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Editorial Results (free)

1. Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade; states can ban abortion -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Friday stripped away women's constitutional protections for abortion, a fundamental and deeply personal change for Americans' lives after nearly a half-century under Roe v. Wade. The court's overturning of the landmark court ruling is likely to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states.

2. Fed nominee Michael Barr calls inflation 'far too high' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's pick to be the Federal Reserve's top banking regulator pledged Thursday to help reduce high inflation and provide "clear rules" to govern financial innovation.

3. As vaccine demand falls, states are left with huge stockpile -

As demand for COVID-19 vaccines collapses in many areas of the U.S., states are scrambling to use stockpiles of doses before they expire and have to be added to the millions that have already gone to waste.

4. After Biden's first year, the virus and disunity rage on -

WASHINGTON (AP) — From the inaugural platform, President Joe Biden saw American sickness on two fronts — a disease of the national spirit and the one from the rampaging coronavirus — and he saw hope, because leaders always must see that.

5. Insurrection prompts year of change for US Capitol Police -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A year after thousands of violent pro-Trump rioters overwhelmed police officers at the U.S. Capitol — severely injuring dozens in the process — the force dedicated to protecting the premier symbol of American democracy has transformed.

6. White House details plans to vaccinate 28M children age 5-11 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Children ages 5 to 11 will soon be able to get a COVID-19 shot at their pediatrician's office, local pharmacy and potentially even their school, the White House said Wednesday as it detailed plans for the expected authorization of the Pfizer shot for elementary school youngsters in a matter of weeks.

7. White House details plans to vaccinate 28M children age 5-11 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Children ages 5 to 11 will soon be able to get a COVID-19 shot at their pediatrician's office, local pharmacy and potentially even their school, the White House said Wednesday as it detailed plans for the expected authorization of the Pfizer shot for elementary school youngsters in a matter of weeks.

8. Transgender rights, religion among cases justices could add -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A closely watched voting rights dispute from Arizona is among five cases standing between the Supreme Court and its summer break. But even before the justices wrap up their work, likely later this week, they could say whether they'll add more high-profile issues to what already promises to be a consequential term, beginning in October.

9. NRA's gun rights message lingers despite legal, money woes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Liberals have cheered the highly public legal and financial jeopardy ensnaring the National Rifle Association, seeing the gun lobby's potential demise as the path to stricter firearms laws.

10. Republicans rebel against mask requirement in House chamber -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans are rebelling against the requirement that they wear a mask on the House floor, stoking tensions with majority Democrats who are refusing to change the rules despite updated guidance from federal health officials.

11. 'Red' states on U.S. electoral map lagging on vaccinations -

SAVANNAH, Georgia (AP) — With coronavirus shots now in the arms of nearly half of American adults, the parts of the U.S. that are excelling and those that are struggling with vaccinations are starting to look like the nation's political map: deeply divided between red and blue states.

12. What's next as Congress ramps up investigations of Jan. 6 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than three months after the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol, Congress is still trying to figure out how to move forward and prevent future attacks.

While the Senate has already heard testimony from law enforcement leaders who were responsible for failures during the riot, several more committees are examining possible changes to the Capitol Police and a restructuring of the Capitol Police security command. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced last month that seven House panels would be probing the attack after hopes faded for setting up an independent, bipartisan commission.

13. Biden to move COVID-19 vaccine eligibility date to April 19 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden was announcing Tuesday that he's bumping up his deadline for states to make all adults in the U.S. eligible for coronavirus vaccines.

With states gradually expanding eligibility beyond such priority groups as older people and essential, front-line workers, the president will announce that every adult will be eligible by April 19 to sign up and get in a virtual line to be vaccinated, said White House press secretary Jen Psaki.

14. As states expand vaccines, prisoners still lack access -

This week, Florida expanded eligibility for COVID-19 vaccines to all residents 16 and older. But across the state, more than 70,000 people still don't have access to the vaccine. Those men and women are state prisoners.

15. McConnell vows 'scorched earth' if Senate ends filibuster -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell warned ominously of a "scorched earth" landscape if Democrats use their new majority to bring an end to the Senate filibuster in hopes of muscling legislation supporting President Joe Biden's agenda past GOP opposition.

16. House approves pro-union bill despite dim Senate odds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democratic-led House approved legislation that would invigorate workers' unions, following decades of court defeats and legislative setbacks that have kneecapped the labor movement's once formidable ability to organize.

17. House moves on pro-union bill despite dim Senate odds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democratic-led House was poised Tuesday to pass legislation that would invigorate workers' unions, following decades of court defeats and legislative setbacks that have kneecapped the labor movement's once-formidable ability to organize.

18. General: Pentagon hesitated on sending Guard to Capitol riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Defense Department leaders placed unusual restrictions on the National Guard for the day of the Capitol riot and delayed sending help for hours despite an urgent plea from police for reinforcement, according to testimony Wednesday that added to the finger-pointing about the government response.

19. Takeaways: What hearings have revealed about Jan. 6 failures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Many questions remain unanswered about the failure to prevent the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. But after six congressional hearings, it's clear that the Capitol Police were unprepared and overwhelmed as hundreds of Donald Trump's supporters laid siege to the building. It's also clear that no one wants to take responsibility for it.

20. General: Pentagon hesitated on sending Guard to Capitol riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Defense Department leaders placed unusual restrictions on the National Guard for the day of the Capitol riot and delayed sending help for hours despite an urgent plea from police for reinforcement, according to testimony Wednesday that added to the finger-pointing about the government response.

21. Capitol defenders cite missed intelligence for deadly breach -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Missed intelligence was to blame for the outmanned Capitol defenders' failure to anticipate the violent mob that invaded the iconic building and halted certification of the presidential election on Jan. 6, the officials who were in charge of security that day said in their first public testimony on the insurrection.

22. Takeaways from Congress' first hearing on Capitol riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Security officials testifying at Congress' first hearing on the deadly siege of the Capitol cast blame and pointed fingers on Tuesday but also acknowledged they were woefully unprepared for the violence.

23. Capitol defenders blame bad intelligence for deadly breach -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Faulty intelligence was to blame for the outmanned Capitol defenders' failure to anticipate the violent mob that invaded the iconic building and halted certification of the presidential election on Jan. 6, the officials who were in charge of security declared Tuesday in their first public testimony on the insurrection.

24. A Biden edge in COVID-19 bill: Dems reluctant to wound him -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic leaders have a potent dynamic on their side as Congress preps for its first votes on the party's $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill: Would any Democrat dare cast the vote that scuttles new President Joe Biden's leadoff initiative?

25. Biden tours Pfizer vaccine plant as weather delays 6M shots -

PORTAGE, Mich. (AP) — President Joe Biden toured a state-of-the art coronavirus vaccine plant Friday as extreme winter weather across broad swaths of the U.S. handed his vaccination campaign its first major setback, delaying shipment of about 6 million doses.

26. Convict Trump or face dire democracy damage, prosecutors say -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Dire harm from Donald Trump's false and violent incitements will vex American democracy long into the future unless the Senate convicts him of impeachment and bars him from future office, House prosecutors insisted Thursday as they concluded two days of emotional arguments in his historic trial.

27. Rioters acted on Trump's 'order,' Democrats say in trial -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats prosecuting Donald Trump's impeachment  said Thursday the Capitol invaders believed they were acting on "the president's orders" to stop Joe Biden's election, arguing it was the culmination of the defeated president's pattern of spreading false and violent rhetoric that will continue to vex American politics if left unchecked.

28. Biden seeks to go big, fast and alone on COVID relief -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden laid out his case Friday for moving fast and without Republicans, if necessary, to pass $1.9 trillion in coronavirus relief, armed with new signs of economic strain brought on by the continuing pandemic.

29. US boosting vaccine deliveries amid complaints of shortages -

Answering growing frustration over vaccine shortages, President Joe Biden announced that the U.S. is ramping up deliveries to hard-pressed states over the next three weeks and expects to provide enough doses to vaccinate 300 million Americans by the end of the summer or early fall.

30. Vaccine appointments canceled amid confusion over supply -

An increasing number of COVID-19 vaccination sites around the U.S. are canceling thousands of appointments because of vaccine shortages in a rollout so rife with confusion that even the new CDC director admitted she doesn't know exactly how many shots are in the pipeline.

31. States report vaccine shortages and cancel appointments -

NEW YORK (AP) — The push to inoculate Americans against the coronavirus is hitting a roadblock: A number of states are reporting they are running out of vaccine, and tens of thousands of people who managed to get appointments for a first dose are seeing them canceled.

32. Gun-toting congresswoman-elect may carry Glock at Capitol -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A firearms-toting congresswoman-elect who owns a gun-themed restaurant in Rifle, Colorado, has already asked Capitol Police about carrying her weapon on Capitol grounds, her office has acknowledged. If she does so, she apparently won't be alone.

33. Scowcroft, national security adviser to 2 presidents, dies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A lifetime before he served two presidents as national security adviser, Brent Scowcroft was just 12 when he decided to become a West Point cadet after reading about cadet life. After he graduated with the Class of 1947, he decided to join the Army Air Corps and train to be a fighter pilot. He achieved that goal, too, but then fate shot down his plans.

34. Trump: No change at bases named for Confederate officers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Wednesday said his administration will "not even consider" changing the name of any of the 10 Army bases that are named for Confederate Army officers. Two days earlier, Defense Secretary Mark Esper indicated that he was open to a broad discussion of such changes.

35. Trump pick for Russia envoy faces questions about Ukraine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The No. 2 official at the State Department faced off Wednesday with senators demanding to know why he didn't know more about the Trump administration's backchannel diplomacy with Ukraine and the dismissal of the former U.S. ambassador to Kyiv, issues now at the heart of the impeachment inquiry into the president.

36. Trump jokes about election meddling with Putin -

OSAKA, Japan (AP) — With a smirk and a finger point, President Donald Trump dryly told Russia's Vladimir Putin "Don't meddle in the election" in their first meeting since the special counsel concluded that Moscow extensively interfered in the 2016 presidential campaign.

37. The legends who made 'endangered' Music Row are gone -

More than a decade and a half ago I took a beloved poet, picker, prophet and pilgrim down to “Music City Row,” as he likes to refer to that stretch of Nashville. He hadn’t been there really for 30 years, and he lamented what he saw. Or didn’t see.

38. Court rejects challenge to regulation of gun silencers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court rejected a challenge to federal regulation of gun silencers Monday, just days after a gunman used one in a shooting rampage that killed 12 people in Virginia.

39. What the Mueller report says about Trump-Russia contacts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a sweeping two-year investigation, special counsel Robert Mueller identified numerous contacts between President Donald Trump's campaign officials and Russians. But the evidence that his team uncovered during the Russia probe that shadowed Trump's presidency didn't rise to the level of a chargeable crime, he said.

40. Trump thanks Saudis after defying calls to punish prince -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump publicly thanked Saudi Arabia for plunging oil prices just a day after he was harshly criticized for deciding not to further punish the kingdom for the killing of U.S.-based columnist Jamal Khashoggi.

41. Trump defies calls to punish crown prince for writer's death -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has declared he will not further punish Saudi Arabia for the killing of U.S.-based columnist Jamal Khashoggi, making clear in an exclamation-filled statement that the benefits of good relations with the kingdom outweigh the possibility its crown prince ordered the killing.

42. Vanderbilt's Garland rebounds big in Vandy's win -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Darius Garland followed a career low with a career high.

The freshman point guard scored a career-high 33 points one game after being held to three as Vanderbilt won a battle of unbeaten teams with a 77-70 victory over Liberty on Monday night.

43. AP FACT CHECK: Trump on migrants, Saudis, Hispanic vote -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump inflated the projected benefits of an arms deal with the Saudis as he defended his wait-and-see attitude about Saudi complicity in the disappearance of a journalist whose apparent murder has sparked world outrage.

44. White House, senators increase pressure over Saudi writer -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House is brushing aside threats by Saudi Arabia that it may economically retaliate for any U.S. punitive action imposed over the suspected murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, pledging a "swift, open, transparent investigation" into his disappearance.

45. Trump defends Saudi arms sales amid fury over missing writer -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump defended continuing huge sales of U.S. weapons to Saudi Arabia on Thursday despite rising pressure from lawmakers to punish the kingdom over the disappearance of a Saudi journalist who lived in the United States and is now feared dead.

46. Trump raises economic concerns over halting Saudi arms sales -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump says the U.S. is looking into the fate of a Saudi writer missing and feared murdered but expressed reservations over calls to withhold further U.S. arms sales to Saudi Arabia, warning that such a move "would be hurting us."

47. Lobbyist tied to Pruitt pushed client's committee candidates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The lobbyist whose wife rented a condo to Environmental Protection Agency head Scott Pruitt at $50 a night sought EPA committee posts for a lobbying client, according to a newly released EPA memo.

48. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for January 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, January 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

49. Trump relishes feud with the NFL, reviving issue with tweets -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is indulging in his favorite kind of drama — personal, aggressive, culturally volatile and entirely of his own making.

And his feud with the NFL shows no signs of abating, with the president tweeting early Monday morning: "The issue of kneeling has nothing to do with race. It is about respect for our Country, Flag and National Anthem. NFL must respect this!"

50. Finding Nashville while searching for America -

Merle Haggard likely is playing in the head of the man I spot, tiny dogs dancing at his feet, as he puffs on a thick stogie atop an asphalt knoll in the middle of Nashville.

“Down every road, there’s always one more city,” a line from Hag’s “I’m A Lonesome Fugitive” is the motto of the man, his mate for life (and road buddy) and their two dogs.

51. High-tech US plants offer jobs even as the laid-off struggle -

NORWOOD, Ohio (AP) — Herbie Mays is 3M proud, and it shows — in the 3M shirt he wears; in the 3M ring he earned after three decades at the company's plant in suburban Cincinnati; in the way he shows off a card from a 3M supervisor, praising Mays as "a GREAT employee."

52. Beware at the pump: Black market fuel is making millions -

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — A black market for diesel and gasoline has rapidly spread around the nation, with organized crime gangs using fraudulent credit cards to syphon millions of dollars in fuel from gas stations into large tanks hidden inside pickup trucks and vans.

53. TMA honors Rosen, Lewis, Mullins -

The Tennessee Medical Association has honored three Nashvillians – Barrett “Buddy” F. Rosen, MD, with one of three 2017 Outstanding Physician Awards, Adele Lewis, MD, as one of three Distinguished Service Awards, and Regina Mullins with its Community Service Award, at the annual meeting of the TMA’s House of Delegates.

54. 2017 Pulitzer winners and finalists in journalism and arts -

The 2017 Pulitzer Prize winners and finalists:

JOURNALISM

Public Service

New York Daily News and ProPublica for uncovering, primarily through the work of reporter Sarah Ryley, widespread abuse of eviction rules by the police to oust hundreds of people, most of them poor minorities.

55. Middle Tennessee's top commercial real estate transactions for 2015 -

Middle Tennessee's top commercial real estate transactions for 2015, Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

56. Top Middle Tennessee commercial real estate transactions for November 2015 -

Top residential real estate sales, November 2015, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

57. Uniguest names Morgan chief executive officer -

Uniguest, a provider of secure managed technology services, has announced the appointment of Joseph P. Morgan, Jr. as chief executive officer, effective July 6, 2015.

Morgan had served as president and chief executive officer of The Standard Register Company, a publicly traded company with revenues approaching $1 billion, since January 2009. At The Standard Register Company, he was responsible for the transformation of the printing giant to an integrated communications company leveraging both technology and innovation to develop a market-focused strategy. Morgan also served on the Board of Directors and held a number of community and charitable leadership positions during his tenure with the company.

58. UT’s Tyndall winning fans despite NCAA investigation -

KNOXVILLE – Donnie Tyndall has hardly slowed down since the former Southern Miss head coach took over Tennessee’s basketball program in April.

Of course, Tyndall had little choice.

59. Lawmakers look to sanctions if Iran deal falters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers are making contingency plans for what happens if — or when — the nuclear accord with Iran falls apart.

Congress is out of town through the end of the month, but lawmakers are already weighing their options for how to address the deal with Iran, in which Tehran agrees to a six-month pause in its nuclear program in exchange for eased sanctions worth $7 billion. Lawmakers from both parties are skeptical the agreement will prod Tehran to give up its nuclear ambitions and say they will be waiting with even harsher punishment if Iran proves an untrustworthy partner.

60. Lawmakers: Obama wooing might break budget logjam -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican lawmakers said Sunday they welcome President Barack Obama's courtship and suggested the fresh engagement between the White House and Congress might help yield solutions to the stubborn budget battle that puts Americans' jobs at risk.

61. Top Midstate residential real estate transactions for 2012 -

Top 2012 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

62. NRA goes silent after Connecticut school shooting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Where is the NRA?

The nation's largest gun-rights organization — typically outspoken about its positions even after shooting deaths — has gone all but silent since last week's rampage at a Newtown, Conn., elementary school that left 26 people dead, including 20 children.

63. Top residential real estate transactions for October 2012 -

October 2012 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

64. Gun industry thrives during Obama's term in office -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama has presided over a heyday for the gun industry despite predictions by the National Rifle Association four years ago that he would be the "most anti-gun president in American history."

65. Sources: Pentagon rules shift on women in combat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pentagon rules are catching up a bit with reality after a decade when women in the U.S. military have served, fought and died on the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan.

On Thursday, the Pentagon is recommending to Congress that women be allowed to serve in more jobs closer to the front lines.

66. Nashville Kiwanis Club elects 2011-12 board -

The Kiwanis Club of Nashville, founded in 1916, has elected its officers for 2011-2012.

Serving a one-year term, they are:

Betty Lou Burnett, president, senior recruiter of The Search Firm, Inc.

67. 'Doomsday' defense cuts loom large for select 12 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For the dozen lawmakers tasked with producing a deficit-cutting plan, the threatened "doomsday" defense cuts hit close to home.

The six Republicans and six Democrats represent states where the biggest military contractors — Lockheed Martin, General Dynamics Corp., Raytheon Co. and Boeing Co. — build missiles, aircraft, jet fighters and tanks while employing tens of thousands of workers.

68. Williamson a model for Civil War tourism -

Those plotting to improve Civil War tourism in Nashville need only look to Franklin for guidance.

The city is site of three historic homes, as well as a 112-acre battlefield that has been carved from the land that once was Franklin Country Club.