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Editorial Results (free)

1. Tennessee flood response aided by out-of-town cellphones -

NASHVILLE (AP) — When deadly floods knocked out all communications but radio in rural Tennessee last weekend, an emergency official took advantage of a new system developed for this kind of emergency: He redirected 911 calls to several cellphones in a neighboring city.

2. Emergency program to give people $50 off internet bill -

Americans can begin applying for $50 off their monthly internet bill on Wednesday as part of an emergency government program to keep people connected during the pandemic.

The $3.2 billion program is part of the $900 billion December pandemic-relief package. The government is increasing spending on broadband as the pandemic made stark that millions of Americans did not have access to, and could not afford, broadband at a time when jobs, school and health care was moving online.

3. Wall Street logs gains Monday on strong earnings -

Health care and energy companies helped push stocks higher Monday, as Wall Street kicked off the first trading day in May with more gains after a four-month winning streak.

The S&P 500 rose 0.3%. Industrial and financial stocks also helped lift the market. Falling technology and communication stocks, and companies that rely on consumer spending, kept the market's gains in check. Treasury yields were mixed.

4. Stocks close lower, pulling indexes below record highs -

Technology companies helped drag U.S. stocks broadly lower Monday, pulling the indexes below the record highs they reached last week.

The S&P 500 dropped 0.5%, shedding more than a third of its gain from last week. Tech stocks were the biggest weight on the market, but the losses were shared broadly by a mix of banks, energy companies and others that rely on direct consumer spending. Chipmaker Intel fell 1.7%, Capital One lost 0.9% and Valero Energy slid 2.3%. Only real estate stocks eked out a gain.

5. Stocks end mostly lower on Wall Street, led by drops in tech -

Stocks mostly pulled back from recent highs Wednesday, weighed down by a slide in technology companies.

The S&P 500 slipped less than 0.1% after giving up an early gain, while the tech-heavy Nasdaq composite gave back 0.6%. Small-company stocks also fell.

6. Nashville bombing spotlights vulnerable voice, data networks -

The Christmas Day bombing in downtown Nashville led to phone and data service outages and disruptions over hundreds of miles in the southern U.S., raising new concerns about the vulnerability of U.S. communications.

7. Samsung wins $6.6 billion Verizon contract for 5G network -

Samsung Electronics Co. will develop 5G network infrastructure for Verizon Communications under a $6.65 billion deal announced Monday.

8. Stocks close mostly higher after a choppy day of trading -

Wall Street capped a choppy day of trading Wednesday with more gains for stocks as investors sized up a mix of company earnings reports and another flare-up in tensions between Washington and Beijing.

9. Banks, energy companies lead stocks higher on Wall Street -

Wall Street extended its recent run of gains Tuesday, despite a late stumble that nearly wiped out the stock market's gains for the day.

The S&P 500 rose 0.2% after having been up 0.8% in the early going. Banks and energy companies led the gains, outweighing losses in technology stocks, which pulled the Nasdaq composite lower. Small company stocks did better than the broader market.

10. FCC calls hours-long T-Mobile service outage 'unacceptable' -

NEW YORK (AP) — The head of the U.S. communications regulator said T-Mobile's nationwide, hours-long outage Monday was "unacceptable" and that the Federal Communications Commission will investigate.

11. Sprint and T-Mobile merge, creating new wireless giant -

NEW YORK (AP) — Mobile carrier T-Mobile has completed the takeover of smaller rival Sprint, creating a new wireless giant that rivals AT&T and Verizon in size.

The companies announced the deal, valued at $31.6 billion based on T-Mobile's closing stock price Tuesday, two years ago. It has taken a long time to close because of pushback from state and federal regulators.

12. Huawei, guarding US business, says Verizon violated patents -

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese tech giant Huawei accused U.S. phone carrier Verizon of violating its patents in a lawsuit filed Thursday, broadening efforts to defend company's business in the United States amid government sanctions.

13. Trump signs law to reduce robocalls, though they won't end -

NEW YORK (AP) — An anti-robocalls measure signed into law Monday by President Donald Trump should help reduce the torrent of unwanted calls promising lower interest rates or pretending to be the IRS, though it won't make all such calls disappear.

14. Court: FCC can dump net neutrality, but can't bar state laws -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Communications Commission could dump rules that keep internet providers from favoring some services over others, but couldn't bar states like California from enacting their own prohibitions, a federal court ruled.

15. Justice Department OKs T-Mobile's $26.5B Sprint deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. regulators have approved T-Mobile's $26.5 billion takeover of rival Sprint, despite fears of higher prices and job cuts, in a settlement that would create three giant U.S. cellphone companies.

16. 4 states added to suit to stop $26.5B Sprint-T-Mobile deal -

NEW YORK (AP) — Hawaii, Massachusetts, Minnesota and Nevada are joining the legal fight against T-Mobile's $26.5 billion bid for Sprint in a case that lawyers on both sides say they hope will reach trial in October.

17. States sue to stop $26.5 billion Sprint-T-Mobile deal -

NEW YORK (AP) — A group of state attorneys general led by New York and California filed a federal lawsuit Tuesday to block T-Mobile's $26.5 billion bid for Sprint, citing consumer harm.

The state attorneys general said the promised benefits, such as better networks in rural areas and faster service overall, cannot be verified, while eliminating a major wireless company will immediately harm consumers by reducing competition and driving up prices for cellphone service.

18. Regulators give phone companies new tools to fight robocalls -

NEW YORK (AP) — Federal regulators voted Thursday to give phone companies the right to block unwanted calls without getting customers' permission first.

The Federal Communications Commission's move could make call-blocking widespread and help consumers dodge annoying robocalls, which have exploded into a problem that pesters Americans on the level of billions of calls a month.

19. Is there finally more help in the fight against robocalls? -

NEW YORK (AP) — New tools are coming to fight robocalls, but don't expect unwanted calls to disappear.

Political gridlock could derail bills aimed at beefing up enforcement and forcing phone companies to do more. The companies have been slow to act against such automated calls on their own. And even if companies do implement better technology, scammers and telemarketers will somehow get through in this never-ending arms race.

20. FCC chairman backs T-Mobile-Sprint deal in key endorsement -

NEW YORK (AP) — A key federal regulator says he backs T-Mobile's $26.5 billion takeover of rival wireless carrier Sprint, a crucial step for the deal's approval.

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai said Monday he supported the deal because the two companies promised to expand mobile internet access in rural areas and roll out 5G , the next generation of mobile networks.

21. With billions to spend, feds unsure who lacks broadband -

There is a way around the notoriously sluggish internet in West Virginia. You just need a car and some time.

Kelly Povroznik can tell you, when she happens to get a good signal. She teaches an online college course so hampered by unreliable connections that she has had to drive a half-hour to her brother's place just to enter grades into a database.

22. House passes bill to restore 'net neutrality' rules -

The House has passed bill Wednesday to restore Obama-era "net neutrality" rules, but the legislation faces slim odds of making it through the Republican-controlled Senate.

The Save the Internet Act passed the Democrat-controlled House 232-190 Wednesday, with only one Republican vote in favor. But top Senate Republican Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that net neutrality is "dead on arrival in the Senate." The Trump administration also opposes the bill . Still, the effort to restore net neutrality could give Democrats political points on consumer protections.

23. S. Korea launches 5G smartphone networks ahead of schedule -

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea's telecommunications carriers turned on super-fast 5G mobile internet networks abruptly ahead of schedule in an attempt to ensure the country becomes the first in the world to launch the services.

24. S. Korea launches 5G smartphone networks ahead of schedule -

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea's telecommunications carriers turned on super-fast 5G mobile internet networks abruptly ahead of schedule in an attempt to ensure the country becomes the first in the world to launch the services.

25. Democrats unveil bill to restore 'net neutrality' rules -

NEW YORK (AP) — Top Democrats in the House and Senate are announcing a new bill to restore the 2015 "net neutrality" rules that Trump-era regulators repealed .

The 2015 Federal Communications Commission regulation barred internet service providers like Verizon, AT&T and Comcast from playing favorites with websites and apps. A Republican-controlled FCC overturned the rules in 2017. Tech companies and nearly two dozen states then sued the FCC ; that case is still ongoing.

26. Democrats question pledges in $26.5B T-Mobile-Sprint deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic lawmakers challenged top executives of T-Mobile and Sprint on Wednesday over their pledge not to raise prices for wireless services or hurt competition if their $26.5 billion merger goes through.

27. Stocks rise again as investors hope for trade breakthrough -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks climbed for the third day in a row Tuesday as the latest round of trade talks between Washington and Beijing continued. It's the longest winning streak for U.S. indexes since late November.

28. Debt threat: Business debt, worries about it are up -

NEW YORK (AP) — Homeowners appear to have learned the lesson of the Great Recession about not taking on too much debt. There is some concern that Corporate America didn't get the message.

For much of the past decade, companies have borrowed at super-low interest rates and used the money to buy back stock, acquire other businesses and refinance old debt. The vast majority of companies are paying their bills on time, thanks in large part to profits that have surged since the economy emerged from the Great Recession nine and a half years ago.

29. US stock indexes edge higher a day after a big gain -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks wobbled Tuesday as large high-dividend stocks rose and smaller companies sank. Major indexes were coming off big gains the day before.

Big health care companies including Johnson & Johnson rallied, as did telecommunications and household goods makers. Steel and other materials makers skidded, and a steep loss for United Technologies pulled defense contractors lower.

30. Verizon reorganizes structure under new CEO to prep for 5G -

NEW YORK (AP) — Verizon is undergoing a significant restructuring under new CEO Hans Vestberg, including its dominant wireless division, as it prepares to roll out its 5G technology.

Three months after Vestberg took control, Verizon said Monday that the New York company will be organized into four groups at the start of the year: Consumer, Business, Media, and Global Network & Technology.

31. Yahoo to pay $50M, other costs for massive security breach -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Yahoo has agreed to pay $50 million in damages and provide two years of free credit-monitoring services to about 200 million people in the U.S. and Israel whose email addresses and other personal information were stolen as part of the biggest security breach in history.

32. Stocks mostly recover from an early plunge on Wall Street -

A turbulent day on Wall Street ended Tuesday with stocks climbing nearly all the way out of a steep, broad sell-off that at one point erased more than 500 points from the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

33. A US privacy law could be good for Google - but bad for you -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress is taking the first steps toward setting national rules governing how companies use consumers data — although one of its goals might be to prevent states from enacting stronger privacy protections of their own.

34. Senate panel to hear from internet execs on privacy policies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is hoping Congress can come up with a new set of national rules governing how companies can use consumers' data that finds a balance between "privacy and prosperity."

35. Trump DOJ appealing judge's OK of AT&T-Time Warner merger -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Stung by a federal judge's dismissal of its objections to AT&T's megamerger with Time Warner, the Trump Justice Department is challenging the decision with a legal appeal.

The Justice Department said in a one-sentence document Thursday it is appealing the ruling last month by U.S. District Judge Richard Leon, which blessed one of the biggest media deals ever following a landmark antitrust trial.

36. Verizon, AT&T to end location data sales to brokers -

Verizon and AT&T have pledged to stop providing information on phone owners' locations to data brokers, stepping back from a business practice that has drawn criticism for endangering privacy.

The data has apparently allowed outside companies to pinpoint the location of wireless devices without their owners' knowledge or consent.  Verizon said that about 75 companies have been obtaining its customer data from two little-known California-based brokers that Verizon supplies directly — LocationSmart and Zumigo

37. Federal judge approves AT&T-Time Warner merger -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge approved the $85 billion mega-merger of AT&T and Time Warner on Tuesday, a move that could usher in a wave of media consolidation while shaping how much consumers pay for streaming TV and movies.

38. Your internet use could change as 'net neutrality' ends -

NEW YORK (AP) — Your ability to watch and use your favorite apps and services could start to change — though not right away — following the official demise Monday of Obama-era internet protections.

39. Senate Democrats push to reinstate 'net neutrality' rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate is poised to approve legislation designed to reverse the Federal Communications Commission's effort to deregulate the internet.

Back in December, the FCC repealed an Obama-era rule known as "net neutrality" rule, junking the principle of equal treatment for all web traffic.

40. Govt argues that AT&T-Time Warner deal would hurt consumers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government pleaded its case Monday for blocking AT&T from absorbing Time Warner, saying it would hurt consumers as a big antitrust trial crept toward its end and a decision by a federal judge.

41. Sprint, T-Mobile have to sell $26.5B deal to antitrust cops -

NEW YORK (AP) — To gain approval for their $26.5 billion merger agreement, T-Mobile and Sprint aim to convince antitrust regulators that there is plenty of competition for wireless service beyond Verizon and AT&T.

42. Ex-Yahoo paying $35M to settle SEC charges over 2014 hack -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The company formerly known as Yahoo is paying a $35 million fine to resolve federal regulators' charges that the online pioneer deceived investors by failing to disclose one of the biggest data breaches in internet history.

43. Washington becomes 1st state to approve net-neutrality rules -

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Setting up a likely legal fight with the Trump administration, Washington has become the first state to enact its own net-neutrality requirements after U.S. regulators repealed Obama-era rules designed to keep the internet an even playing field.

44. OK, now imagine net neutrality is a flame grilled Whopper -

NEW YORK (AP) — Burger King is delivering its own hot take on a regulatory showdown that has enflamed the U.S., using a flame-grilled Whopper.

Burger King's new ad has become a sensation, with more than a million views on YouTube and it's lighting up Twitter .

45. Tennessee Democrats take aim at net neutrality on state level -

Legislation designed to reverse a federal decision repealing net neutrality regulations is surfacing in the General Assembly, an effort to maintain Tennesseans’ open access to the internet.

Sponsored by Rep. John Ray Clemmons and Sen. Lee Harris, both Democrats, the legislation would enable the state and individual consumers to take legal action against internet providers if they create levels of service by charging consumers more for certain websites, service speeds or information.

46. Wave of lawsuits filed to block net-neutrality repeal -

NEW YORK (AP) — The expected wave of litigation against the Federal Communications Commission's repeal of net-neutrality rules has begun.

A group of attorneys general for 21 states and the District of Columbia sued Tuesday to block the rules. So did Mozilla, the maker of the Firefox browser, and New America's Open Technology Institute. Other public-interest groups are expected to file suit as well, and the tech-industry lobbying group has said it will support litigation.

47. What the FCC rollback of 'net neutrality' means to you -

Now that the federal government has rolled back the internet protections it put in place two years ago, the big question is: What does the repeal of "net neutrality' rules mean to you?

In the short term, the answer is simple: Not much. But over time, your ability to watch what you want to watch online and to use the apps that you prefer could start to change.

48. FCC votes along party lines to end 'net neutrality' -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Federal Communications Commission repealed the Obama-era "net neutrality" rules Thursday, giving internet service providers like Verizon, Comcast and AT&T a free hand to slow or block websites and apps as they see fit or charge more for faster speeds.

49. AP Explains: What is net neutrality and why does it matter? -

NEW YORK (AP) — "Net neutrality" regulations, designed to prevent internet service providers like Verizon, AT&T, Comcast and Charter from favoring some sites and apps over others, are on the chopping block. On Thursday, the Federal Communications Commission plans to vote on a proposal that would not only undo the Obama-era rules that have been in place since 2015, but will forbid states to put anything similar in place.

50. As 'net neutrality' vote nears, some brace for a long fight -

NEW YORK (AP) — As the federal government prepares to unravel sweeping net-neutrality rules that guaranteed equal access to the internet, advocates of the regulations are bracing for a long fight.

The Thursday vote scheduled at the Federal Communications Commission could usher in big changes in how Americans use the internet, a radical departure from more than a decade of federal oversight. The proposal would not only roll back restrictions that keep broadband providers like Comcast, Verizon and AT&T from blocking or collecting tolls from services they don't like, it would bar states from imposing their own rules.

51. AP Explains: What is net neutrality and why does it matter? -

NEW YORK (AP) — "Net neutrality" regulations, designed to prevent internet service providers like Verizon, AT&T, Comcast and Charter from favoring some sites and apps over others, are on the chopping block. On Thursday, the Federal Communications Commission plans to vote on a proposal that would not only undo the Obama-era rules that have been in place since 2015, but will forbid states to put anything similar in place.

52. As 'net neutrality' vote nears, some brace for a long fight -

NEW YORK (AP) — As the federal government prepares to unravel sweeping net-neutrality rules that guaranteed equal access to the internet, advocates of the regulations are bracing for a long fight.

The Thursday vote scheduled at the Federal Communications Commission could usher in big changes in how Americans use the internet, a radical departure from more than a decade of federal oversight. The proposal would not only roll back restrictions that keep broadband providers like Comcast, Verizon and AT&T from blocking or collecting tolls from services they don't like, it would bar states from imposing their own rules.

53. Net neutrality fans speak up as FCC set to strike down rules -

NEW YORK (AP) — Net neutrality is a simple concept but a dense and often technical issue that has been argued over for years in tech and telecom circles. Now everyday folks are talking about it.

That's because the Federal Communications Commission has scheduled a vote next week to gut Obama-era rules meant to stop broadband companies such as Comcast, AT&T and Verizon from exercising more control over what people watch and see on the internet. The protests aren't likely to stop the agency's vote on Thursday, but activists hope the outcry will push Congress to intervene and will show support for stricter regulation down the road.

54. US stocks mostly slip away from their latest record highs -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks mostly slipped away from their latest record highs Wednesday as the two former halves of Hewlett-Packard both tumbled, while falling interest rates helped phone companies but hurt banks.

55. FCC chairman sets out to repeal 'net neutrality' rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai on Tuesday followed through on his pledge to repeal 2015 regulations designed to ensure that internet service providers treat all online content and apps equally, setting up a showdown with consumer groups and internet companies who fear the move will stifle competition and innovation.

56. FCC weakens limits on owning newspapers, TV stations -

NEW YORK (AP) — Federal regulators have weakened rules meant to support independent local media.

Now, one company can own newspapers and broadcast stations in one market, undoing a ban in place since 1975. Thursday's decision by the Federal Communications Commission also makes it easier for one company to own two broadcast TV stations in one market and coordinate operations with stations owned by others.

57. Stocks rise as oil jumps 2-year high; chipmakers climb -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks made modest gains and set more records Monday as upheaval in oil-rich Saudi Arabia sent crude prices to two-year highs. Chipmakers and media companies climbed on deal reports while phone and household goods companies sank.

58. Technology companies lead early slide in US stocks; oil down -

Technology companies led a slide in U.S. stocks early Thursday as the market pulled back from its latest record highs. Cruise lines, fast-food restaurants and other consumer-focused companies also declined. Phone company stocks notched gains. Investors were poring over a batch of company earnings. Crude oil prices fell.

59. US stock indexes close mostly higher; new highs for Dow, S&P -

Gains by health care companies led U.S. stock indexes mostly higher Tuesday, pushing the market further into record territory.

The Dow Jones industrial average briefly climbed above the 23,000 mark for the first time, settling just below the milestone. Slight gains nudged the Dow and Standard & Poor's 500 indexes to new highs for the second straight day this week.

60. US stocks dip as retailers and media companies slump -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are slipping in early trading Thursday as retailers and communications and media companies decline. Women's clothing retailer J. Jill is tumbling after it slashed its forecast for the third quarter. AT&T is falling after it said it expects to lose DirecTV subscribers, while cable company Charter and entertainment conglomerate Viacom are down on reports that Viacom channels may go off the air in the New York area because of a contract dispute.

61. Is there finally some relief from annoying robocalls? -

NEW YORK (AP) — For Michael Rizzo, answering the phone is too often a waste of time.

His Sports City Pizza Pub in Buffalo, New York, depends on customers calling to order wings, pizza and potato skins. But much of the time, it's an automated message pushing a scam . "It's getting to the point where it's blocking other callers from coming in," the 24-year-old bar owner said.

62. Banks and tech stocks send Dow industrials closer to 22,000 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Banks and technology companies took U.S. stocks higher Tuesday, and less-loved sectors including phone and real estate companies also climbed as companies continued to report strong second-quarter results.

63. Why you still can't ditch your cable box -

NEW YORK (AP) — Not that long ago, the clunky cable box looked like it was on its way out. The federal government was pressuring cable companies to open up their near-monopoly on boxes to more competition, and industry leader Comcast promised apps that could render some boxes obsolete.

64. Why you still can't ditch your cable box -

NEW YORK (AP) — Not that long ago, the clunky cable box looked like it was on its way out. The federal government was pressuring cable companies to open up their near-monopoly on boxes to more competition, and industry leader Comcast promised apps that could render some boxes obsolete.

65. US stocks notch further records on strong earnings reports -

NEW YORK (AP) — Big gains for Facebook, Verizon Communications and other companies reporting healthier-than-expected results nudged U.S. stock indexes a bit further into record territory on Thursday. Oil's recent rally slowed, Treasury yields inched higher and stock markets round the world were mixed.

66. Women CEOs earned more last year, but few were in top job -

NEW YORK (AP) — Women CEOs earned big bucks last year, but there's still very few of them running the world's largest companies.

The median pay for a female CEO was $13.1 million last year, up 9 percent from 2015, according to an analysis by executive data firm Equilar and The Associated Press. By comparison, male CEOs earned $11.4 million, also up 9 percent.

67. Vote kicks off battle over regulation of internet -

NEW YORK (AP) — A federal agency has voted to kick off the repeal of "net neutrality" rules designed to keep broadband providers like AT&T, Verizon and Comcast from interfering with the internet.

It's the latest change that the Federal Communications Commission has made to ease regulation of the phone, broadcast or cable industries.

68. US stocks slide in morning trading; oil heads higher -

U.S. stocks were broadly lower in morning trading Thursday as investors sized up the latest batch of earnings reports from retailers and other companies. Real estate stocks fell the most. Oil prices headed higher.

69. FCC chief lays out attack on 'net neutrality' rules -

NEW YORK (AP) — Internet companies are readying for a showdown with a Republican-controlled government over a policy near and dear to their hearts: net neutrality.

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai said in a Wednesday speech that he wants to ditch the Obama-era rules, hated by telecoms, that prevent broadband and wireless companies from interfering with the sites and apps that consumers use. He wants to undo their legal basis and to eliminate the FCC's broad powers to monitor Verizon, AT&T and Comcast for bad behavior.

70. Yahoo salvages Verizon deal with $350 million discount -

NEW YORK (AP) — Yahoo is taking a $350 million hit on its previously announced $4.8 billion sale to Verizon in a concession for security lapses that exposed personal information stored in more than 1 billion Yahoo user accounts.

71. 'Net neutrality' foe Ajit Pai is new FCC head -

NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump has picked a fierce critic of the Obama-era "net neutrality" rules to be chief regulator of the nation's airwaves and internet connections.

In a statement Monday, Ajit Pai said he was grateful to the president for choosing him as the next chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. Several reports last week had said he was the pick.

72. Yahoo's big breach helps usher in an age of hacker anxiety -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Yahoo has become the worst-case example of an unnerving but increasingly common phenomenon — massive hacks that steal secrets and other potentially revealing information from our personal digital accounts, or from big organizations that hold sensitive data on our behalf.

73. Yahoo's big breach helps usher in an age of hacker anxiety -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Yahoo has become the worst-case example of an unnerving but increasingly common phenomenon — massive hacks that steal secrets and other potentially revealing information from our personal digital accounts, or from big organizations that hold sensitive data on our behalf.

74. Trump: Japanese mogul pledges $50 billion US investment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After meeting with Donald Trump on Tuesday, Japanese tech billionaire Masayoshi Son said he will invest $50 billion in new startups in the United States, committing to creating 50,000 new jobs over an unspecified time period.

75. US stocks finish level as tech losses cancel out bank gains -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks came back from an early loss and finished almost unchanged Monday. Technology companies like Apple and Microsoft took big losses on fears about their overseas revenue, but bank stocks continued to surge along with bond yields.

76. Broadband privacy rules approved despite industry pushback -

NEW YORK (AP) — Federal regulators have approved new broadband privacy rules that make internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon ask customers' permission before using or sharing much of their data, potentially making it more difficult for them to grow advertising businesses.

77. Verizon closing call centers in 5 states -

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Verizon is closing call centers in five states, including its home state of New York, drawing the ire of the governor's office.

The company says a consolidation of its call centers will impact about 3,200 workers near Rochester and New York City; Bangor, Maine; Lincoln, Nebraska; Wallingford and Meriden, Connecticut, and Rancho Cordova, California.

78. Yahoo hack steals personal info from at least 500M accounts -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Computer hackers swiped personal information from at least 500 million Yahoo accounts in what is believed to be the biggest digital break-in at an email provider.

The massive security breakdown disclosed Thursday poses new headaches for Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer as she scrambles to close a $4.8 billion sale to Verizon Communication.

79. Stocks gain moderately, led by high-dividend sectors -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks posted solid gains on Thursday as investors, comfortable that the Federal Reserve will keep interest rates low, bought up stocks that pay big dividends.

Real estate companies rose as investors looked for income, as did telecom stocks, which also typically pay higher-than-average dividends.

80. Comcast plans to launch wireless service next year -

NEW YORK (AP) — Comcast plans to launch a cellphone service roughly in the middle of next year, although it would be limited to areas of the country where it's a cable provider.

That could potentially offer real competition to carriers like Verizon and AT&T for a subset of the country. Comcast has just over 28 million customers.

81. Arianna Huffington is leaving The Huffington Post -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Huffington Post is going to be without a Huffington.

Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post's editor-in-chief, announced Thursday that she's leaving to head a new health, wellbeing and productivity startup.

82. US stocks slip as falling oil prices punish energy companies -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks wobbled and finished mostly lower Monday as the price of oil continued to nosedive thanks to the strong dollar. Energy companies took the biggest losses as U.S. crude hovered around $40 a barrel, its lowest price in almost four months, and materials companies also traded lower.

83. Stocks pull back after 4 weeks of gains; Yahoo slips -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks fell moderately on Monday as investors took a break after four weeks of gains that brought the market to record highs.

Energy companies fell more than the rest of the market as the price of oil took another turn lower. Yahoo fell after Verizon Communications announced it would buy most of Yahoo's internet businesses for $4.83 billion.

84. 'Net neutrality' rules for fair internet access win in court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal appeals court on Tuesday upheld the government's "net neutrality" rules, preserving regulations that force internet providers such as Comcast and AT&T to treat all online traffic — everything from Netflix and cat videos to games and downloads — equally.

85. US stocks give up recent gains as oil prices sink -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks skidded Friday in a wave of selling that wiped out most of the market's gains from earlier this week. A drop in oil prices took energy companies sharply lower. Investors were also troubled by a poll showing Britain may be more likely to leave the European Union.

86. US stocks struggle as energy companies fall with oil prices -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock indexes struggled to a mixed close Tuesday as energy companies fell with the price of oil, overcoming gains in utilities and phone companies.

Investors sold household goods makers after a report showed consumers are growing more worried about business and job market conditions.

87. US stocks rise, shaking off tech slump, after Fed stands pat -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rose Wednesday after the Federal Reserve left its key interest rate unchanged, as investors expected. Energy companies climbed again as the price of oil came close to a six-month high. Technology stocks were battered following weak results from Apple and Twitter.

88. About 39K Verizon workers strike amid contract dispute -

NEW YORK (AP) — About 39,000 Verizon landline and cable workers on the East Coast walked off the job Wednesday morning after little progress in negotiations since their contract expired nearly eight months ago.

89. US stocks jump as JPMorgan gives banks a big boost -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks climbed again Wednesday as quarterly results from JPMorgan Chase gave banks a big lift. Economic news from China powered industrial and technology companies in the U.S. and stock exchanges overseas.

90. Verizon to buy fiber-optic business for about $1.8 billion -

NEW YORK (AP) — Verizon says it will pay $1.8 billion to buy the fiber-optic network business of XO Communications, in a deal that the wireless phone company said would boost the networks of its customers.

91. Comcast loses fewest TV customers in 8 years -

NEW YORK (AP) — Comcast is trumpeting its best year for traditional TV services in nearly a decade, even though it continues to lose TV subscribers.

The number of traditional TV customers is still declining across the industry, and analysts say Comcast's TV gains are largely coming from competitors, like AT&T and Dish, rather than young new cable customers who have never paid for cable before.

92. Stock rise, driven by a turn higher in crude oil prices -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks jumped Tuesday as the price of oil made another abrupt reversal, this time rising almost 4 percent after falling sharply the day before.

Energy stocks climbed along with the price of oil, and Chevron and Exxon Mobil made major gains. Strong fourth-quarter results from beleaguered wireless provider Sprint gave telecom stocks a boost. Quarterly earnings also sent several stocks higher, including Post-it Notes maker 3M, Procter & Gamble, which makes Crest toothpaste, and luxury handbag maker Coach.

93. US stocks rise as energy stocks bounce back from big loss -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are climbing Thursday, led by big gains in energy companies as the prices of crude oil and natural gas recover from steep plunges the day before. Telecom stocks also rose after Verizon reported strong fourth-quarter results.

94. Yahoo going back to the drawing board with Alibaba spinoff -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Yahoo's long-running identity crisis is spiraling in a new direction now that the company is abandoning a year's work on a tax-dodging spinoff to pursue an alternative path that will carve off its Internet business instead.

95. Fight over net neutrality rules returns to appeals court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government's latest push to make sure consumers get equal access to the Internet faces a key legal test as a federal appeals court considers whether to treat high-speed service providers like public utilities.

96. Yahoo mulls shareholder demand to sell Internet business -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Yahoo's board is considering an activist shareholder's demand to sell the Internet services the company is best known for, a maneuver that might help the company dodge a tax bill of more than $10 billion looming over its holdings in China's Alibaba Group.

97. Global stock markets waver as Fed decision nears -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks were more or less unchanged in midday trading Thursday as investors remained on the sidelines until the Federal Reserve's announcement this afternoon. Policymakers are considering whether or not to raise U.S. interest rates for the first time in nearly a decade.

98. Seeing pope in US? Pics, tweets and streaming video -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Pope Francis' personality is more joyful than grumpy cat, his vestments undeniably white and gold — not blue or black — and you'll never hear him say OMG or ermahgerd.

The 78-year-old pontiff isn't your typical social media star. He doesn't even carry a cellphone. But wherever Pope Francis goes, millions of tweets, posts, pictures and video streams are sure to follow.

99. Still use a landline? FCC voting on new phone rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The copper network behind landline phones, a communications mainstay for more than a century, is going away, as cable and fiber-optics lines come along with faster Internet speeds.

100. Comcast adds Internet customers; box office pumps up revenue -

NEW YORK (AP) — Despite a slowdown in subscriber growth, the Internet is still propelling Comcast.

The country's largest cable company added 180,000 Internet customers in the April-June quarter, the smallest gain in at least two years. That brings its total Internet subscribers to 22.6 million.