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Editorial Results (free)

1. NY court hears arguments on fantasy sports -

NEW YORK (AP) — A New York court is hearing arguments over the legality of the country's two biggest daily fantasy sports companies.

More than 100 lawyers, observers and reporters appeared Wednesday at the hearing in state Supreme Court in Manhattan.

2. US new-home sales rebound in October after September plummet -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sales of new homes recovered in October after suffering a steep drop in September, returning to this year's trend of an improving market for real estate developers and builders.

The Commerce Department said Wednesday that new-home sales climbed 10.7 percent last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 495,000. This rebound followed a 12.9 percent plunge in the sales rate during September.

3. Average US rate on 30-year mortgage slides to 3.95 percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates slipped this week after they climbed recently expectations that the Federal Reserve may soon raise its key short-term interest rate.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Wednesday the average rate on a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage slipped to 3.95 percent from 3.97 percent a week earlier. The key 30-year rate was nearly unchanged from its level of a year ago, 3.97 percent. But the average has increased over the past months from 3.76 at the end of October.

4. Holiday weight loss advice: Forget about it -

I hardly ever dream, and when I do, I hardly ever remember them. Usually, when I lay my head down on my pillow and close my eyes, that’s all. It’s all over until the next morning.

Hubby, however, always remembers his dreams.

5. Poet’s indescretions lead down meandering path -

Last week we noted that American poet Ezra Pound wrote a historical two-line poem in 1913. While establishing himself as a leader in the movement that gave us stream-of-consciousness fiction, free-verse poetry, atonal music and abstract art. And years before being indicted for treason.

6. Beacon of hope in rise of proximity marketing -

With 2016 just around the corner, it’s the right time to consider emerging marketing trends that could benefit your company’s growth strategy.

Right at the top of the list of emerging trends is the explosion of proximity marketing, which is a form of geo-targeted marketing that leverages beacon technology in high-traffic areas.

7. Belmont’s Littlejohn named Professor of the Year -

Belmont’s Ronnie Littlejohn, professor of philosophy and director of the University’s Asian Studies program, has been named as the 2015 Tennessee Professor of the Year, an award selection determined by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE).

8. Can VU pull off one more SEC win against Vols? -

Tennessee football fans already are talking about their bowl destinations for the Christmas holidays.

Will it be the Belk Bowl in Charlotte, the Music City Bowl in Nashville or the Outback Bowl in Tampa?

9. Mularkey’s choice: Build resume or build for future -

Mike Mularkey finds himself in a tough situation. The Titans head coach, who took over after Ken Whisenhunt was fired three games ago, knows he needs to win some games down the stretch to better enhance whatever chance he might have of being named permanent head coach.

10. Real estate world will miss Belmont, 12South pioneer Jenkins Hardin -

Every now and then, someone comes along who is destined for greatness. This trait is evident in many people, even in their youth, and these characteristics follow them throughout their lives.

Of those who possess this quality, some see it as a gift or a blessing, while others feel it is a burden or even a curse.

11. Shop a safe haven for barber, his customers -

Mister T puts a straight razor to the busboy’s throat. “I like it here because of the comfortability,” says Larry Johnson, 32, the busboy, as Mister T finishes his surgically precise separation of whiskers from neck and chin.

12. Queens, workers, drones: Types of bees and what they do -

For honeybees, it’s all about the queen, and long may she reign.

Honeybee colonies have three types of bees: queens, workers and drones.

All the bees in the colony are descendants of the queen. A bit larger than the worker bee, the queen is the fertile bee who spends her time laying up to 3,000 eggs each day.

13. Nashvillian continues lifelong fascination with all things bees -

Joel White’s fascination with bees began in 1975 when one of his college coaches took him out to some apiaries to show him around.

He was hooked, and kept his own bees for the next eight years.

14. Vanishing bees pose big threat to economy -

Dave Hackenberg, a beekeeper in Florida, discovered 400 of his over 2,000 beehives had been abandoned during the winter.

It wasn’t that the bees were dead and their bodies were scattered around the hives.

15. Consumer spending up weak 0.1 percent in October -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumer spending posted a modest increase for a second straight month in October, while personal income rebounded after a sluggish September.

Spending edged up 0.1 percent after a similar tiny gain in September, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday.

16. Applications for US unemployment benefits fall to 260,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people seeking U.S. unemployment aid dropped sharply last week, the Labor Department said Wednesday, the latest sign that businesses are cutting few jobs.

THE NUMBERS: Weekly applications for jobless benefits dropped 12,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 260,000. That is not far from the four-decade low of 255,000 reached in July. The four-week average, a less volatile measure, was unchanged at 271,000.

17. Cheap gas fueling expanded Thanksgiving travel day -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — An expanded version of America's annual Thanksgiving travel saga has begun with gas prices low and terrorism fears high.

An estimated 46.9 million Americans are expected to take a car, plane, bus or train at least 50 miles from home over the long holiday weekend, according to the motoring organization AAA. That would be an increase of more than 300,000 people over last year, and the most travelers since 2007.

18. US stocks edge higher in midday trading; Deere gains on earns -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are drifting higher in midday trading as markets start to wind down ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday in the U.S.

Several stocks were moving on news.

Deere rose 3 percent after the maker of farm equipment reported earnings that beat analysts' forecasts.

19. US home prices jump in September by most in more than a year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices rose in September from a year earlier at the fastest pace in 13 months as a lack of houses for sale has forced buyers to bid up available properties.

The Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller 20-city home price index, released Tuesday, increased 5.5 percent in September compared with a year ago, the largest annual gain since August 2014.

20. List of large chain stores open on Thanksgiving or Black Friday -

NEW YORK (AP) — After the turkey and stuffing comes the kickoff of the holiday shopping season. And even though most retailers are offering the same deals online, many still plan to open their doors on Thanksgiving Day or in the early morning hours of Black Friday. So if you prefer to pick up those discounted TVs, toys and other goods in person, here's a list of what time stores are open on Thanksgiving and Black Friday:

21. US stocks recover from early slump; price of oil spikes -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks overcame an early stumble Tuesday and finished modestly higher as investors shook off concerns about heightened tensions in the Middle East and a drop in consumer confidence.

22. Funding Board sets moderate growth projection in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The State Funding Board has issued its official revenue projections for the current and next budget years that fall below the estimates presented by experts earlier this month.

The panel made up by the finance commissioner and the state's three constitutional officers on Monday predicted that this year's surplus will be up to $353 million, while next year's revenues could grow by up to $348 million.

23. US home sales slump in Oct. as higher prices weigh on buyers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fewer Americans bought homes in October, a sign that rising home values may be pushing more would-be buyers to the real estate market's sidelines.

The National Association of Realtors said Monday that sales of existing homes fell 3.4 percent last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.36 million.

24. How to fly free forever: Put $170 million on your AmEx -

NEW YORK (AP) — Chinese billionaire Liu Yiqian, who doesn't exactly struggle to afford a plane ticket, can now likely fly free, in first class, with his whole family, anywhere in the world, for the rest of his life.

25. Ford workers narrowly approve new contract with UAW -

DETROIT (AP) — Ford workers narrowly approved a new four-year contract, wrapping up five months of negotiations between the United Auto Workers union and Detroit automakers.

The UAW said late Friday that Ford's contract passed with a 51.4-percent vote. The agreement covers 53,000 U.S. hourly workers at 22 plants.

26. Home values point to a sharp wealth divide within US cities -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's still possible in Boston for a mail carrier, an accountant and a Harvard-trained psychiatrist — basically, the crowd from "Cheers" — to live as neighbors.

That finding by the real estate brokerage Redfin makes the capital of Massachusetts a rarity at a time when neighborhoods in most U.S. cities are increasingly isolated from each other by income and home values.

27. Greene's punt return helps Jaguars beat Titans 19-13 -

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Rashad Greene fielded the line-drive punt, weaved through a few defenders, broke into the open field and nearly scored.

It was the big play the Jacksonville Jaguars needed to beat Tennessee. It was the key moment they had to have to gain ground in the muddled AFC South.

28. Corporate America's problem: Falling profit, revenue -

NEW YORK (AP) — Corporate America has a profit problem. U.S company earnings are falling for the first time since 2009, when the economy was still reeling from the Great Recession.

The main culprit is the plunging price of oil, which has decimated earnings at big energy companies like Exxon Mobil and Chevron. Mining companies have also taken a beating because of tumbling prices for gold, silver and copper.

29. VW has only a few costly options to fix polluting diesels -

DETROIT (AP) — When Volkswagen submits a plan to fix emissions-cheating diesel engines on Friday, it will have only two options for most of the cars.

It can install a bigger exhaust system to trap harmful nitrogen oxide, or it can retrofit a chemical treatment process that cuts pollution.

30. Official: Tennessee Promise helps spike in higher ed enrollment -

NASHVILLE (AP) - The executive director of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam's free-tuition program says it has contributed to the spike in students pursuing a higher education.

Tennessee Promise offers eligible high school seniors free tuition to a two-year community or technical college.

31. Ex-Subway pitchman Fogle gets more than 15 years in prison -

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Former Subway pitchman Jared Fogle was sentenced to more than 15 years in prison on Thursday for trading in child pornography and having sex with underage prostitutes, with the judge describing his "perversion and lawlessness" as "extreme."

32. Average US rate on 30-year mortgage slips to 3.97 percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates edged slightly lower this week after two straight weeks of sharp increases. Expectations persist that the Federal Reserve may soon raise its key short-term interest rate.

33. Best Buy reports weak 3Q sales, cautious outlook -

NEW YORK (AP) — Best Buy shares plunged Thursday after reporting disappointing quarterly sales and a cautious outlook for the key holiday shopping season as it faces price pressures and tougher competition from online stores.

34. Stocks march higher, ending their best week so far this year -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market closed out its best week of the year Friday as big gains by retailers and technology companies pushed major indexes higher.

Stocks faded as Friday wore on, but they still finished higher. The S&P 500 index climbed almost 3.3 percent this week. By just a hair, that was the biggest weekly gain for the index in 2015.

35. Getting ahead this holiday season -

One of the biggest misconceptions about the holidays is that your career can take a back seat until January.

Don’t get me wrong. Family festivities and reconnecting with close friends is important. But putting your career on the back burner for two months is a big mistake.

36. Dangerous time to play emotionally charged Tigers -

Tennessee’s football team may be headed into a perfect storm Saturday night at Missouri.

It’s been an emotional whirlwind the last two weeks for the Tigers (5-5, 1-5 SEC), and they will have plenty of motivation against the Vols (6-4, 3-3).

37. Average US rate on 30-year mortgage slips to 3.97 percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates edged slightly lower this week after two straight weeks of sharp increases. Expectations persist that the Federal Reserve may soon raise its key short-term interest rate.

38. Applications for US jobless aid fall to low level of 271,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Labor Department reported Thursday that fewer Americans sought unemployment aid last week, fresh evidence that companies are confident enough in the economy to hold onto their workers.

39. Stocks indexes mixed in midday trading; Square soars in IPO -

U.S. stocks edged mostly lower in midday trading Thursday as traders weighed a mix of company earnings news. Health care stocks were among the biggest decliners after UnitedHealth Group cut its earnings forecast. Payments company Square soared in its market debut.

40. UAW taking 'micro' approach to unionizing Volkswagen plant -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The United Auto Workers union is back with a more concentrated approach after suffering a bitter loss in its efforts to gain collective-bargaining rights for all blue-collar workers at Volkswagen's plant in Tennessee.

41. United Auto Workers gets OK for union vote at Chattanooga VW plant -

NASHVILLE (AP) - The National Labor Relations Board on Wednesday granted the United Auto Workers petition for a union vote for skilled trades workers at the German automaker's lone U.S. plant in Tennessee.

42. Minutes of meeting show Fed pondering December rate hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials believed last month that the economic conditions needed to trigger the first interest rate hike in nearly a decade could "well be met" by their next meeting in December.

43. Soup: From afterthought to main course -

Last week, hubby and I were in Cleveland taking care of some business. We got a hotel close enough to be able to walk to our destination, and pretty much stayed put for the whole week. Most of the downtown area of Cleveland, where we were staying, was under major construction, so venturing out to explore like we usually do wasn’t much of an option.

44. Top trends to watch while getting ready for 2016 -

As the new year draws closer, it’s an ideal time to reflect on this past year’s marketing strategies, those that hit it out of the park, as well as those that might have struck out.

This honest self-reflection on historical performance is the key to continuous improvement and the development of a solid 2016 strategic marketing plan. Equally important is the ability to look ahead to marketing trends on the horizon that will or already are impacting your company’s growth.

45. Belmont's Joe Calloway: Use magnetism to help pull in new business -

A lasso just won’t do it. Neither will a harness, a come-along, or a whole pack of sheepdogs. No, there are better ways to get customers to your door, but what are they? What’s the secret to snaring new clients?

46. Painful thought: Will the Titans ever be good again? -

As the Tennessee Titans head down the backstretch of another unproductive season, it might be time to ponder a scary question: Will the Titans ever be good again?

How much longer will they be an NFL’s bottom feeder, swimming the same muddy waters as the Raiders, Browns, Lions and Jaguars?

47. Emerald ash borer devastates Tennessee forests -

The emerald ash borer is an unassuming little bug, an almost-pretty insect that could fit on the head of a penny with three or four of its brothers.

But these little green pests are weaving a wormy path of destruction through Tennessee’s lumber industry to the tune of $11 billion. That’s a lot of pennies, and a lot of emerald ash borers.

48. Most memorable interviews … -

Although Jim Bouton won a combined 39 games in the 1963-64 seasons with the New York Yankees, he is best known as the author of the ground-breaking book Ball Four, which I had read and reread.

In the spring of 1977, seven years after publication of the tell-all book, Bouton was making a comeback as a knuckleball pitcher in the minor leagues.

49. The sporting life of David Climer -

I’m blaming Rudy Kalis. As the years passed in a long career as a sports writer, I always swore I’d never be the oldest guy at the press conference.

As long as Rudy was in the house as sports anchor for WSMV-TV, I was safe. Then he got a morning gig at Channel 4.

50. Courting business, Obama presses for climate action in Asia -

MANILA, Philippines (AP) — Aggressive action to fight climate change will be a boon for businesses in Asia and beyond, President Barack Obama has asserted as he reaches for a global climate change agreement he hopes will burnish his environmental legacy.

51. As US prepares to hike rates, Europe could reap benefits -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — In a high-stakes juncture for the global economy, the central banks of Europe and the United States are set to take opposing actions in December: the European Central Bank to cut rates, the Federal Reserve to raise them.

52. Deal news and bank gains send stock market solidly higher -

U.S. stocks notched their best day in nearly four weeks on Wednesday as investors welcomed new hints pointing to a Federal Reserve interest rate hike in coming weeks. Traders were also encouraged by more corporate deal news.

53. Yellen opposes GOP proposal to boost Fed oversight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Tuesday that legislation supported by House Republicans to make the Federal Reserve more transparent and accountable would be a "grave mistake" that could harm the U.S. economy.

54. More Thanksgiving travelers; don't get stuck at the airport -

NEW YORK (AP) — A stronger economy and lower gas prices mean Thanksgiving travelers can expect more congested highways this year.

During the long holiday weekend, 46.9 million Americans are expected to go 50 miles or more from home, the highest number since 2007, according to travel agency and car lobbying group AAA. That would be a 0.6 percent increase over last year and the seventh straight year of growth.

55. US manufacturing output rises for first time in 3 months -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. manufacturing output rose in October for the first time in three months as factories cranked out more steel, cars and computers.

Manufacturing production increased 0.4 percent last month, the Federal Reserve said Tuesday, after slipping 0.1 percent in September.

56. Angie's List board rejects $512 million takeover from IAC -

NEW YORK (AP) — Angie's List says that its board has rejected a $512 million takeover deal from Internet company IAC/InterActiveCorp.

57. Consumer prices rise slightly in October -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The costs of food, gasoline, shelter and medical care rose last month, yet inflation continues to run at low levels ahead of a December Federal Reserve meeting to consider raising short-term interest rates for the first time in nearly a decade.

58. CMT to honor Kenny Rogers as artist of a lifetime -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Kenny Rogers, who earlier this year announced his retirement from touring, will be honored as the CMT Artist of a Lifetime for his extensive music career spanning across multiple genres for decades.

59. US startup challenges Japan to giant robot battle -

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — They've been popularized in movies, television and video games, but giant fighting robots still haven't left the realm of science fiction. That will soon change.

Megabots Inc., an Oakland, California-based startup, has built a 15-foot mechanical gladiator called the Mark II and challenged a Japanese firm to an international battle for robot supremacy.

60. Energy stocks lead a rally as the price of oil climbs -

U.S. stocks mounted a broad rally on Monday, snapping a three-day losing streak as investors moved past concerns that the terrorist attacks in Paris could spell big trouble for the global economy.

Oil and gas stocks were among the biggest gainers as the price of crude rose. Traders also bid up shares in defense contractors, while travel-related stocks slumped.

61. Marriott becomes world's largest hotelier, buying Starwood for $12.2 billion -

NEW YORK (AP) — Hotel behemoth Marriott International is becoming even larger, taking over rival chain Starwood in a $12.2 billion deal that will catapult it to become the world's largest hotelier by a wide margin.

62. A blur of lobbyists as transportation bill takes shape -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress is racing toward a Friday deadline to renew the law that pays for national transportation programs, and lobbyists trying to shape the legislation are in a frenzy.

Among the issues: the length of trucks allowed on roads, whether recalled used cars must be repaired before they can be sold and how to pay for bridges and highways.

63. Big deal momentum may carry into 2016 for health care -

With $2 trillion in buyouts since January, 2015 has become the year of the megadeal, fueled by free money in a zero-interest rate environment.

But with the Fed appearing increasingly keen on hiking rates, that party may be coming to an end.

64. Experts predict big Tennessee revenue growth this year and next -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Experts are predicting a large budget surplus in Tennessee in the current year, and more revenue growth in the next.

In presentations made to the State Funding Board on Friday, Robert Currey of the Legislature's Fiscal Review Committee had the most optimistic surplus projection of $422 million for the budget year ending June 30.

65. Tennessee October sales tax revenue $90.7M more than expected -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Tennessee Finance Commissioner Larry Martin says the state's overall revenue collections in October were $90.7 million more than expected.

66. US producer prices drop in latest sign of tame inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The prices charged by farmers, manufacturers and other producers fell in October for the second straight month, fresh evidence that there is little sign of inflation in the U.S. economy.

67. Old bag: Age-related invective or sexist slander? -

This just in from crossword land: I’ve deleted OLD BAG from my word list. Along with COOT, CODGER, and GEEZER. Still thinking about CURMUDGEON.

Confused? Okay, here’s the story.

In a recent crossword, the phrase OLD BAG appeared in the fill. Based largely on the “Seinfeld” episode in which Jerry stole a loaf of marble rye bread from a woman (my most recent point of reference), I neither batted an eye nor thought twice about the term.

68. Lower fuel prices spark Holiday travel jump -

Americans might have more reasons to travel this holiday season as airfare trends continue to work in favor of the consumer.

Jet fuel prices have declined nearly 35 percent this year, and airfares this summer saw the biggest fare decline in 20 years, leading to projections that the end of the year would continue to see those falling prices.

69. Is anybody there? Too many choices for connectivity -

In today’s modern world of communication, it should be easier than ever to get in touch with colleagues.

We have so many options, including the old-fashioned telephone, the cell phone, email, text messages and even social media.

70. Delivering value to buyers who’ve done homework -

These days, most buyers engage in significant online research before they ever consider speaking with sales professionals.

Today’s buyers are further along in the sales process, with a much clearer understanding of what they need, before your sales team says a word.

71. Volvo V60 Cross Country stylish but lacks space -

Volvo’s 2016 V60 Cross Country is a sleekly styled, compact wagon with strong turbocharged power and an interior that embodies the understated modernism of Scandinavian design.

There are a generous amount of standard features, including leather-covered seats, leather-trimmed steering wheel, a navigation system, power-adjustable front seats, dual-zone climate control and a moonroof.

72. Gary, Hart to lead new consulting group -

Two health care veterans and international law firm Dickinson Wright PLLC are launching a new corporate health care venture to be based in Nashville, DW Franklin Consulting Group, LLC. The firms will work together to provide solutions spanning both legal and business consulting services.

73. North Texas could never upset the Vols, right? -

No way Tennessee’s football team can lose Saturday’s homecoming game against North Texas, one of the worst teams in college football.


Tennessee (5-4) was a 40.5-point favorite early in the week coming off a 27-24 victory over South Carolina last Saturday at Neyland Stadium.

74. Whisenhunt’s failed tenure now easier to understand -

It was only one game, one win, but it was clear in the aftermath Sunday just how much the Tennessee Titans needed the victory they got in overtime against the New Orleans Saints.

After an emotional week highlighted by the firing of Ken Whisenhunt, interim coach Mike Mularkey and the remainder of Whisenhunt’s staff was able to rally the team and find a way to end a six-game losing streak that derailed the 2015 season almost from the start.

75. Events -

Williamson Chamber Annual Celebration. See a different side of the Williamson Chamber at this after-hours event that combines business with pleasure. The Annual Celebration is a time to recognize the Williamson County business community. During the State of the Chamber dinner, President and CEO Matt Largen will sum up the year’s accomplishments and preview what’s to come in 2016, followed by a keynote address by Randy Boyd, Commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development. Today, 5-8 p.m., The Factory, 230 Franklin Road, Franklin. Information and registration: http://members.williamsonchamber.com/events/details/2015-annual-celebration-353294

76. Applications for US jobless aid stay near historic lows -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people seeking unemployment aid was unchanged last week, a sign that most businesses are reluctant to cut jobs.

The Labor Department said Thursday that weekly applications for jobless benefits remained at a seasonally adjusted 276,000, the same as the previous week. The four-week average, a less volatile measure, rose 5,000 to 267,750.

77. High-tech means higher sales for many small retailers -

NEW YORK (AP) — An independent retailer may not look like the cutting edge of technology, but these small businesses increasingly turn to apps and sophisticated software to connect with customers.

Small retailers use high-tech innovations to build relationships with customers; they often can't compete with big chains on prices, so they aim at better, individualized service. Some of the technology is designed for smaller companies, while some retailers find ways to turn a widely-used computer program or app to their advantage. They're also able to implement technology faster than many giant retailers because they're not operating hundreds or thousands of stores.

78. Holiday car deals move earlier: 4 things to consider -

DETROIT (AP) — Lexus put the red bows atop its cars a month early, and General Motors is advertising Black Friday deals two weeks before Thanksgiving as the auto industry copies traditional retailers with holiday discounts well before the holidays.

79. For gadfly Hooker, cancer is 'a jolt' but also opportunity -

NASHVILLE (AP) - The ups and downs of John Jay Hooker are the stuff of Nashville legend.

Friend of Muhammad Ali, socialite, lawyer who moved in the Kennedys' circle, Hooker also lost businesses, millions of dollars and high-profile political campaigns. In his later years, he has earned the moniker gadfly, mostly for losing battles, and seemed to be fading into irrelevance.

80. GM, government actions questioned in car fire recalls -

DETROIT (AP) — Shortly after Elizabeth Berry parked her bright yellow 2003 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS on the street in front of her family's home in May 2014, flames engulfed the engine, destroying the car and scorching her mailbox.

81. Give it up! You’re not giving your house away -

Last week we had some fun recounting “Stuff that Realtors say,” and the real estate brokerage community enjoyed laughing at itself but has demanded equal time. So we move on to “Stuff that buyers say” and “Stuff that sellers say.”

82. State’s landlords find hidden costs of privatization -

Murfreesboro businessman Tom Hyde felt the sting of Tennessee’s privatization practices two years ago when a representative of Jones Lang Lasalle notified him he would have to pay the company a commission as part of his next lease agreement.

83. One man’s push to revitalize Jefferson Street -

A cheery void of sirens screaming on the North Nashville horizon, pretty college girls, talking about Jimmy Hendrix (before he became Jimi) and “Jefferson Street Joe,” the sun busting the gray wall of gloom … there’s no reason not to enjoy an hour or two inside this former “shooting gallery,” the pioneer outpost Nathaniel “Nate” Harris’ sweat equity purchased from the squalor that had consumed his home neighborhood.

84. Clarksville commuters hoping for rail service to, from Nashville -

More and more riders are taking the express bus service between Clarksville and Nashville, but they’d rather be on the train.

The move to commuter rail would help unburden a congested I-24 and quell the clamor for fast, reliable service for those who want to work or play in Nashville.

85. No empty nest: Young women live with mon, dad like it's 1940 -

Young women are living with their parents or relatives at a rate not seen since 1940 as more millennial women put off marriage, attend college and face high living expenses.

A Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data found that 36.4 percent of women between the ages 18 and 34 lived with parents or relatives in 2014, the most since at least 1940, when 36.2 percent lived with family.

86. AP FACT CHECK: GOP candidates flub some figures in debate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ben Carson botched the economic effect of minimum wage increases. Jeb Bush again pitched a dubious target for economic growth. Marco Rubio, in a tale about plumbers and philosophers, undersold the value of a college education.

87. Analysis: No breakouts in GOP debate; muddled status quo -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Marco Rubio emerged unscathed. Ben Carson defended his integrity. Donald Trump flashed his dominant personality. And Jeb Bush avoided disaster.

88. Tennessee returned $40 million in unclaimed property -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The state Treasury Department says it returned $40 million of unclaimed property to its rightful owners this past fiscal year.

Unclaimed property in this case does not refer to physical items but to money that has been turned over to the state by businesses and organizations that cannot locate the rightful owners. It includes stocks, bonds, gift certificates, checks, unclaimed wages, refunds and life insurance annuities.

89. Google Maps offers offline option when Internet is spotty -

NEW YORK (AP) — Google Maps is getting disconnected. With an update for Android phones Tuesday, you'll be able to search nearby businesses and get driving directions, including turn-by-turn voice prompts, even if your Internet connection is spotty or non-existent. Google says a version for iPhones will come soon.

90. Strain of low oil prices apparent even at plush Gulf meeting -

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — On stage only a short time after the United Arab Emirates said it would increase its oil production despite low worldwide prices, the oil and gas minister of neighboring Oman didn't pull any punches.

91. Trade slowdown points to world recession risk, watchdog says -

PARIS (AP) — A slowdown in international trade could be a harbinger of a new recession for the world's leading economies, a leading global policy organization warned Monday.

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development says trade figures are worrisome because the stagnating or declining rates of trade seen this year "have, in the past, been associated with global recession."

92. Mysterious electric car startup looking to build $1B factory -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The luxury electric car market may be small, but it's lucrative enough to get another jolt — this time from a mysterious startup that says it wants to re-imagine how people interact with their autos.

93. US hiring surge raises likelihood of Fed rate hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. hiring swelled in October by the largest amount all year, and unemployment dropped another notch to 5 percent, increasing the likelihood that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates next month for the first time in a decade.

94. While markets tumbled in the summer, many savers held tight -

NEW YORK (AP) — When fear was pumping through the stock market this summer, most retirement savers kept their cool.

So say figures from Fidelity, which could see how individual investors in general behaved by looking at its 13.5 million 401(k) and 6 million IRA accounts as stocks tumbled in New York, Shanghai and places in between during the turbulent third quarter. The Standard & Poor's 500 index sank more than 10 percent within a week during August, driving the index to its worst quarter in four years.

95. Obama quashes Keystone XL in bid to boost climate leverage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ending a seven-year political saga, President Barack Obama killed the proposed Keystone XL pipeline on Friday, declaring it would have undercut U.S. efforts to clinch a global climate change deal at the center of his environmental legacy.

96. The October US jobs report, by the numbers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The job market boomed in October. Employers added 271,000 jobs, and the unemployment rate fell to 5 percent, the lowest level in seven years.

The flurry of hiring is likely to give the Federal Reserve confidence to go ahead with a long-anticipated increase in short-term interest rates in December.

97. Final residents to leave Clover Bottom for small group homes -

NASHVILLE (AP) - The last six residents of a 90-year-old Nashville facility for the disabled will relocate this month to small group homes.

WPLN-FM reports (http://bit.ly/1Mmalj0) the Clover Bottom Developmental Center opened in 1923. By its peak in the 1960s it housed 1,500 people with physical and intellectual disabilities.

98. Toyota invests $1 billion in artificial intelligence in US -

TOKYO (AP) — Toyota is investing $1 billion in a research company it's setting up in Silicon Valley to develop artificial intelligence and robotics, underlining the Japanese automaker's determination to lead in futuristic cars that drive themselves and apply the technology to other areas of daily life.

99. House votes to keep highway spending level, ignores warnings -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite years of warnings that the nation's roads, bridges and transit systems are falling apart and will bring nightmarish congestion, the House on Thursday passed a six-year transportation bill that maintains the spending status quo.

100. Details of controversial Pacific trade deal are released -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Details of a sweeping Pacific Rim trade deal released Thursday set the stage for a raucous debate in the U.S. Congress but also may provide reassurances to those who worried the agreement could gut protections for the environment, public health and labor.