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Editorial Results (free)

1. 'Just too much': Meet the uber-rich who want a wealth tax -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When the grand vacation homes of Newport Beach were empty on a beautiful Memorial Day weekend, Molly Munger decided it was time for the U.S. to consider taxing wealth.

As her family's boat moved through the harbor a few years ago, Munger, whose father is a billionaire investor, saw that many of her neighbors' houses were sitting dark and vacant. She knew why: The owners now controlled enough money to holiday at one of their several other luxury homes. It didn't sit right, she said.

2. Traditional versus gig: What’s the better deal for seasonal workers? -

Want to work a second job or grab a temporary gig from mid-November through early January?

What’s the better deal, working behind the counter at a department store or grabbing a spot in an e-commence fulfillment center? Or driving for Lyft or Uber? Or plugging into some other type of gig economy slot that lets you pick and choose?

3. Need a holiday job? You’ve picked the right time & place -

For those who had their pick of seasonal jobs during the 2018 holiday season, it’s a time of glad tidings: This year the pickings are just as plentiful.

For those who are doing the hiring, it’s a time of great joy in terms of consumer enthusiasm. It’s also a great challenge to find the manpower to meet it. They are responding with flexible hours, bonuses, discounts, on-site meals and more.

4. Downtown vs. neighborhood living a tossup -

After more than a year of living downtown, and now entering a fourth month of life in a neighborhood, we ponder the question: Which is better?

It’s an issue I never would have entertained in the 1990s during my first Nashville incarnation. Downtown then was a place to work, and occasionally eat and drink, but it was not ideally equipped as a residential option.

5. Airbnb says it will go public in 2020 -

Airbnb Inc. said Thursday it plans to go public in 2020, a long-awaited move by the home-sharing company that is both loved and reviled for its disruption of the hotel business.

Airbnb disclosed the news in a brief statement. It didn't give a target date for the initial public offering or say why it thinks the timing is right. Airbnb was valued at $31 billion last year, according to Renaissance Capital, which researches IPOs.

6. CEOs speak out on gun violence, want Congressional action -

The CEOs of more than 100 companies are stepping into the nation's gun debate, imploring Congress to expand background checks and enact a strong "red flag" law.

In a letter sent to the Senate on Thursday, CEOs from businesses including Airbnb, Twitter and Uber asked Congress to pass a bill to require background checks on all gun sales and a strong red flag law that would allow courts to issue life-saving extreme risk protection orders.

7. Publix: Only officers should openly carry guns in its stores -

LAKELAND, Fla. (AP) — If you're carrying a gun, the Publix supermarket chain doesn't want to see it.

There are 46 Publix stores throughout Middle and East Tennessee.

Publix is joining a growing number of retailers in asking customers not to openly carry firearms in its stores, even if state laws allow it.

8. California Senate approves bill regulating gig economy -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The California Senate has passed a bill that would give new wage and benefit protections to workers at so-called gig economy companies like Uber and Lyft.

The 29-11 vote late Tuesday sends the bill back to the state Assembly for final approval over strident Republican opposition. Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom has said he supports it.

9. Ex-Google worker charged with stealing secrets sold to Uber -

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — A former Google engineer was charged Tuesday with stealing closely guarded secrets that he later sold to Uber as the ride-hailing service scrambled to catch up in the high-stakes race to build robotic vehicles.

10. Why many employees feel devalued even in booming job market -

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Ken White had a good job at a credit card processor for 22 years, but he was laid off in the Great Recession.

Today, at 56, White does similar work. Yet everything feels different. He's a contractor for a technology services firm that assigns him to manage tech projects for a regional bank. He's paid just two-thirds of his old salary. The bonuses and stock awards he once earned are gone.

11. Stocks stumble on trade-war worries, capping wild week -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks stumbled on Wall Street Friday, veering between modest and sharp losses, as worries flashed yet again about President Donald Trump's trade war with China. The declines bookend a wild week where markets zoomed down, up and down again as investors struggled to make sense of a trade dispute whose resolution suddenly seems much more uncertain.

12. Technology companies power broad rally for US stocks -

Technology companies powered stocks broadly higher on Wall Street Thursday, driving the S&P 500 to its best day in more than two months and erasing its losses for the week.

The rally, which pushed the Dow Jones Industrial Average up by more than 370 points, followed an early rise in bonds yields after a weekly government report on unemployment claims came in better than economists had expected.

13. Uber loses $5.24B in 2Q after post-IPO stock payouts -

NEW YORK (AP) — Uber lost $5.24 billion in the second quarter after making huge stock-based payouts in the months following its stock market debut.

The ride-hailing giant said Wednesday it paid $3.9 billion in stock-based compensation and expenses during the quarter. It also paid $298 million in stock and cash to drivers to show appreciation in connection with the IPO.

14. French wine vs US tech prowess: new Trump-Macron standoff -

PARIS (AP) — France is pushing ahead with a landmark tax on tech companies like Google and Facebook despite U.S. President Donald Trump's threats of retaliatory tariffs on French wine.

That's rattling French vintners, who sold 1.6 billion euros ($1.78 billion) worth of wine last year to American consumers. But neither Trump nor French President Emmanuel Macron appears ready to back down.

15. What’s the secret to negotiating Nashville traffic? -

It was a stupid, rookie mistake. I was downtown and decided to go somewhere. In a vehicle. At, roughly, 4:45 p.m.

I can sense your eyes rolling. What an idiot, you’re probably thinking.

16. Dining reservation app OpenTable moves into delivery -

OpenTable is getting into the food delivery business. The world's biggest online restaurant reservation service — which was founded 21 years ago — has been watching warily as more and more diners opt for delivery. Between May 2018 and May 2019, U.S. restaurant visits were flat at 23.8 billion, but deliveries rose 3% to 2 billion, according to NPD Group, a market research company.

17. Appeals court: NYC can ban ads in Uber and Lyft cars -

NEW YORK (AP) — Drivers for companies like Uber and Lyft in New York City can be banned from displaying advertisements in their vehicles, a federal appeals court said Tuesday.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the ban does not violate the First Amendment as it reversed a February 2018 lower-court decision that concluded the city could not justify its regulations.

18. Facebook's currency plan gets hostile reception in Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Under sharp criticism from senators, a Facebook executive on Tuesday defended the social network's ambitious plan to create a digital currency and pledged to work with regulators to achieve a system that protects the privacy of users' data.
"We know we need to take the time to get this right," David Marcus, the Facebook executive leading the project, told the Senate Banking Committee at a hearing.
But that message did little to assure senators. Members of both parties demanded to know why a company with massive market power and a track record of scandals should be trusted with such a far-reaching project, given the potential for fraud, abuse and criminal activity.
"Facebook is dangerous," asserted Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio, the committee's senior Democrat. Like a toddler playing with matches, "Facebook has burned down the house over and over," he told Marcus. "Do you really think people should trust you with their bank accounts and their money?"
Republican Sen. Martha McSally of Arizona said "the core issue here is trust."Users won't be able to opt out of providing their personal data when joining the new digital wallet for Libra, McSally said. "Arizonans will be more likely to be scammed" using the currency, she said. The litany of criticism came as Congress began two days of hearings on the currency planned by Facebook, to be called Libra. Also Tuesday, a House Judiciary subcommittee was extending its bipartisan investigation of the market power of Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple.
On the defensive from bursts of aggressive questioning, Marcus indicated the currency plan is a work in progress. "We will take the time" to ensure the network won't be open to use by criminals and illicit activity like money laundering and financial fraud. "We hope that we'll avoid conflicts of interest. We have a lot of work to do," Marcus said.
The grilling followed a series of negative comments and warnings about the Libra plan in recent days from President Donald Trump, his treasury secretary and the head of the Federal Reserve.
But some senators emphasized the potential positive benefits of Facebook's plan, meant to bring money transacting at low cost to millions around the globe who don't have bank accounts. Facebook had its strong defenders of the project, too, on the panel.
"To strangle this baby in the crib is wildly premature," said Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa.
In that vein, Marcus said Libra "is about developing a safe, secure and low-cost way for people to move money efficiently around the world. We believe that Libra can make real progress toward building a more inclusive financial infrastructure."
The planned digital currency is to be a blend of multiple currencies, so that its value will fluctuate in any given local currency. Because Libra will be backed by a reserve, and because the group of companies managing it will encourage a competitive system of exchanges, the project leaders say, "anyone with Libra has a high degree of assurance they can sell it for local (sovereign) currency based on an exchange rate."
Promising low fees, the new currency system could open online commerce to millions of people around the world who lack access to bank accounts and make it cheaper to send money across borders. But it also raises concerns over the privacy of users' data and the potential for criminals to use it for money laundering and fraud.
To address privacy concerns, Facebook created a nonprofit oversight association, with dozens of partners including PayPal, Uber, Spotify, Visa and MasterCard, to govern Libra. As one among many in the association, Facebook says it won't have any special rights or privileges. It also created a "digital wallet" subsidiary, Calibra, to work on the technology, separately from its main social media business. While Facebook owns and controls Calibra, it won't see financial data from it, the company says.
Senators demanded to know exactly what that separation will entail.
"Facebook isn't a company; it's a country," said Sen. John Kennedy, R-La. Kennedy and other conservative senators took the occasion to air long-standing grievances against Facebook, Twitter and Google for a perceived bias against conservative views.
Facebook's currency proposal has also faced heavy skepticism from the Trump administration.
Trump tweeted last week that the new currency, Libra, "will have little standing or dependability." Both Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Fed Chair Jerome Powell have expressed serious concerns recently that Libra could be used for illicit activity.
The Treasury Department has "very serious concerns that Libra could be misused by money launderers and terrorist financers," Mnuchin told reporters at the White House on Monday. "This is indeed a national security issue."
Facebook has "a lot of work to do before we get to the point where we're comfortable with it," Mnuchin said.

...

19. VW, Ford broaden alliance to autonomous, electric vehicles -

NEW YORK (AP) — Volkswagen will sink $2.6 billion into a Pittsburgh autonomous vehicle company that's mostly owned by Ford as part of a broader partnership on electric and self-driving vehicles, the companies confirmed Friday.

20. France adopts pioneering tax on tech giants after US threat -

PARIS (AP) — France on Thursday adopted a pioneering tax on internet giants like Google, Amazon and Facebook despite U.S. threats of new tariffs on French imports if Paris went ahead with the plan.

21. BMW CEO to quit after carmaker loses early lead in electrics -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — BMW CEO Harald Krueger is stepping down after a four-year tenure in which the automaker lost its lead in luxury car sales and saw an early head start in electric vehicles evaporate.

22. S&P 500 index closes at record high as stock rally continues -

Wall Street capped a broad rally for stocks Thursday by driving the S&P 500 index to an all-time high.

The milestone, which eclipsed the benchmark index's last record close on April 30, underscores a swift rebound for the market in June that has erased the losses from a 6.6% dive in May. The major U.S. stock indexes are up more than 7% so far this month.

23. Nissan, Renault team with Waymo on robotaxis outside US -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Self-driving car pioneer Waymo is teaming up with automakers Renault and Nissan to make its first journey outside the U.S. with a ride-hailing service that will dispatch a fleet of robotaxis in France and Japan.

24. Slack is latest tech company to go public, with a twist -

NEW YORK (AP) — Shares of work messaging platform Slack are expected to start trading on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker "WORK."

The San Francisco company is set to start trading Thursday in what's known as a direct listing.

25. Facebook's currency Libra faces financial, privacy pushback -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook is getting a taste of the regulatory pushback it will face as it creates a new digital currency with corporate partners.

Just hours after the social media giant unveiled early plans for the Libra cryptocurrency, French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire insisted that only governments can issue sovereign currencies. He said Facebook must ensure that Libra won't hurt consumers or be used for illegal activities.

26. Nissan, Renault team with Waymo on robotaxis outside US -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Self-driving car pioneer Waymo is teaming up with automakers Renault and Nissan to make its first journey outside the U.S. with a ride-hailing service that will dispatch a fleet of robotaxis in France and Japan.

27. Facebook plans its own currency for 2 billion-plus users -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook already rules daily communication for more than two billion people around the world. Now it wants its own currency, too.

The social network unveiled an ambitious plan Tuesday to create a new digital currency similar to Bitcoin for global use, one that could drive more e-commerce on its services and boost ads on its platforms.

28. Uber, Lyft suggest changes but want drivers as contractors -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft say they are willing to change the way they treat drivers in California as long as state lawmakers don't require them to classify drivers as employees, a move that would entitle them to a wide range of benefits.

29. Stocks fizzle after early gains, suffer 1st loss in 6 days -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks fell Tuesday for the first time in six days after the recent upward momentum gave way to lingering concerns about the U.S. trade war with China.

Defense contractors suffered steep declines and technology stocks gave up most of their early gains, taking the steam out of an early rally on Wall Street. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed with a loss of 14 points after rising as many as 186 in the morning.

30. Amazon to shutdown US restaurant delivery service -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon is closing its U.S. restaurant delivery service, a 4-year-old business that failed to take off amid fierce competition from Uber Eats, Door Dash and others.

The service, called Amazon Restaurants, offered delivery in more than 20 cities in the U.S. It was expanded into the United Kingdom, but Amazon shut it down late last year.

31. US stocks muster slight gains after listless day of trading -

Major U.S. stock indexes capped a day of listless trading with modest gains Thursday, snapping the market's two-day losing streak.

A late flurry of buying helped lift the indexes, which had spent much of the day moving sideways after an early rally lost momentum. Even so, the market remained on track for its fourth straight weekly loss and its first monthly decline of the year.

32. Waymo bringing self-driving trucks to Phoenix area freeways -

PHOENIX (AP) — Google's self-driving vehicle division says it's bringing autonomous trucks to the Phoenix area.

Waymo announced Wednesday that its self-driving tractor-trailers will start driving on freeways this week and will expand to more routes over time.

33. Waymo bringing self-driving trucks to Phoenix area freeways -

PHOENIX (AP) — Google's self-driving vehicle division says it's bringing autonomous trucks to the Phoenix area.

Waymo announced Wednesday that its fully self-driving tractor-trailers will start driving on freeways this week and will expand to more routes over time.

34. Uber to boot riders from app if they repeatedly misbehave -

If you misbehave repeatedly while getting a ride from Uber, you could get booted off the app.

The company said that starting Wednesday, riders with a rating from drivers that's significantly below average could lose their ability to ride.

35. Trump's escalating trade war sends stocks plunging -

The Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged more than 600 points Monday as investors sought shelter from an escalating trade war between the U.S. and China.

The selling was widespread and heavy, handing the benchmark S&P 500 index its biggest loss since January. The sell-off extended the market's slide into a second week. The losses so far in May have now erased the market's gains from April.

36. Uber, Lyft losses keep competitors at bay -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A fare war between Uber and Lyft has led to billions of dollars in losses for both ride-hailing companies as they fight for passengers and drivers.

But in one way it has been good for investors who snatched up the newly public companies' stock: The losses have scared off the competition, giving the leaders a duopoly in almost every American city.

37. San Francisco may ban police, city use of facial recognition -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco is on track to become the first U.S. city to ban the use of facial recognition by police and other city agencies, reflecting a growing backlash against a technology that's creeping into airports, motor vehicle departments, stores, stadiums and home security cameras.

38. Uber begins trading nearly 7% below its IPO price -

NEW YORK (AP) — Uber began trading as a public company at $42 per share Friday, nearly 7% below its initial public offering price on an already volatile day for the markets.

The ride-hailing giant priced shares in the IPO Thursday at $45 each, raising $8.1 billion and giving the company a valuation of $82 billion.

39. US stocks slide as modest rally fades ahead of trade talks -

A modest rally faded in the last few minutes of trading on Wall Street, leaving stocks slightly lower Wednesday ahead of the latest round of trade talks between the U.S. and China.

The late-afternoon reversal added to the market's losses following a steep sell-off a day earlier as investors worry that the costly trade dispute between the world's two biggest economies will escalate.

40. Toyota reports dip in quarterly profit, projects recovery -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan's top automaker Toyota said Wednesday its profit for January-March fell 4% as vehicle sales lagged in North America, while smaller car manufacturer Honda reported a loss.

Toyota Motor Corp. recorded a quarterly profit of 459.5 billion yen, or $4.2 billion, down from 480.8 billion yen in the same period the previous year. Quarterly sales rose 2% to 7.75 trillion yen ($70 billion), the company said.

41. Uber, Lyft drivers protest across the US, overseas -

NEW YORK (AP) — Some drivers for ride-hailing giants Uber and Lyft turned off their apps Wednesday to protest what they say are declining wages at a time when both companies are raking in billions of dollars from investors.

42. US stocks close higher as S&P 500, Nasdaq hit new highs -

Wall Street capped a week of milestones by delivering a couple more Friday.

A late-afternoon burst of buying lifted the major U.S. stock indexes, which had spent much of the day in a sideways drift. The gains nudged the benchmark S&P 500 index and Nasdaq composite to new closing highs for the second time this week. Both indexes also set record highs on Tuesday.

43. Uber looks to raise up to $9B in initial public offering -

NEW YORK (AP) — Uber is planning to sell 180 million shares for between $44 and $50 each, valuing the ride-hailing giant lower than previous estimates in a sign of caution.

That would raise up to $9 billion for the San Francisco-based company, valuing Uber at an estimated $80.5 billion to $91.5 billion, compared with prior estimates that were as high as $120 billion.

44. Tesla CEO heads down perilous road in pursuit of profit -

Tesla has lost nearly $6 billion since setting out to revolutionize the auto industry 15 years ago, but CEO Elon Musk foresees a profitable future fueled in part by a ride-hailing service made up of electric cars driven by robots.

45. Tesla CEO plans to hand the car keys to robots next year -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Tesla CEO Elon Musk expects to start converting the company's electric cars into fully self-driving vehicles next year as part of an audacious plan to create a network of robotic taxis to compete against Uber and other ride-hailing services.

46. Tesla gears up for fully self-driving cars amid skepticism -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Tesla CEO Elon Musk appears poised to transform the company's electric cars into driverless vehicles in a risky bid to realize a bold vision that he has been floating for years.

47. Toyota, SoftBank fund, Denso invest $1 billion in Uber -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan's top automaker Toyota, auto parts maker Denso and internet company SoftBank's investment fund are investing $1 billion in car-sharing Uber's technology unit.

48. IPO mania: Zoom zooms, Pinterest pins down Wall Street -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — There's some tech jubilance in the air on Wall Street and in Silicon Valley as a pair of newly public companies — Zoom and Pinterest — saw their stocks soar on their first trading day.

49. As cashless stores grow, so does the backlash -

NEW YORK (AP) — Hembert Figueroa just wanted a taco. So he was surprised to learn the dollar bills in his pocket were no good at Dos Toros Taqueria in Manhattan, one of a small but growing number of establishments across the U.S. where customers can only pay by card or smartphone.

50. Uber reveals strong growth, huge losses ahead of IPO -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Uber is providing a look under the hood of its business in the lead-up to its hotly anticipated debut on the stock market, revealing strong growth but an ongoing struggle to overcome huge losses and repair its reputation.

51. Stocks struggle to a mixed finish after early rally sputters -

The major U.S. stock indexes closed unevenly Thursday after an early rally gave way to a mostly sideways day of trading on Wall Street.

Losses in health care stocks mostly offset gains in industrial companies, banks and elsewhere in the market. Insurers UnitedHealth Group and Anthem led the sector's slide. Technology stocks also fell.

52. Homebuying guide needs update for Nashville market -

The National Association of Realtors provides a simple 12-step guide for prospective homebuyers through its HomeLogic.com website. It’s fine, so far as it goes.

53. Retailers try to lure customers with free Uber rides -

NEW YORK (AP) — While shoppers are getting everything from morning coffee to complete work wardrobes delivered to their homes, some businesses are working with ride-hailing company Uber to entice customers back through their doors.

54. Pinterest sets conservative pricing after Lyft drop -

NEW YORK (AP) — Pinterest, among the gaggle of tech companies hoping to go public this year, set a conservative price range Monday for its initial public offering. It hopes to raise as much as $1.5 billion in its initial offering of shares.

55. IPWhoa: What to know before joining this year's IPO wave -

We use Uber to go places, Slack to chat with co-workers and Pinterest to save our favorite ideas. Why not own a piece of these companies that increasingly dominate our daily lives?

That's the question for many regular investors as a parade of well-known technology companies are expected to make their stocks available to everyone for purchase this year, not just big pension funds and wealthy people. Lyft was at the head of the line when it had its initial public offering of stock, or IPO, on Friday.

56. US stocks post solid finish on encouraging economic data -

Stocks closed solidly higher on Wall Street Monday after a batch of encouraging global economic data kept investors in a buying mood.

Financial and technology companies powered much of the rally, which extended the market's gains from last week, when the benchmark S&P 500 closed out its best quarter in nearly a decade.

57. S&P 500 posts biggest quarterly gain in a decade; Lyft soars -

Stocks finished broadly higher on Friday as Wall Street closed out the first quarter with the market's biggest gain in nearly a decade.

The benchmark S&P 500 index is now up 13.1 percent this year, a drastic turnaround for stocks after a jarring 14 percent sell-off in the last three months of 2018.

58. Investors hail Lyft shares in IPO, see profits down the road -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Lyft's shares soared as the company went public Friday, giving investors their first chance to bet on the future of the ride-hailing industry.

The stock opened at $87.24, up 21 percent from its offering price of $72. It closed at $78.29, up 8.7 percent, giving the company a $27 billion valuation.

59. Ride-hailing giants face bumpy road to profitability -

NEW YORK (AP) — Ride-hailing giants Uber and Lyft have redefined what we expect from transportation, hooking customers on the immediacy of on-demand rides with a few clicks on a smartphone.

But whether the companies can turn their popularity into profits is a question investors are asking as both companies prepare to offer shares to the public.

60. Embrace tourists, conventioneers for night in tourist district -

In this current world of deep divides, I’m going to try to bridge the gap a little bit. I’m not getting into politics, but I will admit that this is a little bit of an “us and them” proposition.

61. Uber acquires Mideast competitor Careem for $3.1 billion -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Ride-hailing service Uber announced on Tuesday it has acquired Mideast competitor Careem for $3.1 billion, giving the San Francisco-based firm the commanding edge in a region with a large, young, tech-savvy population.

62. BMW warns profits will fall due to costs, trade uncertainty -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — German automaker BMW said Wednesday that profits in 2019 would be "well below" last year's and that it planned to cut 12 billion euros ($13.6 billion) in costs by the end of 2022 to offset spending on new technology.

63. Lyft opens up its IPO road show, offers 30 million shares -

NEW YORK (AP) — Lyft officially kicked off the road show for its initial public offering, putting 30 million shares up for sale Monday with an anticipated price of between $62 and $68 per share.

64. Facebook's messaging ambitions amount to much more than chat -

Facebook, already the leader in enabling you to share photos, videos and links, now wants to be a force in messaging, commerce, payments and just about everything else you do online.

The company's ambitions harken to how WeChat has become the centerpiece of digital life in China, where people use it to order movie tickets, subway passes, food delivery and rides. If Facebook succeeds in turning its own messaging services into a platform for everything, it could ultimately threaten established services such as Snapchat, Yelp, Venmo, eBay and even Apple and Amazon.

65. Google paid former exec $35 million after harassment claim -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google paid former search executive Amit Singhal $35 million in an exit package when he was reportedly forced to resign after a sexual assault investigation, according to court documents released Monday.

66. Facebook's vision of future? Looks like Chinese app WeChat -

LONDON (AP) — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is taking the social media company in a new direction by focusing on messaging. Chinese tech giant Tencent got there years ago with its app WeChat.

Zuckerberg outlined his vision to give people ways to communicate privately, by stitching together Facebook's various services so users can contact each other across all of the apps.

67. France unveils plan to tax internet giants -

PARIS (AP) — The French government on Wednesday unveiled plans to slap a 3 percent tax on the French revenues of internet giants like Google, Amazon and Facebook.

The bill is an attempt to get around tax avoidance measures by multinationals, which pay most of their taxes in the EU country they are based in — often at very low rates. That effectively means the companies pay next to no tax in countries where they have large operations.

68. Autonomous car testing plan aims to boost public confidence -

PITTSBURGH (AP) — Companies testing autonomous vehicles in Pittsburgh will have to immediately report crashes resulting in any injuries as part of new guidelines announced Monday intended to boost public confidence in the testing after a deadly accident in Arizona last year.

69. Lyft reveals big growth but no profits as it readies for IPO -

NEW YORK (AP) — Lyft revealed that it is growing quickly ahead of its initial public offering but continues to bleed money and may struggle to turn a profit, according to a federal filing.

The company released its financial details for the first time on Friday, giving the public a glimpse into its performance before deciding whether to buy into the ride-hailing phenomenon.

70. Lyft reveals financial details ahead of its IPO -

NEW YORK (AP) — Ride-hailing giant Lyft is releasing financial details about the company in a federal filing before it begins selling its stock to the public.

The company said its revenue grew from $343.3 million in 2016 to $1.1 billion in 2017 and $2.2 billion in 2018, representing year-over-year growth rates of 209 percent and 103 percent respectively.

71. BMW, Daimler team up on automated driving technology -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — BMW and Daimler announced Thursday they will work together on developing the automated driving technology expected to transform the industry in the years ahead as automakers try to fend off competition from tech companies such as Uber and Waymo.

72. Google to end forced arbitration for all worker disputes -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google said Thursday it will no longer require that its workers settle disputes with the company through arbitration, responding to months of pressure from employees.

The change will take effect March 21 and will apply to current and future employees. Employees that have settled past disputes won't be able to re-open their cases.

73. BMW, Daimler: You can trust us with car-sharing data -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Automakers Daimler and BMW say that trustworthy handling of personal data will be a key competitive advantage in their new joint venture that offers app-based services like free-floating car-sharing in big cities.

74. Why must we fix problems caused by scooters? -

The Vanderbilt trauma surgeon neatly put his finger on what, to me, was the real puzzler for the evening:

“I can’t wrap my head around this, that all of a sudden we’ve decided scooters are great transportation,” said the surgeon, Dr. Oscar D. Guillamondegui.

75. Retailers are shopping for ways to get rid of checkout lines -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Get ready to say good riddance to the checkout line.

A year after Amazon opened its first cashier-less store, startups and retailers are racing to get similar technology in stores throughout the world, letting shoppers buy groceries without waiting in line.

76. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for December 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, December 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

77. From travel to IPOs, how shutdown is upsetting US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Delta Air Lines can't get eight new aircraft in the air. Roughly a million government employees and contractors aren't being paid. Some Americans who are trying to start small businesses face delays in obtaining the required tax identification number from the IRS.

78. VW, Ford team up on pickups, explore deal on electrics -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Volkswagen and Ford are forming a global alliance to develop commercial vans and medium-sized pickups together while exploring broader cooperation on future battery-powered and autonomous vehicles and services.

79. Did 2018 usher in a creeping tech dystopia? -

We may remember 2018 as the year when technology's dystopian potential became clear, from Facebook's role enabling the harvesting of our personal data for election interference to a seemingly unending series of revelations about the dark side of Silicon Valley's connect-everything ethos.

80. Uber resumes autonomous vehicle tests in Pittsburgh -

PITTSBURGH (AP) — Uber is resuming autonomous vehicle tests in an area near downtown Pittsburgh.

The restart Thursday comes just over nine months after one of its autonomous cars struck and killed a pedestrian in Arizona. Testing has been suspended since the accident in March.

81. Kroger, Nuro bringing unmanned delivery to customers -

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP) — Deliveries from an Arizona grocery store will soon be arriving with no one behind the wheel.

A fully autonomous vehicle is about to pilot public roads Tuesday with no back up driver, though it will be monitored by humans in another automobile.

82. Lyft aims to beat Uber to US stock market with IPO -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Lyft still hasn't caught up to Uber in the rapidly growing ride-hailing market, but it's ahead in the race to sell its stock on the public market where the two companies could potentially raise billions to help finance their expansion.

83. Hailing the future taxi: Drone-car mashup model takes flight -

AMSTERDAM (AP) — A scale model of a flying drone-car drove and hovered across an Amsterdam exhibition hall Tuesday, providing a glimpse of what could be the future of urban mobility.

The "Pop.Up Next" prototype drone, being developed by aviation giant Airbus, automaker Audi and the Italdesign design house is made up of three separate modules — a chassis with wheels, a two-seat capsule for passengers and a four-rotor drone. The concept has been shown before, but a one-quarter-size scale model made its maiden public flight at the Amsterdam Drone Week convention.

84. Uber fined nearly $1.2 million by Dutch, UK over data breach -

LONDON (AP) — The ride-hailing service Uber has been fined the equivalent of nearly $1.2 million by British and Dutch authorities for failing to protect customers' data during a cyberattack in 2016.

85. Ford buys electric scooter sharing company Spin -

NEW YORK (AP) — Ford Motor Co. has bought an electric scooter sharing company, expanding its presence in alternative modes of transportation.

86. Google reforms sexual misconduct rules -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google is promising to be more forceful and open about its handling of sexual misconduct cases, a week after high-paid engineers and others walked out in protest over its male-dominated culture.

87. Lyft, Uber offering free, discounted rides to polls -

NEW YORK (AP) — Ride-share companies are capitalizing on voter enthusiasm ahead of Tuesday's midterm elections by offering free or discounted rides to the polls in shared cars, bikes and scooters.

They say they are aiming to remove what many consider a barrier to voting: lack of transportation.

88. Lady Vols lean on togetherness to rebuild -

If they’re heading to the gym for some extra work, they always have a few teammates tagging along. If they need a ride to the store, they just text a teammate instead of using an Uber. If they hit the floor during practice, they can depend on a teammate to extend a helping hand.

89. Desperately seeking holiday workers -

Every holiday season has its “must-have” toy or gift item that tops the shopping list.

This year it’s workers, as retail and support industries struggle with a tight labor market to find enough employees to serve holiday shoppers and revelers.

90. Saudi investment forum opens, clouded by writer's death -

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia (AP) — A high-profile economic forum in Saudi Arabia began on Tuesday in Riyadh, with the crown prince making a brief public appearance at the kingdom's first major event since the killing of writer Jamal Khashoggi at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul earlier this month.

91. Report: Uber IPO could put company value at $120 billion -

NEW YORK (AP) — Uber may put forth an initial public offering early next year that values the ride-hailing business at as much as $120 billion, according to a media report.

The Wall Street Journal said Tuesday that Uber Technologies Inc. received valuation proposals from Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley. There is no guarantee Uber will fetch that valuation, or go public soon.

92. Global business leaders suspend ties with Saudi Arabia -

LONDON (AP) — Global business leaders are reassessing their ties with Saudi Arabia, stoking pressure on the Gulf kingdom to explain what happened to a dissident writer who disappeared after visiting its consulate in Istanbul.

93. Google's Waze expands carpooling service throughout US -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google will begin offering its pay-to-carpool service throughout the U.S., an effort to reduce the commute-time congestion that its popular Waze navigation app is designed to avoid.

94. Toyota, SoftBank setting up mobility services joint venture -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan's No. 1 automaker Toyota Motor and technology giant SoftBank Group are setting up a joint venture to create mobility services in what they called a "united Japan" effort to face global competition.

95. GM, Honda team to produce self-driving vehicles -

General Motors and Honda are teaming up on self-driving vehicle technology as big automakers and tech giants race to develop the next generation of personal transportation.

Japan's Honda Motor Co. will invest $2.75 billion in the autonomous vehicle unit run by General Motors Co., called GM Cruise, which is considered a leader in the nascent industry.

96. Tennessee to receive $1.7M from Uber data breach settlement -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee's attorney general says the state will receive a $1.7 million share from a $148 million nationwide settlement with Uber over its data breach.

Attorney General Herbert Slatery's office says the money will be put in the state's general fund.

97. Tennessee to receive $1.7M from Uber data breach settlement -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee's attorney general says the state will receive a $1.7 million share from a $148 million nationwide settlement with Uber over its data breach.

Attorney General Herbert Slatery's office says the money will be put in the state's general fund.

98. Uber agrees to $148M settlement with states over data breach -

CHICAGO (AP) — Uber has agreed to pay $148 million and take steps to tighten data security, after the ride-hailing company failed for a year to notify drivers that hackers had stolen their personal information.

99. Private sector advances -

The private sector has seen the need for ramped-up senior transportation options and is engaging at the national, regional and local levels.

For instance, Uber has introduced Uber Health, a subset of its platform that will let health care providers and organizations order rides for patients to and from a health care location. According to Uber, it will allow for advance scheduling, access for patients who do not have smartphones since it’s text-based, and it will be HIPAA compliant.

100. Seniors struggle to get on board transportation revolution -

There’s no getting around the fact that Tennessee’s senior citizens are having trouble getting around.

Not simply in terms of physical mobility; a decrease in that happens to most everyone as they age. The problem facing Tennessee, especially in its rural communities, is a lack of transportation options for the aging and elderly, especially those who live alone.