEW YORK (AP) — Shoppers' return to occasion dressing helped to power Macy's fiscal first-quarter results, and the department store chain raised its annual earnings outlook even as surging inflation is crimping Americans' budgets.

67. CEO pay up 17% as profits, stocks soar; workers fall behind -

NEW YORK (AP) — Even when regular workers win their biggest raises in decades, they look minuscule compared with what CEOs are getting.

The typical compensation package for chief executives who run S&P 500 companies soared 17.1% last year, to a median $14.5 million, according to data analyzed for The Associated Press by Equilar.

68. Stocks fall sharply as Target's woes renew inflation fears -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones Industrial Average sank more than 1,100 points and the S&P 500 had its biggest drop in nearly two years Wednesday, as big earnings misses by Target and other major retailers stoked investors' fears that surging inflation could cut deeply into corporate profits.

69. Consumers shift again, flummoxing big retailers like Target -

NEW YORK (AP) — The pandemic vastly changed the way Americans spend money and now as they return to pre-pandemic behavior, they're tripping up retailers again.

That dynamic has only been intensified in recent months as inflation jumps sharply, and the latest financial report from Target underscores the challenges.

70. Retail sales rise 0.9% in April as consumers show resilience -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. retail sales rose 0.9% in April, a solid increase that underscores Americans' ability to keep ramping up spending even as inflation persists at nearly a 40-year high.

The increase was driven by greater sales of cars, electronics, and at restaurants, the Commerce Department said Tuesday.

71. Walmart profit hit as inflation afflicts low-wage earners -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart reported stronger sales for the first quarter, but its profit took a beating as the nation's largest retailer grappled with surging inflation on food and fuel and higher costs from a snarled global supply chain.

72. Starbucks will cover travel for workers seeking abortions -

Starbucks said Monday it will pay the travel expenses for U.S. employees to access abortion and gender-confirmation procedures if those services aren't available within 100 milof a worker's home.

The Seattle coffee giant said it will also make the travel benefit available to the dependents of employees who are enrolled in Starbucks' health care plan. Starbucks has 240,000 U.S. employees but the company didn't say what percentage of them are enrolled in the its health care plan.

73. Judge to decide how much pharmacies owe over opioid crisis -

CLEVELAND (AP) — A hearing has begun in federal court in Cleveland for a judge to determine how much CVS, Walgreens and Walmart pharmacies should pay two Ohio counties to help them ease the ongoing costs and problems caused by the opioid crisis.

74. Get the latest COVID booster? It’s hard to know what to do -

Except for the anti-vax crowd – a self-thinning Darwinian herd – it’s time for some of us to consider another COVID shot. Turns out it’s more complicated than I had hoped.

Deciding on the first shots was a no-brainer. As soon as they were authorized for my age group, Geezer II, I made arrangements and twice stood in a substantial line at a Walmart to get jabbed. Other than some surprisingly potent soreness in the receiving arm after the first shot, there were no negative repercussions. And I felt bulletproof.

75. Once a retail giant, Kmart down to 3 stores after NJ closing -

AVENEL, N.J. (AP) — The familiar sights and sounds are still there: the scuffed and faded floor tiles, the relentless beige-on-beige color scheme, the toddlers' clothes and refrigerators and pretty much everything in between.

76. Walmart offers supply-chain workers a chance to drive trucks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart workers who once unloaded trucks now have a chance to drive them.

The nation's largest retailer has launched a training program that gives employees who work in its distribution or fulfillment centers a chance to become certified Walmart truck drivers through a 12-week program taught by the company's established drivers.

77. Medicare enrollees to get free COVID-19 tests at drug stores -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Amid worries that the latest coronavirus variant could spark another rise in cases, Medicare announced Monday that millions of enrollees will finally have access to free over-the-counter COVID-19 tests at drug stores.

78. Walmart to end cigarette sales in some stores -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart will no longer sell cigarettes in some of its stores though tobacco sales can be a significant revenue generator.

Wall Street Journal was the first to report the development Monday. It noted some stores in California, Florida, Arkansas and New Mexico were on the list, citing anonymous sources and store visits.

79. US retail spending slows as inflation starts to bite -

NEW YORK (AP) — After beginning the year in a buying mood, Americans slowed their spending in February on gadgets, home furnishings and other discretionary items as higher prices for food, gasoline, and shelter are taking a bigger bite out of their wallet.

80. Biden's high court choice defies expectations on labor cases -

DETROIT (AP) — Labor unions and worker advocates have applauded President Joe Biden's nomination of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson for the Supreme Court. Yet a look back at Jackson's decisions in cases involving business and labor suggest that she won't always rule as they want or expect her to.

81. Amazon's voice assistant Alexa to start seeking doctor help -

If there is no doctor in the house, Amazon's Alexa will soon be able to summon one.

Amazon and telemedicine provider Teladoc Health are starting a voice-activated virtual care program that lets customers get medical help without picking up their phones.

82. Target seeks to entice workers with pay of up to $24 an hour -

NEW YORK (AP) — Workers at Target stores and distribution centers in places like New York, where competition for finding and hiring staff is the fiercest, could see starting wages as high as $24 an hour this year.

83. Amazon union organizer, 2 others arrested at NYC facility -

NEW YORK (AP) — A former Amazon employee who is leading a push to unionize a New York City warehouse of the online retailer was arrested along with two others Wednesday after authorities got a complaint about him trespassing at the facility, police said.

84. Ukraine tensions send US stocks and bond yields lower -

Stocks and bond yields sank Thursday as markets remained anxious over the possibility that Russia could invade Ukraine.

The S&P 500 fell 2.1%, its biggest drop in two weeks.

Technology stocks led the way lower, pulling the Nasdaq down 2.9%. Investors shifted money into low-risk U.S. government bonds, pushing yields lower.

85. Walmart steers through inflation, boosting profit and sales -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart muscled through rising inflation, a snarled global supply chain and surging costs related to COVID-19 sick leave among its workers to deliver strong fourth quarter results Thursday.

86. January retail sales surge 3.8% as consumers defy inflation -

NEW YORK (AP) — Fueled by pay gains, solid hiring and enhanced savings, Americans sharply ramped up their spending at retail stores last month in a sign that many consumers remain unfazed by rising inflation.

87. Companies revert to more normal operations as COVID wanes -

NEW YORK (AP) — For the first time in two years for many people, the American workplace is transforming into something that resembles pre-pandemic days.

Tyson Foods said Tuesday it was ending mask requirements for its vaccinated workers in some facilities. Walmart and Amazon — the nation's No. 1 and 2 largest private employers respectively — will no longer require fully vaccinated workers to don masks in stores or warehouses unless required under local or state laws. Tech companies like Microsoft and Facebook that had allowed employees to work fully remote are now setting mandatory dates to return to the office after a series of fits and starts.

88. Justice Dept. announces $3.6B crypto seizure, 2 arrests -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department announced Tuesday its largest-ever financial seizure — more than $3.5 billion — and the arrests of a New York couple accused of conspiring to launder billions of dollars in cryptocurrency stolen from the 2016 hack of a virtual currency exchange.

89. Report: Corporate climate pledges are weaker than they seem -

NEW YORK (AP) — Many of the world's largest companies are failing to take significant enough steps to meet their pledges to vastly reduce the impact of their greenhouse gas emissions in the decades ahead.

90. Why can’t I find what I want at the grocery? -

Maybe by the time you read this, toaster strudels and refrigerated crescent roll dough will be for sale at the grocery store. Rice Krispies, Shake-n-Bake, chips and juice boxes might be reliably available to shoppers. Possibly you’ll have all kinds of choices in frozen entrees.

91. Amazon plans a clothing store for a Southern California mall -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon says it plans to open a clothing store in a Southern California mall later this year, a first for the online behemoth and a fresh challenge for already struggling traditional retailers.

92. Home COVID tests to be covered by insurers starting Saturday -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Starting Saturday, private health insurers will be required to cover up to eight home COVID-19 tests per month for people on their plans. The Biden administration announced the change Monday as it looks to lower costs and make testing for the virus more convenient amid rising frustrations.

93. Belle Meade property going on auction block -

Luxury real estate auction house Platinum Luxury Auctions will begin the new year with an auction of a Belle Meade home that listed earlier for $9.5 million.

The property, 1310 Chickering Road in Belle Meade, is scheduled for auction Jan. 22.

94. Scientist, enforcer, high-flyer: 3 women put a mark on tech -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Three bright and driven women with ground-breaking ideas made significant — if very different — marks on the embattled tech industry in 2021.

Frances Haugen, Lina Khan and Elizabeth Holmes — a data scientist turned whistleblower, a legal scholar turned antitrust enforcer and a former Silicon Valley high-flyer turned criminal defendant — all figured heavily in a technology world where men have long dominated the spotlight. Think Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg, Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk.

95. Tennessee gets first shipment of oral antiviral COVID drugs -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee has received its first shipments of oral antiviral treatments for COVID-19, the Tennessee Department of Health said on Thursday.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued an emergency use authorization for two oral COVID-19 treatments: Paxlovid by Pfizer and molnupiravir by Merck.

96. Amazon settles with NLRB to give workers power to organize -

NEW YORK (AP) — Under pressure to improve worker rights, Amazon has reached a settlement with the National Labor Relations Board to allow its employees to freely organize — and without retaliation.

97. California sues Walmart over disposal of hazardous waste -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Retail giant Walmart illegally dumps more than 1 million batteries, aerosol cans of insect killer and other products, toxic cleaning supplies, electronic waste, latex paints and other hazardous waste into California landfills each year, state prosecutors alleged Monday in a lawsuit that the company labeled "unjustified."

98. Towns in mourning while digging out from deadly tornadoes -

DAWSON SPRINGS, Ky. (AP) — Tight-knit communities still digging out from the deadly tornadoes that killed dozens of people across eight states in the South and Midwest are turning to another heavy-hearted task: honoring and burying their dead.

99. Resale is making gains in December holiday gift shopping -

NEW YORK (AP) — Second hand. Like new. Thrift. Buy Nothing. Gently used. There are lots of ways to describe consumption in the booming resale market.

Add "Merry Christmas!" to the list.

Resale has taken off among those looking to save the planet and spend less on gifts during what can be the most wasteful time of the year — the December holidays. This year's supply chain delays have provided extra motivation.

100. Walmart said she shoplifted; jury awards her $2.1 million -

MOBILE, Ala. (AP) — An Alabama woman who says she was falsely arrested for shoplifting at a Walmart and then threatened by the company after her case was dismissed has been awarded $2.1 million in damages.