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Editorial Results (free)

1. Boeing expected to move headquarters from Chicago to DC area -

Boeing Co. said Thursday it will move its headquarters from Chicago to the Washington, D.C., area, where company executives would be closer to key federal government officials.

The company said it will use its campus in Arlington, Virginia, as the new headquarters, and it plans to develop a research and technology hub in the area.

2. State turns to court after ex-House aide refuses subpoenas -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee's attorney general is taking the one-time chief of staff of a former House speaker to court after he refused to comply with subpoenas in the investigation of a shadowy political action committee.

3. Cuomo wants $125 million for 'unlawful' CNN firing -

NEW YORK (AP) — Chris Cuomo wants an arbitrator to award him $125 million for his firing from CNN, alleging his bosses knew full well how he advised his brother, former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, and suggested they did the same themselves.

4. Charged with fraud, Tennessee rep resigns, reaches plea deal -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee Republican lawmaker resigned Monday shortly after court documents were unsealed revealing that she faces a federal wire fraud charge involving a disgraced former state House speaker.

5. Reading Putin: Unbalanced or cagily preying on West's fears? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For two decades, Vladimir Putin has struck rivals as reckless, impulsive. But his behavior in ordering an invasion of Ukraine — and now putting Russia's nuclear forces on high alert — has some in the West questioning whether the Russian president has become dangerously unstable.

6. Big tech grapples with Russian state media, propaganda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As Russia's war in Ukraine  plays out for the world on social media, big tech platforms are moving to restrict Russian state media from using their platforms to spread propaganda and misinformation.

7. Nashville-area summer camps guide 2022 -

Camp provides children and young adults the chance to experience something totally different from their daily lives – maybe an opportunity to connect with nature, ride horses or learn to sail – as well as the opportunity to participate in team-based activities and develop relationships. Based on health safety precautions, check with each program about their policies based on recommendations from local health authorities and the Centers for Disease Control, and will have a different refund policy based on COVID. Contact each one to review.

8. Please hold: Pricey way to jump IRS phone line at tax time -

WASHINGTON (AP) — If there's one thing that pains everyone trying to reach the IRS at tax time, it's being stuck on endless hold.

Well, not everyone.

E. Martin Davidoff's accounting firm spends upwards of $5,000 a year to a company that can zip him and others to the front of the line to get through to an IRS customer service representative. He says paying for enQ's line-jumping service cuts out hours every day that he would otherwise spend waiting to talk to an agent.

9. Convenience vs. quality: Oh, for an internet do-over -

Spotify has been in the news lately with Neil Young and Joni Mitchell pulling their music to protest COVID-19 misinformation being spread by Joe Rogan on his popular podcast, which Spotify hosts.

Down a little farther in those stories are details on how little artists are paid by streaming services. Some leaders of the Music Row community feel they overlooked Napster – which birthed the music-streaming industry – when it began pirating their material in the early days of the commercial internet.

10. Insurrection prompts year of change for US Capitol Police -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A year after thousands of violent pro-Trump rioters overwhelmed police officers at the U.S. Capitol — severely injuring dozens in the process — the force dedicated to protecting the premier symbol of American democracy has transformed.

11. Top Davidson County residential sales for 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, November 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

12. US delays intelligence center targeting foreign influence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As Russia was working to subvert U.S. elections and sow discord among Americans, Congress directed the creation of an intelligence center to lead efforts to stop interference by foreign adversaries. But two years later, that center still is not close to opening.

13. Garlington is new CFO at Centerstone -

Centerstone, a not-for-profit health system specializing in mental health and substance use disorder services, has selected Andy Garlington as the new chief financial officer.

Garlington will manage Centerstone’s revenues of more than $295 million and lead a finance team of 225 professionals.

14. Christmas tree buyers face reduced supplies, higher prices -

ALAMEDA, Calif. (AP) — Even Christmas trees aren't immune to the pandemic-induced shortages and inflation plaguing the economy.

Extreme weather and supply chain disruptions have reduced supplies of both real and artificial trees this season. American shoppers should expect to have fewer choices and pay up to 30% more for both types this Christmas, industry officials said.

15. US files antitrust suit to stop major book publisher merger -

The Justice Department is suing to block a $2.2 billion book publishing deal  that would have reshaped the industry, saying consolidation would hurt authors and, ultimately, readers.

German media giant Bertelsmann's Penguin Random House, already the largest American publisher, wants to buy New York-based Simon & Schuster, whose authors include Stephen King, Hillary Clinton and John Irving, from TV and film company ViacomCBS.

16. Tennessee senator indicted on campaign cash scheme charges -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee state senator and a Nashville social club owner were indicted on charges that they violated campaign finance laws by illegally concealing the transfer of $91,000 during the Republican lawmaker's 2016 failed congressional campaign, federal investigators announced Monday.

17. Trump plan for new media venture gets investors' thumbs up -

NEW YORK (AP) — Some investors aren't waiting to see if former President Donald Trump's plans for a media company to challenge the likes of Facebook, Twitter and even Disney can actually become reality — they're all in.

18. CIA creates working group on China as threats keep rising -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The CIA said Thursday it will create a top-level working group on China as part of a broad U.S. government effort focused on countering Beijing's influence.

The group will become one of fewer than a dozen mission centers operated by the CIA, with weekly director-level meetings intended to drive the agency's strategy toward China. The CIA also announced that it would ramp up efforts to recruit Chinese speakers and create another mission center focusing on emerging technologies and global issues such as climate change and global health.

19. Can $1 trillion coin fix debt limit? Quirky law says maybe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some politicians think they've found a silver bullet for the impasse over the debt limit, except the bullet is made of platinum: Mint a $1 trillion coin, token of all tokens, and use it to flood the treasury with cash and drive Republicans crazy.

20. Hollywood's behind-the-scenes crews vote to authorize strike -

Film and television production in North America is in jeopardy of coming to a standstill after its behind-the-scenes workers overwhelmingly voted to authorize a strike for the first time in its 128-year history.

21. Democratic-led committees vow investigations on Afghanistan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic-led congressional committees are vowing to press President Joe Biden's administration on what went wrong as the Taliban swept to power in Afghanistan and the United States left scores of Americans and thousands who helped them over the years in grave danger.

22. For Biden and senators, a sense that 'world was watching' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When President Joe Biden first announced the framework he'd reached with a bipartisan group of senators for a big infrastructure bill, he said it meant more than building roads and bridges.

23. Weary US businesses confront new round of mask mandates -

Businesses large and small, from McDonald's and Home Depot to local yoga studios, are reinstituting mask mandates as U.S. coronavirus cases rise. Bars, gyms and restaurants across the country are requiring vaccines to get inside.

24. Infrastructure senators brush off criticism from left, right -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The often-elusive political center is holding steady in the Senate with a strong coalition of Democrats and Republicans brushing off critics to push  the $1 trillion infrastructure package toward passage.  Final votes are expected Tuesday.

25. Senate Dems rallying behind Biden's $3.5T budget vision -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Democrats across the political spectrum seem near the unanimity they'll need for the crucial first step toward their $3.5 trillion vision of bolstering health care, education, family services and environment programs

26. Biden nudges Senate over 'historic' $1T infrastructure bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite a rocky week of fits and starts, President Joe Biden on Friday praised the Senate for edging the bipartisan infrastructure  plan closer to passage, ahead of a key vote on the $1 trillion package.

27. Indy 500 winner Castroneves pumped for return at Nashville -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Helio Castroneves exhausted himself sprinting down Indianapolis Motor Speedway in celebration and then tacked on another -- a fourth at Indy! -- fence climb that left the Brazilian wanting more.

28. Top Senate Dem sets infrastructure vote, pressures lawmakers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer is pressuring lawmakers to reach agreement by next week on a pair of massive domestic spending measures, signaling Democrats' desire to push ahead aggressively on President Joe Biden's multitrillion-dollar agenda.

29. Top Davidson County residential sales for second quarter 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, second quarter 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

30. Events -

Ask the Experts: Business & Legal Clinic For Artists, Musicians & Creatives. Seek help with legal, marketing or accounting questions related to your art. Ask the Experts, a pro bono business and legal clinic for Greater Nashville’s creative community. Get 30-minute one-on-one time with industry experts. Appointments are limited, sign up to receive a spot. After signing up, an ABC staff member will contact you for more information. Your appointment will not be confirmed until. After you respond to the staff email regarding your appointment. Wednesday, 6-8 p.m. via zoom. Information

31. Bipartisan infrastructure group swells to 21 senators -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan senators' group working on a $1 trillion infrastructure compromise more than doubled in size to 21 members Wednesday, a key threshold that gives momentum to their effort as President Joe Biden returns from overseas at a pivotal time for his big legislative priority.

32. Harris announces $1.25 billion for community lenders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Kamala Harris announced Tuesday that the Biden administration is distributing $1.25 billion to hundreds of community lenders in an effort to help boost the economic recovery from the coronavirus for small businesses and disadvantaged business owners.

33. Report: Nashville police could have done more with bomb tip -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Nashville police could have done a better job of following up on a 2019 tip about bomb-making activity by the man who later detonated an explosive in downtown Nashville on Christmas Day, a report released Wednesday concludes.

34. Gibson Garage opens June 9 with concert -

Gibson, the iconic, American instrument brand based in Nashville, is debuting the Gibson Garage, which it bills as the “ultimate guitar experience.”

The 8,000-square-foot shop will officially open to the public June 9 at historic Cummins Station, located on 209 10th Avenue South.

35. With AMC shares up 1,100% in 2021, company sells shares -

The movie theater chain AMC is raising $230.5 million through an 8.5 million share sale, cashing in on the meme stock frenzy that has sent its stock price up more than 1,100% this year.

Theaters and other beleaguered industries like restaurants and concert venues are anticipating the return of crowds over the next few months with the massive U.S. vaccination effort ongoing.

36. Streaming landscape shifts with $43B AT&T Discovery deal -

NEW YORK (AP) — AT&T said Monday it will combine its massive WarnerMedia media assets, which includes HBO and CNN, with Discovery Inc. to create a new media heavyweight in a $43 billion deal.

37. Biden boosted by Senate rules as GOP bucks infrastructure -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With an appeal to think big, President Joe Biden is promoting his $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan directly to Americans, summoning public support to push past the Republicans lining up against the massive effort they sum up as big taxes, big spending and big government.

38. Biden summons public support as GOP bucks infrastructure -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With an appeal to think big, President Joe Biden is promoting his $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan directly to Americans, summoning public support to push past the Republicans lining up against the massive effort they sum up as big taxes, big spending and big government.

39. Regal Cinemas, 2nd largest chain in US, to reopen in April -

NEW YORK (AP) — Regal Cinemas, the second largest movie theater chain in the U.S., will reopen beginning April 2, its parent company, Cineworld Group, announced Tuesday.

Regal had been one of most notable holdouts in the gradual reopening of cinemas nationwide. For nearly half a year, its 7,211 screens and 549 theatres in the U.S. have been dark. Doors will open early next month with attendance limited to 25% to 50% capacity in about 500 locations.

40. Takeaways: What hearings have revealed about Jan. 6 failures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Many questions remain unanswered about the failure to prevent the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. But after six congressional hearings, it's clear that the Capitol Police were unprepared and overwhelmed as hundreds of Donald Trump's supporters laid siege to the building. It's also clear that no one wants to take responsibility for it.

41. 2021 Middle Tennessee Summer camp list -

Camps provide an opportunity to connect with nature, participate in team-based activities and develop relationships. The COVID-19 pandemic will still have an impact on summer camps this summer as most programs and activities will have limited capacity to provide for social distancing, and may have to pivot or modify based on recommendations from local health authorities and the Center for Disease Control. Every camp has a different refund policy based on COVID as well, so please contact each one to review.

42. US still unraveling 'sophisticated' hack of 9 gov't agencies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. authorities are still working to unravel the full scope of the likely Russian hack that gave the "sophisticated" actor behind the breach complete access to files and email from at least nine government agencies and about 100 private companies, the top White House cybersecurity official said Wednesday.

43. Openings begin March 4 at Fifth + Broadway -

Brookfield Properties’ mixed-use project Fifth + Broadway in downtown Nashville will begin its first tenant openings March 4.

The event culminates a multiyear effort by the company and local developer Pat Emery on the former site of the Nashville Convention Center.

44. Tennessee lawmaker: FBI took all campaign files in search -

NASHVILLE (AP) — One of several Republican state lawmakers in Tennessee whose homes and legislative offices were searched by federal agents this month says the FBI confiscated all files and documents related to his campaign.

45. Justice Dept. won't charge Sen. Burr over stock sales -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Richard Burr said Tuesday that the Justice Department has told him it will not prosecute him over stock sales made during the coronavirus pandemic, ending an insider trading investigation that led him to at least temporarily step aside from a powerful committee chairmanship last year.

46. Tennessee lawmakers return for session amid pandemic, FBI probe -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers gathered to start their annual session Tuesday in Nashville amid a pandemic and an FBI probe that drew searches of multiple legislative offices by federal agents last week.

47. Calamity? Anomaly? 2020 was a box office year like no other -

When the sun sets on the 2020 film box office, it'll be difficult to look at the numbers as anything but disastrous.

After five consecutive years of North American revenues exceeding $11 billion, this year they're expected to cap out at an almost 40-year low of around $2.3 billion. That'll be down 80% from last year according to data firm Comscore. Globally, where markets have been able to recover more fully, ticket sales will likely end up somewhere between $11 and $12 billion. Last year, that total hit $42.5 billion. But of course, 2020 is a year with a big asterisk.

48. Nashville man's girlfriend warned he was building bombs -

NASHVILLE (AP) — More than a year before Anthony Warner detonated a bomb in downtown Nashville on Christmas, officers visited his home after his girlfriend told police he was building bombs in an RV trailer at his residence, according to documents obtained by The Associated Press. But they did not make contact with him, or see inside his RV.

49. Restaurants to retailers, virus transformed business -

It would be just a temporary precaution. When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon – as soon as New York was safe again.

50. From restaurants to retailers, virus transformed economies -

NEW YORK (AP) — It would be just a temporary precaution.

When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon — as soon as New York was safe again.

51. Christopher Nolan calls Warner's streaming plan 'a mess' -

Christopher Nolan, one of Warner Bros.' most important filmmakers, has come out strongly against the company's decision to debut its films on HBO Max and in theaters in 2021. The "Tenet" filmmaker told The Associated Press Monday that it's not a good business decision and criticized how the company handled it.

52. Senator says Trump, McConnell likely to back COVID-19 relief -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A proposed COVID-19 relief bill is expected to get backing from President Donald Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell but it won't include $1,200 in direct payments to most Americans, a Republican senator involved in the bipartisan talks says.

53. Warner Bros. to release all 2021 films on HBO Max, theaters -

NEW YORK (AP) — In the most seismic shift by a Hollywood studio yet during the pandemic, Warner Bros. Pictures on Thursday announced that all of its 2021 film slate — including a new "Matrix" movie, "Godzilla vs. Kong" and the Lin-Manuel Miranda adaptation "In the Heights" — will stream on HBO Max at the same time they play in theaters.

54. Centrist lawmakers push $908B plan to break virus impasse -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan group of lawmakers is putting pressure on congressional leaders to accept a split-the-difference solution to the months-long impasse on COVID-19 relief in a last-gasp effort to ship overdue help to a hurting nation before Congress adjourns for the holidays.

55. The pandemic is changing Hollywood, maybe forever -

NEW YORK (AP) — "No New 'Movies' Till Influenza Ends" blared a New York Times headline on Oct. 10, 1918, while the deadly second wave of the Spanish Flu was unfolding.

A century later, during another pandemic, movies — quotes no longer necessary — are again facing a critical juncture. But it's not because new films haven't been coming out. By streaming service, video-on-demand, virtual theater or actual theater, a steady diet of films have been released under COVID-19 every week. The Times has reviewed more than 460 new movies since mid-March.

56. Curious about going to a movie theater? 7 things to know -

It's been over two months since movie theaters started reopening in the U.S., but there is still a fair amount of consumer confusion about moviegoing in the COVID-19 era.

Movie studios and theater owners have found themselves in the unique position of having to re-educate audiences on how to see movies now. Warner Bros. even recently revamped the website for " Tenet," Christopher Nolan's sci-fi espionage thriller, to help take some of the mystery out of going back to the movies.

57. Packing up is hard to do: Sell the house and get out -

Houses keep selling, often more quickly than owners anticipated. With the holidays approaching, many sellers who were not expecting the houses to sell and close in such a short time period are attempting to push the buyers into allowing them to stay longer in their homes.

58. In reversal, intelligence panels to get election briefings -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration has agreed to provide in-person briefings on threats to the November election to key members of Congress, backing down from a decision last month to provide that information only in writing.

59. Big drop reported in vaping by US teenagers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Vaping by U.S. teenagers fell dramatically this year, especially among middle schoolers, according to a federal report released Wednesday.

Experts think last year's outbreak of vaping related illnesses and deaths may have scared off some kids, but they believe other factors contributed to the drop, including higher age limits and flavor bans.

60. Smith named president of Tennessee Medical Association -

The Tennessee Medical Association has named Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s M. Kevin Smith, M.D., Ph.D., MMHC of Nashville as 2020-21 president of the member-based nonprofit advocacy organization that represents 9,500 physicians statewide.

61. AMC to offer 15-cent tickets on first day of reopening -

NEW YORK (AP) — AMC Theatres, the nation's largest movie theater chain, will reopen in the U.S. on Aug. 20 with retro ticket prices of 15 cents per movie.

AMC Entertainment, which owns the chain, said Thursday that it expects to open the doors to more than 100 cinemas — or about a sixth of its nationwide locations — on Aug. 20 with throwback pricing for a day.

62. AMC to offer 15-cent tickets on first day of reopening -

NEW YORK (AP) — AMC Theatres, the nation's largest movie theater chain, will reopen in the U.S. on Aug. 20 with retro ticket prices of 15 cents per movie.

AMC Entertainment, which owns the chain, said Thursday that it expects to open the doors to more than 100 cinemas — or about a sixth of its nationwide locations — on Aug. 20 with throwback pricing for a day.

63. Republicans quickly rebuff Trump after his vote delay idea -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's suggestion of postponing the November election drew condemnation from Republican officials in the states and on Capitol Hill as they tried to bat away questions their own party leader had raised about the legitimacy of that upcoming vote.

64. Democrats: Trump must tell voters about election threats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic leaders in Congress are dialing up pressure on President Donald Trump's administration over foreign election interference, saying it's time for officials to make a "concrete and specific statement" to inform voters ahead of the 2020 contest.

65. Movie theaters implore studios: Release the blockbusters -

NEW YORK (AP) — A long time ago in a pre-COVID universe far, far away, blockbusters opened around the globe simultaneously or nearly so. In 1975, "Jaws" set the blueprint. Concentrate marketing. Open wide. Pack them in.

66. US labs buckle amid testing surge; world virus cases top 15M -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Laboratories across the U.S. are buckling under a surge of coronavirus tests, creating long processing delays that experts say are actually undercutting the pandemic response.

67. Events -

Next Normal Series. Pandethics - How a Crisis Affects the Ethics of Business (and the Business of Ethics). In partnership with Vanderbilt Executive Education at the Owen Graduate School of Management, the Nashville Area Chamber is presenting a webinar on what professor Bruce Barry called “Pandethics,” the intersection of ethics and decision making during a pandemic. Friday, 9-10 a.m. Information

68. Movie theaters, shuttered for months, plan July reopening -

NEW YORK (AP) — After three months of near total blackout of cinemas nationwide, movie theaters are preparing to reopen — even if it means only a few titles on the marquee and showings limited to as little as 25% capacity.

69. Summer getaway might be closer than you think -

With summer weeks away, the mercury beginning its trek upward and the children still underfoot after two weeks of spring break coupled with six weeks of quarantined home schooling, it is time for many Nashvillians to head to the mountains.

70. Too much TV? Enter HBO Max, the latest streaming wannabe -

Is a pandemic the perfect time to launch a new and relatively expensive streaming service? AT&T sure hopes so.

The phone company is investing billions in HBO Max, its first big entertainment venture since it spent $85 billion for Time Warner in 2018. The good news for its timing: millions are stuck at home, watching more video than ever. The bad news: many of them also out of work and carefully watching their incomes. The service launches Wednesday in the U.S.

71. Rubio warns of foreign actors amplifying virus conspiracies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Marco Rubio, the new Republican chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, is warning that foreign actors will seek to amplify conspiracy theories about the coronavirus and find new ways to interfere in the 2020 presidential election.

72. Committee approves Ratcliffe for DNI, sends to full Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate intelligence committee on Tuesday approved the nomination of Texas GOP Rep. John Ratcliffe to be director of national intelligence, sending the nomination to the Senate floor for his likely confirmation.

73. Senate panel backs assessment that Russia interfered in 2016 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan Senate report released Tuesday affirms the U.S. intelligence community's conclusions that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election in a far-ranging influence campaign approved by Russian President Vladimir Putin and aimed at helping Donald Trump win the White House.

74. Trump taps loyalist Grenell as nation's top intel official -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump announced that Richard Grenell, the U.S. ambassador to Germany, will become acting director of national intelligence, a move that puts a staunch Trump ally in charge of the nation's 17 spy agencies, which the president has only tepidly embraced.

75. Trump taps loyalist Grenell as nation's top intel official -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump announced that Richard Grenell, the U.S. ambassador to Germany, will become acting director of national intelligence, a move that puts a staunch Trump ally in charge of the nation's 17 spy agencies, which the president has only tepidly embraced.

76. Summer camp guide 2020 -

Camps provide children and teens a chance to connect with nature, participate in team-based activities and develop relationships. From academics to athletics, there is a camp for everyone at every age, with any interest. Here are just a few.

77. Events -

13th Annual Louise Scruggs Memorial Forum Honoring Bev Paul. Bev Paul joined the staff of Sugar Hill Records and label founder Barry Poss in 1991. During Paul’s tenure, Sugar Hill emerged as one of the most important independent labels in history. Ricky Skaggs, Jerry Douglas, Sam Bush, Nickel Creek, and Robert Earl Keen released seminal albums on the label, which also embraced singer-songwriters such as Guy Clark and Townes Van Zandt. Paul nurtured many young professional women who would go on to play key roles throughout the music industry. The Louise Scruggs Memorial Forum is presented annually to honor a music industry leader who exemplifies the legacy of Louise Scruggs. Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, 222 Fifth Avenue N. Information

78. Senate: Obama officials hamstrung by Russia election attack -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration was ill-prepared to handle and failed to respond effectively to Russian interference during the 2016 election, according to a bipartisan congressional report released Thursday. It noted officials feared getting caught up in a heavily politicized environment and undermining public confidence in the electoral process.

79. Companies offer rebuke of Tennessee's anti-LGBT adoption law -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Almost three dozen big companies and more than 100 small businesses in Tennessee on Wednesday predicted economic backlash from a newly enacted state adoption law and other proposals that target LGBT people, with one company saying plans to add jobs in Nashville are "in doubt" over the legislation.

80. Busy Vol Davis relishes delivering Super Bowl to world -

Charles Davis was in the middle of the broadcast when his cellphone began buzzing.

The PGA Tour was having a tournament in Dubai, and professional golfers were texting Davis to say they were watching him call the Super Bowl.

81. Trump doubles down on striking cultural sites in Iran -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump insisted Sunday that Iranian cultural sites were fair game for the U.S. military, dismissing concerns within his own administration that doing so could constitute a war crime under international law. He also warned Iraq that he would levy punishing sanctions if it expelled American troops in retaliation for a U.S. airstrike in Baghdad that killed a top Iranian official.

82. The box office belonged to Disney in 2019 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Every movie year offers up a parade of hits and flops. But in 2019, no winner was in the same galaxy as the Walt Disney Co. And the biggest loser might have been anyone less thrilled about the box-office domination of franchise films.

83. Bradley welcomes 5 new associates -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has added five associate attorneys in the firm’s Nashville office. They are:

• Bethany Breeze Davenport, tax and bankruptcy practice groups. She earned her J.D. from the University of Kentucky College of Law, where she served as editor-in-chief of the Kentucky Law Journal. She is a graduate of Transylvania University.

84. US permits sale of cigarettes with 95% less nicotine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials on Tuesday endorsed a type of cigarette that could help ease the addictive grip of smoking by delivering very low levels of nicotine.

The Food and Drug Administration will allow 22nd Century Group to begin selling the first low-nicotine cigarettes reviewed by federal health regulators. The products contain roughly 95% less nicotine than standard cigarettes, according to the FDA.

85. Sundance sets lineup with Taylor Swift, 'Tesla,' 'Downhill' -

NEW YORK (AP) — A documentary on Taylor Swift will kickoff the next Sundance Film Festival, where new films including the Will Ferrell-Julia Louis Dreyfus remake of the Swedish film "Force Majeure" and Benh Zeitlin's long-awaited follow-up to "Beasts of the Southern Wild" are set to premiere.

86. Vols receiver Callaway ‘always the kid everybody loved’ -

Marquez Callaway thought it was a bit strange that he was allowed to return home only a week before his first career game in a Tennessee uniform.

His family told Callaway that his grandmother was being honored at a local church in Warner Robins, Georgia, and he needed to be there.

87. AT&T says HBO Max streaming service to launch in May for $15 -

AT&T said Tuesday that its HBO Max streaming service will launch in May for $15 a month, joining a crowded field.

The company has said HBO Max will become the "workhorse" for its video business as cord-cutting of traditional TV expands. It hopes to migrate people who pay for HBO in different ways today to the new platform. The service grew out of AT&T's $81 billion purchase of Time Warner, which AT&T overhauled and rechristened WarnerMedia.

88. AT&T makes changes in response to activist investor push -

NEW YORK (AP) — AT&T will review its portfolio for assets it can sell off, pay down debt related to its Time Warner acquisition and add two board members as part of a plan to boost results.

The moves come after criticism from hedge fund manager Elliott Management. In September the activist disclosed a $3.2 billion investment in AT&T, roughly a 1% stake, and called for changes at the company such as selling assets and paying down debt.

89. Middle Tennessee's private schools -

Key information, including tuition costs, for private schools in the Middle Tennessee area. All tuition prices are for the 2019-2020 academic school year unless otherwise noted. Tuition prices are subject to change. Additional fees, payment plans and other programs such as need-based financial aid, tuition breaks for siblings or religious affiliation.

90. Big Tech faces a new set of foes: nearly all 50 US states -

Big tech companies have long rebuffed attempts by the U.S. federal government to scrutinize or scale back their market power. Now they face a scrappy new coalition as well: prosecutors from nearly all 50 states.

91. Elliott invests $3.2B in AT&T, seeks changes -

NEW YORK (AP) — Activist hedge fund manager Elliott Management is making a new $3.2 billion investment in AT&T and calling for changes at the company such as selling its DirecTV and Mexican wireless operations.

92. As feds loom, states hit Facebook, Google with new probes -

NEW YORK (AP) — Two bipartisan groups of state attorneys general are launching separate antitrust investigations into Facebook and Google, adding to regulatory scrutiny of two of the world's largest and most ubiquitous tech companies.

93. Events -

Full Moon Pickin' Parties: Enjoy these unique Friday night parties featuring bluegrass music performed by attendees as well as main acts. Percy Warner Park Equestrian Center. Food available, Water, soft drinks and up to four beers are included with admission. Adults: $20 advance, $25 day of; Youth (7-17): $7 advance, $10 day of; Children 6 and younger free. Pickers: $5 (no alcohol), $10 with beer. Season pass: $100. Proceeds benefit Warner Parks. 7-11 p.m. Information: http://warnerparks.org/programs-events/events-2/pickin-party

94. CBS, Viacom to reunite as media giants bulk up for streaming -

NEW YORK (AP) — CBS and Viacom announced a long-anticipated reunion Tuesday, bringing together their television networks and the Paramount movie studio as traditional media giants bulk up to challenge streaming companies like Netflix.

95. Events -

County Fairs: Agricultural fairs are a tradition in Tennessee, and Middle Tennessee has plenty to choose from. Middle Tennessee fairs and dates include:

Aug. 14-18: Cheatham County, 870 Fairgrounds Road, Ashland City. www.facebook.com/CheathamCountyFair

96. Nashville attorneys selected for AHLA -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has announced two of the firm’s Nashville attorneys, Stephanie M. Hoffmann and Janus Pan have been selected to participate in the American Health Lawyers Association Leadership Development Program.

97. Justice Dept. puts Big Tech under the antitrust microscope -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Like Europe before it, the U.S. government looks ready to try reining in its technology giants. But doing so may be more difficult than it seems.

On Tuesday, the U.S. Department of Justice opened a sweeping antitrust investigation of major technology companies and whether their online platforms have hurt competition, suppressed innovation or otherwise harmed consumers.

98. MAD magazine leaving newsstands after 67-year run (Really!) -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — MAD, the long-running satirical magazine that influenced everyone from "Weird Al" Yankovic to the writers of "The Simpsons," will be leaving newsstands after its August issue. Really.

99. Some big farms collecting outsized checks from Trump aid package -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — When President Donald Trump's administration announced a $12 billion aid package for farmers struggling under the financial strain of his trade dispute with China, the payments were capped. But many large farming operations had no trouble finding legal ways around them, records provided to The Associated Press under the Freedom of Information Act show.

100. In Trump aid package for farmers, many blow past caps -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — When President Donald Trump's administration announced a $12 billion aid package for farmers struggling under the financial strain of his trade dispute with China, the payments were capped. But many large farming operations had no trouble finding legal ways around them, records provided to The Associated Press under the Freedom of Information Act show.