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Editorial Results (free)

1. Need a healthy snack? Go for the cherries -

One of the most beautiful signs of spring is a pink-flowering cherry tree promising succulent fruit in about two months. The only thing better is being able to enjoy the succulent fruit a few months later.

2. Franklin’s Almanac was best-seller of its day -

Two weeks ago we left the 17-year-old Ben Franklin in the process of fleeing Boston. That was where he and his employer/brother, James, had literally come to blows.

At issue were the stated and unstated job requirements of assistant publisher of the “New England Courant.”

3. No rest in exploring the family side of St. Louis -

Waking on Sunday morning in the HoteLumiere in Downtown St. Louis, I was physically beat from a scorching hot Cardinals game the night before.

But traveling with my 8-year-old son affords no rest for the weary. It was 8 a.m. and it seemed like we had just wrapped up our midnight room service dinner when suddenly the curtains that cover the massive window in our room that overlooks the Mississippi River six stories below were thrown open.

4. Job interruption? Some disruption is what you need -

Being out of work in today’s economy can be daunting. Even as things continue to improve, finding a job can be tough.

In addition to the small number of new positions created each day, the entire hiring process takes longer – despite when you find the perfect job.

5. Questions hold the answers to closing deals -

Curiosity might have killed the cat, but it can almost always keep you from killing a deal.

Questions are a powerful tool in the sales process, but if you’re only using questions to identify your prospect’s needs at the beginning of the sales process, you may be missing key opportunities.

6. Events -

Ninth annual Nashville Emerging Leader Awards. The Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce and YP Nashville present the ninth annual NELAs, which recognize young professionals in 15 industry classifications who are excelling in their careers and making a difference in the Nashville community. Today, 5-10 p.m., Lipscomb University’s Collins Alumni Auditorium. Information: nashvillechamber.com, 615 743-3063.

7. Top residential real estate transactions for May 2015 -

Top residential real estate transactions, May 2015, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

8. Texas can keep its PAC money, misleading ads -

If being the “It City” means that a super PAC from Texas elects the city’s mayor, I vote we relinquish the crown.

If the PAC insists in playing in our sandbox, it should learn more about Nashville government, in particular the mayor’s role.

9. With no real rival, state Republicans attack their own -

Republicans are sitting in Tennessee’s political catbird seat, but that doesn’t keep them from flying off in different directions.

Elected political leaders of the same stripe found themselves at odds this year over the Bible as a state book, Common Core education standards and Insure Tennessee, Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to catch 280,000 people in a medical coverage gap.

10. Rural-friendly businesses in Whites Creek -

Neighborhood activists in Whites Creek are aggressively seeking businesses that blend into the rural character of the historical area. They want more working farms, stores that feature arts and crafts and local wares, restaurants, entertainment venues and entrepreneurial ventures that honor agriculture, history and culture, and arts and crafts.

11. As new residents push into Nashville, neighborhoods push back -

It’s no secret that Nashville’s a city on the rise, and a close look at numbers suggests the rapid population growth is not just strong, it’s stratospheric. Undoubtedly, the city’s current boomtown status puts Nashville in the international spotlight and brings jobs and prosperity to more residents.

12. Tennessee sales tax holiday August 7-9 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Department of Revenue wants residents across the state to remember that they can shop tax-free in Tennessee August 7-9.

By law, Tennessee's annual sales tax holiday is held every year, beginning at 12:01 a.m. on the first Friday in August and ending at 11:59 p.m. the following Sunday night.

13. Rising gas prices push inflation up modestly in June -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rising gasoline prices pushed inflation up modestly in June, leaving overall consumer prices higher than they were a year earlier for the first time since December.

Economists say the tick up in consumer prices makes it more likely the Federal Reserve will end a policy of keeping short-term interest rates near zero for more than six years. "Rebounding inflation combined with solid employment growth will likely lead the Fed to raise rates in September," said Gregory Daco, head of U.S. macroeconomics at Oxford Economics.

14. Yellen: Higher rates won't derail recovery -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen sought to reassure worried lawmakers on Thursday that when the Fed begins to raise interest rates, it will be careful not to derail the economy.

15. As Amazon turns 20, a look at its biggest bets -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon has come a long way from selling books out of a Seattle garage.

The company had an inauspicious start in July 1995 at the dawn of the Web as an online bookseller. It narrowly escaped the dot-com bust of 2000 to reinvent online retailing. And eventually, it morphed into the global e-commerce powerhouse it is today with $89 billion in annual revenue.

16. Amazon: 20 bets in 20 years -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Amazon turns 20 on Thursday. Here's a timeline of 20 investment bets Amazon made in the past 20 years:

1995: Amazon opens its virtual doors as an online bookseller.

Late 1990s: Amazon invests in startups like Pets.com and kozmo.com that promised to change the way people bought pet food and ordered delivery items. But they both went bust shortly after the bubble burst in 2000, causing Amazon to lay off some staff and scale back elsewhere.

17. Mail-order meals deliver; leftovers missed -

Last week, I wrote about two websites, BlueApron.com and HelloFresh.com, which deliver ready-to-cook meals to your doorstep. Curious as I am, I ordered from both of them to see what they’re like.

18. Pocket change: Column morphs into song lyrics -

Recently I wrote a song titled “Some Change.” Literally, the song is about a guy whose gal has not come home: “Thirty minutes past midnight. Where could you be?”

Apparently, something like this has happened before: “On one of your road trips, from sea to shining sea?” When she still has not come back the next day, a mysterious third party makes the first of two appearances in the song: “Bubba said, ‘She’s gone and done it. She finally got out of this town. Just sayin’, she needed some change.’”

19. New tricks: How to change careers later in life -

This week, a reader reached out to me with a question many people are facing.

“A friend is seeking to leave education after 13 years and re-enter business where she worked as a tech writer,” she states. “She teaches math and computer science and is incredibly detail-oriented, smart, concise and reliable.

20. Six best practices to boost sales staff efficiency -

Thomas Watson, president of IBM in the 1950s, insightfully declared, “Nothing happens until a sales is made.”

A company’s sales effort is the ultimate driver of organizational growth. It is the most critical function within any company and requires advanced training and intestinal fortitude for success.

21. Netflix delivers strong 2Q with 3.3 million more customers -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Netflix's second-quarter performance followed a familiar script of accelerating subscriber growth that has turned the Internet video service into a stock market sensation.

The company added 3.3 million worldwide subscribers during the three months ending to end the period with 65.6 million customers. About 900,000 of the additional subscribers were signed up in the U.S., where Netflix Inc. now has 42.3 million customers.

22. Shoppers disappointed in much-hyped 'Prime Day' sales -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Amazon aimed for Christmas in July with its much-hyped "Prime Day" sale. But some shoppers found a lump of coal instead.

The online retailer said Prime Day would offer bigger sales than those during the winter holiday shopping season. The goal was to boost $99 annual Prime loyalty program memberships during the sluggish summer months. The sale gained so much attention, other retailers, including Wal-Mart, Target, Macy's and Best Buy, had sales of their own.

23. Events -

Portland’s Music on Main. Bucky Covington will perform at this free event, which begins tonight at 7. Attendees are encouraged to bring lawn chairs.

THURSDAY, JULY 23

Real Estate Investors Network

Advanced investor notes group: For local investors who want to actively invest in notes. The goal is to help each other stay motivated, analyze deals, discuss strategies, etc. Members should have more than a basic understanding of notes. 11:30 a.m., The Egg and I, 1000 Meridian Blvd, Suite 118, Franklin. Information: www.reintn.org/calendar.

24. Caputo appointed to American Chamber post -

Christopher M. Caputo of Baker Donelson has been appointed by the American Chamber of Commerce in Italy as the organization’s local representative in Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana and Tennessee.

25. Middle Tennessee real estate trends for Q2 2015 -

Second quarter 2015 real estate trends for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford and Wilson counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

26. Middle Tennessee real estate trends for June 2015 -

June 2015 real estate trends for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford and Wilson counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

27. Beware of potential buyers at your door -

It’s a little early for Halloween, but that’s not stopping adults dressed as real estate professionals from knocking on doors and looking for handouts.

But these little ghouls aren’t asking for candy. They’re looking for a big payday – as opposed to a Payday – and to take advantage of potential sellers in this robust market.

28. ‘The Fighting 26’ Democrats work to stay relevant -

Sometimes Tennessee Democrats must feel like a tree that falls in the forest: Does anyone hear them?

When Democratic legislative leaders called for a special session this summer on Insure Tennessee, Gov. Bill Haslam’s market-based plan to use federal dollars to catch 280,000 working people in a coverage gap, they found themselves alone.

29. Vols, Titans fight to fill empty stadium seats -

When it comes to giving the consumer what it wants, few sports programs can match University of Tennessee football.

Neyland Stadium, which 40 years ago could accommodate only 70,000 fans, has swelled to a capacity of 102,455, fifth largest in college football. It has a $4 million, 4,580-square-foot Jumbotron, W-Fi connections for fans and enough flashing lights around the stadium’s interior to shame the Las Vegas Strip.

30. US wholesale prices rise 0.4 percent in June -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prices for the producers of goods and services rose modestly in June, a sign that broader inflation is being kept in check. But an outbreak of avian influenza caused the cost of eggs to nearly double, as prices soared at the fastest pace ever recorded.

31. Yellen: First Fed rate hike likely later this year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Wednesday she is encouraged by signs that the economy is reviving after a brutal winter. And if the improvements stay on track, the Fed will likely start raising interest rates later this year.

32. TSU, Fisk partner to host national honors conference -

NASHVILLE (AP) - More than 4,000 of the nation's brightest students will converge on Nashville, Tennessee, in the fall.

Tennessee State University is partnering with Fisk University to host the 24th annual Conference of the National Association of African American Honors Programs.

33. State officials cancel controversial anti-DUI campaign -

NASHVILLE (AP) - State officials have ended a new anti-DUI campaign following criticism that it had taken a sexist approach to encouraging young men not to drive under the influence.

The Tennessean first reported (http://tnne.ws/1JekJni) a website connected to the campaign was pulled Monday night. But the Tennessee Governor's Highway Safety Office, which launched the campaign, announced Tuesday that it was canceling it entirely.

34. Plans for new Tennessee State Museum taking shape -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Gov. Bill Haslam will lead the planned private fundraising campaign to bolster $120 million in taxpayer support for the new Tennessee State Museum.

Haslam's chief of staff, Mark Cate, outlined plans Monday for both fundraising and construction of the facility, which will be on the Bicentennial Capitol Mall in Nashville, multiple media outlets report.

35. Yellen expects interest rate hike this year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen says she expects to start raising interest rates later this year but stresses that a number of headwinds are still holding back the U.S. economy.

36. Meals, grocery deals delivered to your door -

I recently received an email from Amazon.com about a new service since I am one of their best prime customers – at least my husband tells me so.

Amazon was informing me of their food pantry. I can now order most any grocery items I want, except fresh veggies, and have them shipped to my house. It seems like a pretty good service, and coupons are available.

37. Take charge of your career independence -

With the Fourth of July fresh in my memory, I’ve been thinking about the importance of independence.

So often, I meet people who are struggling. Whether they’ve lost their job, or work for a boss who doesn’t appreciate them, they’re going through a rough time.

38. Fed officials still cautious in June about rate hikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve policymakers last month saw signs that the economy was healing after its winter slump but still wanted more signs of improvement before they began raising interest rates.

39. Lack of brotherly love sends Franklin to Philadelphia -

Next January will mark the 310th birthday of Benjamin Franklin. Thinker, inventor, scientist, diplomat, politician, writer. Founding parent of a great nation. A non-President with his face on a bit of paper currency.

40. Earning the right to ask clients tough questions -

The world’s best salespeople excel at asking engaging questions and actively listening to a prospect’s response without interruption.

They master the art of posing high-impact questions that generate insightful responses, which offer a glimpse into a prospect’s decision-making process, competitors also under consideration, the likelihood of purchase, or even the factors that will be weighed most heavily by decision makers.

41. Events -

Business Studio: Marketing Starter Series - Social Media. The Nashville Chamber has partnered with k2forma to present four “DIY” marketing workshops as part of our Marketing Starter Series. This series is designed to empower small business owners to manage their marketing efforts and optimize their resources on their own. You’ll learn how to work smarter, not harder. During this session, participants will learn about the myriad platforms for social media and how each one differs, as well as how to determine which platforms are best for individual businesses and how one can utilize each for business growth. Wednesday, 3:30-5 p.m. Refinery Nashville, 438 Houston Street, Suite 263. Information: nashvillechamber.com, 615 743-3060615 743-3060 .

42. Special action on same-sex nuptials a waste of time -

With Republican lawmakers scrambling for a response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s gay-marriage ruling, Tennesseans on both sides of the issue say they are seeking “equality.”

Immediately after the court’s decision on Obergefell v. Hodges, Democratic U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper of Nashville says, “Love and equality won. I’m glad the Supreme Court ruled on the right side of history.”

43. Craft sake is the latest trend that's brewing in US -

KITTERY, Maine (AP) — First came boutique wineries. Then microbreweries and craft distilleries. Now Japanese sake aficionados are hoping to transform the so-called "rice wine" into the next artisan alcohol-of-the-moment in the U.S.

44. Crude oil tumbles 8 pct, points to low gas prices this fall -

NEW YORK (AP) — A slew of global economic and geopolitical factors are working to pummel the price of oil and set up U.S. drivers for very low gasoline prices later this year.

The price of U.S. crude dropped 7.7 percent Monday to close at $52.53 a barrel and is now down nearly 15 percent from the high for the year set on June 10.

45. Uncle Dave Macon Days to feature Ralph Stanley -

MURFREESBORO (AP) — Organizers say some of the biggest names in bluegrass will take stage at this year's Uncle Dave Macon Days Old-Time Music and Dance Festival in Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

The Daily News Journal of Murfreesboro reports (http://on.dnj.com/1IZaHpO) the event is set for July 10-12 at the historic Cannonsburgh Village.

46. US probing possible airline collusion to keep fares high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government is investigating possible collusion among major airlines to limit available seats, which keeps airfares high, according to a document obtained by The Associated Press.

47. Walking on the greener side of the fence -

I’ve amped up my walking recently. I’m trying to combat the middle-age spread and couch-potato effect the long and cruel winter and the wetter than normal spring have impaled on my body.

48. One Davidson grads revels in another’s success -

When NBA MVP Stephen (pronounced Steff’n) Curry was in high school, he attended a basketball camp sponsored by LeBron James. The first time LeBron saw Steph, however, was in March 2008.

James’s Cleveland Cavaliers were playing the Detroit Pistons, a night game. That afternoon LeBron showed up at Ford Field, with 53,000 others.

49. ‘Underqualified’ for a job? That shouldn’t stop you -

If you’re like most people, there was a time in life when you were underqualified for a job. This is typically the case when you apply for your first job. It can also happen when you make a big career change midstream and have to start over.

50. How to use LinkedIn to drive brand loyalty -

LinkedIn, the world’s largest social media platform specifically targeting the business community, has grown to roughly 350 million users in 2015, according to Statista.

And businesses have taken note with more than 4 million of them flocking to create company pages in order to tap into this critical mass of business professionals.

51. Uniguest names Morgan chief executive officer -

Uniguest, a provider of secure managed technology services, has announced the appointment of Joseph P. Morgan, Jr. as chief executive officer, effective July 6, 2015.

Morgan had served as president and chief executive officer of The Standard Register Company, a publicly traded company with revenues approaching $1 billion, since January 2009. At The Standard Register Company, he was responsible for the transformation of the printing giant to an integrated communications company leveraging both technology and innovation to develop a market-focused strategy. Morgan also served on the Board of Directors and held a number of community and charitable leadership positions during his tenure with the company.

52. Events -

Business Studio: Marketing Starter Series - Websites & SEO. Business Studio is partnering with k2forma to present four “DIY” marketing workshops (Today, July 15, 22 and 29) as part of our Marketing Starter Series. This series is designed to empower small business owners to manage their marketing efforts and optimize their resources on their own. You’ll learn how to work smarter, not harder. Kelly Koeppel of k2forma will lead the workshops with a different industry expert as guest facilitator each week. The workshops will be hands-on with lively discussion and will build upon the previous class. The workshops are designed to be a four part series but can also be “a la carte” and attended individually. 3:30-5 p.m., Refinery Nashville, 438 Houston Street, Suite 263 Nashville. Information: nashvillechamber.com, 615 743-3060615 743-3060.

53. $1M-plus Middle Tennessee residential real estate transactions for 2015 -

2015 $1 million-plus residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

54. Buying a house? Here’s 12 things you must do -

Anyone buying any home anywhere should have a checklist of things to do. In this area, there are several.

  • Get a home inspection. Old or new, things may not be what they seem. As attorney Jean Harrison says of new homes, “Passing codes means they got at least a D-.” A home that has been pre-inspected could have serious flaws undiscovered by the seller’s inspector.
  • Hire a real estate agent. No one with any sense would go to court and use the other person’s attorney to represent them in order to save three percent. By the way, you won’t save the three percent.
  • Have a survey conducted. Who knows who owns what without a survey? Veteran real estate agents and surveyors have more war stories in this regard than any. There have been entire houses built upon the wrong lots, and the same goes for driveways, swimming pools, fences, walls and bridges.
  • Have a radon test and have it mitigated if the reading is over four pica curies, as in Madame Curie, you know, the radiation person. Radon causes cancer. Period. The end. If you don’t want cancer, rid the space of the radon.
  • Treat the house for termites. A clear termite letter means the termites did not swarm at the exact moment of the inspection. The bugs are in the dirt and they will eat your house, at least the wooden part.
  • Have a licensed HVAC contractor inspect the HVAC. If they disassemble the unit during inspection and find it to be dangerous, they are forbidden to re-assemble it. The home owner is going to require heat or conditioned air, so it will be repaired.
  • Have your insurance agent run a CLUE report prior to the inspection to determine if claims have been filed against the house.
  • Check for outstanding building permits.
  • If the house is sheathed in synthetic stucco, have several feet of the sheathing removed all around the house.
  • If there is water beneath the house, get it out.
  • Don’t have the homeowner fix the problems. The jobs will go to the lowest bidder.
  • When the sellers give you money, use it to make the repairs. The Palm is tempting, but they don’t treat termites.

As the Facebook people say, “That is all.”

55. Southern heritage defined differently across Tennessee -

Tennessee’s loyalty was divided in the Civil War, and 150 years later, little is changed as the debate over Confederate symbols arises in the wake of the racist-fueled South Carolina church massacre.

56. US court agrees Apple violated antitrust law in e-book entry -

NEW YORK (AP) — Apple violated antitrust laws by colluding with publishers to raise electronic book prices when it entered a market in 2010 that had been dominated by Amazon.com, a federal appeals court said Tuesday.

57. THP stepping up safety patrol over July Fourth holiday -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Highway Patrol is taking steps to try to make the Fourth of July holiday period as safe as possible.

According to a news release, the agency will use predictive analytics to allocate manpower and target areas where the likelihood of alcohol-related, serious injury or fatal crashes may occur during the holiday period.

58. With court defeat, GOP health law effort now aimed at '16 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court's resounding rejection of a conservative attempt to gut President Barack Obama's health care overhaul won't stop Republicans from attacking the law they detest. But now, their efforts will be chiefly about teeing up the issue for the 2016 presidential and congressional elections.

59. Agency posts thousands of complaints against banks, others -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau released thousands of complaints Thursday from disgruntled customers of banks, credit card companies and other providers of financial services.

60. Blackberries: Plump, juicy, delicious and available -

At first, I didn’t know what to write about, and then I thought about the blackberries my mom is growing in her backyard. Since blackberries are ripening as I write, I decided to use them as my topic.

61. It’s easy to botch Murphy’s Law origin story -

Whatever can go wrong will go wrong. That’s a common wording for the epigram we call “Murphy’s Law.” Granted, others have said it somewhat differently.

In her 1953 book, “The Making of a Scientist,” Ann Roe (1904-1991) attributed “If anything can go wrong, it will” to an unnamed physicist whom she’d interviewed. In his 1952 book, “The Butcher – The Ascent of Yerupaja,” John Sack cited a saying among mountaineers: “Anything that can possibly go wrong, does.”

62. Negotiate a less-painful exit before accepting job -

Last week, the Internet was buzzing about the struggles of Gap and Lucky Magazine.

Gap announced it will lay off 250 workers and close 175 stores. From the outside, Lucky appears to be going out of business or reducing operations considerably.

63. Naysayer finds happiness in the land of Mickey -

I must’ve been out of my mind. How else to explain an anti-Disney person deciding to travel two time zones to visit Disneyland, just days after the official kickoff of the madness of the 60th anniversary celebration?

64. Sales gauging techniques that move the needle -

Unless you have more sales from ideal customers than you know what to do with, your organization can benefit from sales measurement strategies. They allow you to not only forecast future sales but also to dissect your team’s success through each step of the sales cycle in order to fine-tune your approach and improve results.

65. Tinder, Match.com looking for love on Wall Street -

NEW YORK (AP) — Match.com and Tinder are looking for a Wall Street hookup as their parent group spins off the dating sites as a publicly traded company.

IAC/InteractiveCorp, which is controlled by billionaire Barry Diller, approved a proposal for an initial public offering.

66. Events -

First Saturday Art Crawl. This event is typically held on the first Saturday of each month, but it will be held on Friday this month due to Let Freedom Sing! Music City July 4th Celebration. Art galleries throughout downtown host receptions and art openings every month. Most galleries serve free wine and other refreshments. Live music will be performed on platforms along 5th Avenue. Two free shuttles will circulate the route from 6 pm - 10 pm.

67. French: Right favors ‘buycotts’ over boycotts -

The Rev. Franklin Graham is so not cool with gay couples who express their romantic feelings using more than a subtle nod from across the room.

He’s even more not cool with companies using same-sex couples in their advertising, like Tiffany & Co.’s two men sitting on stairs and Wells Fargo’s women learning sign language for their adopted daughter.

68. Top commercial real estate transactions for May 2015 -

Top commercial real estate transactions, May 2015, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

69. Uncomfortable truths in black and white of contracts -

Bill Decker of Decker Wealth Management was recently discussing a contract issue he had with one of his vendors, the issue being whether Decker should be allowed to purchase additional product at a certain price.

70. Haslam needs to back up call for more local control -

If Gov. Bill Haslam is trying to build political capital, he’s making the right move by trying to light a fire under local officials.

He might also want to turn up the flame on his own game.

71. It’s gonna be a long, hot, delicious summer -

Summertime brings us wedges of juicy watermelon and drippy ice cream cones. It yields pies piled with blackberries and peaches so fresh they can fill a room with their aroma.

It offers jewel-toned tomatoes for slicing and piling onto BLTs.

72. EBay bans sales of Confederate flag on its site -

NEW YORK (AP) — Calling it a "contemporary symbol of divisiveness and racism," eBay said Tuesday that it will ban the sale of Confederate flags and similarly themed merchandise.

"This decision is consistent with our long-standing policy that prohibits items that promote or glorify hatred, violence and racial intolerance," said eBay spokeswoman Johnna Hoff.

73. Here's why home sales are finally surging -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Real estate has gotten hot again.

Home sales are on pace for their best year since 2007.

First-time buyers are streaming back into the market. Prices are skyrocketing, aided by a stronger job market and tantalizingly low mortgage rates that are creating pressure for buyers to act fast.

74. Office Depot shareholders approve sale to Staples -

NEW YORK (AP) – Office Depot shareholders have voted overwhelmingly in favor of the company's $6.3 billion acquisition by one-time rival Staples.

The deal, announced in February, is part of a rapid consolidation in the office supply sector that has been hammered by technological changes in the workplace and by competition from Amazon.com and other online retailers.

75. House easily votes to repeal tax on medical equipment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House shrugged off a White House veto threat and voted Thursday to repeal a tax that President Barack Obama's health care law imposed on medical equipment makers.

The Republican-led chamber has voted more than 50 times since 2011 to void all or part of Obama's overhaul, usually along party lines. In this case, Republicans were joined by roughly four dozen Democrats from states where medical devices are made to erase the 2.3 percent tax.

76. Treasury says woman will be picked for $10 bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Alexander Hamilton, who has been featured on the $10 bill since 1929, is making way for a woman.

77. What would Peanuts characters be doing today? -

Charles Schulz died Feb. 12, 2000. This column ran March 3, 2000. There is no connection between this column and today’s I Swear Crossword.

We’ve been saying goodbye to the creator of “Peanuts.” Others, especially columnists and cartoonists, have likewise been saying farewell.

78. Want to stand out in crowd? It’s all about timing -

One of the quickest ways to stand out from the crowd is one of the easiest. And, unfortunately, it can make you look very good or incredibly bad. The concept I’m referring to is timing. Your timing can have a huge impact on your outcome on multiple fronts professionally.

79. Using past performance to predict future revenue -

Far too many companies look to past growth as the single-best predictor of future growth in setting annual revenue targets with little analysis of the factors driving that past progress, anticipated market shifts over the coming year and the predictability of the sales and marketing strategies built into their annual plan.

80. Bass, Berry & Sims welcomes 2 attorneys -

Susan K. Bilbro and Shannon E. Pinkston have joined the Nashville office of Bass, Berry & Sims PLC.

Pinkston, a senior health care attorney, advises public and private health care companies in operations, regulatory and transactional matters. Previously, Pinkston served as vice president, assistant general counsel and assistant secretary for Vanguard Health Systems, and as senior counsel for Tenet Healthcare following Tenet’s acquisition of Vanguard.

81. Events -

Asurion Hiring Event. The company plans to hire 400 people by October and will hold a hiring event and open house Thursday to interview candidates. The openings are for customer support technicians at its Nashville call center, located at 5720 Crossings Blvd. in Antioch. Average pay rate for a customer support technicians is $14.50. 9 A.M.-4 p.m. Interested candidates should text “Nashville” to 617-207-6382617-207-6382  to RSVP or call 262 439-1941262 439-1941.

82. Middle Tennessee real estate trends for May 2015 -

May 2015 real estate trends for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford and Wilson counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

83. Top residential real estate transactions for May 2015 -

Top residential real estate transactions, May 2015, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

84. Sales volume raises risk of closing snafus -

The Greater Nashville Association of Realtors’ May sales data show sales continuing to rise.

There were 3,558 closings, up 15.6 percent from last May. In comparison, there were 1,783 closings in May 2009. So closings have almost doubled since the Recession. And, as everyone knows, inventory has dropped dramatically.

85. Running state like a business rings hollow for workers -

More and more, Tennessee’s state employees are feeling the same harsh realities of those working – or formerly working – in corporate America.

On the heels of 1,500 buyouts under the Bredesen administration in 2008 and 850 layoffs in 2010, Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration is offering voluntary buyouts to more than 2,000 employees in the executive branch.

86. Fed sees stronger economy but leaves key rate at record low -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy has strengthened since a slump early this year, the Federal Reserve said Wednesday, but it wants to see further gains in the job market and higher inflation before raising interest rates from record lows.

87. Push for facial recognition privacy standards hits roadblock -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Retailers have the ability to scan your face digitally, and use that identification to offer you special prices or even recognize you as a prior shoplifter. But should they use it? Should they get your permission first?

88. Why a higher-rate era may not pain economies and individuals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumers, businesses and investors are facing an era of higher borrowing costs as some of the lowest global interest rates in modern history begin to rise.

Yet the message from most economists is a reassuring one: Rates won't likely climb fast or high enough to inflict much damage on economic recoveries in the United States or Europe. Borrowers and investors may feel some short-term pain but should manage fine in the long run.

89. Vast data warehouse raises HealthCare.gov privacy concerns -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A government data warehouse that stores information indefinitely on millions of HealthCare.gov customers is raising privacy concerns at a time when major breaches have become distressingly common.

90. Target selling pharmacy, clinic businesses to CVS Health -

Target will sell its pharmacy and clinic businesses to CVS Health in the latest twist behind a push from big retailers to become all things to all customers.

The nation's second-largest drugstore chain will pay about $1.9 billion to run Target's in-store health operations and expand what they offer for customers who have come to expect that they will be able to fill a prescription when they shop at Target.

91. US wholesale prices jump in May, led by eggs, gasoline -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prices at the wholesale level rose at the fastest pace in nearly 3 years in May, pushed higher by a sharp jump in the cost of gasoline and a record increase in the price eggs related to an outbreak of avian influenza. But outside of increases in volatile food and energy costs, core inflation remained moderate.

92. Tennessee, Kentucky getting funds for Civil War battlefields -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee and Kentucky are among seven states that will receive a portion of $3.1 million in grants to help preserve Civil War battlefields.

The National Park Service says the Land and Water Conservation Fund grants will preserve more than 270 acres of battlefields that are threatened with damage or destruction by development.

93. Half of 2K buyout applications targeted at 2 Tenn. agencies -

NASHVILLE (AP) — More than half of the 2,000 buyout applications offered to state employees have been sent to workers in two state agencies: the departments of transportation and human services.

94. Business dashboard will help sales, marketing teams -

Numerous studies support the fact that companies that excel at aligning their marketing and sales efforts enjoy significantly higher revenue growth. A best-in-class strategy for creating such cohesion is the regular development of a business dashboard.

95. Events -

Free Symphony Concerts. The Nashville Symphony continues its series of free community concerts Thursday at 7:30 at Two Rivers Mansion. The series features eight performances across the Middle Tennessee region during the month of June. Featuring works by Brahms, Bernstein, Sibelius, Copland, Gershwin and more, the community concerts deliver classical favorites in a casual setting at local parks. All performances are free (except where noted) and will be conducted by Nashville Symphony Assistant Conductor Vinay Parameswaran. Attendees are invited to share their experience on social media and be entered to win a special prize from the Nashville Symphony and Griffin Technology. To enter, shoot a photo at a community concert and post to Instagram using the tags @nashvillesymphony and #NSOsummer. Winners will be announced the day after each concert. Information: www.nashvillesymphony.org/tickets/calendar/communityconcerts. Remaining dates and locations:

96. Vacuum-sealing keeps food fresh, saves money -

This week, I decided to write about a little of this and a little of that. You know, tips on foods, a little trivia, etc. Maybe you’ll learn something you didn’t know.

Are vacuum sealers really worth having?

Meat, fish, and other perishables stored in your fridge don’t have a long shelf life the way they’re packaged. Vacuum-sealing helps keeps flavor in and bacteria out, so food can be stored up to five to six times longer. (It saves money, too.)

97. Writer tells all about life’s path, even the final chapter -

Anne Lamott is something of an expert on grace. And she’s a brilliant thinker and writer. As such, she’s widely cited in sermons. And some columns. The following are among my favorite Lamott quotes:

98. The evolving nature of Christian values -

The Rev. Cindy “Cyd” Andrews-Looper’s first message to Nashville: You can be gay, and you can be a conservative Christian, and there is nothing mutually exclusive about those two things.

99. Friendly fire may put your house hunt at risk -

Friends don’t let friends buy junk. As it pertains to real estate, friends don’t let friends buy anything. In the past it was the parents with the “Ma and Pa Meddle” syndrome that impeded the youth from purchasing homes.

100. OPEC agrees to keep output target at 30 mln barrels a day -

VIENNA (AP) — OPEC decided to keep its output target at 30 million barrels a day Friday but left it to members to restrain their overproduction, reflecting the cartel's inability to strictly enforce its own limits in attempts to control the world supply of crude.