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Editorial Results (free)

1. Airlines urge the G7 nations to help international travel -

The airline industry is ratcheting up its campaign to ease border restrictions and allow more international travel — even by people who aren't vaccinated against coronavirus — despite high infection rates in many countries.

2. How vaccine passports for global travel would work -

LONDON (AP) — Boarding pass, suitcase, passport and ... digital vaccination certificate?

Keen to avoid losing another summer of holiday revenue to the coronavirus pandemic, the European Union, some Asian governments and the airline industry are scrambling to develop so-called COVID-19 vaccine passports to help kickstart international travel.

3. Frontier Airlines hopes IPO rides wave of travel recovery -

Frontier Airlines is betting that the budding recovery in leisure travel is for real.

Shares of the discount carrier began public trading Thursday, edging lower in midday trading. The Denver-based airline and its private owners sought to raise $570 million before costs from the IPO after pricing 30 million shares at $19, the low end of a $19 to $21 target. The stock opened at $18.61, then bumped up to $19.06 before dipping back down to $18.54.

4. US approves new airline from JetBlue founder -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Transportation Department has granted approval for a new airline led by David Neeleman, who started JetBlue Airways two decades ago.

Breeze Aviation Group has up to one year to begin flights using up to 22 planes, the company said Wednesday.

5. Airlines close books on rotten 2020 and, so far, 2021 is grim -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines lost $3.1 billion last year, its first full-year loss since Richard Nixon was president and gasoline sold for about 36 cents a gallon with no extra charge for the attendant who cleaned your windshield.

6. American, Southwest, Alaska add to airline loss parade in 3Q -

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines are piling up billions of dollars in additional losses as the pandemic chokes off air travel, but a recent uptick in passengers, however modest, has provided some hope.

7. American, Southwest add to parade of airline losses in 3Q -

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines are piling up billions of dollars in losses as the pandemic causes a massive drop in air travel.

American Airlines on Thursday reported a loss of $2.4 billion and Southwest Airlines lost $1.16 billion in the third quarter, typically a very strong period of air travel that includes most of the summer vacation season.

8. Hong Kong OKs $5 billion bailout for Cathay Pacific Airways -

HONG KONG (AP) — Financially battered Hong Kong airline Cathay Pacific Airways has become the latest airline to get government support to survive the coronavirus pandemic.

The Hong Kong government on Tuesday approved a 39 billion Hong Kong dollar ($5 billion) recapitalization plan that calls for a new government-controlled entity called Aviation 2020 to buy $2.6 billion of an up to 33 billion Hong Kong dollars ($4.3 billion) share offering by Cathay Pacific.

9. American Airlines posts $2.2 billion loss during pandemic -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines reported a staggering loss of $2.24 billion for the first quarter, when the coronavirus pandemic triggered a sharp drop in air travel.

The airline said Thursday that revenue fell 19% while costs continued to rise even as the virus spread.

10. Outbreak: bankruptcies, layoffs, quiet skies and empty rails -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments on Thursday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

11. Virus seizes markets; it's no longer business as usual -

Global markets and businesses big and small opened the week to a landscape seemingly altered by the coronavirus pandemic. National retail chains have closed all stores. Banks are taking steps to keep cash on hand, lots of it. Markets in Asia, Europe and the U.S. are plunging. Following is a quick look at how the outbreak is impacting the financial and business sector, as well as millions of workers and customers.

12. Virus upends life in Italy as China vows to defeat epidemic -

BEIJING (AP) — Starkly illustrating the global east-to-west spread of the new coronavirus, Italy began an extraordinary, sweeping lockdown Tuesday while in China, the diminishing threat prompted the president to visit the epicenter and declare: "We will certainly defeat this epidemic."

13. Virus concerns: What to know if you're planning a trip -

The fast-spreading coronavirus is forcing travelers to reconsider their trips.

As of Wednesday, the virus has sickened more than 94,000 people and 3,200 have died. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends avoiding all nonessential travel to China, Iran, South Korea and Italy, and says older adults or those with chronic medical conditions should postpone travel to Japan.

14. Companies adjust policies as virus scrambles travel plans -

The fast-spreading coronavirus is forcing travelers to reconsider their trips.

As of Tuesday, the virus has sickened more than 92,000 people and 3,100 have died. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends avoiding all nonessential travel to China, Iran, South Korea and Italy, and says older adults or those with chronic medical conditions should postpone travel to Japan.

15. IATA: Virus may slash $29 billion from airlines' revenue -

TOKYO (AP) — The outbreak of the new virus threatens to erase $29 billion of this year's revenue for global airlines, mostly for Chinese carriers, as travel crashes worldwide, according to the International Air Transport Association.

16. More airlines drop flights to China as deadly virus spreads -

BANGKOK (AP) — British Airways halted all flights to China and American Airlines suspended Los Angeles flights to and from Shanghai and Beijing as efforts to contain a new and deadly virus intensifies.

17. Grounded Boeing jet holds back profits, growth at airlines -

DALLAS (AP) — The three big U.S. airlines that own Boeing 737 Max jets don't expect the grounded plane back in their fleets until after the peak summer travel season, and that promises to lead to thousands more canceled flights and higher costs well into another year.

18. Airbus nails $20B in new plane orders at Dubai Airshow -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Airbus nailed down $20 billion in new plane orders on the second day of the Dubai Airshow after previous rounds of the biennial showcase saw its competitor Boeing take the lion’s share of deals.

19. Stocks climb for 2nd straight day on US-China trade optimism -

Stocks closed broadly higher on Wall Street for the second straight day Thursday as the U.S. and China kicked off a new round of negotiations in their long-running trade war.

Technology companies and banks led the rally as investors turned hopeful that the 13th round of trade talks will bring both sides closer to ending the costly conflict between the world's two biggest economies.

20. Saudi carrier cancels troubled Boeing 737 order for Airbus -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Boeing's campaign to restore the reputation of its best-selling plane after two deadly crashes suffered a blow with a Saudi airline canceling an order worth up to $5.9 billion in favor of a European rival of the U.S. manufacturer.

21. Countries and carriers around globe ground Boeing 737 Max -

SINGAPORE (AP) — Airlines and countries around the world have grounded Boeing 737 Max jets or banned them from their airspace following the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines plane that killed 157 people on Sunday, five months after a similar Indonesian Lion Air jet plunged into the ocean, killing 189. A look at those countries and airlines:

22. Before meeting Kim, Trump oversees big Vietnamese plane deal -

HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — President Donald Trump and Vietnamese President Nguyen Phu Trong presided over the signing of several trade deals in Hanoi on Wednesday, including agreements to sell the booming Southeast Asian country 110 Boeing planes worth billions of dollars.

23. Qatar to pull out of Saudi-dominated OPEC amid Doha boycott -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The tiny, energy-rich Arab nation of Qatar announced Monday it will withdraw from OPEC in January, a rebuke of the Saudi-dominated cartel as the kingdom's boycott of Doha continues unabated and a crucial meeting of the group looms this week.

24. Will American Airlines bar customers from changing a ticket? -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — American Airlines is threatening to prohibit customers from making changes to nonrefundable tickets if Congress makes good on a proposal to crack down on unreasonable airline fees.

25. $19B tourism industry looks to record year -

Tourism officials are a glass-half-full bunch. It’s a job requirement, necessary since they must relentlessly promote a city, region, state or even a country no matter what the economic climate or general traveler mood might be.

26. Surge in airline hiring boosts interest in aspiring pilots -

DALLAS (AP) — Major U.S. airlines are hiring pilots at a rate not seen since before 9/11, and that is encouraging more young people to consider a career in the cockpit.

Hiring is likely to remain brisk for years. Smaller airlines in the U.S. are struggling with a shortage that will continue as they lose pilots to the bigger carriers, which in turn will need to replace thousands of retiring pilots over the next few years.

27. Flight cancellations mount as Irma pushes north from Florida -

Big airports in Florida remained closed Monday, and flight cancellations were spreading north along the track of Tropical Storm Irma.

American Airlines said it won't resume flights in Miami until at least Tuesday, revising its plans to restart late Monday.

28. US stock indexes tick higher as oil's dismal week eases -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock indexes ticked higher in morning trading Thursday after the price of oil stabilized, at least for now.

This week has been dominated by oil's tumbling price, which dropped on Wednesday to its lowest level since last summer, and how much it will affect the broader market.

29. Qatar says Kuwait trying to mediate, solve Gulf crisis -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Kuwait is trying to mediate a Gulf crisis between Qatar and its Arab neighbors, which have severed ties with the energy-rich travel hub and moved to isolate it from the outside world, Qatar's foreign minister said Tuesday.

30. American will reward fliers based on dollars, not miles -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines is following other airlines by basing perks like free flights on how much passengers spend on tickets, not how many miles they fly.

The change, which matches those at Delta Air Lines and United Airlines, starts with flights on Aug. 1 and rewards American's highest-paying passengers.

31. Alaska Air buys Virgin America to expand West Coast flights -

NEW YORK (AP) — Alaska Air Group Inc. is buying Virgin America in a deal worth $2.6 billion, making Alaska the biggest carrier on the West Coast and reigniting the debate over airline consolidation.

32. Airlines restore tiny perks, like pretzels, to pacify fliers -

NEW YORK (AP) — After 15 years of near austerity, U.S. airlines are restoring some small perks for passengers crammed into coach.

Don't expect ample legroom or free checked bags. But fliers will find improved snacks, a larger selection of free movies and — on a few select routes — the return of free meals.

33. More Thanksgiving travelers; don't get stuck at the airport -

NEW YORK (AP) — A stronger economy and lower gas prices mean Thanksgiving travelers can expect more congested highways this year.

During the long holiday weekend, 46.9 million Americans are expected to go 50 miles or more from home, the highest number since 2007, according to travel agency and car lobbying group AAA. That would be a 0.6 percent increase over last year and the seventh straight year of growth.

34. United suffers 2nd major grounding in 2 months -

NEW YORK (AP) — United Airlines temporarily grounded flights across the country for part of Wednesday after experiencing computer problems, causing more than 800 delays.

A White House spokesman said President Barack Obama was briefed on the glitch and that it appeared unrelated to an outage hours later at the New York Stock Exchange.

35. US stocks end lower, pushing Dow into the red for the year -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones industrial average slipped into the red for the year on Monday as stocks extended their slump.

Airlines were among the biggest losers amid concern that capacity growth in the industry may curb profitability. JetBlue Airways, American Airlines and Delta Air Lines were among the carriers that declined.

36. Top commercial real estate transactions March 1, 2014-March 1, 2015 -

Top commercial real estate transactions, March 1, 2014-March 1, 2015, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

37. Top 2014 commercial real estate transactions for Middle Tennessee -

Top 2014 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

38. American Airlines tops Street 4Q forecasts -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — American Airlines is logging record profits and rewarding shareholders just one year removed from bankruptcy court and a big merger.

The airline is getting a huge lift from cheaper fuel — savings could top $5 billion this year — and travel demand that shows no sign of weakening. CEO Doug Parker says 2015 is shaping up as another strong year.

39. American Airlines, pilots union reach labor deal -

The pilots union at American Airlines has agreed to put up for a vote a five-year contract proposal that would boost pay by more than 26 percent and offer smaller raises in later years.

The board of the Allied Pilots Association agreed late Saturday, just before a midnight deadline set by the company, to accept the basic terms of the deal before the offer was pulled and negotiations moved to arbitration.

40. US companies eager to embrace Cuba face hurdles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Cargill aims to sell more corn and soybeans. MasterCard covets another site for Americans to swipe credit cards. Marriott sees beachfront property that needs hotels.

And outside Orlando, Florida, Danny Howell just knows there would be demand for his classic Chevrolet parts.

41. American Airlines crew reject union contract -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Flight attendants at American Airlines rejected a five-year contract Sunday, forcing the world's largest carrier and its union for cabin-crew workers into binding arbitration.

Just 16 votes blocked the contract — with 8,180 voting for and 8,196 voting against, the Association of Professional Flight Attendants said in a statement.

42. Fuel costs ease, US airline profits soar -

DALLAS (AP) — Saving a nickel or a dime per gallon might not seem like much to the average motorist, but for airlines that burn hundreds of millions of gallons of fuel every month, it adds up quickly.

43. Hawaiian Airlines keeps top spot in on-time list -

The Associated Press

Here are the government's rankings of the leading airlines and their on-time performance in May. Some airlines, including Spirit and Allegiant, are not included because they operate fewer flights. The federal government counts a flight as on-time if it arrives within 14 minutes of schedule.

44. For airlines not named United, it was a great 1Q -

DALLAS (AP) — Even with the turbulence of severe winter storms and stubbornly high fuel prices, many of the major airlines are cruising and their stock prices are soaring.

Mergers have reduced competition and made it easier for the airlines to limit the supply of seats and raise average fares. Extra fees bring in billions more each year.

45. American, US Airways tweak fees, mileage rules -

DALLAS (AP) — If you use miles to get a free ticket on American Airlines, you may have to pay to check that suitcase.

American and US Airways announced changes Tuesday to their policies on checked-bag fees and redeeming miles for free flights.

46. New American Airlines to emerge as deal closes -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — American Airlines emerged from bankruptcy protection and US Airways culminated its long pursuit of a merger partner as the two completed their deal Monday to create the world's biggest airline.

47. S&P 500 index notches another record close -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market notched another record close Monday after a big acquisition in the food industry. Hope for a longer-term budget deal in Washington also helped.

Food distributor Sysco rose the most in the Standard & Poor's 500 index after the company announced an agreement to buy rival US Foods in an $8.2 billion deal. Sysco's stock jumped $3.31, or 9.7 percent, to $37.62.

48. Judge moves airline merger step closer to takeoff -

A federal bankruptcy judge has cleared the way for American Airlines and US Airways to complete their merger and create the world's largest airline.

The judge ruled Wednesday that this month's settlement of an antitrust lawsuit filed by the federal government didn't upset American's bankruptcy-reorganization plan, which is built around the merger. He rejected a request by a group of consumers to block the deal temporarily.

49. Judge moves airline merger step closer to takeoff -

A federal bankruptcy judge has cleared the way for American Airlines and US Airways to close their merger and create the world's largest airline.

The judge ruled Wednesday that this month's settlement of an antitrust lawsuit filed by the federal government didn't upset American's bankruptcy-reorganization plan, which is built around the merger. He rejected a request by a group of consumers to block the deal temporarily.

50. Govt in agreement to allow American merger -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines and US Airways reached a deal with the government that lets the two form the world's biggest airline and opens up more room at key U.S. airports for low-cost carriers.

51. US seeks to delay airline-merger trial until March -

DALLAS (AP) — The U.S. government wants to wait until March for a trial on its lawsuit aimed at blocking the merger of American Airlines and US Airways, a deal that would create the world's biggest airline.

52. Uncertainty awaits airline industry without merger -

DALLAS (AP) — The merger between American Airlines and US Airways was supposed to cap an era of consolidation that helped the airline industry return to profitability. And it would produce a stronger competitor to giants United and Delta.

53. Government, states challenge proposed American Airlines merger -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal government is trying to block the proposed merger of American Airlines and US Airways, saying it would cause "substantial harm" to consumers by leading to higher fares and fees.

54. Parent of American Airlines posts $220M profit -

The parent of American Airlines is reporting a $220 million profit for the second quarter as its cost-cutting from its bankruptcy reorganization kicked in.

It's the first time in six years that the airline has had a profit during the April-June quarter. During the same period last year, it lost $241 million, mostly because of bankruptcy-related expenses.

55. US Airways shareholders approve American merger -

NEW YORK (AP) — US Airways shareholders overwhelmingly approved a proposed merger with American Airlines, bringing the companies closer to creating the world's biggest airline.

The main hurdle now is a review by antitrust regulators at the U.S. Department of Justice. Concerns have been raised about the merger's impact on airfares, and the combined airline's potential dominance at Washington's Reagan National Airport.

56. American, US Airways name post-merger leadership -

DALLAS (AP) — The new American Airlines will have more top executives from smaller but more successful US Airways than from the current American.

Five US Airways executives will follow their current CEO, Doug Parker, when he takes control after the airlines complete their proposed merger. Three executives from American parent AMR Corp. were named to the new company's leadership team.

57. Airlines losses narrowed in 1Q to $552 million -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. airlines charged more in fares and fees and reduced debt as they improved their financial performance in the first quarter.

They still lost money, which is typical for the year's first three months travel slows after the holidays and delays rack up from snow storms. But the deficit was $552 million — or $3.30 per passenger — compared with $1.7 billion in same period in 2012.

58. American Airlines set to file reorganization plan -

DALLAS (AP) — US Airways began studying a potential merger with American Airlines several months before American filed for bankruptcy protection in late 2011, according to papers filed Monday by the two companies.

59. Judge denies $20M severance deal for AMR CEO -

DALLAS (AP) — A federal bankruptcy judge has denied a proposed $20 million severance payment for the CEO of American Airlines as part of the company's merger with US Airways.

The judge ruled Thursday that the proposed payment to CEO Tom Horton exceeded limits that Congress set for bankruptcy cases in 2005.

60. Health insurers lead stocks higher on Wall Street -

The Dow Jones industrial average closed at a record high Tuesday after reports on auto sales and factory orders provided the latest evidence that the U.S. economy is strengthening. Traders plowed money back into European stocks as the financial situation in Cyprus appeared to stabilize.

61. Merger activity stirs on Wall Street -

NEW YORK (AP) — Companies are buying each other again.

This year was shaping up to be one of the biggest for mergers and acquisitions since 2007. Then, on Thursday, two more blockbuster deals were announced: A $11 billion merger between American Airlines and U.S. Airways, and a $23 billion takeover of ketchup maker H.J. Heinz Co. by a group including billionaire Warren Buffett.

62. Stocks mixed as Europe's economy slows -

NEW YORK (AP) — Renewed worries about Europe overshadowed an encouraging U.S. jobs report, and stocks flipped between slight gains and losses on Thursday.

The Dow Jones industrial average fell eight points to 13,974, shortly after 2:30 p.m. E.S.T.

63. Airlines submit bids to provide flights from Macon -

MACON, Ga. (AP) — Four airlines are vying for the chance to provide passenger flights from Macon's airport to Atlanta and possibly other cities, including Nashville.

The Telegraph reports (http://bit.ly/YOmqWV) that the four airlines have submitted bids to the U.S. Department of Transportation, which subsidizes Macon flights under the federal Essential Air Service program.

64. FAA to review of Boeing 787, calls plane safe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Aviation Administration is conducting a comprehensive review of the design, manufacture and assembly of the Boeing 787, but government officials declared the plane safe despite recent incidents including a fire and a fuel leak earlier this week.

65. Hurricane Sandy grounds air travel in Northeast -

NEW YORK (AP) — Hurricane Sandy brought air travel to a halt in the Northeast Monday, grounding thousands of flights and upending travel plans across the globe. Planes and passengers are likely to remain stranded Tuesday and it could be a number of days before airport operations are back to normal.

66. Labor strife threatens American Airlines schedule -

DALLAS (AP) — With American Airlines canceling dozens of flights every day, passengers with fall travel plans are confronting an inconvenient question: Should they avoid the nation's third-largest carrier because labor strife might cause delays and cancelations?

67. American Airlines, US Airways merger talks start -

NEW YORK (AP) — American Airlines and US Airways are one step closer to a potential merger.

The companies said Friday they signed legal documents allowing them to confidentially exchange information. But a deal is still far from reality.

68. Stocks higher, but volatile, after Bernanke speaks -

It took a while, but investors eventually decided they liked what they heard from Ben Bernanke, and stock indexes rose enough on Friday to put them into positive territory for August.

Stocks gyrated after the Federal Reserve chairman spoke on Friday morning. They first gave up their morning gains, then bolted to their highs for the day, before settled in-between.

69. American Airlines' flight attendants OK contract -

DALLAS (AP) — Flight attendants at American Airlines voted to approve a new contract offer from the airline, which is seeking to cut costs in bankruptcy protection.

The results released Sunday showed attendants voted to accept the contract by 59.5 percent to 40.5 percent, according to the Association of Professional Flight Attendants.

70. US seeks $162M in fines against American Airlines, American Air -

DALLAS (AP) — Federal safety regulators are seeking up to $162.4 million in fines against American Airlines and its affiliates for alleged violations of U.S. safety standards going back several years. Those sanctions would dwarf any previous penalties against an airline.

71. American CEO bashes US Airways; calls it desperate -

BOSTON (AP) — American Airlines CEO Tom Horton wants to set the record straight: It was he who approached US Airways CEO Doug Parker about the possibility of combining the two airlines, not the other way around.

72. CEOs of American Airlines, US Airways discuss merger options -

DALLAS (AP) — The CEOs of American Airlines parent AMR Corp. and US Airways met over breakfast Thursday to talk about potential merger scenarios.

73. CEOs of American Airlines, US Airways discuss merger options -

DALLAS (AP) — The CEOs of American Airlines parent AMR Corp. and US Airways met over breakfast Thursday to talk about potential merger scenarios.

74. American Airlines has 2Q loss of $241M on bankruptcy costs -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines is reaping higher fares and record revenue but still losing money.

AMR Corp. said Wednesday that it narrowed its second-quarter loss to $241 million mostly because of $230 million in costs tied to its bankruptcy restructuring. A year ago, it lost $286 million.

75. FAA proposes fining Boeing $13.5 million -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Aviation Administration on Friday proposed fining Boeing $13.5 million for failing to meet a deadline to provide airlines with instructions on how to prevent fuel tank explosions like the one that destroyed TWA Flight 800 off the coast of Long Island, N.Y., 16 years ago, killing all 230 people on board.

76. American Airlines CEO says it's time to weigh merger options -

DALLAS (AP) — The head of American Airlines says his company has done so much to fix its problems that it can consider potential mergers, and invitations will be going out soon.

Thomas Horton, the CEO of American and parent AMR Corp., said Tuesday that American has boosted revenue, reached cost-cutting deals with labor unions, and is well on its way to a successful restructuring after seven months under bankruptcy protection.

77. American Airlines to reduce July flying -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines says it will reduce flights in July partly because of a shortage of pilots due to more of them calling in sick.

The 1 percent reduction in July's schedule follows a 1.5 percent cutback in June, which was also blamed partly on higher usage of sick leave by pilots.

78. Stock indexes drift lower as Europe fears loom -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones industrial average and other stock indexes drifted lower Thursday after a meeting of European leaders failed to deliver any new steps to ease the region's debt crisis.

79. Stocks edge lower on worries about China, Greece -

NEW YORK (AP) — Two signs of trouble elsewhere in the world pushed U.S. stocks lower: slowing economic growth in China and a possible hitch in a deal to get Greece its bailout money.

The Dow Jones industrial average closed the day down 14.76 points to 12,962.81, or down 0.1 percent. The Dow closed above 13,000 last week for the first time since May 2008.

80. Stocks close higher on Fed promise of low rates -

The stock market bounced to its highest close since last spring Wednesday after the Federal Reserve pledged to keep interest rates near zero for almost three more years.

81. American Airlines stock led investors on volatile ride -

Airlines are no place for conservative investors, as the dramatic rise and fall of AMR Corp. shares in recent years illustrates.

Oil prices, economic trends, and fare wars are among the issues that have taken the stock of American Airlines' parent company, and other carriers, on a wild ride.

82. American Airlines parent files for bankruptcy -

DALLAS (AP) — The parent company of American Airlines filed for bankruptcy protection Tuesday, seeking relief from crushing debt caused by high fuel prices and expensive labor contracts that its competitors shed years ago.