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Editorial Results (free)

1. USDA getting tougher on salmonella in chicken products -

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — The federal government on Monday announced proposed new regulations that would force food processors to reduce the amount of salmonella bacteria found in some raw chicken products or risk being shut down.

2. EXPLAINER: Twitter, Musk and the Delaware Chancery Court -

DOVER, Del. (AP) — Elon Musk's attempt to delay a lawsuit filed against him by Twitter after he tried to walk away from a $44 billion agreement to buy the company has failed. On Tuesday, a Delaware judge ordered an expedited trial citing the "cloud of uncertainty" over the social media platform.

3. Smithfield Foods settles pork price-fixing lawsuit for $42M -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Smithfield Foods will pay restaurants and caterers $42 million to settle a lawsuit that accused the giant meat producer of conspiring to inflate pork prices, which will likely only add to concerns about how the lack of competition in the industry affects meat prices.

4. Report criticizes meat industry, USDA response to pandemic -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — At the height of the pandemic, the meat processing industry worked closely with political appointees in the Trump administration to stave off health restrictions and keep slaughterhouses open even as COVID-19 spread rapidly among workers, according to a Congressional report released Thursday.

5. Companies revert to more normal operations as COVID wanes -

NEW YORK (AP) — For the first time in two years for many people, the American workplace is transforming into something that resembles pre-pandemic days.

Tyson Foods said Tuesday it was ending mask requirements for its vaccinated workers in some facilities. Walmart and Amazon — the nation's No. 1 and 2 largest private employers respectively — will no longer require fully vaccinated workers to don masks in stores or warehouses unless required under local or state laws. Tech companies like Microsoft and Facebook that had allowed employees to work fully remote are now setting mandatory dates to return to the office after a series of fits and starts.

6. Why can’t I find what I want at the grocery? -

Maybe by the time you read this, toaster strudels and refrigerated crescent roll dough will be for sale at the grocery store. Rice Krispies, Shake-n-Bake, chips and juice boxes might be reliably available to shoppers. Possibly you’ll have all kinds of choices in frozen entrees.

7. Soaring prices a heavy burden for consumers as holidays near -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A worsening surge of inflation for such bedrock necessities as food, rent, autos and heating oil is setting Americans up for a financially difficult Thanksgiving and holiday shopping season.

8. Meatpacker Tyson: Mandate led 96% of workers to get vaccine -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Meatpacking giant Tyson Foods says more than 96% of its workers have been vaccinated ahead of the company's Nov. 1 deadline for them to do so.

The company based in Springdale, Arkansas, said the number of its 120,000 workers who have been vaccinated has nearly doubled since it announced its mandate on Aug. 3. At that point, only 50% of Tyson workers had been vaccinated.

9. Ammonia release at chicken processing plant investigated -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Officials are investigating a release of toxic ammonia gas at a Middle Tennessee chicken processing plant that led to the evacuation of more than 200 residents.

Fire officials said the gas leak at a Tyson Foods facility in Goodlettsville early Sunday was found by an overnight worker who alerted others at the industrial complex near the intersection of U.S. Highway 41 and Interstate 65, The Tennessean reported.

10. Tyson Foods workers get paid sick leave; 75% vaccinated -

NEW YORK (AP) — Tyson Foods is offering its front-line workers paid sick leave for the first time, part of an agreement that secured union support for its mandate that all U.S. employees get vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus.

11. Poll: Half of US workers favor employee shot mandate -

NEW YORK (AP) — Half of American workers are in favor of vaccine requirements at their workplaces, according to a new poll, at a time when such mandates gain traction following the federal government's full approval of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine.

12. Stocks end a wobbly day lower, edging below recent records -

Stocks ended a wobbly day mostly lower on Wall Street Monday, with energy companies logging some of the biggest losses as oil prices took another turn lower.

The S&P 500 index fell 0.1% and the Nasdaq rose 0.2%.

13. Fauci hopeful COVID vaccines get full OK by FDA within weeks -

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — The U.S. government's top infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, said Sunday that he was hopeful the Food and Drug Administration will give full approval to the coronavirus vaccine by month's end and predicted the potential move will spur a wave of vaccine mandates in the private sector as well as schools and universities.

14. Students ask Supreme Court to block college vaccine mandate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is being asked to block a plan by Indiana University to require students and employees to get vaccinated against COVID-19. It's the first time the high court has been asked to weigh in on a vaccine mandate and comes as some corporations, states and cities are also contemplating or have adopted vaccine requirements for workers or even to dine indoors.

15. United Airlines will require US employees to be vaccinated -

United Airlines will require employees in the U.S. to be vaccinated against COVID-19 by late October, perhaps sooner, joining a growing number of big corporations that are responding to a surge in virus cases.

16. Tyson Foods, Microsoft to require vaccination for US workers -

ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — Tyson Foods will require all of its U.S. employees to get vaccinated against COVID-19, becoming one of the first major employers of front-line workers to do so amid a resurgence of the virus.

17. New US rules to protect animal farmers expected soon -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — The Biden administration plans to issue a new rule to protect the rights of farmers who raise cows, chickens and hogs against the country's largest meat processors as part of a plan to encourage more competition in the agriculture sector.

18. Rising commodities costs hit Americans at home and on road -

NEW YORK (AP) — Rising prices for a variety of commodities are contributing to a jump in prices at the consumer level, with Americans paying more for meat, gasoline, items they keep in their homes and even the homes themselves.

19. Tyson raising pay to keep up as US chicken demand soars -

Tyson Foods says it's raising wages to combat absenteeism and worker turnover at its plants as U.S. demand for chicken soars.

The Springdale, Arkansas-based company, which processes 20% of U.S. beef, chicken and pork, said Monday that absentee rates are around 50% higher than they were before the pandemic.

20. A jab on the job: Companies, unions offer COVID-19 vaccines -

Marie Watson wanted to be among the first in line when she and other essential workers became eligible for the coronavirus vaccine — and with good reason.

21. PepsiCo goes Beyond Meat in new partnership -

PepsiCo and Beyond Meat are creating a joint venture to develop snacks and drinks made from plant-based proteins.

The companies didn't reveal what kinds of products they will make Tuesday, saying they're still in development.

22. Tyson suspends Iowa plant managers amid virus betting claim -

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Tyson Foods suspended top officials at its largest pork plant on Thursday and launched an investigation into allegations that they bet on how many workers would get infected during a widespread coronavirus outbreak.

23. Pilgrim's Pride reaches plea deal on chicken price-fixing -

Pilgrim's Pride Corp. has reached a plea agreement with the U.S. government over charges of price-fixing in the chicken industry.

24. Is your workplace a COVID-19 risk? -

Since the coronavirus pandemic first surfaced in Tennessee in March, monthly worker complaints to occupational safety and health regulators have more than doubled, with 1,000 complaints so far showing a possible connection to COVID-19.

25. Tyson Foods to open medical clinics at some meat plants -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Tyson Foods is planning to open medical clinics at several of its U.S. plants to improve the health of its workers and better protect them from the coronavirus.

The Springdale, Arkansas-based company, which processes about 20% of all beef, pork and chicken in the U.S., said its plan to open the clinics near its plants was in the works before the coronavirus struck this year, but that they will undoubtedly help the company respond to the pandemic.

26. As Trump urges reopening, thousands getting sick on the job -

NEW YORK (AP) — Even as President Donald Trump urges getting people back to work and reopening the economy, an Associated Press analysis shows thousands of people are getting sick from COVID-19 on the job.

27. 'It's gone haywire': When COVID-19 arrived in rural America -

DAWSON, Ga. (AP) — The reverend approached the makeshift pulpit and asked the Lord to help him make some sense of the scene before him: two caskets, side by side, in a small-town cemetery busier now than ever before.

28. Meatpackers cautiously reopen plants amid coronavirus fears -

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — A South Dakota pork processing plant took its first steps toward reopening Monday after being shuttered for over two weeks because of a coronavirus outbreak that infected more than 800 employees.

29. It keeps getting worse for imperiled airlines -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Monday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

30. Pork producer says it needs flexibility on virus guidelines -

O'FALLON, Mo. (AP) — The world's largest pork producer told a judge in Missouri on Thursday that it was working as quickly as it can to comply with federal guidelines that seek to slow the spread of the coronavirus but that it needs some flexibility in an industry where people typically work side by side.

31. Trump order keeping meat packing plants open worries unions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump took executive action to order meat processing plants to stay open amid concerns over growing coronavirus cases and the impact on the nation's food supply.

The order signed Tuesday uses the Defense Production Act to classify meat processing as critical infrastructure to try to prevent a shortage of chicken, pork and other meat on supermarket shelves. Unions fired back, saying the White House was jeopardizing lives and prioritizing cold cuts over workers' health.

32. Trump to sign order keeping meat processing plants open -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump will sign an executive order Tuesday meant to stave off a shortage of chicken, pork and other meat on American supermarket shelves because of the coronavirus.

33. Virus is expected to reduce meat selection, raise prices -

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Meat isn't going to disappear from supermarkets because of outbreaks of the coronavirus among workers at U.S. slaughterhouses. But as the meat plants struggle to remain open, consumers could face less selection and slightly higher prices.

34. Tyson Foods idling its largest pork plant amid Iowa outbreak -

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Tyson Foods suspended operations Wednesday at an Iowa plant that is critical to the nation's pork supply but had been devastated by a growing coronavirus outbreak.

The company said that the indefinite closure of the Waterloo, Iowa, pork plant would deny a vital market to hog farmers and further disrupt the nation's meat supply. Tyson had kept the facility, its largest pork plant, open in recent days over the objections of the mayor and local elected officials.

35. New Trump advisory groups to consult on reopening US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Tuesday that he's enlisting advisers from nearly all sectors of American commerce, the medical field and elected office to help shape his plans to reopen the coronavirus-battered economy.

36. Virus closes some meat plants, raising fears of shortages -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Some massive meat processing plants have closed at least temporarily because their workers were sickened by the new coronavirus, raising concerns that there could soon be shortages of beef, pork and poultry in supermarkets.

37. The other fake meat: Impossible Foods unveils pork, sausage -

After a big year for its plant-based burger, Impossible Foods has something new on its plate.

The California-based company unveiled Impossible Pork and Impossible Sausage on Monday evening at the CES gadget show in Las Vegas.

38. US chickens headed to China after Beijing lifts 5-year ban -

WASHINGTON (AP) — China is lifting a five-year ban on U.S. poultry, a goodwill gesture at a time when the world’s two biggest economies are trying to finalize a tentative trade deal.

China had blocked U.S. poultry imports a month after an outbreak of avian influenza in December 2014, closing off a market that bought more than $500 million worth of American chicken, turkey and other poultry products in 2013.

39. S&P 500 ekes out record high after listless day of trading -

A day of listless trading on Wall Street ended Thursday with another record high for the S&P 500.

The benchmark index notched its third consecutive gain after spending most of the day wavering between small gains and losses. The Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq composite also budged little, capping the day with miniscule drops.

40. Pence asks Tennesseans to support Mexico-Canada trade deal -

GOODLETTSVILLE (AP) — Vice President Mike Pence on Monday urged a group of Tennesseans to call the state's two Democratic congressmen and ask them to help pass the Trump administration's trade deal with Mexico and Canada.

41. Pence to headline Goodlettsville event with Gov. Lee -

GOODLETTSVILLE (AP) — Vice President Mike Pence is slated to headline an event on trade in Tennessee next week alongside Gov. Bill Lee and U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue.

An event invitation says Pence will speak at a Tyson Foods facility in Goodlettsville on Monday to advocate for passage of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement. The event is funded by Trade Works for America, a group that is pushing for the trade deal.

42. Pence to headline Goodlettsville event with Gov. Lee -

GOODLETTSVILLE (AP) — Vice President Mike Pence is slated to headline an event on trade in Tennessee next week alongside Gov. Bill Lee and U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue.

An event invitation says Pence will speak at a Tyson Foods facility in Goodlettsville on Monday to advocate for passage of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement. The event is funded by Trade Works for America, a group that is pushing for the trade deal.

43. Stocks notch gains, erase prior day's losses for S&P 500 -

Technology companies led stocks broadly higher on Wall Street Wednesday, erasing the S&P 500's losses from a day earlier.

Traders pivoted to riskier holdings as encouraging developments overseas helped alleviate investors' anxiety over the global economy. Lawmakers in Britain were seeking a less chaotic exit from the European Union and political tensions in Hong Kong eased.

44. S&P 500 plunges in worst loss of year as trade war escalates -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks plunged to their worst loss of the year Monday and investors around the world scrambled to sell on worries about how much President Donald Trump's worsening trade war will damage the global economy.

45. US stock indexes finish mixed ahead of trade talks -

The U.S. stock market capped a day of listless trading with modest losses Monday as investors focused on upcoming trade talks between the U.S. and China.

The major stock indexes drifted between small gains and losses for much of the day, though smaller company stocks had their worst day since May. The losses erased some of the market's solid gains from last week, when the benchmark S&P 500 index closed at an all-time high.

46. Not to be outdone, Tyson enters plant-based meat market -

The fast-growing market for meat alternatives has a surprising new player: Tyson Foods.

Tyson, one of the world's largest meat producers, will begin selling nuggets made from pea protein at grocery stores this summer. A blended burger made from beef and pea protein will follow this fall. Both will be sold under a new brand, Raised and Rooted, which will continue to develop plant-based and blended products for both groceries and restaurants.

47. Tech rebound powers US stocks higher, snaps 2-day S&P slump -

Technology companies helped power stocks broadly higher on Wall Street Tuesday, snapping the market's two-day losing streak.

The rally followed the U.S. government's decision to temporarily ease off proposed restrictions on technology sales to Chinese companies. The news gave a boost to technology sector stocks, which took steep losses a day earlier when the Trump administration announced curbs on technology sales, aimed primarily at Chinese telecom gear maker Huawei.

48. Beyond Meat goes public as sales of plant-based meats rise -

Beyond Meat is ready for more. The El Segundo, California-based maker of plant-based burgers and sausages will make its debut on the Nasdaq stock exchange Thursday. It's the first pure-play maker of vegan "meat" to go public, according to Renaissance Capital, which researches and tracks IPOs.

49. Energy companies lead US stocks lower after oil price plunge -

The steepest drop in oil prices in more than three years put investors in a selling mood Tuesday, extending a losing streak for the S&P 500 index to a fourth day.

Energy stocks led a late-afternoon sell-off on Wall Street after the price of U.S. crude oil plunged 7.1 percent to $55.69 a barrel, the lowest level since December 2017.

50. US stocks get a lift from earnings; Berkshire boosts banks -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks finished broadly higher for the third day in a row Monday. Media, retail and technology companies rose, and Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway led gains for the financial sector.

51. You don’t miss your water until your well runs dry -

As people and businesses pour into Tennessee, state leaders are working on a plan to keep its taps flowing.

The water management plan, TNH2O, is a legacy project for Governor Bill Haslam, who assembled a high-level group in January to ensure the state’s water supply can flow in abundance and to the right places as population growth, development and new business transform the face of Tennessee over coming decades.

52. Tennessee OKs $20m in incentives for Tyson Foods facility -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tyson Foods Inc. will receive a state economic incentives package worth $20 million to build a new chicken production complex in Tennessee, a project that's expected to include $322 million in private investment and 1,600 new jobs within five years.

53. Tennessee OKs $20m in incentives for Tyson Foods facility -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tyson Foods Inc. will receive a state economic incentives package worth $20 million to build a new chicken production complex in Tennessee, a project that's expected to include $322 million in private investment and 1,600 new jobs within five years.

54. Lawmakers OK 5 University of Tennessee board nominees -

NASHVILLE (AP) — State lawmakers have approved five of Gov. Bill Haslam's nominees to serve on a newly configured University of Tennessee board of trustees.

The Senate voted Tuesday to agree with the House on the confirmation of former PepsiCo President John Compton; former Lady Vol and ESPN analyst Kara Lawson; River City Co. President and CEO Kim White; AutoZone CEO William Rhodes III; and former Tyson Foods CEO Donnie Smith.

55. Sex Week seems tame compared to Legislature's antics -

Why should UT Knoxville be limited to its annual Sex Week when Tennessee legislators are celebrating year-round?

Based on the scurrilous reports published in these parts over the last couple of years, state legislators are doing more than collecting per diems in Nashville, and there’s plenty of evidence to prove it.

56. Senate committee nixes 4 UT Board appointees -

One of Gov. Bill Haslam’s main legislative pushes has run afoul of a Legislature angry about everything from Sex Week at the University of Tennessee to the handling of the football coach hiring at the Knoxville campus.

57. Tyson Foods: New Humboldt facility to create 1,500 jobs -

HUMBOLDT (AP) — Tyson Foods Inc. plans to build a new chicken production complex in Tennessee, a $300 million project that is expected to create more than 1,500 jobs when the facility begins operations in late 2019, the company said Monday.

58. Consumer goods firms lead US stocks slightly higher -

The major U.S. stock indexes capped a day of mostly subdued trading with slight gains Monday.

Consumer and household goods companies led the market higher, offsetting losses by industrial and energy stocks.

59. Technology firms and small companies lead US stocks higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — Large technology and health care companies and smaller U.S.-focused firms rose again Friday as stocks finished the third quarter at record highs.

Stocks were mixed at the start of trading, as they had been the day before. But chipmakers and big-name technology companies pulled stocks higher, as they have done all year. Health care companies also did better than the rest of the market. Tyson Foods climbed after it gave strong profit forecasts, and investors cheered strong quarterly results from homebuilder KB Home.

60. Tech firms drive US stock indexes to new highs -

Gains in technology companies helped lift U.S. stock index higher Monday, nudging the market once again into record territory.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index closed at an all-time high, as did the Dow Jones industrial average. The latest gain extended the Dow's winning streak to 10 days.

61. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for June 2017 -

Top commercial real estate sales, June 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

62. Ready-to-cook meals from Amazon in bid to expand groceries -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon has begun selling ready-to-cook meal packages for busy households in a bid to expand its groceries business.

Amazon-branded meal kits come with raw ingredients needed to prepare such meals as chicken tikka masala and falafel patties. They can help households save time; a kit for salmon with soba noodles can be prepared in just a half-hour, for instance. But at $16 to $20 for two servings, they can be more expensive than buying ingredients separately in larger quantities.

63. All is calm: US stock indexes nudge again to record highs -

NEW YORK (AP) — A turn higher in the last few minutes of trading was enough to nudge U.S. indexes to more record highs Monday as fear seemed to drain out of the market.

Trading was remarkably calm following the weekend's presidential election in France, which had the potential to upset global markets. The candidate who was in favor of keeping France in the European Union and in the euro currency won, to the relief of investors who feared the alternative would have hurt global trade. That helped calm markets enough that an index used to measure the market's fear level dropped to its lowest level since 1993.

64. Losses for banks pull US stocks further from record highs -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks finished lower Monday for the second time in the last three trading days. Banks gave back some of their recent gains after a jump in interest rates last week sent them sharply higher.

65. US stocks close lower, snap S&P 500's 3-day winning streak -

Energy companies led U.S. stocks slightly lower Monday as the price of crude oil declined, snapping a three-day winning streak for the Standard & Poor's 500 index.

Phone company and real estate stocks were also among the big decliners. Technology and industrial companies eked out tiny gains.

66. US stocks make small gains as banks trade higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S.stocks are mostly higher Thursday morning as Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen emphasizes that the Fed plans to raise interest rates, which is sending bond yields higher and giving banks a boost. Companies that make and sell food and household goods are lagging the market after Wal-Mart and Smucker announced disappointing sales.

67. Stocks end lower to cap first weekly loss in a month -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks ended slightly lower on Wall Street on Friday, giving the market its first weekly decline in a month.

The market edged up in early trading after a much anticipated report on hiring last month showed decent gains. It quickly turned lower and remained down for the rest of the day. Suppliers of basic materials and industrial companies lost the most.

68. Stocks rise as tepid jobs report stokes hopes for low rates -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are rising Friday as a slowdown in hiring last month raised investors' hopes that the Federal Reserve may wait even longer before raising interest rates. Energy companies made the biggest gains as the price of oil turned higher for the first time this week.

69. Winning streak for stocks ends as banks and miners slump -

NEW YORK (AP) — A three-day winning streak for U.S. stocks ended quietly Thursday. A decline in bond yields sent bank stocks lower, while utilities and phone companies moved higher.

Stocks traded lower all day as investors took some profits. Banks took the biggest losses, followed by metals companies. With bond yields down, investors snapped up phone and utility company shares. Household goods makers turned higher late in the day, but that wasn't enough to cancel out losses elsewhere.

70. Federal Reserve relief and oil prices send stocks higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks jumped Monday after Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen again managed to soothe investors' jangled nerves. The Standard & Poor's 500 index made its highest close in 2016, and oil prices also reached their highest levels of the year.

71. US stocks finish a little higher as health care jumps -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks finished just a bit higher Monday as gains for drug companies were almost canceled by sharp losses for metals and energy companies.

Coming off two weeks of losses, stocks traded in a narrow range. Drug company stocks, which have been under pressure recently over concerns they'll have trouble raising prices for medicines, moved sharply higher. The energy market was shaken up and the price of oil fell as Saudi Arabia replaced its oil minister. Metals companies tumbled on renewed worries about China's economy.

72. US stocks slip as energy companies fall with oil prices -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks slipped in quiet trading Monday as energy companies dropped with the price of oil. Metals and chemicals companies also fell. Company earnings remain weak, and Xerox and drugmaker Perrigo tumbled after reporting disappointing results and cutting their forecasts for the year.

73. US stocks jump as JPMorgan gives banks a big boost -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks climbed again Wednesday as quarterly results from JPMorgan Chase gave banks a big lift. Economic news from China powered industrial and technology companies in the U.S. and stock exchanges overseas.

74. Justices reject Wal-Mart, Wells Fargo class-action appeals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is turning down appeals by Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Wells Fargo & Co. of multimillion-dollar class-action judgments.

75. Justices uphold $5.8 million award against Tyson Foods -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court has ruled for more than 3,000 workers at a Tyson Foods Inc. pork-processing plant in Iowa in a pay dispute with the company.

The justices voted 6-2 on Tuesday to reject new limits Tyson, which has numerous  facilities in Middle Tennessee, asked them to impose on the ability of workers to band together to challenge pay and workplace issues.

76. US stocks gain, pushing the market close to record levels -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market closed just short of a record on Monday as investors assessed some positive earnings reports.

Cognizant Technology Solutions, a technology consulting business, was the biggest gainer in the Standard & Poor's 500 index after it reported earnings that beat the expectations of Wall Street analysts and raised its outlook for earnings and sales for the year. Tyson Foods, the maker of Jimmy Dean sausage products, was another company whose stock gained after posting strong earnings.

77. Tyson to sell Mexico, Brazil poultry operations -

SPRINGDALE, Ark. (AP) — Tyson Foods plans to sell its poultry businesses in Mexico and Brazil for $575 million in cash to help pay debt from its recently announced acquisition of Hillshire Brands.

The Springdale, Arkansas, meat processor said Monday that it still plans to expand its international operations, especially in Asia, but the businesses it will sell didn't have the scale to gain leading positions in their markets. Tyson made the announcement the same day it reported fiscal third-quarter earnings that climbed more than 4 percent but missed analyst expectations.

78. Energetic stock market pushes toward milestones -

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. stock market is back to setting records.

After treading water for most of March and April, stocks are nudging deeper into record territory and are closing in on milestones with lots of zeros attached to them. The Dow Jones industrial average is within 30 points of 17,000 while the Standard & Poor's 500 is just shy of 2,000 after rising 6 percent this year.

79. S&P 500 ekes out another record high -

NEW YORK (AP) — Call it the ho-hum market. Another day, another record high.

News of a handful of corporate deals sent some stocks jumping Monday. And Family Dollar climbed following news that investor Carl Icahn has taken a stake in the company.

80. Tyson wins bidding war for Hillshire Brands -

NEW YORK (AP) — Tyson Foods Inc. has won a bidding war for Hillshire Brands, the maker of Jimmy Dean sausages and Ball Park hot dogs, with a $63 per share offer.

Tyson had been vying with rival poultry producer Pilgrim's Pride for Hillshire Brands, which ended its bidding process Sunday. Tyson had previously offered $50 per share for the company. Pilgrim's Pride then raised its bid to $55 per share.

81. Hillshire to talk with Tyson, Pilgrim's Pride -

NEW YORK (AP) — Hillshire Brands says it will hold separate talks with Pilgrim's Pride and Tyson Foods, as the two meat processing heavyweights engage in a bidding war for the maker of Jimmy Dean sausages and Ball Park hot dogs.

82. Stocks edge lower; Hillshire bidding war heats up -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market fell slightly Tuesday, pulling back from record highs the day before.

Hillshire Brands jumped as a bidding war for the company heated up, while Krispy Kreme Doughnuts plunged after issuing a disappointing forecast.

83. Tyson enters meat brawl with Hillshire bid -

NEW YORK (AP) — Hillshire Brands is at the center of a barnyard brawl.

Tyson Foods, the largest U.S. meat processor, on Thursday made a $6.2 billion offer for the maker Jimmy Dean sausages and Ball Park hot dogs, topping a bid made two days earlier by rival poultry producer Pilgrim's Pride. Based in Greeley, Colorado, Pilgrim's Pride is owned by Brazilian meat giant JBS.

84. Tyson makes rival $6.2B bid for Hillshire Brands -

NEW YORK (AP) — Hillshire Brands has another suitor.

Two days after poultry producer Pilgrim's Pride made a $5.58 billion bid for the maker of Ball Park hot dogs and Jimmy Dean sausages, Tyson Foods Co. barged in with a $6.2 billion offer. The latest offer sent Hillshire shares up 14 percent in premarket trading.

85. US stocks edge up after jobless claims drop -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks moved slightly higher in morning trading Thursday after the government reported that the number of people applying for unemployment benefits sank last week, a sign that employers are laying off fewer people.

86. Stocks slip on a quiet day on Wall Street -

NEW YORK (AP) — A quiet day of trading left stock indexes mixed Monday.

There was little in the way of news to shake the market out of a summertime stupor, other than a report from the Institute for Supply Management that the U.S. service sector expanded in July, helped by a rise in new orders.

87. Stocks close little changed after record week -

NEW YORK (AP) — Major stock market indexes are ending little changed on Wall Street following a record-breaking week.

The Dow Jones industrial average ended down five points at 14,968 Monday. It broke through 15,000 last week.

88. Tyson agrees to $4M penalty to resolve EPA case -

ST. LOUIS (AP) — The U.S. government says Tyson Foods has agreed to pay roughly $4 million in civil penalties to settle alleged violations related to eight accidental releases of anhydrous ammonia that happened over a four-year span and caused one death.

89. Home Depot leads Dow average higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — A jump in home sales and strong earnings from Home Depot helped the Dow claw back more than half of its losses from Monday. Improving consumer confidence also brought back buyers to the market.

90. Dow gains 207 in best day since election -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks had their best day since the election. Market-watchers are citing optimism about a deal to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff of tax increases and government spending cuts.

91. US stocks closing higher; Knight Capital gets lifeline -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks edged higher on a day marked by uncharacteristic quiet following a turbulent week.

In the absence of major economic news, stocks were riding a tailwind of optimism from the most recent U.S. job numbers released last week and hope for more action by European authorities to address that region's debt crisis.

92. Markets recover from stumble over Europe elections -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stock markets recovered around the world following an early stumble caused by election results in France and Greece that appeared to jeopardize Europe's plans for fighting its debt crisis.

93. Haslam urges quicker permitting for chicken farms -

FRANKLIN (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday that his administration is trying to speed up the time it takes for poultry farms to get environmental permits.

The Republican governor said after a speech to the Farm Bureau that his goal is for the state to strike the "right balance between our stewardship responsibilities and making certain we're providing product and providing jobs."

94. Obama, first lady to tout jobs plan for veterans -

HAMPTON, Va. (AP) — President Barack Obama is employing the services of the first lady on the final leg of his three-day bus tour as they tout proposals in the president's jobs bill that the White House says would put more of the nation's unemployed veterans back to work.

95. Tyson 3Q profit falls but beats expectations -

SPRINGDALE, Ark. (AP) — Tyson Foods is reporting a 21 percent drop in earnings for its third quarter, but the results beat expectations on higher pork profits.

Expensive grain has wiped out profit margins for meat companies. But pork prices have risen high enough to boost profit margins in Tyson's swine division to 8.8 percent, compared to 1 percent for chicken.

96. US markets fall sharply after S&P downgrade -

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. stock market joined a sell-off around the world Monday in the first trading since Standard & Poor's downgraded American debt and gave investors another reason to be anxious.