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Editorial Results (free)

1. US unemployment claims rise by 14,000 to 262,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans who signed up for unemployment benefits rose last week to the highest level since November, though the U.S. job market continues to show signs of strength.

2. Applications for US jobless claims up again last week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More Americans applied for jobless benefits last week as the number of unemployed continues to rise modestly, though the labor market remains one of the strongest parts of the U.S. economy.

3. Dems seem headed for climate, health win after ups and downs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's been more than a year in the making and has seen plenty of ups and downs. Now, a Democratic economic package focused on climate and health care faces hurdles but seems headed toward party-line passage by Congress next month.

4. 1st ship carrying Ukrainian grain leaves the port of Odesa -

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — The first ship carrying Ukrainian grain set out from the port of Odesa on Monday under a deal brokered by the United Nations and Turkey that is expected to release large stores of Ukrainian crops to foreign markets and ease a growing food crisis.

5. Prisons chief deflects blame for failures, angering senators -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With just days left in his tenure, the embattled director of the federal prison system faced a bipartisan onslaught Tuesday as he refused to accept responsibility for a culture of corruption and misconduct that has plagued his agency for years.

6. Democrats widen scrutiny of tech over abortion data privacy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic representatives are widening their scrutiny into the role of tech companies in collecting the personal data of people who may be seeking an abortion, as lawmakers, regulators and the Biden administration grapple with the aftermath of the Supreme Court ruling last month ending the constitutional protections for abortion.

7. Monkeypox virus could become entrenched as new STD in the US -

NEW YORK (AP) — The spread of monkeypox in the U.S. could represent the dawn of a new sexually transmitted disease, though some health officials say the virus that causes pimple-like bumps might yet be contained before it gets firmly established.

8. Sky-high diesel prices squeeze truckers, farmers, consumers -

NEW YORK (AP) — When long-haul trucker Deb LaBree sets out on the road to deliver pharmaceuticals, she has strategies to hold down costs. She avoids the West Coast and the Northeast, where diesel prices are highest. She organizes her delivery route to minimize "deadheading" — driving an empty truck in between deliveries.

9. US stocks got close to a bear market. Here's what that means -

NEW YORK (AP) — The bear came close to Wall Street but then backed off.

The stock market's slump this year briefly pulled the S&P 500 into what's known as a bear market Friday, before a late rally put the index in the green. The prevailing sentiment among investors remains negative, however, so the relief may be temporary.

10. Spy agencies urged to fix open secret: A lack of diversity -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The peril National Security Agency staff wanted to discuss with their director didn't involve terrorists or enemy nations. It was something closer to home: the racism and cultural misunderstandings inside America's largest intelligence service.

11. EXPLAINER: Why is Wall Street close to a bear market? -

NEW YORK (AP) — The bears are rumbling toward Wall Street. The stock market's skid this year has pulled the S&P 500 close to what's known as a bear market. Rising interest rates, high inflation, the war in Ukraine and a slowdown in China's economy have caused investors to reconsider the prices they're willing to pay for a wide range of stocks, from high-flying tech companies to traditional automakers.

12. Slightly more Americans seek jobless aid last week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for jobless aid ticked up slightly last week but the total number of Americans collecting benefits remained at its lowest level in more than five decades.

13. AllianceBernstein shows off new corporate home -

AllianceBernstein LP, a research and global investment management firm, has officially unveiled its corporate headquarters in Nashville.

AB is located at 501 Commerce, which is part of the mixed-use Fifth + Broadway development.

14. Avalanche 1st to advance to 2nd round with sweep of Preds -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Colorado Avalanche are happy they got a bit of a challenge before sweeping the Nashville Predators.

They actually had to rally for the first time in the first round.

Valeri Nichushkin scored the tiebreaking goal with 7:58 left, and the Avalanche became the first team to advance to the second round Monday night beating the Predators 5-3 Monday night.

15. Fewer Americans file for jobless claims last week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell again last week with numbers still at historically low levels.

Jobless claims in the U.S. declined by 5,000 to 180,000 for the week ending April 23, the Labor Department reported Thursday. First-time applications generally reflect the number of layoffs.

16. Try this on: Kick-starting your online clothing resale gig -

With the recent rise of resale apps like Depop and Poshmark, the idea of selling old clothes online is becoming more fashionable. Many people have turned clothing resale into a lucrative side gig or even a full-time job, gaining thousands of followers and making dozens of sales per week.

17. US jobless claims rise but remain near a half-century low -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people seeking unemployment benefits ticked up last week but remained at a historically low level, reflecting a robust U.S. labor market with near record-high job openings and few layoffs.

18. Amazon adds 5% 'fuel and inflation surcharge' to seller fees -

Amazon is taking a step to offset its rising costs, announcing Wednesday it will add a 5% "fuel and inflation surcharge" to fees it charges third-party sellers who use the e-commerce giant's fulfillment services.

19. Five SUVs to help you save money at the pump -

With gas prices reaching record highs, many car shoppers may be asking which SUVs are the most fuel-efficient? Edmunds brings you five options to consider so you can spend less time and money at the pump.

20. ‘Squirrel’ White scurries into hearts of players, coaches -

If people didn’t realize Marquarius White is known for speed, his nickname is a dead giveaway.

The freshman everyone calls “Squirrel” has made an immediate impression during spring ball as an early enrollee for the Tennessee football team.

21. GameStop is surging again on first stock split in 15 years -

Shares of GameStop surged before the market opened Friday after the video game retailer announced that it would attempt its first stock split in 15 years.

The Grapevine, Texas, company said in a regulatory filing late Thursday that it wants to increase its share count from 300 million to 1 billion so it can implement a stock split in the form of a dividend. It plans to seek shareholder approval at its upcoming, annual stockholders meeting.

22. Nurses: Guilty verdict for dosing mistake could cost lives -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The moment nurse RaDonda Vaught realized she had given a patient the wrong medication, she rushed to the doctors working to revive 75-year-old Charlene Murphey and told them what she had done. Within hours, she made a full report of her mistake to the Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

23. Invest what you can afford to lose in friend’s business -

Ben & Jerry’s was started by childhood best friends. Four grad school buddies founded Warby Parker. A long friendship-turned-partnership brought Clear to TSA security lines across the U.S. A shopping trip between two pals launched size-inclusive clothing brand Universal Standard.

24. Seeding snub might just be the ticket for Vols’ NCAA run -

Candace Parker saw the NCAA men’s tournament brackets released Sunday and immediately went to social media to provide her analysis.

It came only a few hours after Tennessee captured the SEC tournament title for the first time since 1979 with a victory over Texas A&M.

25. Granlund lifts Predators past Stars, 2-1 in shootout -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Mikael Granlund and goalie Juuse Saros made sure Nashville's night to remember ended as well as the evening started.

Granlund scored the lone goal of a four-round shootout, helping the Predators cap Thursday night by beating the Dallas Stars 2-1.

26. Vrabel has coordinator’s back as fans look for offensive answers -

While change is inevitable in the NFL, don’t look for Titans coach Mike Vrabel to alter his core beliefs and personnel after the team’s hasty playoff exit.

That means Ryan Tannehill will be back under center in 2022. The team will not make a blockbuster deal for Aaron Rodgers or Russell Wilson should they become available.

27. A late buying drive pushes stocks higher on Wall Street -

Stocks closed higher on Wall Street Tuesday, getting February off to a decent start after a miserable January.

The S&P 500 added 0.7%, as did the Nasdaq composite. The Dow Jones Industrial Average added 0.8%. Nearly all of the gains came in the last hour after the market spent most of the day waffling between gains and losses.

28. 14.5M get health care under Obama law, with help from Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At least 14.5 million Americans are getting private health insurance for this year under the Obama-era health law, thanks to help from the Biden administration.

"Health care should be a right, not a privilege, for all Americans," President Joe Biden said Thursday in a statement announcing the numbers. "We are making that right a reality for a record number of people, bringing down costs and increasing access for families across the country."

29. As omicron surges, HealthCare.gov sign-up deadline arrives -

People looking for health insurance in the grip of the omicron surge have through Saturday to sign up for taxpayer-subsidized private coverage under the Obama-era Affordable Care Act.

President Joe Biden's administration is on track is to deliver robust enrollment numbers, but those gains could turn into a mirage if congressional Democrats remain stymied on Biden's social agenda package. Biden's coronavirus relief bill has been providing generous subsidy increases that benefit new and returning customers. The juiced-up assistance will go away at the end of this year without further congressional action.

30. Omicron might be headed for a rapid drop in Britain, US -

Scientists are seeing signals that COVID-19's alarming omicron wave may have peaked in Britain and is about to do the same in the U.S., at which point cases may start dropping off dramatically.

The reason: The variant has proved so wildly contagious that it may already be running out of people to infect, just a month and a half after it was first detected in South Africa.

31. COVID case counts may be losing importance amid omicron -

The explosive increase in U.S. coronavirus case counts is raising alarm, but some experts believe the focus should instead be on COVID-19 hospital admissions. And those aren't climbing as fast.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, for one, said Sunday on ABC that with many infections causing few or no symptoms, "it is much more relevant to focus on the hospitalizations as opposed to the total number of cases." Other experts argue that case counts still have value.

32. US jobless claims unchanged at 205,000 -

The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits was unchanged last week, remaining at a historically low level that reflects the job market's strong recovery from the coronavirus recession last year.

33. Supply shortages and emboldened workers: A changed economy -

Employees at a fast-food restaurant in Sacramento, California, exasperated over working in stifling heat for low wages, demanded more pay and a new air conditioner — and got both.

Customer orders poured in to an Italian auto supplier, which struggled to get hold of enough supplies of everything from plastic to microchips to meet the demand.

34. US home construction rebounds a strong 11.8% in November -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — New home construction in the U.S. rebounded 11.8% in November as strong demand continues to boost builder confidence even with the slower winter season approaching.

The double-digit percentage increase last month left home construction at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.68 million units, an 8.3% increase from the rate at this time last year, the Commerce Department reported Thursday. October's home construction number was revised downward slightly to 1.5 million units from 1.52 million units.

35. Buying a new car? Here are 5 must-have features -

One of the perks of buying a new vehicle is that it offers features that promise a safer and more convenient driving experience. Some technologies have trickled down from luxury to mainstream segments, while others have been introduced quickly across the market.

36. Worker says she risked discipline if she left job amid storm -

MAYFIELD, Ky. (AP) — An employee of the Kentucky candle factory where eight workers were killed by a tornado said Tuesday that a supervisor threatened her with written disciplinary action if she went home early because storms were approaching.

37. US jobless claims drop 52-year low amid seasonal volatility -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits plunged last week to the lowest level in 52 years, more evidence that the U.S. job market is recovering from last year's coronavirus recession.

38. Can Vrabel hold Titans together for 5 games? -

One of the reasons Jon Robinson fired Mike Mularkey after a playoff win in 2018 and replaced him with Mike Vrabel was Robinson’s judgment that Vrabel was more likely to take the Titans to the next level.

39. US jobless claims rise by 28,000 to still-low 222,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits rose last week even though the U.S. job market has been rebounding from last year's coronavirus recession.

Jobless claims climbed by 28,000 to 222,000 from the previous week's pandemic low 194,000, the Labor Department reported Thursday. The four-week average of claims, which smooths out week-to-week ups and downs, fell below 239,000, a pandemic low.

40. Science report: US should make less plastic to save oceans -

America needs to rethink and reduce the way it generates plastics because so much of the material is littering the oceans and other waters, the National Academy of Sciences says in a new report.

The United States, the world's top plastics waste producer, generates more than 46 million tons (42 million metric tons) a year, and about 2.2 billion pounds (1 million metric tons) ends up in the world's oceans, according to the academy's report.

41. Forsberg scores 4, leading Predators past Blue Jackets 6-0 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Filip Forsberg scored four goals and Juuse Saros made 27 saves for his first shutout of the season, leading the Nashville Predators to a 6-0 victory over the Columbus Blue Jackets on Tuesday night.

42. US jobless claims hit 52-year low after seasonal adjustments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits plummeted last week to the lowest level in more than half a century, another sign that the U.S. job market is rebounding rapidly from last year's coronavirus recession.

43. Key reason for supply shortages: Americans keep spending -

DETROIT (AP) — Take a step back from the picked-over store shelves, the stalled container ships and the empty auto showrooms, and you'll find a root cause of the shortages of just about everything.

44. Americans give bosses same message in record numbers: I quit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans quit their jobs at a record pace for the second straight month in September, in many cases for more money elsewhere as companies bump up pay to fill job openings that are close to an all-time high.

45. Japan's Toshiba spins off energy, computer device units -

TOKYO (AP) — Embattled Japanese technology conglomerate Toshiba said Friday it is restructuring to improve its competitiveness, spinning off its energy infrastructure and computer devices businesses.

46. Biden: Infrastructure bill will ease economy woes, just wait -

BALTIMORE (AP) — President Joe Biden touted his $1 trillion infrastructure plan Wednesday as an eventual fix for the nation's inflation and supply chain woes — if Americans just have the patience to wait for the construction to begin.

47. Vols welcome alumni, high-riding Dawgs for biggest game -

Most football programs schedule a downtrodden opponent for their homecoming game to celebrate an easy win. Tennessee went in the exact opposite direction this season.

The Vols (5-4, 3-3) are hosting No. 1 Georgia (9-0, 7-0) in an SEC East showdown that is attracting national media attention. The 51st meeting between the programs is the SEC on CBS game of the week at 2:30 CST, and SEC Nation will be broadcasting on-site in Knoxville.

48. US jobless claims drop to pandemic low of 267,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell to a new pandemic low 267,000 last week as the job market recovers from last year's sharp coronavirus downturn.

49. White House rushes with infrastructure fixes for US economy -

BALTIMORE (AP) — The Biden administration is relying on infrastructure dollars to help fix the clogged ports and blanket the nation with internet access — but a series of initiatives rolled out on Tuesday show that the urgent pace might not be fast enough to address the immediate needs of an economy coping with a supply chain squeeze and a shift to remote work.

50. Unemployment claims drop to 269,000, another pandemic low -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell to a fresh pandemic low last week, another sign the job market is healing after last year's coronavirus recession.

51. Titans at Rams: What to watch -

The Titans are 6-2 and in control of the AFC South, but the challenge of going forward without Derrick Henry begins Sunday night in Los Angeles. The Rams provide a stern test for a wounded Titans team, now missing its biggest piece.

52. FDA paves way for Pfizer COVID-19 vaccinations in young kids -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration on Friday paved the way for children ages 5 to 11 to get Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine.

The FDA cleared kid-size doses — just a third of the amount given to teens and adults — for emergency use, and up to 28 million more American children could be eligible for vaccinations as early as next week.

53. FDA panel backs Pfizer's low-dose COVID-19 vaccine for kids -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. moved a step closer to expanding COVID-19 vaccinations for millions more children as government advisers on Tuesday endorsed kid-size doses of Pfizer's shots for 5- to 11-year-olds.

54. Solid earnings drive US stocks further into record heights -

Stocks held on to modest gains on Wall Street Tuesday, pushing the S&P 500 and the Dow Jones Industrial Average further into record heights.

The S&P 500 added 0.2% and the Dow edged up less than 0.1%. The Nasdaq also rose less than 0.1%.

55. Higher shipping rates help UPS as Q3 results top Street -

ATLANTA (AP) — UPS' third-quarter results beat analysts' expectations, as consumers are paying higher rates to have the package delivery company fulfill their shipping needs.

Shares rose 5% before the market open on Tuesday.

56. Warmer welcome for WeWork 2 years later on Wall Street -

WeWork will become a publicly traded company Thursday after a spectacular collapse during its first attempt to do so two years ago.

WeWork is emerging more than a year into a pandemic that closed millions of square feet off office space and the hope is that a work environment turned upside down is the ideal time for a company that sells shared workspace to thrive.

57. Commerce head out to save US jobs, 1 computer chip at a time -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo only wears watches made by Bulova — a company that laid off her scientist father, closed its Rhode Island factory and moved production to China in 1983.

58. White House: LA port going 24/7 to ease shipping backlog -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House said Wednesday it has helped broker an agreement for the Port of Los Angeles to become a 24-hour, seven-days-a-week operation, part of an effort to relieve supply chain bottlenecks and move stranded container ships that are driving prices higher for U.S. consumers.

59. Companies scraping for staff ahead of the holidays -

NEW YORK (AP) — All employers want for Christmas is some holiday help. But they might not get their wish.

Companies that typically hire thousands of seasonal workers are heading into the holidays during one of the tightest job markets in decades, making it unlikely they'll find all the workers they need. For shoppers, it might mean a less than jolly holiday shopping experience, with unstaffed store aisles and online orders that take longer than usual to fill.

60. Big picture, big data: Swiss unveil VR software of universe -

LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — The final frontier has rarely seemed closer than this — at least virtually.

Researchers at one of Switzerland's top universities are releasing open-source beta software on Tuesday that allows for virtual visits through the cosmos including up to the International Space Station, past the Moon, Saturn or exoplanets, over galaxies and well beyond.

61. US unemployment claims rise third straight week to 362,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits rose for the third straight week, a sign that the highly contagious delta variant may be slowing a recovery in the job market.

62. Amazon eyes 125K more hires, $18+ per hour average salary -

Amazon wants to hire 125,000 delivery and warehouse workers and said Tuesday that it is paying new hires an average of $18 an hour in a tight job market as more people shop online.

Competition for hourly workers has become fierce, and many companies are offering higher pay, sign-on bonuses and other incentives. Last week, package delivery company UPS promised to handout job offers in 30 minutes after candidates apply for many of the 100,000 holiday workers it plans to hire.

63. Fast hiring: UPS to hire 100,000, many in 30 minutes or less -

NEW YORK (AP) — Besides packages, UPS is promising to deliver something else fast: job offers.

The package delivery company said Thursday that it plans to hire more than 100,000 people for the busy holiday shipping season, many of whom will get job offers within 30 minutes of applying.

64. EXPLAINER: What is Apple doing with its App Store? -

Over the past week or so, Apple has eased some longstanding restrictions that helped make its App Store into a big moneymaker for the company. The company has long required app developers to pay high commissions to Apple on the sales of paid apps as well as purchases of subscriptions or digital items inside their apps.

65. Pop-up restaurants might stick around as COVID sees resurgence -

Pop-up restaurants, many started as stopgap measures by struggling chefs and owners, may have staying power as consumers continue to embrace takeout and delivery and the delta variant threatens to make dining in less of an option.

66. Americans spent less in July as COVID-19 cases surged -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans cut back on their spending last month as a surge in COVID-19 cases kept people away from stores.

Retail sales fell a seasonal adjusted 1.1% in July from the month before, the U.S. Commerce Department said Tuesday. It was a much larger drop than the 0.3% decline Wall Street analysts had expected.

67. US jobless claims down 24,000 to 400,000 as economy recovers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans collecting unemployment benefits slid last week, another sign that the job market continues to recover rapidly from the coronavirus recession.

Jobless claims dropped by 24,000 to 400,000 last week, the Labor Department reported Thursday.

68. UPS earns $2.7 billion but volume dips as stores reopen -

ATLANTA (AP) — Free from the pandemic lockdowns of last year, more shoppers are venturing into stores and relying just a bit less on brown UPS trucks.

United Parcel Service said Tuesday that it earned almost $2.7 billion in the second quarter. However, domestic volume was weaker than Wall Street expected, and the company's shares tumbled nearly 7% in afternoon trading.

69. China launches 6-month campaign to clean up apps -

BEIJING (AP) — China's industry ministry has announced a 6-month campaign to clean up what it says are serious problems with internet apps violating consumer rights, cyber security and "disturbing market order."

70. Top Senate Dem sets infrastructure vote, pressures lawmakers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer is pressuring lawmakers to reach agreement by next week on a pair of massive domestic spending measures, signaling Democrats' desire to push ahead aggressively on President Joe Biden's multitrillion-dollar agenda.

71. Subsidizing spokes: Amazon to reimburse bicycling employees -

ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — First, Amazon embraced the banana stand. Now it's embracing the banana seat.

The tech company, which famously offered a free banana stand at its Seattle headquarters, is adding a new commuter benefit for its employees to encourage bicycling to work.

72. The Teamsters have a new mission: Unionize Amazon workers -

NEW YORK (AP) — One of the nation's largest union is aiming to unionize Amazon workers.

Representatives from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, a union that represents 1.4 million workers, voted on Thursday to make organizing Amazon workers a priority. That means it will create a division focused on Amazon and set aside money for the effort.

73. Teamsters aims to step up efforts to unionize Amazon workers -

NEW YORK (AP) — The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, a union that represents 1.4 million delivery workers, is setting its sights on Amazon.

On Thursday, it will vote on whether to make organizing Amazon workers its main priority. The Teamsters accuse the nation's second-largest private employer of exploiting employees by paying them low wages, pushing them to work at fast speeds and offering no job security.

74. US jobless claims tick up to 412,000 from a pandemic low -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits rose last week for the first time since April despite widespread evidence that the economy and the job market are rebounding steadily from the pandemic recession.

75. Parents should leave college loans to students -

For parents who want to make sure their children graduate college debt-free, taking out loans themselves might seem like a better option. But a recent article by The New York Times highlights the problems with the federal Parent PLUS loans that can be made without consideration of the borrower’s ability to repay, and with little protections if they can’t.

76. Automakers face a threat to EV sales: Slow charging times -

DETROIT (AP) — If the auto industry is to succeed in its bet that electric vehicles will soon dominate the roads, it will need to overcome a big reason why many people are still avoiding them: Fear of running out of juice between Point A and Point B.

77. EXPLAINER: 5 key takeaways from the May jobs report -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The American economy delivered 559,000 added jobs in May.

In ordinary times, that would amount to a blockbuster burst of hiring for one month, and the response would be an outpouring of cheers.

78. Hemp’s shaky promise -

They are located more than 2,500 miles apart. But except for their polar-opposite population bases, there are many similarities between tiny Ketchum, Idaho (2,878 residents, the latest census figures show) and Knoxville (741,000).

79. Retailer results so far show people are going out, spending -

NEW YORK (AP) — At Walmart, sales of teeth whitener are popping as customers take their masks off. So are travel items. Macy's says that special occasion dressing like prom dresses are on the upswing as well as luggage, men's tailored clothing, and dressy sandals.

80. Pekka Rinne notches shutout as Preds beat Hurricanes 5-0 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Pekka Rinne took a lap around the ice as teammates watched, tapping their sticks against the boards. The Nashville Predators surrounded their 38-year-old goalie for a group hug, and he was the last to leave the ice.

81. Pope sets 40-euro Vatican gift cap in corruption crackdown -

ROME (AP) — Pope Francis set a 40-euro ($48) gift cap for all Vatican employees Thursday and issued a new law requiring Vatican cardinals and managers to periodically report on their compliance with clean financial practices in one of his biggest efforts yet to crack down on corruption in the Holy See.

82. 5 smart ways to use your tax return on a car -

Tax season will be coming to a close later than usual this year due to the May 17 extended deadline. Until that time, you might hear advertisements from car dealerships urging you to bring in your refund or pandemic stimulus check to buy a new car. Given that the average tax refund issued in 2020 was $2,741, the IRS reports, it is a solid amount that people often use to make major purchases.

83. Girl Scout cookies take flight in Virginia drone deliveries -

Missing out on Thin Mints in the pandemic? A Google affiliate is using drones to deliver Girl Scout cookies to people's doorsteps in a Virginia community.

The town of Christiansburg has been a testing ground for commercial delivery drones operated by Wing, a subsidiary of Google's corporate parent Alphabet.

84. Stocks end a wobbly day mixed, S&P 500 still near record -

Major U.S. stock indexes ended a wobbly day mixed on Wall Street, keeping the S&P 500 near the record high it set a day earlier.

The benchmark index ended down less than one point Tuesday and the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed basically unchanged. The Nasdaq fell 0.3%.

85. Small business demand lifts UPS Q1 profit, revenue up 27% -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small businesses in the U.S. fueled demand for delivery, helping UPS post better-than-expected earnings and revenue for the first quarter of the year.

That sent the company's stock to an all-time high Tuesday.

86. Go forth and spend: Call for action closes US climate summit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — World leaders shared tales of climate-friendly breakthroughs — and feverish quests for more — to close President Joe Biden's virtual global climate summit on Friday, from Kenyans abandoning kerosene lanterns for solar to Israeli start-ups straining for more efficient storage batteries.

87. Stocks end lower after report on Biden's tax proposal -

A report that President Biden will propose a hefty tax increase on the gains wealthy individuals reap from investments triggered a stock market sell-off Thursday afternoon that left indexes broadly lower.

88. Study finds that blocking seats on planes reduces virus risk -

A new study says leaving middle seats open could give airline passengers more protection from the virus that causes COVID-19.

Researchers said the risk of passengers being exposed to the virus from an infected person on the plane could be reduced by 23% to 57% if middle seats are empty, compared with a full flight.

89. 2 new airlines await Americans looking to fly somewhere -

Americans are traveling in the greatest numbers in more than a year, and soon they will have two new leisure-oriented airlines to consider for those trips.

Both hope to draw passengers by filling in smaller strands on the spider web of airline routes crisscrossing the United States.

90. More than a half million Americans gain health coverage under Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than a half million Americans have taken advantage of the Biden administration's special health insurance sign-up window keyed to the COVID-19 pandemic, the government announced Wednesday in anticipation that even more consumers will gain coverage in the coming months.

91. Medics despair as France's 'third way' virus strategy flails -

AMIENS, France (AP) — As France battles a new virus surge that many believe was avoidable, intensive care nurse Stephanie Sannier manages her stress and sorrow by climbing into her car after a 12-hour shift, blasting music and singing as loud as she can.

92. After backlash, Delta CEO says Ga. voting law 'unacceptable' -

ATLANTA (AP) — The CEO of Georgia-based Delta Air Lines said Wednesday that the state's new election law overhaul is "unacceptable" and "based on a lie," after the company faced criticism that it didn't speak out forcefully enough in opposition to the bill when it was being considered by the state's Republican leaders.

93. WeWork stock offer comes amid doubtful need for office space -

NEW YORK (AP) — Uncertainty about demand for office space in a global pandemic is a big risk that investors will have to weigh as WeWork makes a second run at a public stock offering.

A year after the novel coronavirus turned office towers into ghost towns worldwide, the embattled communal work space company said Friday it would merge with special purposes acquisition company BowX Acquisition and seek a public listing.

94. WeWork attempts to go public again, this time through a SPAC -

NEW YORK (AP) — Nearly two years after its attempted initial public offering of shares disintegrated, WeWork is going public in a merger with a special-purpose acquisition company.

WeWork is merging with BowX Acquisition, a SPAC, in a transaction that would value the embattled communal office-space company at $9 billion plus debt, the companies said in a joint statement Friday.

95. As contact tracing ebbs in parts of US, NYC stays committed -

NEW YORK (AP) — Coronavirus contact tracing programs across the U.S. scaled back their ambitions as cases surged in winter, but New York City has leaned into its $600 million tracing initiative.

The city hired more tracers during the holiday season surge and in early March hit its goal of reaching at least 90% of people who test positive, a mark it hadn't reached since around Thanksgiving. Last week, the number hit 96%.

96. Growing number of Southern Baptist women question roles -

Emily Snook is the daughter of a Southern Baptist pastor. She met her husband, also a pastor, while they attended a Southern Baptist university

Yet the 39-year-old Oklahoma woman now finds herself wondering if it's time to leave the nation's largest Protestant denomination, in part because of practices and attitudes that limit women's roles.

97. For television, NFL deal is likely a matter of survival -

NEW YORK (AP) — The $113 billion deal to telecast NFL games through 2033 is head-swimmingly large — until you consider that the very survival of broadcast networks as we know them may depend upon it.

98. Bill to aid US publishers vs. Google, Facebook rises again -

A congressional effort to bolster U.S. news organizations in negotiations with Big Tech has supporters hoping that third time's the charm.

The bill, the Journalism Competition and Preservation Act, was introduced in March for the third time since 2018. Its odds of passage may have improved in a Democrat-run Congress that's working on overhauling antitrust laws.

99. EU regulator 'convinced' AstraZeneca benefit outweighs risk -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union's drug regulator insisted Tuesday that there is "no indication" the AstraZeneca vaccine causes blood clots as governments around the world faced the grimmest of dilemmas: push on with a vaccine known to save lives or suspend its use over reports of clotting in some recipients.

100. Stocks extend gains for fifth day, led by technology shares -

Stocks shook off an early stumble and closed broadly higher Monday, nudging some of the major U.S. indexes to more all-time highs as the market added to its recent string of gains.

The S&P 500 rose 0.7% after having been down 0.5% in the early going, extending its winning streak to a fifth day. Technology stocks, airlines, cruise operators and other companies that rely on consumer spending helped lift the market. Banks and energy stocks were the only laggards.