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Editorial Results (free)

1. Stocks eke out gains after a mixed set of earnings reports -

U.S. stock indexes eked out tiny gains Wednesday following a wobbly day of trading as investors reviewed another set of mixed quarterly report cards from big companies.

Some of the companies' earnings topped analysts' expectations. Others put traders in a selling mood after warning that the slowing global economy and trade tensions are hitting their profits.

2. Zuckerberg defends Facebook's currency plans before Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg endured hours of prickly questioning from lawmakers Wednesday as he defended the company's new globally ambitious project to create a digital currency while also dealing with widening scrutiny from U.S. regulators.

3. US stock indexes close lower on mixed company earnings -

A choppy day of trading on Wall Street ended Tuesday with stocks closing lower after a technology sector-led sell-off strengthened toward the end of the day.

That late-afternoon burst of selling erased modest gains for the market, which was coming off two weeks of gains.

4. Facebook says Libra won't launch without US approval -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg plans to tell Congress Wednesday that the company's planned Libra cryptocurrency won't launch unless all U.S. regulators approve.

In prepared remarks released Tuesday ahead of a hearing before the House Financial Services Committee, Zuckerberg says that Facebook will not be part of launching the new digital currency anywhere in the world without U.S. government approval.

5. Visa, Mastercard shun Facebook's Libra digital currency plan -

NEW YORK (AP) — Visa and Mastercard are dropping out of Facebook's Libra project, a potentially fatal blow to the social network's plan for a worldwide digital currency.

Along with the two payment giants, several other large companies have announced their departures from Libra. Payment processing company Stripe said it was stepping back, as well as online auction company eBay.

6. US stocks notch solid gains as job report allays worries -

Wall Street ended a choppy week of trading with a broad rally that drove the Dow Jones Industrial Average more than 370 points higher.

The gains Friday also gave the S&P 500 index its best day in seven weeks, though the benchmark index still finished with its third straight weekly loss.

7. Wells Fargo appoints Scharf, Wall Street cheers -

Wells Fargo named its third CEO in as many years as the bank attempts to put behind it a series of recent scandals.

Wells Fargo said Friday that Charles Scharf will take over for C. Allen Parker, who has led the San Francisco bank since March after its second CEO stepped down in quick succession.

8. Iranian president: US should end 'maximum pressure' policy -

NEW YORK (AP) — Iranian President Hassan Rouhani urged the United States on Thursday to "cease this policy of maximum pressure" on his nation, saying it was driving the possibility of negotiations even further away.

9. US stock indexes end mostly higher after late buying burst -

Major U.S. stock indexes closed mostly higher Tuesday, erasing much of an early slide, as investors favored smaller, U.S.-focused companies for the second straight day.

Industrial, energy and health care stocks helped power the market higher. Banks also notched solid gains amid a broad pullback in demand for U.S. government bonds, which pushed yields higher. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note climbed to 1.73% from 1.62% late Monday, a big move.

10. S&P 500 finishes flat; smaller company stocks notch gains -

Major U.S. stock indexes ended mixed Monday as large companies gave up early gains and smaller companies closed broadly higher.

The S&P 500 ended virtually flat as losses in technology and health care stocks outweighed gains in financials and other sectors. The Russell 2000 index of smaller company stocks, which has lagged the S&P 500 this year, outpaced the rest of the market.

11. Facebook's Libra gets stark warning from G-7 finance chiefs -

CHANTILLY, France (AP) — Finance chiefs from the Group of Seven rich democracies issued a stark warning on Thursday that cryptocurrencies like the Libra digital money recently unveiled by Facebook should not be allowed before "serious regulatory and systemic concerns" are addressed.

12. Facebook's currency plan gets hostile reception in Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Under sharp criticism from senators, a Facebook executive on Tuesday defended the social network's ambitious plan to create a digital currency and pledged to work with regulators to achieve a system that protects the privacy of users' data.
"We know we need to take the time to get this right," David Marcus, the Facebook executive leading the project, told the Senate Banking Committee at a hearing.
But that message did little to assure senators. Members of both parties demanded to know why a company with massive market power and a track record of scandals should be trusted with such a far-reaching project, given the potential for fraud, abuse and criminal activity.
"Facebook is dangerous," asserted Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio, the committee's senior Democrat. Like a toddler playing with matches, "Facebook has burned down the house over and over," he told Marcus. "Do you really think people should trust you with their bank accounts and their money?"
Republican Sen. Martha McSally of Arizona said "the core issue here is trust."Users won't be able to opt out of providing their personal data when joining the new digital wallet for Libra, McSally said. "Arizonans will be more likely to be scammed" using the currency, she said. The litany of criticism came as Congress began two days of hearings on the currency planned by Facebook, to be called Libra. Also Tuesday, a House Judiciary subcommittee was extending its bipartisan investigation of the market power of Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple.
On the defensive from bursts of aggressive questioning, Marcus indicated the currency plan is a work in progress. "We will take the time" to ensure the network won't be open to use by criminals and illicit activity like money laundering and financial fraud. "We hope that we'll avoid conflicts of interest. We have a lot of work to do," Marcus said.
The grilling followed a series of negative comments and warnings about the Libra plan in recent days from President Donald Trump, his treasury secretary and the head of the Federal Reserve.
But some senators emphasized the potential positive benefits of Facebook's plan, meant to bring money transacting at low cost to millions around the globe who don't have bank accounts. Facebook had its strong defenders of the project, too, on the panel.
"To strangle this baby in the crib is wildly premature," said Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa.
In that vein, Marcus said Libra "is about developing a safe, secure and low-cost way for people to move money efficiently around the world. We believe that Libra can make real progress toward building a more inclusive financial infrastructure."
The planned digital currency is to be a blend of multiple currencies, so that its value will fluctuate in any given local currency. Because Libra will be backed by a reserve, and because the group of companies managing it will encourage a competitive system of exchanges, the project leaders say, "anyone with Libra has a high degree of assurance they can sell it for local (sovereign) currency based on an exchange rate."
Promising low fees, the new currency system could open online commerce to millions of people around the world who lack access to bank accounts and make it cheaper to send money across borders. But it also raises concerns over the privacy of users' data and the potential for criminals to use it for money laundering and fraud.
To address privacy concerns, Facebook created a nonprofit oversight association, with dozens of partners including PayPal, Uber, Spotify, Visa and MasterCard, to govern Libra. As one among many in the association, Facebook says it won't have any special rights or privileges. It also created a "digital wallet" subsidiary, Calibra, to work on the technology, separately from its main social media business. While Facebook owns and controls Calibra, it won't see financial data from it, the company says.
Senators demanded to know exactly what that separation will entail.
"Facebook isn't a company; it's a country," said Sen. John Kennedy, R-La. Kennedy and other conservative senators took the occasion to air long-standing grievances against Facebook, Twitter and Google for a perceived bias against conservative views.
Facebook's currency proposal has also faced heavy skepticism from the Trump administration.
Trump tweeted last week that the new currency, Libra, "will have little standing or dependability." Both Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Fed Chair Jerome Powell have expressed serious concerns recently that Libra could be used for illicit activity.
The Treasury Department has "very serious concerns that Libra could be misused by money launderers and terrorist financers," Mnuchin told reporters at the White House on Monday. "This is indeed a national security issue."
Facebook has "a lot of work to do before we get to the point where we're comfortable with it," Mnuchin said.

...

13. Facebook's digital currency might flourish where banks don't -

NEW YORK (AP) — Europeans and Americans have their Visa and Mastercards. For everyone else, here comes ... Libra?

Facebook's new Libra digital currency is aimed at a huge potential market for financial services — the entire developing world, with billions of people in areas such as India and Sub-Saharan Africa, where financial services are often less sophisticated and many people don't use traditional banking accounts.

14. Justices: Proof needed that person knew he couldn't have gun -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court says prosecutors must prove that people charged with violating federal gun laws knew they were not allowed to have a weapon. The government says the decision could affect thousands of prosecutions of convicted criminals who are barred from having a firearm.

15. Facebook's currency Libra faces financial, privacy pushback -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook is getting a taste of the regulatory pushback it will face as it creates a new digital currency with corporate partners.

Just hours after the social media giant unveiled early plans for the Libra cryptocurrency, French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire insisted that only governments can issue sovereign currencies. He said Facebook must ensure that Libra won't hurt consumers or be used for illegal activities.

16. Facebook plans its own currency for 2 billion-plus users -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook already rules daily communication for more than two billion people around the world. Now it wants its own currency, too.

The social network unveiled an ambitious plan Tuesday to create a new digital currency similar to Bitcoin for global use, one that could drive more e-commerce on its services and boost ads on its platforms.

17. Hong Kong court: Denying same-sex spousal benefits unlawful -

HONG KONG (AP) — Hong Kong's Court of Final Appeal said Thursday the government cannot deny spousal employment benefits to same-sex couples, in a ruling hailed as a major step forward for same-sex equality in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory.

18. China issues travel alerts, slams US 'interference' -

BEIJING (AP) — China issued a pair of travel warnings for the U.S. on Tuesday and slammed what it called "interference" in its internal affairs.

Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang accused the U.S. of acting in bad faith in trade negotiations and said any attempts to interfere or undermine China's stability would be "doomed to fail."

19. Chinese tourism to US drops for 1st time in 15 years -

After more than a decade of rapid growth, Chinese travel to the U.S. is falling. And that has cities, malls and other tourist spots scrambling to reverse the trend.

Travel from China to the U.S. fell 5.7% in 2018 to 2.9 million visitors, according to the National Travel and Tourism Office, which collects data from U.S. Customs forms. It was the first time since 2003 that Chinese travel to the U.S. slipped from the prior year.

20. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's trade theories don't hold water -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump cast a fog of misinformation over the U.S. trade dispute with China, floating inaccurate numbers and skewed economic theories as big tariffs kicked in on Chinese goods.

21. GOP senators to be briefed on White House immigration plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and Republican senators are scheduled to meet Tuesday to discuss a new White House immigration plan.

White House counselor Kellyanne Conway describes the plan as "fairly comprehensive," saying it aims to beef up border security and maximize merit-based immigration. Conway says it will cover other changes favored by Trump, including ending some family migration and visa lottery programs.

22. US to make 30,000 more visas available for seasonal workers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration plans to allow 30,000 more foreign workers temporarily into the United States for seasonal work through the end of September, a move that reflects how the booming economy has complicated President Donald Trump's efforts to restrict legal immigration.

23. US searches of phones, laptops at airports rising, suit states -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. government searches of travelers' cellphones and laptops at airports and border crossings nearly quadrupled since 2015 and were being done for reasons beyond customs and immigration enforcement, according to papers filed Tuesday in a federal lawsuit that claims scouring the electronic devices without a warrant is unconstitutional.

24. AP source: Officials consider new penalty for visa overstays -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Top administration officials have been discussing ways to increase pressure on countries with high numbers of citizens who overstay short-term visas, as part of President Donald Trump's growing focus on immigration heading into his re-election campaign.

25. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's exaggerations about the Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is taking his interpretation of special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation well beyond the facts.

He says he's been fully exonerated based on a four-page summary of Mueller's nearly 400-page report and is casting himself as a victim of illegal practices by the FBI because the agency investigated him in the first place.

26. AP FACT CHECK: Trump misleads on health care, Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rallying in Michigan, President Donald Trump bragged about a surging auto industry that isn't surging, a Republican rescue for health care that has yet to take shape, a "total" exoneration in the Russia investigation that was not offered.

27. Mother Russia: South Florida sees a boom in 'birth tourism' -

MIAMI (AP) — Every year, hundreds of pregnant Russian women travel to the United States to give birth so that their child can acquire all the privileges of American citizenship.

They pay anywhere from $20,000 to sometimes more than $50,000 to brokers who arrange their travel documents, accommodations and hospital stays, often in Florida.

28. US bars entry of International Criminal Court investigators -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States will revoke or deny visas to International Criminal Court personnel who try to investigate or prosecute alleged abuses committed by U.S. forces in Afghanistan or elsewhere, and may do the same with those who seeking action against Israel, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Friday.

29. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's epic speech laced with fabrications -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump uttered a dizzying number of false statements in his epically long weekend speech, to an audience that didn't seem to mind at all.

He got the unemployment rate wrong. He misstated his winning margin in the election. He reprised some of his most frequently told fictions and dusted off old ones, even going back to the size of his inauguration crowd.

30. Worker visas in doubt as Trump immigration crackdown widens -

NEW YORK (AP) — Immigrants with specialized skills are being denied work visas or seeing applications get caught up in lengthy bureaucratic tangles under federal changes that some consider a contradiction to President Donald Trump's promise of a continued pathway to the U.S. for the most talented foreigners.

31. Adams Keegan expands operations in Nashville -

Adams Keegan, a national managed HR, payroll and benefits provider, has expanded its presence in Nashville by opening a new office near Vanderbilt University at 210 25th Avenue North. The company also has hired Jeff Young as business development manager.

32. AP FACT CHECK: Trump spins fiction about diversity visas -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is going after the "horror show" known as the diversity visa lottery program. His description of it is pure fiction.

The president offered a multitude of fabrications and partial truths over the past week on the subject of immigration — both the legal and illegal varieties — as he declared a national emergency aimed at finding the money to build his border wall. He said drugs are flowing across the hinterlands from Mexico, not from border crossings, and suggested that the federal prison population is laden with hardened criminals who are in the U.S. illegally. Neither claim is substantiated.

33. Is it love? Maybe not, as romance scams proliferate -

Is it love? Maybe not.

The FTC announced this week that romance-related scams have surged recently and generated more losses than any other consumer fraud reported to the agency last year. The number of these romance scams reported to the agency jumped from 8,500 in 2015 to more than 21,000 in 2018. And the amount lost by victims has quadrupled over that period — reaching $143 million last year. The median reported loss for victims was $2,600, about seven times more than other fraud tracked by the FTC.

34. AP FACT CHECK: Trump falsely claims Obama support for wall -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With the deceptive use of a video, President Donald Trump on Thursday heartily thanked his White House predecessor for supporting his policy at the Mexican border. Barack Obama has offered no such support; only criticism.

35. The reality on the border: How much would a wall really help? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump says there is a security crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border that can be addressed only by spending $5.7 billion on a wall.

Democrats have flatly refused to agree to the funding. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi called the wall an "immorality."

36. Wall Street notches best day in 10 years in holiday rebound -

Wall Street notched its best day in 10 years as stocks rallied back Wednesday, giving some post-Christmas hope to a market that has otherwise been battered this December.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average jumped more than 1,000 points — its biggest point-gain ever — rising nearly 5 percent as investors returned from a holiday break. The benchmark S&P 500 index also gained 5 percent and the technology heavy Nasdaq rose 5.8 percent.

37. US says asylum-seeking migrants to wait in Mexico -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Migrants heading to the southwest border to seek asylum in the United States will have to wait in Mexico until their claims are processed, under an agreement between the two countries announced on Thursday that will affect tens of thousands of people each month.

38. New credit scoring could help credit card-shy millennials -

Millennials’ aversion to credit cards can make it hard for them to build good credit scores. A recently announced scoring system, the UltraFICO, may someday help them and other consumers get loans and credit based on how they use their bank accounts.

39. Trump says 'no reason' for him to hear Khashoggi death tape -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said there is no reason for him to listen to a recording of the "very violent, very vicious" killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, which has put him in a diplomatic bind: how to admonish Riyadh for the slaying yet maintain strong ties with a close ally.

40. US colleges attracting fewer new students from abroad -

The number of foreign students heading to U.S. colleges and universities fell again last year, the second straight decline after more than a decade of growth, a new report finds.

Enrollment of new international students dropped by about 7 percent in fall 2017, according to an annual report released Tuesday by the State Department and the Institute of International Education, a nonprofit research group based in New York.

41. As risks outweigh growth, Wall Street looks for value -

NEW YORK (AP) — As stocks hit record after record in the past decade, investors didn't much care if a stock was cheap or expensive. What mattered most was: Is it growing quickly?

If the answer was yes, the stock was in high demand, almost regardless of the price. Investors were ravenous for companies able to add customers and deliver fat growth. So they were willing to pay premium prices for an Amazon or a Netflix. Left behind were stocks in more staid industries, even if they looked like better bargains by several measures.

42. A day after a rout, US stocks turn higher on solid earnings -

NEW YORK (AP) — Strong results from major companies including Microsoft, Visa and Comcast are sending U.S. stocks higher Thursday morning as the market found its footing after three weeks of steep declines.

43. Nashville’s building boom made possible by immigrant labor -

President Donald Trump draws raucous approval at his rallies when he rails against illegal immigrants with such applause lines as “we’re sending them the hell back!” and “Build the Wall.”

44. Will economic boom complicate curbing immigration? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — One of President Donald Trump's priorities, low unemployment, is complicating another: curbing immigration.

With the number of jobs available exceeding the number of Americans seeking jobs, employers are looking beyond the border to fill openings, and migrants are coming to the country in search of work.

45. Will he or won't he? Trump sows confusion on shutdown plans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Will he or won't he? President Donald Trump is sowing confusion about whether he's committed to keeping the government open through the fall elections or would willingly shut it down to secure more money for his promised wall at the U.S.-Mexico border.

46. Trump says he has 'no problem' shutting down government -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Monday he would have "no problem" shutting down the federal government this year if congressional lawmakers don't agree to provide additional border security funding.

47. Trump threatens government shutdown over border security -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans anxious about keeping control of Congress think it's a bad idea, but President Donald Trump still says he's willing to close the government over border security issues, including money he wants to build a promised U.S.-Mexico border wall.

48. UK releases long-awaited and already derided Brexit plan -

LONDON (AP) — The British government released detailed plans Thursday for what it called a "principled pragmatic and ambitious" Brexit — plans that already triggered the resignation of two top ministers and split the governing Conservative Party, and which face likely resistance from the European Union.

49. UK releases long-awaited and already derided Brexit plan -

LONDON (AP) — The British government released detailed plans Thursday for what it called a "principled pragmatic and ambitious" Brexit — plans that already triggered the resignation of two top ministers and split the governing Conservative Party, and which face likely resistance from the European Union.

50. US Army quietly discharging immigrant recruits -

SAN ANTONIO (AP) — Some immigrant U.S. Army reservists and recruits who enlisted in the military with a promised path to citizenship are being abruptly discharged, the Associated Press has learned.

51. Ex-boxer recalls his fight for American dream -

The former boxer raises his fist softly, conversational punctuation rather than threat, as he discusses his life, from the time he illegally entered the U.S. to his proud citizenship, his career in the ring and the years since he stepped between the ropes for the final time to focus on his sons and his nightclub, San Jose Fiesta.

52. Supreme Court rules for American Express in credit card case -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court handed American Express a win Monday in a lawsuit over rules it imposes on merchants who accept its cards.

Under their contracts, merchants who accept American Express generally can't encourage customers to use other credit cards, even though they charge merchants lower fees. The federal government and a group of states sued over those so-called "anti-steering" provisions, arguing that they violate federal law.

53. Corporate America increasingly avoids gun-industry business -

GAINESVILLE, Ga. (AP) — With Gary Ramey's fledgling gun-making business taking off in retail stores, he decided to start offering one of his handguns for sale on his website.

54. Immigration firm seems to thrive after Trump lawyer's help -

NEW YORK (AP) — AT&T and drug giant Novartis got nothing but bad publicity when they asked Donald Trump's personal attorney Michael Cohen for help with business, but a Florida immigration firm that tapped him appears to have gotten nearly everything it wanted.

55. House Republican factions hunt for immigration deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republican leaders brought opposing GOP factions into a closed-door meeting Friday to consider the outline of a compromise on immigration, as they try frantically to resolve an issue that has divided the party.

56. Blackburn’s scattershot hits surprise targets -

Republican U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn is doubling down against Democratic opponent Phil Bredesen in the race for an open U.S. Senate seat, hammering him as a liberal in the vein of Obama, Clinton, Schumer and Pelosi.

57. Facebook leads technology stock rally as US indexes climb -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are rising Thursday as Facebook leads a big rally for technology companies. The social media platform jumped after its recent data privacy scandal didn't appear to affect business in the first quarter. Other big technology companies also moved higher, as did retailers. Chipotle Mexican Grill, Ford and Visa also rose after they gave strong first-quarter reports.

58. Facebook leads technology stock rally as US indexes rise -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are rising Thursday morning as Facebook leads a big rally for technology companies. The social media network jumped after its recent data privacy scandal didn't appear to affect its business in the first quarter. Other big technology companies also moved higher. Chipotle Mexican Grill, Ford and Visa also rose after they gave strong first-quarter reports.

59. Kushner Cos. subpoenaed by feds after AP report -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Kushner Cos. has been subpoenaed by federal prosecutors for information related to an Associated Press report that the company filed dozens of false documents about its buildings in New York City.

60. Trump suggests paying for US border wall with Pentagon funds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Still angry about the budget deal he signed last week, President Donald Trump has floated the idea of using the Pentagon budget to pay for his long-promised border wall with Mexico, despite the fact that such spending would likely require approval from Congress.

61. Why Trump's effort to curb immigration could hurt US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's 21st century job market increasingly demands high-tech skills and knowledge. Yet consider this: Nearly half the new jobs the government foresees emerging by 2026 will require only a high school diploma — or none at all.

62. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's visa lottery system doesn't exist -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is looking for a fix to a problem that doesn't exist — stopping foreign countries from picking out troublesome people for a lottery to move to the U.S. They don't get to do that.

63. Sensing collateral damage, US companies split with NRA -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. companies are taking a closer look at investments, co-branding deals and other ties to the gun industry and its public face, the National Rifle Association, after the latest school massacre.

64. Senate rejects immigration bills; young immigrants in limbo -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate has left hundreds of thousands of "Dreamer" immigrants in limbo, rejecting rival plans that would have spared them from deportation and strengthened the nation's border security. Senators dealt President Donald Trump an especially galling defeat as more than a quarter of fellow Republicans abandoned him on an issue that helped propel him to the White House.

65. Trump continues to paint immigrants as criminals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is continuing his habit of painting immigrants as criminals, highlighting gang connections, calling family reunification a national security threat and bemoaning the death of a pro football player involved in a car accident with a man living in the country illegally.

66. Bipartisan immigration bill surfaces, Trump knocks it down -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan immigration proposal has surfaced in the Senate, only to be quickly knocked down by President Donald Trump via Twitter on Monday.

Republican Sen. John McCain and Democratic Sen. Chris Coons planned to propose legislation Monday that would shield from deportation immigrants who entered the U.S. illegally as children, known as "Dreamers."

67. Top Democrat questions US meeting with Russian spy chiefs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats want to know why the Trump administration allowed two Russian spy chiefs under U.S. and European sanctions to meet last week in Washington with American intelligence officials.

68. Five players to watch as Nashville SC takes shape -

Over the last several months, Nashville SC’s staff has scoured this country and beyond in search of soccer talent.

In just over a week, the product will be put on public display for the first time.

69. AP FACT CHECK: Trump inflates impact of some initiatives -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Boastful even within the traditional confines of a State of the Union speech, President Donald Trump inflated the impact of his tax cuts Tuesday night, declared an end to a "war" on energy that did not exist when he took office and displayed a faulty grasp of immigration policy.

70. Trump calls for optimism in spite of warnings of danger -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Addressing a deeply divided nation, President Donald Trump summoned the country to a "new American moment" of unity in his first State of the Union, challenging Congress to make good on long-standing promises to fix a fractured immigration system and warning darkly of evil forces seeking to undermine America's way of life.

71. Trump immigration plan draws criticism from top Senate Dem -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate's top Democrat dismissed President Donald Trump's immigration proposal as a "wish list" for hard-liners on Friday as the plan drew harsh reviews from Democrats and some conservatives.
Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., expressed satisfaction that Trump had provided some clarity to his immigration goals, which have befuddled members of both parties and hindered progress in Congress. The White House plan unveiled Thursday offers a pathway to citizenship for 1.8 million young immigrants living in the U.S. illegally in exchange for new restrictions on legal immigration and $25 billion in border security.
Schumer expressed relief that Trump "finally acknowledged that the Dreamers should be allowed to stay here and become citizens," a reference to those young immigrants. But he said Trump's plan "flies in the face of what most Americans believe" and called the proposal "the wish list that anti-immigration hardliners have advocated for for years."
The White House proposal was labeled "Trump Amnesty Disaster" in an email distributed by conservative figure Richard Viguerie, who wrote that the numbers of immigrants it would allow in the U.S. "will make Republicans a permanent minority party."
Senior White House officials cast the plan as a centrist compromise that could win support from both parties and enough votes to pass the Senate. But it comes with a long list of concessions that many Democrats, and also conservative Republicans, especially in the House, may find impossible to swallow.
The plan would provide a pathway to citizenship for the roughly 690,000 younger immigrants protected from deportation by the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program — as well as hundreds of thousands of others who independent estimates say qualify for the program, but never applied.
Trump announced last year that he was doing away with the program, but he gave Congress until March to come up with a legislative fix.
The plan would not allow parents of those immigrants to seek lawful status, the officials said.
In exchange, Trump's plan would dramatically overhaul the legal immigration system. Immigrants would only be allowed to sponsor their spouses and underage children to join them in the U.S., and not their parents, adult children or siblings. The officials said it would only end new applications for visas, allowing those already in the pipeline to be processed. Still, immigration activists said the move could cut legal immigration in half.
It would also end a visa lottery aimed at diversity, which drew Trump's attention after the New York City truck attack last year, redirecting the allotment to bringing down the existing backlog in visa applications.
The officials spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to publicly discuss the plan before its release.
Under the plan, recipients could have their legal status revoked due to criminal behavior or national security threats, the officials said, and eventual citizenship would require still-unspecified work and education requirements — and a finding that the immigrants are of "good moral character."
The nonpartisan Migration Policy Institute said it believes the largest share of the White House's 1.8 million people who'd be eligible for citizenship — 1.3 million — are people who currently meet all of DACA's eligibility requirements. These include years in the U.S., their ages now and when they entered this country, and whether they have a high school or equivalent education.
Another 400,000 are people who'd be eligible for DACA protection but for their education. And 100,000 more are people who are under age 15 —the minimum age allowed for most people requesting protection under the program.
Trump ended the DACA program in September, setting a March 5 deadline for Congress to provide legal protections or the program's recipients would once again be subject to deportation. The officials said Trump would only sign legislation providing those protections if the other immigration changes he is proposing are implemented.
Trump earlier this month had deferred to a bipartisan group of lawmakers in the House and Senate to craft an immigration proposal, saying he would sign whatever they passed. But as talks on Capitol Hill broke down — in part because of controversy Trump ginned up using vulgar language to describe African countries — the White House decided to offer its own framework.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and others had also complained the president had failed to sufficiently lay out his priorities, leaving them guessing about what he might be willing to sign. One official said the Thursday release represents a plan for the Senate, with the administration expecting a different bill to pass the House.
McConnell thanked the president and his aides for providing the outline. "I am hopeful that as discussions continue in the Senate on the subject of immigration, Members on both sides of the aisle will look to this framework for guidance as they work towards an agreement," he said in a statement.
Doug Andres, a spokesman for House Speaker Paul Ryan, echoed the sentiment saying: "We're grateful for the president showing leadership on this issue and believe his ideas will help us ultimately reach a balanced solution."
Rep. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., an immigration hard-liner, called Trump's plan "generous and humane, while also being responsible" and said he'd work toward its passage. He said that besides protecting DACA recipients, "It also will prevent us from ending up back here in five years by securing the border and putting an end to extended-family chain migration."
But some of Congress' more conservative members seemed unwilling to open the citizenship door for the Dreamers.
"DACA itself didn't have a pathway to citizenship," said Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, who battled Trump in 2016 for the GOP presidential nomination. "So I think it would be a profound mistake and not consistent with the promises we made to the voters to enact a pathway to citizenship to DACA recipients or to others who are here illegally."
Democrats were also raging. House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., blasted the plan as "part of the Trump Administration's unmistakable campaign to make America white again."
Democratic Whip Dick Durbin, D-Ill., urged Republicans to join together with Democrats to reach a bipartisan alternative.
"Dreamers should not be held hostage to President Trump's crusade to tear families apart and waste billions of American tax dollars on an ineffective wall," he said in a statement.
Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham, D-N.M., who chairs the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said the White House was using DACA recipients "as bargaining chips for sweeping anti-immigrant policies."
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72. Trump says he's open to pathway to citizenship for Dreamers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump says he's open to an immigration plan that would provide a pathway to citizenship for hundreds of thousands of young people who were brought to the country as children and are now here illegally.

73. Tennessee lawmaker drops 'VISA' driver's license label push -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee lawmaker has dropped a push to require prominent labeling of driver's licenses held by people without permanent residency status.

In a House subcommittee Wednesday, Rep. John Ragan said his bill will no longer require the word "VISA" on those licenses. Originally, the bill required displaying "ALIEN" or "NON U.S. CITIZEN."

74. Top Democrat rescinds offer of $25 billion for Trump's wall -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Top Senate Democrat Chuck Schumer has pulled back an offer of $25 billion for President Donald Trump's long-promised southern border wall, as lawmakers scrambled to figure out how to push a deal to protect 700,000 or more so-called Dreamer immigrants from deportation.

75. US travel industry launches plan to reverse tourism decline -

NEW YORK (AP) — Travel industry representatives sounded an alarm Tuesday over declines in international tourism to the U.S. and announced plans to reverse the trend.

Organizers of the new Visit U.S. Coalition portrayed the decline as long-term, going back to 2015, and said they would work with the Trump administration to reverse the decline.

76. Lawmakers seek deal on immigration, border security -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bargainers seeking a bipartisan immigration accord planned talks as soon as Wednesday as President Donald Trump and leading lawmakers sought to parlay an extraordinary White House meeting into momentum for resolving a politically blistering issue.

77. Stocks retreat from record highs as House passes tax bill -

NEW YORK (AP) — After big gains over the last two days, U.S. stocks declined Tuesday after the House of Representative approved the Republican-backed tax bill, which would lower corporate tax rates.

78. Not a final ruling, but justices OK travel ban enforcement -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's not a final ruling, but the Supreme Court is letting the Trump administration fully enforce a ban on travel to the United States by residents of six mostly Muslim countries.

Challenges to the policy are winding through the federal courts, and the justices themselves ultimately are expected to rule on whether the ban is legal. It applies to travelers from Chad, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen.

79. Supreme Court allows full enforcement of Trump travel ban -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday allowed the Trump administration to fully enforce a ban on travel to the United States by residents of six mostly Muslim countries.

This is not a final ruling on the travel ban: Challenges to the policy are winding through the federal courts, and the justices themselves ultimately are expected to rule on its legality.

80. Federal "extreme vetting" plan castigated by tech experts -

Leading researchers castigated a federal plan that would use artificial intelligence methods to scrutinize immigrants and visa applicants, saying it is unworkable as written and likely to be "inaccurate and biased" if deployed.

81. Trump's Mar-A-Lago gets approval to hire 70 foreign workers -

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — President Donald Trump's upscale Mar-a-Lago club received permission from the federal government to temporarily hire 70 foreign housekeepers, waiters and cooks to fill out its staff during its upcoming busy season, with its managers attesting there aren't enough Americans qualified, willing and available to do the work.

82. AP FACT CHECK: Trump and the not-so-middle-class tax cut -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans can't say it enough — the tax plan on the table is for the middle class. But the numbers tell the tale of a tax cut tilted to the rich.

Over the past week, taxes, terrorism and the Russia investigation provided plenty of fodder for iffy claims by President Donald Trump and others.

83. Black launches latest broadside in Tennessee governor's race -

NASHVILLE (AP) — U.S. Rep. Diane Black's gubernatorial campaign is taking aim at Republican rival Randy Boyd, launching a broadside Tuesday at the former member of Gov. Bill Haslam's Cabinet for everything from his running attire to what the congresswoman decries as his moderate record.

84. Coming soon: a selfie with your credit card application -

NEW YORK (AP) — The selfie is everywhere — Facebook, Instagram, Twitter — and soon your bank could be asking for one in order to approve your purchase or credit card application.

Payment processing giant Visa is launching a platform to allow banks to integrate various types of biometrics — your fingerprint, face, voice, etc. — into approving credit card applications and payments.

85. Judge: Newest travel ban 'same maladies' as previous version -

HONOLULU (AP) — Just hours before President Donald Trump's latest travel ban was to take full effect, a federal judge in Hawaii blocked the revised order, saying the policy has the same problems as a previous version.

86. Supreme Court to consider American Express fee dispute -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is taking up an appeal by 11 states that argue American Express violated antitrust laws by barring merchants from asking customers to use other credit cards that charge lower fees.

87. Tech and health care stocks take indexes back to records -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock indexes drifted back to record highs Wednesday as investors got ready for another round of corporate reports to begin. Technology, health care and household goods companies all rose.

88. Insurers lead US stocks modestly lower in early trading -

U.S. stocks edged lower in early trading Thursday, pulled down by insurers and other financial companies as investors weighed the prospects of big losses for the sector from Hurricane Irma. The storm, which hammered the Northern Caribbean, was projected to hit Florida this weekend. Health care and technology companies were among the biggest gainers.

89. Trump backs GOP plan to push legal immigration changes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Wednesday embraced legislation from two Republican senators that would place new limits on legal immigration and seek to create a system based more on merit and skills than family ties.

90. US stocks dip with energy prices; European stocks sink -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks finished barely lower Friday as energy companies fell with oil prices and a 10-day rally for technology companies came to an end. But Wall Street mostly avoided the sharp losses that hit European stocks.

91. Micromanaging Nashville is Job 1 for Legislature -

Metro Nashville is used to getting hammered by the Legislature’s Republicans. Nearly every time the Metro Council tries to come up with a solution to growing problems, conservatives in the General Assembly swoop in and save the rest of the state from Music City’s attempts to better handle its success.

92. More court challenges expected for Trump's new travel ban -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A scaled-back version of President Donald Trump's travel ban is now in force, stripped of provisions that brought protests and chaos at airports worldwide in January yet still likely to generate a new round of court fights.

93. Tighter rules taking effect on travel to US from 6 nations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After months of wrangling, tighter restrictions on travel to the U.S. from six mostly Muslim nations take effect Thursday evening after the Supreme Court gave its go-ahead for a limited version of President Donald Trump's plans for a ban. Visa applicants from the six countries — and all refugees — will need to show close family or business ties to the United States.

94. Limits on travel to US issued after Supreme Court ruling -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration has set new criteria for visa applicants from six mainly Muslim nations and all refugees that require a "close" family or business tie to the United States. The move came after the Supreme Court partially restored President Donald Trump's executive order that was widely criticized as a ban on Muslims.

95. Tennessee, Left Coast a world apart on immigration -

San Francisco resident Terry Karlsson relishes her hometown’s reputation for embracing “multi-cultural diversity.”

The wife of a Swedish immigrant, Karlsson says she believes San Francisco’s status as a sanctuary city, one in which it refuses to participate in the enforcement of federal immigration law, reflects a nation born of people who moved here, a land of immigrants from many countries.

96. Trump travel ban partly reinstated; fall court arguments set -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is allowing the Trump administration to go forward with a limited version of its ban on travel from six mostly Muslim countries, a victory for President Donald Trump in the biggest legal controversy of his young presidency.

97. Kushner firm apologizes for reference to White House ties -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Plenty can go wrong when foreign money mixes with immigration green cards, real estate deals and political connections.

Revelations that the sister of Jared Kushner, President Donald Trump's son-in-law and adviser, promoted a program offering a path to U.S. citizenship to Chinese backers in a Kushner family project bring new scrutiny to a foreign investor visa program. The Kushner Companies apologized Monday, saying it had not meant to lure investors by using Jared Kushner's name at an investment promotion event held Saturday at a Ritz Carlton in Beijing. Marketing materials for the event promoted Nicole Kushner Meyer as Jared's sister, and cited the Kushner family's "celebrity" status.

98. Farmers fear deportation of workers could hurt livelihood -

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The head of Bethel Heights Vineyard looked out over the 100 acres of vines her crew of 20 Mexicans had just finished pruning, worried about what will happen if the Trump administration presses ahead with its crackdown on immigrants.

99. Trump targets visa program for highly skilled workers -

KENOSHA, Wis. (AP) — President Donald Trump hopes to revive the economic populism that helped drive his election campaign, signing an order Tuesday in politically important Wisconsin to tighten rules on technology companies bringing in highly skilled foreign workers.

100. Supreme Court won't restore $7.25B swipe fees settlement -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court will not restore a $7.25 billion settlement between merchants and Visa Inc. and MasterCard Inc. over credit card transaction fees.