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1. Too much TV? Enter HBO Max, the latest streaming wannabe -

Is a pandemic the perfect time to launch a new and relatively expensive streaming service? AT&T sure hopes so.

The phone company is investing billions in HBO Max, its first big entertainment venture since it spent $85 billion for Time Warner in 2018. The good news for its timing: millions are stuck at home, watching more video than ever. The bad news: many of them also out of work and carefully watching their incomes. The service launches Wednesday in the U.S.

2. The box office belonged to Disney in 2019 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Every movie year offers up a parade of hits and flops. But in 2019, no winner was in the same galaxy as the Walt Disney Co. And the biggest loser might have been anyone less thrilled about the box-office domination of franchise films.

3. AT&T says HBO Max streaming service to launch in May for $15 -

AT&T said Tuesday that its HBO Max streaming service will launch in May for $15 a month, joining a crowded field.

The company has said HBO Max will become the "workhorse" for its video business as cord-cutting of traditional TV expands. It hopes to migrate people who pay for HBO in different ways today to the new platform. The service grew out of AT&T's $81 billion purchase of Time Warner, which AT&T overhauled and rechristened WarnerMedia.

4. CBS, Viacom to reunite as media giants bulk up for streaming -

NEW YORK (AP) — CBS and Viacom announced a long-anticipated reunion Tuesday, bringing together their television networks and the Paramount movie studio as traditional media giants bulk up to challenge streaming companies like Netflix.

5. Disney takes over Hulu from Comcast as stream wars heat up -

NEW YORK (AP) — Disney is taking full control of Hulu from Comcast, as both companies prepare to launch their own streaming services in response to declining audiences for traditional TV.

The companies said Tuesday that Comcast, which owns a third of Hulu, can sell its stake to Disney starting in 2024, for a minimum of $5.8 billion. Until then, Comcast will be a silent investor.

6. Apple is jumping belatedly into the streaming TV business -

CUPERTINO, California (AP) — Jumping belatedly into a business dominated by Netflix and Amazon, Apple announced its own TV and movie streaming service Monday, enlisting such superstars as Oprah Winfrey, Jennifer Aniston and Steven Spielberg to try to overcome its rivals' head start.

7. Disney closes $71B deal for Fox entertainment assets -

Disney has closed its $71 billion acquisition of Fox's entertainment business, putting "Cinderella," ''The Simpsons," ''Star Wars" and "Dr. Strange" under one corporate roof.

The deal is likely to shake up the media landscape. Among other things, it paves the way for Disney to launch its streaming service, Disney Plus, due out later this year. It will also likely lead to layoffs in the thousands, thanks to duplication in Fox and Disney film-production staff.

8. AT&T shakes up WarnerMedia to emphasize streaming -

NEW YORK (AP) — Now that AT&T's $81 billion takeover of Time Warner is a done deal , the company is reorganizing its TV and movie businesses to emphasize streaming rather than cable TV networks.

9. US appeals court clears AT&T's $81B purchase of Time Warner -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal appeals court on Tuesday cleared AT&T's takeover of Time Warner, rejecting the Trump administration's claims that the $81 billion deal will harm consumers and reduce competition in the TV industry.

10. AT&T's WarnerMedia to offer their own streaming service -

NEW YORK (AP) — AT&T and WarnerMedia are joining the ever-expanding list of companies offering a streaming video service.

They say the service due to launch in late 2019 will include films, TV shows, documentaries, animation and other offerings. No pricing was announced.

11. With the fall of a kingmaker, CBS is punished on Wall Street -

NEW YORK (AP) — Sizing up a future of a network without its kingmaker, Wall Street sent shares of CBS down sharply Monday, the first day of trading since the departure of Les Moonves.

CBS said late Sunday, as more allegations of sexual abuse surfaced, that Moonves would be replaced and that the company was shaking up its board of directors.

12. HBO chief: Quality won't suffer under new owner AT&T -

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (AP) — HBO's programming chief pushed back Wednesday against the possibility that the cable channel will suffer under new owner AT&T.

Casey Bloys, speaking to a meeting of TV critics, said there are no plans to choose volume over quality for its shows.

13. Comcast tops profit forecasts; cable TV subscriptions fall -

NEW YORK (AP) — Comcast is reporting a stronger-than-expected second-quarter profit even as it struggles to keep cable TV subscribers.

On Thursday, the company reported a 22 percent jump in earnings to $3.22 billion, or 69 cents per share. Earnings, adjusted for non-recurring gains, were 65 cents per share, which, according to a survey by Zacks Investment Research, was 4 cents better than expected.

14. Comcast drops Fox bid, paving way for sale to Disney -

NEW YORK (AP) — Comcast is dropping its bid for Fox's entertainment businesses, paving the way for Disney to boost its upcoming streaming service by buying the studios behind "The Simpsons" and X-Men.

15. Trump DOJ appealing judge's OK of AT&T-Time Warner merger -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Stung by a federal judge's dismissal of its objections to AT&T's megamerger with Time Warner, the Trump Justice Department is challenging the decision with a legal appeal.

The Justice Department said in a one-sentence document Thursday it is appealing the ruling last month by U.S. District Judge Richard Leon, which blessed one of the biggest media deals ever following a landmark antitrust trial.

16. Disney's bid for Fox clears US antitrust hurdle -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Walt Disney Co. on Wednesday won U.S. antitrust approval for its $71.3 billion bid for Twenty-First Century Fox's entertainment assets.

17. Days after buying Time Warner, AT&T launches new TV service -

NEW YORK (AP) — AT&T is launching a new streaming service incorporating television networks from the Time Warner company it just bought.

The WatchTV service, a cable-like package of more than 30 TV channels delivered over the internet, is an example of the "skinny bundles" coming from telecom and broadband providers as more people watch TV online. Competitors include Sling TV, PlayStation Vue and AT&T's own DirecTV Now.

18. Days after buying Time Warner, AT&T launches new TV service -

NEW YORK (AP) — AT&T is launching a new streaming service incorporating television networks from the Time Warner company it just bought.

The WatchTV service, a cable-like package of more than 30 TV channels delivered over the internet, is an example of the "skinny bundles" coming from telecom and broadband providers as more people watch TV online. Competitors include Sling TV, PlayStation Vue and AT&T's own DirecTV Now.

19. The Mouse chases the Fox: Disney makes $71B counteroffer -

NEW YORK (AP) — The mouse is chasing the fox. Disney is offering more than $71 billion for Fox's entertainment businesses in a counterbid to Comcast's nearly $66 billion offer.

The battle for Twenty-First Century Fox reflects a new imperative among entertainment and telecommunications firms. They are amassing ever more programming to better compete with technology companies such as Amazon and Netflix for viewers' attention — and dollars. The bidding war comes after AT&T bought Time Warner for $81 billion.

20. AT&T, Time Warner close $81B merger 2 days after judge OKs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — AT&T has completed its $81 billion takeover of Time Warner, one of the biggest media deals ever. A federal judge approved the combination just two days earlier over objections by the Trump Justice Department that it would hurt consumers.

21. How Fox's businesses would match up with Disney and Comcast -

NEW YORK (AP) — Competing bids from Comcast and Disney for the bulk of Twenty-First Century Fox come as the media landscape changes and companies get more involved in both creating and distributing content.

22. Comcast challenges Disney with $65B bid for Fox -

NEW YORK (AP) — Comcast made a $65 billion bid Wednesday for Fox's entertainment businesses, setting up a battle with Disney to become the next mega-media company.

The bid comes just a day after a federal judge cleared AT&T's takeover of Time Warner and rejected the government's argument that it would hurt competition in cable and satellite TV and jack up costs to consumers for streaming TV and movies. The ruling signaled that Comcast could win regulatory approval, too; its bid for Fox shares many similarities with the AT&T-Time Warner deal.

23. After AT&T's win, here comes the expected Comcast-Fox bid -

NEW YORK (AP) — After AT&T-Time Warner comes the deluge. Comcast bid $65 billion for Fox's entertainment business on Wednesday, a day after a federal judge has cleared AT&T's $85 billion takeover of Time Warner.

24. Stocks slip after Fed says interest rates will rise faster -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks slipped Wednesday after the Federal Reserve raised interest rates and said it expects to increase rates two more times by the end of the year. Investors bet that several huge deals are more likely to happen after a federal court cleared AT&T's $85 billion purchase of Time Warner.

25. Federal judge approves AT&T-Time Warner merger -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge approved the $85 billion mega-merger of AT&T and Time Warner on Tuesday, a move that could usher in a wave of media consolidation while shaping how much consumers pay for streaming TV and movies.

26. Comcast v. Disney: a fight for Twenty-First Century Fox -

NEW YORK (AP) — Comcast and Disney are on the verge of a head-to-head bidding war for Fox's entertainment properties.

The potential battle for Twenty-First Century Fox comes as traditional entertainment companies try to amass more properties to compete better with technology companies such as Amazon and Netflix for viewers' attention — and dollars.

27. CIA nominee wins Senate panel backing, confirmation expected -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Gina Haspel, President Donald Trump's nominee to head the CIA, won the backing of the Senate intelligence committee on Wednesday, paving the way for her expected confirmation to lead the spy agency.

28. Govt argues that AT&T-Time Warner deal would hurt consumers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government pleaded its case Monday for blocking AT&T from absorbing Time Warner, saying it would hurt consumers as a big antitrust trial crept toward its end and a decision by a federal judge.

29. How Comcast is trying to change the cable game -

NEW YORK (AP) — If you can't beat them, join them. Comcast is trying to refigure the traditional cable bundle, adding services like Netflix to its subscription packages and offering internet-only TV streaming.

30. US, AT&T fire opening salvos as govt seeks to block merger -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government and AT&T exchanged opening salvos in a federal trial Thursday as the U.S. seeks to block the telephone giant from absorbing Time Warner, in a case that could shape how consumers get — and how much they pay for — streaming TV and movies.

31. A media giant in the balance: AT&T antitrust trial begins -

NEW YORK (AP) — On Monday, AT&T squares off against the federal government in a trial that could shape how you get — and how much you pay for — streaming TV and movies.

AT&T says it needs to gobble up Time Warner if it's to have a chance against the likes of Amazon, Netflix and Google in the rapidly evolving world of video entertainment.

32. Disney buying large part of 21st Century Fox in $52.4B deal -

NEW YORK (AP) — Disney is buying the Murdoch family's Fox movie and television studios and some cable and international TV businesses for about $52.4 billion, as the home of Mickey Mouse tries to meet competition from technology companies in the entertainment business.

33. Disney buying large part of 21st Century Fox in $52.4B deal -

NEW YORK (AP) — Disney is buying a large part of the Murdoch family's 21st Century Fox for about $52.4 billion in stock, including film and television studios and cable and international TV businesses, as it tries to meet competition from technology companies in the entertainment business.

34. Politics or policy? Behind the dispute over AT&T-Time Warner -

NEW YORK (AP) — AT&T is vowing to fight the U.S. government to save its $85 billion bid for Time Warner, after the Justice Department sued to block the deal on grounds it could hike television bills and hamper innovation.

35. After US pushback, AT&T prepares to fight for Time Warner -

NEW YORK (AP) — Seeing an attempt to block its buyout out of Time Warner as a "radical" departure by the U.S. government, AT&T is preparing for a fight to see the $85 billion deal through.

36. Justice Dept. sues to stop AT&T's $85B Time Warner deal -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Justice Department is suing AT&T to stop its $85 billion purchase of Time Warner, setting the stage for an epic legal battle with the telecom giant.

It could also create a new headache for President Donald Trump, whose public statements have raised suspicions that he might have interfered with the department's decision, potentially undermining its legal case. DOJ's antitrust chief, Makan Delrahim, has said the president did not tell him what to do. White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Monday she wasn't aware of any specific action related to the case taken by the White House.

37. Technology companies, retailers send US stock indexes higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rose Monday as a mix of smaller, U.S.-focused companies, technology firms and banks climbed. Drugmakers struggled, which limited those gains.

Retailers and smaller companies rose for the third day in a row as their latest quarterly reports have investors feeling better about the U.S. economy and the amount of shopping people are likely to do over the holidays. Technology companies rose following another deal between chipmakers, and industrial companies also posted gains.

38. FCC weakens limits on owning newspapers, TV stations -

NEW YORK (AP) — Federal regulators have weakened rules meant to support independent local media.

Now, one company can own newspapers and broadcast stations in one market, undoing a ban in place since 1975. Thursday's decision by the Federal Communications Commission also makes it easier for one company to own two broadcast TV stations in one market and coordinate operations with stations owned by others.

39. AT&T vs. Justice: Behind the dispute over Time Warner deal -

NEW YORK (AP) — AT&T says it's ready to fight the government for its $85 billion Time Warner deal if it has to. The Justice Department's objections surprised many on Wall Street.

The objections also raised red flags for those who worry that the White House is trying to hurt CNN through the merger-review process. President Donald Trump has tangled frequently with the Time Warner-owned news network.

40. Stocks tick upward as video game makers jump, but banks skid -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock indexes finished with small gains Wednesday as video game makers gave technology companies a boost and household goods companies also rose. However a recent decline in interest rates continued to put pressure on banks.

41. Turner is latest to plan sports streaming service -

NEW YORK (AP) — Turner Sports is the latest TV company to announce a sports streaming service as traditional television companies chase millennial audiences.

The service, expected next year in the U.S., has signed up European soccer with the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Europa League. Higher-profile sports on Turner's TV channels, such as baseball and basketball, won't move to the new service. Instead, Turner is looking for new deals with content owners and leagues.

42. Another strong month of hiring sends stock indexes higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — Banks and other stocks climbed Friday after the government reported more gains in hiring last month, the latest signal that the economy is continuing to hum along. The modest gains wrapped up another quiet week for the stock market.

43. Why you still can't ditch your cable box -

NEW YORK (AP) — Not that long ago, the clunky cable box looked like it was on its way out. The federal government was pressuring cable companies to open up their near-monopoly on boxes to more competition, and industry leader Comcast promised apps that could render some boxes obsolete.

44. Why you still can't ditch your cable box -

NEW YORK (AP) — Not that long ago, the clunky cable box looked like it was on its way out. The federal government was pressuring cable companies to open up their near-monopoly on boxes to more competition, and industry leader Comcast promised apps that could render some boxes obsolete.

45. CEOs get biggest raise since 2013 -

NEW YORK (AP) — The typical CEO at the biggest U.S. companies got an 8.5 percent raise last year, raking in $11.5 million in salary, stock and other compensation last year, according to a study by executive data firm Equilar for The Associated Press. That's the biggest raise in three years.

46. Stocks dip as media, health care companies fall; banks jump -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks dipped Wednesday as media and health care companies took losses. The Federal Reserve left interest rates unchanged, but bond yields and banks rose as investors felt rates will increase soon.

47. Hollywood writers, producers reach deal; strike averted -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A tentative deal was reached between screenwriters and producers Tuesday, averting a strike that could have crippled TV and film production.

The three-year agreement, which requires ratification by members of the Writers Guild of America, was confirmed by the guild and producers' spokesman Jarryd Gonzales shortly after the current contract expired early Tuesday. The deal came after a flurry of last-minute bargaining, conducted during a media blackout that offered no tangible details about whether picket lines would go up until after midnight Tuesday.

48. Charter won't have to compete with other cable companies now -

NEW YORK (AP) — Federal regulators are relaxing one of the conditions imposed on Charter when it absorbed Time Warner Cable after smaller cable companies complained about greater competition in their territories.

49. Your cable company wants to be your phone company, too -

NEW YORK (AP) — Your TV provider may soon become your phone company. Which seems only fair, because your phone company also wants to be your TV provider.

In the next few months, cable giant Comcast will start selling wireless service, just as AT&T and Verizon already do. Charter, the No. 2 cable company, also has a mobile plan. Meanwhile, the largest wireless carriers — AT&T and Verizon — have launched digital TV services.

50. 'Net neutrality' foe Ajit Pai is new FCC head -

NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump has picked a fierce critic of the Obama-era "net neutrality" rules to be chief regulator of the nation's airwaves and internet connections.

In a statement Monday, Ajit Pai said he was grateful to the president for choosing him as the next chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. Several reports last week had said he was the pick.

51. Murdoch's 21st Century Fox agrees to buy Europe's Sky -

NEW YORK (AP) — Rupert Murdoch may get all of European broadcaster Sky after all after the U.K. phone-hacking scandal scotched a previous effort.

Sky said Friday that Murdoch's entertainment conglomerate 21st Century Fox has reached a preliminary deal to buy the rest of Sky for 10.75 pounds ($13.60) per share, the equivalent of about 11.2 billion pounds ($14.1 billion).

52. Innovation or monopoly? Panel looks at ATT-Time Warner deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators questioning the logic of a proposed merger between AT&T and Time Warner turned their focus to the nickels and dimes of the issue, at least as to how the $85.4 billion mega-deal would affect Americans. OK, you say this huge merger will enhance, not quash, competition and benefit consumers. Will it actually reduce prices that consumers pay?

53. Companies set monthly record for mergers, acquisitions -

U.S. companies are cutting merger deals at a record pace even though antitrust regulators have moved to oppose several recent high-profile combinations.

So far this month, companies have agreed to mergers and acquisitions valued at $249 billion, according to financial information provider Dealogic. That surpasses the previous record of $240 billion in July 2015.

54. Broadband privacy rules approved despite industry pushback -

NEW YORK (AP) — Federal regulators have approved new broadband privacy rules that make internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon ask customers' permission before using or sharing much of their data, potentially making it more difficult for them to grow advertising businesses.

55. Comcast fined $2.3M to end probe into mischarging customers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Government regulators are fining Comcast $2.3 million, saying the cable giant has charged customers for stuff they never ordered, like premium channels or extra cable boxes.

The Federal Communications Commission said the Philadelphia company must clearly ask customers before charging them for new services or equipment and make it easier for customers to fight charges they think are wrong.

56. So long cable box. New rules may allow you to bypass the box -

NEW YORK (AP) — You may soon have more options for a cable box than renting one from your cable company.

The Federal Communications Commission has a plan to make cable companies provide apps that could be used on devices made by tech companies like maybe Roku or Apple. It says Americans spend billions each year renting boxes and believes there is a better way.

57. Hulu dropping free video as it prepares cable TV alternative -

NEW YORK (AP) — Hulu is dropping the free TV episodes that it was initially known for as it works on an online television service to rival cable TV.

Free episodes — typically the most recent four or five episodes from a show's current season — will be gone from the site within a few weeks. Instead, Hulu is making free episodes available through Yahoo .

58. Time Warner invests in Hulu in win for cable cord-cutters -

NEW YORK (AP) — In another win for cable cord-cutters, Time Warner has become the latest media company to invest in streaming service Hulu.

The move could boost the viability of an online TV service that Hulu is expected to launch next year as an alternative to cable TV. Sony and Dish already operate online TV services, while Apple has expressed interest in one, according to published reports. None of those companies, however, have the networks themselves as full partners or owners, the way Hulu does.

59. Netflix facing tougher times as US subscriber growth slows -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — After years of spectacular success, Netflix is starting to hit some potholes. The high-flying internet video service added only 160,000 U.S. subscribers from April through June, its lowest gain in the period since splitting up its video-streaming and DVD-by-mail services five years ago.

60. Justice Department approves deal to create new cable giant -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Justice Department has approved Charter's bid to buy Time Warner Cable and create another cable giant.

Buying Time Warner Cable and Bright House Networks will turn Charter Communications, a mid-size cable company, into the country's No. 2 home Internet provider, after Comcast. The new Charter will be No. 3 in video, trailing Comcast and AT&T, which bought DirecTV last year.

61. US stocks slip as energy companies fall with oil prices -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks slipped in quiet trading Monday as energy companies dropped with the price of oil. Metals and chemicals companies also fell. Company earnings remain weak, and Xerox and drugmaker Perrigo tumbled after reporting disappointing results and cutting their forecasts for the year.

62. NCAA Tournament deal with CBS, Turner extended through 2032 -

NEW YORK (AP) — With eight years left on their deal to broadcast the NCAA Tournament, CBS and Turner are tacking on another eight.

The extension announced Tuesday goes all the way through 2032. The length of the contract is not unusual for college sports these days, though with the NCAA facing legal challenges on multiple fronts, a lot can change in 16 years.

63. Comcast loses fewest TV customers in 8 years -

NEW YORK (AP) — Comcast is trumpeting its best year for traditional TV services in nearly a decade, even though it continues to lose TV subscribers.

The number of traditional TV customers is still declining across the industry, and analysts say Comcast's TV gains are largely coming from competitors, like AT&T and Dish, rather than young new cable customers who have never paid for cable before.

64. Ready to cut the cord on cable/satellite? -

If you’ve resolved to lower your bills this year, you might want to look at your TV screen. No, not for help from Dave Ramsey or Suze Orman, but at the cable connected to it.

Can you can envision life without hundreds of channels? If so, you might be able to save money by becoming a cord-cutter.

65. How to spend $5 trillion: A record-breaking year in deals -

NEW YORK (AP) — Companies around the world spent a record $5.04 trillion on acquisitions in 2015, according to Dealogic, as slow worldwide economic growth and low interest rates pushed companies to combine forces.

66. US stocks slip, led by weakness in the energy sector -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks retreated modestly Wednesday after comments from Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen implied that Fed policymakers are still considering raising interest rates in December.

67. Time Warner Cable plans for TV on the Internet -

NEW YORK (AP) — Hate your cable box? In a few weeks, Time Warner Cable is going to start testing in New York City a cable service that doesn't need one and is delivered over their customers' home Internet.

68. How Comcast wants to meter the Internet -

NEW YORK (AP) — Most home Internet service providers offer unlimited data, but cable giant Comcast is moving in the opposite direction.

It's started charging heavy Internet users extra in more parts of the country.

69. Pay TV industry shows cracks in media earnings -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Further cracks emerged this week in the pay TV bundle as media companies and distributors indicated that more people are cutting the cord and ditching pricey channel packages. Meanwhile, media company executives did damage control, putting a positive spin on the prospect of selling individual channels online.

70. Comcast speeding up its discounted Internet service -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Comcast is speeding up and expanding a discounted Internet service that was created to get more low-income people online.

Comcast created the program four years ago as a condition of government approval of its purchase of NBCUniversal. The service costs $10 a month, a quarter of Comcast's promotional price for a slightly faster Internet speed.

71. AT&T-DirecTV deal set to close after approval from FCC -

NEW YORK (AP) — AT&T's $48.5 billion purchase of DirecTV is set to close after winning approval Friday from the Federal Communications Commission.

The Justice Department had already cleared the deal, which will create the largest provider of cable or satellite TV in the U.S., with 26.4 million cable and satellite TV subscribers.

72. Comcast adds Internet customers; box office pumps up revenue -

NEW YORK (AP) — Despite a slowdown in subscriber growth, the Internet is still propelling Comcast.

The country's largest cable company added 180,000 Internet customers in the April-June quarter, the smallest gain in at least two years. That brings its total Internet subscribers to 22.6 million.

73. New Comcast online video service for its Internet customers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Comcast, the country's largest cable company, is offering its own online video alternative as people spend fewer hours watching live TV and more time using tablets and phones for entertainment.

74. To sway regulators, Charter pledges to play nice on Internet -

NEW YORK (AP) — Charter is trying to convince the government that consumers will benefit if it is allowed to create a cable giant through its proposed $67.1 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable and Bright House.

75. To sway regulators, Charter pledges to play nice on Internet -

NEW YORK (AP) — Charter is trying to convince the government that consumers will benefit if it is allowed to create a cable giant through its proposed $67.1 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable and Bright House.

76. Slumping energy sector leads a broad sell-off in US stocks -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market endured its worst day in three weeks on Tuesday as investors fretted over Greece's debt crisis and a surge in the U.S. dollar.

Investors seeking safety bought U.S. government bonds.

77. Charter deal seeks to keep cable consolidation on track -

Charter Communications Inc. is buying Time Warner Cable Inc. for $55.3 billion and Bright House Networks for $10.4 billion. It is the latest in a series of deals that have reshaped the cable industry.

78. Charter buying Time Warner Cable as TV viewers go online -

NEW YORK (AP) — As TV watchers increasingly look online for their fix, cable companies are bulking up. In the latest round, Charter Communications is buying Time Warner Cable for $55.33 billion.

79. Verizon barges into online video, buying AOL for $4.4B -

NEW YORK (AP) — Verizon is buying AOL for about $4.4 billion, advancing the telecom's push in both mobile and advertising fields.

The acquisition gives Verizon an entry into increasingly competitive online and mobile video. The New York company is the country's largest wireless carrier as well as an Internet and TV provider — and wireless video and targeted advertising is seen as the next battleground for customers.

80. Comcast now has nearly as many Internet as cable customers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Just before its $45 billion deal with Time Warner Cable collapsed over regulators' fears about a giant cable company's control over the Web, Comcast was racking up more Internet customers.

81. Comcast must show what's next after collapse of deal -

NEW YORK (AP) — Comcast, which reports financial results on Monday, faces some tough questions about what's next for the country's biggest cable company after its dreams of a far-reaching network collapsed with the death of its $45 billion Time Warner Cable deal.

82. Comcast abandons Time Warner Cable bid after gov't pushback -

NEW YORK (AP) — What killed Comcast's $45 billion bid for Time Warner Cable? Regulators' desire to protect the Internet video industry that is reshaping TV.

A combination of the No. 1 and No. 2 U.S. cable companies would have put nearly 30 percent of TV and about 55 percent of broadband subscribers under one roof, along with NBCUniversal, giving the resulting behemoth unprecedented power over what Americans watch and download.

83. Comcast deal may be dead, but cable consolidation will go on -

NEW YORK (AP) — Even if Comcast's $45.2 billion bid for Time Warner Cable is dead, consolidation among the companies that pipe in our TV, phone and Internet will carry on.

Combining the No. 1 and No. 2 U.S. cable companies would have put nearly 30 percent of TV and about 55 percent of broadband subscribers under one roof, along with NBCUniversal. That appeared to be too much concentration for regulators.

84. ESPN says Verizon's new FiOS TV packages violate agreements -

NEW YORK (AP) — Breaking up the cable-TV bundle won't be easy. ESPN is objecting to how Verizon is giving its FiOS TV customers more choice.

In new plans that went into effect Sunday, Verizon made the ESPN and ESPN2 sports channels optional, but ESPN says its contracts with Verizon prohibit the channels from being in a separate sports package.

85. Charter Communications buying Bright House Networks -

STAMFORD, Conn. (AP) — Charter Communications Inc. is buying fellow cable operator Bright House Networks LLC in a deal valued at $10.4 billion.

86. Comcast says $45B Time Warner Cable deal to take longer -

NEW YORK (AP) — Comcast says it $45 billion purchase of Time Warner Cable to take longer than expected because of a long-running regulatory review.

The country's largest cable company wants to buy Time Warner Cable Inc., the No. 2 cable provider, to create an Internet and TV giant that will serve nearly 30 percent of cable TV subscribers and more than half of high-speed Internet subscribers.

87. Comcast gets social to shake bad customer-service reputation -

NEW YORK (AP) — Comcast is adding more social media representatives as it tries to work on its reputation for inefficient, unresponsive or just plain rude customer service.

It is tripling the size of its social media team to 60, and could add more. That's just a tiny percentage of the thousands of customer service people it has. But answering people faster on Twitter and Facebook is part of an overall push to improve customer service.

88. 3 things to know about HBO's new streaming service -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — In less than a month, people in the U.S. will be able to subscribe to HBO without a cable or satellite TV subscription. The stand-alone HBO Now streaming service unveiled this week will debut in time for the April 12 season premiere of "Game of Thrones."

89. Comcast 4Q profit edges up, adds customers, boosts dividend -

NEW YORK (AP) — Comcast Corp.'s fourth-quarter net income edged up less than 1 percent as the company added more customers for its cable TV, high-speed Internet and phone services.

90. Obama pitching more access to fast Internet -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama is once again challenging major cable and telephone companies by encouraging the Federal Communications Commission to pre-empt state laws that stifle competition for high-speed Internet service.

91. ESPN to be available without cable, dish -

LAS VEGAS (AP) — One of the biggest changes in television this year will be more channels being available online with no separate cable or satellite subscription. But for would-be cord-cutters, watching sports has been the Holy Grail. Until now — Dish Network Corp. on Monday unveiled an Internet-only subscription offering that includes ESPN.

92. Bull market for stocks keeps on going in 2014 -

Stocks delivered again in 2014. Even after a poor start in January and wobbles in October and December, the U.S. market has climbed 13 percent and is ending the year close to record levels.

The solid gain has pushed the bull run for stocks into its sixth year, the longest such streak since the 1990s.

93. Bull market for stocks keeps on going in 2014 -

Stocks delivered again in 2014. Even after a poor start in January and wobbles in October and December, the U.S. market has climbed 13 percent and is ending the year close to record levels.

The solid gain has pushed the bull run for stocks into its sixth year, the longest such streak since the 1990s.

94. CEOs in 10 big mergers to get $430M: Equilar study -

NEW YORK (AP) — This year's flurry of corporate mergers may not pay off for shareholders in the long run, but one thing is for sure: The bosses who are selling their companies will do just fine.

The CEOs who've decided to sell in the 10 biggest U.S. deals this year are set to rake in an estimated $430 million in "golden parachute" payments, according to a study done by pay-tracking firm Equilar at the request of The Associated Press. Translation: It would take the typical American household 847 years of work to get what the average CEO will receive in one fell swoop.

95. Obama steps into divisive debate on net neutrality -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Let's say President Barack Obama gets his way and high-speed Internet service providers are governed by the same U.S. regulations imposed on telephone companies 80 years ago.

96. Obama calls for tougher Internet regulation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama on Monday embraced a radical change in how the government treats Internet service, coming down on the side of consumer activists who fear slower download speeds and higher costs but angering Republicans and the nation's cable giants who say the plan would kill jobs.

97. US stocks climb to new highs; home builders gain -

NEW YORK (AP) — For stocks on Monday, the path of least resistance was up.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index and the Dow Jones industrial average both edged up to all-time highs on a day that was light on economic news and company releases.

98. US stocks gain as the price of crude oil rebounds -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks returned to record levels on Wednesday as a rebound in oil prices boosted energy stocks. The stock market also gained after the completion of midterm elections that saw Republicans take control of the Senate.

99. Not so fast cordcutters_cable's not going anywhere -

NEW YORK (AP) — Cord cutters rejoiced last week after HBO and CBS announced plans to sell stand-alone streaming services, a move that cable and satellite television providers have resisted for years. Customers tired of paying big fees for hundreds of channels they never watch just to have access to a few favorite shows might be expected to start cancelling cable service in droves. Get Netflix, throw in HBO, add a network here and there — why would anyone sign up now for cable?

100. HBO unleashes streaming from cable contracts -

NEW YORK (AP) — No cable? No problem. Viewers longing to watch "Game of Thrones", "True Detective" and "Veep" will no longer have to pay big bucks for cable and satellite contracts.

Next year HBO is cutting the cord and selling its popular streaming video service HBO Go as a stand-alone product, as more Americans choose to watch the Web, not the TV.