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Editorial Results (free)

1. Nike makes full exit from Russia after suspending operations -

Nike will fully shut down operations in Russia, joining other international companies that have withdrawn from the country after its brutal invasion of Ukraine.

Nike Inc. suspended operations three months ago at all of its company-owned and operated stores in Russia but like other major corporations, has attempted to avoid exposing employees to hardship during a complete withdrawal.

2. Labor board takes Starbucks to court over alleged violations -

The National Labor Relations Board is asking a federal court to order Starbucks to stop interfering with unionization efforts at its U.S. stores.

It's the third time the board has filed a case in federal court against Starbucks since December, when a store in Buffalo, New York, became the coffee chain's first location in decades to unionize. Since then, more than 289 U.S. stores have petitioned the NLRB to hold union elections and at least 151 stores have voted to unionize.

3. Starbucks head of North America business leaving company -

SEATTLE (AP) — Rossann Williams, Starbucks' North America president who's been a prominent figure in the company's push against worker unionization, is leaving the company after 17 years.

In a letter sent to Starbucks employees, whom the company calls "partners," chief operating officer John Culver said the decision "was not taken lightly" and added that Williams was offered another job at the company, which she declined.

4. 7 fired Starbucks workers celebrate union vote in Memphis -

MEMPHIS (AP) — Seven employees of a Tennessee Starbucks who were fired after starting unionization efforts claimed victory Tuesday when their Memphis store voted to join a wave of U.S. locations of the coffee chain that have decided to organize.

5. New Orleans Starbucks store 1st in Louisiana to vote union -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Employees at a Starbucks store in New Orleans voted to form a union, becoming the first of the coffee giant's locations in Louisiana to unionize.

Ballots were cast Friday and Saturday 11-1 in favor of joining Workers United, which represents the unionized Starbucks stores, WWNO-FM reported. Two ballots were challenged, the station said.

6. Starbucks leaving Russian market, shutting 130 stores -

Starbucks is pulling out of the Russian market. In a memo to employees Monday, the Seattle coffee giant said it decided to close its 130 stores and no longer have a brand presence in Russia.

Starbucks said it will continue to pay its nearly 2,000 Russian employees for six months and help them transition to new jobs.

7. Starbucks will cover travel for workers seeking abortions -

Starbucks said Monday it will pay the travel expenses for U.S. employees to access abortion and gender-confirmation procedures if those services aren't available within 100 milof a worker's home.

The Seattle coffee giant said it will also make the travel benefit available to the dependents of employees who are enrolled in Starbucks' health care plan. Starbucks has 240,000 U.S. employees but the company didn't say what percentage of them are enrolled in the its health care plan.

8. McDonald's to sell its Russian business, try to keep workers -

McDonald's said Monday that it has started the process of selling its Russian business, which includes 850 restaurants that employ 62,000 people, making it the latest major Western corporation to exit Russia since it invaded Ukraine in February.

9. Amazon union head, others meet at White House on organizing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Kamala Harris and Labor Secretary Marty Walsh met with union organizers at the White House on Thursday as the administration looks to boost unionization campaigns.

10. VP Harris to meet Thursday with union organizers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Kamala Harris and Labor Secretary Marty Walsh will meet with union organizers at the White House on Thursday, part of a broader effort by the administration to boost unionization campaigns at major employers.

11. Starbucks reports record Q2 sales as costs climb -

Starbucks' sales climbed to record levels in its fiscal second quarter, but its profits took a hit from climbing labor and ingredient costs.

The Seattle coffee company __ which welcomed back former CEO Howard Schultz last month as its interim leader __ said revenue rose 15% to a record $7.6 billion in its 13-week quarter, which ended April 3. That was in line with Wall Street's estimates, according to analysts polled by FactSet.

12. Etsy sellers protest fees by halting their sales for a week -

NEW YORK (AP) — Some vendors on Etsy say they are halting sales of their items on the site for a week to protest a hike in the fees the crafts e-commerce marketplace charges them.

Starting Monday, Etsy sellers must pay a 6.5% commission on each transaction, up from the 5% in place since 2018.

13. Miami's crypto craze on full display at bitcoin conference -

Thousands of cryptocurrency enthusiasts are gathering in Miami as the city builds its reputation as one of the key locations to develop the blockchain technology despite its underdog status.

Dozens of companies are using the Bitcoin 2022 conference running Wednesday through Saturday as a venue to network, pitch ideas and share announcements.

14. Starbucks halts stock buybacks as Schultz returns -

Longtime Starbucks leader Howard Schultz — who returned to the company as interim CEO on Monday — said his first major action will be suspending Starbucks' share buyback program and plowing those billions of dollars into the company instead.

15. Amazon, union organizers face off again in Alabama -

BESSEMER, Ala. (AP) — For union organizers at an Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama, the second time could be a charm — or not.

After a crushing defeat last year, when a majority of workers voted against forming a union, the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union is hoping for a different outcome in a do-over election. The National Labor Relations Board on Monday began counting mail-in ballots that were sent to 6,100 workers in early February. Results could come as early as Thursday.

16. Even as inflation bites, corporate profits remain flush -

NEW YORK (AP) — What's immune to high inflation? So far, the profits at big U.S. companies.

Businesses are facing higher gasoline and heating bills, just like consumers, in addition to higher expenses for labor and raw materials. But unlike many middle- and lower-income Americans, they've been making more than enough extra income to cover the additional costs.

17. Russia war ends era of globalization that kept inflation low -

For decades, the free flow of trade across much of the world allowed the richest nations to enjoy easy access to low-priced goods and supplies. It meant solid economies and stable markets.

And for households and businesses, especially in the United States and Europe, it meant an entire generation of ultra-low inflation.

18. Rising rates add another hurdle for harried buyers -

Historically, rising interest rates force hesitant buyers to jump from the fences and into the fray. As rates have begun a steady climb recently, borrowers are clamoring to lenders in order to lock rates before they increase even more.

19. 'Do the right thing': How US, allies united to punish Putin -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Just days before Russia invaded Ukraine on Feb. 24, President Joe Biden quietly dispatched a team to European Union headquarters in Belgium.

These were not spy chiefs or generals, but experts in reading fine print and tracking the flow of money, computer chips and other goods around the world. Their mandate: inflict maximum pain on Russian President Vladimir Putin, making it harder, if not impossible, for him to fund a prolonged war in Ukraine and denying him access to technologies at the core of modern warfare.

20. Koch to continue running 2 glass facilities in Russia -

Koch Industries is planning to continue running two glass manufacturing facilities in Russia, saying it doesn't want to hand over the plants to the Russian government.

Koch's Guardian Industries operates the glass facilities in Russia. They employ approximately 600 workers. Dave Robertson, president and COO of Koch Industries, said in a statement that the company has no other physical assets in Russia, and outside of Guardian, it employs 15 people in the country.

21. Howard Schultz returns to lead Starbucks on interim basis -

Longtime Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz is returning to lead the company on an interim basis after the coffee giant's chief executive announced his retirement.

Starbucks made the announcement Wednesday ahead of its annual meeting.

22. Once a powerful symbol in Russia, McDonald's withdraws -

Two months after the Berlin Wall fell, another powerful symbol opened its doors in the middle of Moscow: a gleaming new McDonald's.

It was the first American fast-food restaurant to enter the Soviet Union, reflecting the new political openness of the era. For Vlad Vexler, who as a 9-year-old waited in a two-hour line to enter the restaurant near Moscow's Pushkin Square on its opening day in January 1990, it was a gateway to the utopia he imagined the West to be.

23. Not all Western companies sever ties to Russia over Ukraine -

A shrinking number of well-known companies are still doing business in Russia, even as hundreds have announced plans to curtail ties.

Burger King restaurants are open, Eli Lilly is supplying drugs, and PepsiCo is selling milk and baby food, but no more soda.

24. Russia-Ukraine war: Key developments in the ongoing conflict -

A Russian airstrike hit a maternity hospital in the besieged Ukrainian port city of Mariupol on Wednesday, wounding at least 17 people in what Ukraine officials described as a "war crime" and an "atrocity."

25. Ukrainians evacuate Kyiv suburbs amid deepening crisis -

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Residents of the bombarded suburbs of Ukraine's capital snaked their way across the slippery wooden planks of a makeshift bridge that provided the only way to escape Russian shelling, amid renewed efforts Wednesday to rescue civilians from besieged cities.

26. McDonald's to temporarily close 850 stores in Russia -

DETROIT (AP) — McDonald's said Tuesday it is temporarily closing all of its 850 restaurants in Russia in response to the country's invasion of Ukraine, a highly symbolic move for the U.S. chain that was among the first to enter the former Soviet Union three decades ago.

27. REI store in New York City becomes 1st to unionize -

NEW YORK (AP) — Workers at a New York City outpost of outdoor clothing and equipment seller REI voted overwhelmingly to join a union — the first REI store to do so — amid efforts from workers at other big companies to do the same.

28. Wall Street losses mount amid simmering Ukraine crisis -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street's losses mounted Wednesday as world leaders waited to see if Russian President Vladimir Putin orders troops deeper into Ukraine.

The S&P 500 fell 1.8% to an 8-month low, deepening the benchmark index's "correction," or a loss of 10% from its recent peak. More than 85% of stocks in the S&P 500 fell, with technology companies weighing down the index most.

29. Companies revert to more normal operations as COVID wanes -

NEW YORK (AP) — For the first time in two years for many people, the American workplace is transforming into something that resembles pre-pandemic days.

Tyson Foods said Tuesday it was ending mask requirements for its vaccinated workers in some facilities. Walmart and Amazon — the nation's No. 1 and 2 largest private employers respectively — will no longer require fully vaccinated workers to don masks in stores or warehouses unless required under local or state laws. Tech companies like Microsoft and Facebook that had allowed employees to work fully remote are now setting mandatory dates to return to the office after a series of fits and starts.

30. How inflation and tangled supply lines are gripping economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Since the pandemic erupted two years ago, Forest Ramsey and his wife, Kelly, have held the line on prices at their gourmet chocolate shop in Louisville, Kentucky. Now, they're about to throw in the towel.

31. US inflation jumped 7.5% in the past year, a 40-year high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation soared over the past year at its highest rate in four decades, hammering America's consumers, wiping out pay raises and reinforcing the Federal Reserve's decision to begin raising borrowing rates across the economy.

32. Starbucks, citing safety, fires 7 seeking union in Memphis -

Starbucks has fired seven employees who were leading an effort to unionize a Memphis, Tennessee, store.

The Seattle coffee giant said Tuesday that the employees violated company policy by reopening a store after closing time and inviting non-employees to come inside and move throughout the store, including behind the counter and in back rooms. The employees used the store to do an interview with a local television station about their unionizing effort.

33. Amazon workers try new tactics to unionize in Alabama -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon workers and organizers in Bessemer, Alabama, are making door-to-door house calls, sporting pro-union T-shirts and challenging anti-union messaging by Amazon-hired consultants as they try to convince their peers for the second time to unionize their warehouse in an election that starts Friday by secret ballot.

34. Starbucks nixes vaccine mandate after Supreme Court ruling -

Starbucks is no longer requiring its U.S. workers to be vaccinated against COVID-19, reversing a policy it announced earlier this month.

In a memo sent Tuesday to employees, the Seattle coffee giant said it was responding to last week's ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court. In a 6-3 vote, the court rejected the Biden administration's plan to require vaccines or regular COVID testing at companies with more than 100 workers.

35. Second Starbucks store near Buffalo votes to unionize -

A second Starbucks store near Buffalo, New York, has voted to unionize, one of a growing number of the coffee chain's stores seeking to organize workers.

Workers at the store, in the suburb of Cheektowaga, voted 15-9 in favor of representation by Workers United, an affiliate of the Service Employees International Union. The National Labor Relations Board confirmed the vote Monday.

36. Starbucks says employees must get vaccine or test weekly -

Starbucks says its U.S. workers must be fully vaccinated by Feb. 9 or face a weekly COVID testing requirement.

The Seattle-based coffee giant said Monday it was acting in response to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which issued a vaccine-or-test requirement for companies with more than 100 employees in November.

37. Amazon settles with NLRB to give workers power to organize -

NEW YORK (AP) — Under pressure to improve worker rights, Amazon has reached a settlement with the National Labor Relations Board to allow its employees to freely organize — and without retaliation.

38. Labor board certifies first union at a US Starbucks store -

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — The National Labor Relations Board confirmed a vote Friday to form a union at a Starbucks store in Buffalo, meaning the coffee retailer, for the first time, will have to bargain with organized labor at a company-owned U.S. store.

39. In a first, Starbucks workers agree to union in Buffalo, NY -

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — Starbucks workers at a store in Buffalo, New York, voted to unionize on Thursday, a first for the 50-year-old coffee retailer in the U.S. and the latest sign that the labor movement is stirring after decades of decline.

40. Starbucks fights expanding unionization effort at its stores -

Starbucks is fighting an expanded effort to unionize its stores, even as a union vote proceeds at three of the coffee-chain's locations in Buffalo, New York.

Union organizers from three additional Buffalo-area stores appeared before the National Labor Relations Board on Thursday, asking to hold union votes at each of their stores. The workers say they want more input on pay and store operations and they're seeking representation by Workers United, an affiliate of the Service Employees International Union.

41. Starbucks fights expanding unionization effort at its stores -

Starbucks is fighting an expanded effort to unionize its stores, even as a union vote proceeds at three of the coffee-chain's locations in Buffalo, New York.

Union organizers from three additional Buffalo-area stores appeared before the National Labor Relations Board on Thursday, asking to hold union votes at each of their stores. The workers say they want more input on pay and store operations and they're seeking representation by Workers United, an affiliate of the Service Employees International Union.

42. Rare Starbucks union vote set to begin in Buffalo -

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — Never in its 50-year history has Starbucks relied on union workers to serve up frothy lattes as its U.S. cafes. But some baristas aim to change that.

Workers at three separate Starbucks stores in and around Buffalo, New York, are expected to begin voting by mail this week on whether they want to be represented by Workers United, an affiliate of the Service Employees International Union.

43. Clarksville’s Customs House earns awards -

The Customs House Museum & Cultural Center is the recent recipient of multiple awards in 2021 from the Southeastern Museums Conference.

The SEMC awards come from two categories – Technology and Publication Design. The Technology Competition recognizes excellence in the use of technology and winning entries demonstrate innovation, effective design, accessibility, creativity and recognition of institutional identity. The Publications Design Competition encourages communication, effective design, creativity, pride of work and recognition of institutional image and identity. Museum publications play a vital role in the institution’s educational mission as they document exhibitions and collections through high-quality design and production.

44. Starbucks workers will vote on union at 3 Buffalo stores -

Workers hoping to unionize Starbucks stores in the U.S. have won a preliminary victory before the National Labor Relations Board.

The board said employees at three separate Starbucks stores in Buffalo, New York, can hold union elections in November in a new ruling. The board rejected Starbucks' attempt to hold a single vote with 20 stores in the region.

45. Starbucks raising US workers' pay as union effort looms -

Starbucks said Wednesday it is raising its U.S. employees' pay and making other changes to improve working conditions in its stores.

The Seattle-based coffee giant said all of its U.S. workers will earn at least $15 — and up to $23 — per hour by next summer. In late January, employees with two or more years of service will get a 5% raise, while those with five or more years of service could receive up to a 10% raise. Workers can also get a $200 recruitment bonus to help attract new employees.

46. Supreme Court Notebook: Don't stand so close to us -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Get tested. Wear a mask. Don't get too close. Not your typical court orders, but that was the word from the Supreme Court to lawyers and reporters who returned to the high court this week for the first in-person arguments in more than a year and a half.

47. GM CEO Barra to lead the Business Roundtable -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Mary Barra, who became the first top executive of a big three auto company when she took over at General Motors, will become the first female chair of the Business Roundtable, an organization that represents some of the nation's most powerful companies.

48. EXPLAINER: Why coffee could cost more at groceries, cafes -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — As if a cup of coffee wasn't expensive enough, a confluence of factors is driving up farmers' costs to grow the beans and it could begin filtering down to your local cafe before the end of the year.

49. Starbucks hits sales record as customers return to stores -

Starbucks saw record sales in the third quarter as the impact of the pandemic receded and customers flocked to its stores.

But the company's shares fell after it lowered its forecast for sales growth in China, its second-largest market outside the U.S.

50. Oat milk maker Oatly to raise $1.4 billion in public debut -

Oatly, the world's largest oat milk company, will raise $1.4 billion in an initial public offering Thursday on the Nasdaq stock exchange, capitalizing on a global surge in demand for its products.

Oatly priced its shares at $17 apiece ahead of the IPO, giving the company a valuation of nearly $10 billion. It will trade under the ticker symbol "OTLY."

51. Amazon wins EU court fight over $300 million tax ruling -

BRUSSELS (AP) — In the latest setback to European Union efforts to tackle corporate tax avoidance, a court on Wednesday annulled a ruling by the European Commission that a tax deal between Amazon and Luxembourg's government amounted to illegal state support.

52. Despite virus, Atlantic City casinos reinvesting millions -

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — With COVID-19 restrictions limiting how many people can gamble inside, and revenue and profits plunging, this might not sound like the best time for Atlantic City's casinos to be spending big on renovations.

53. McDonald's comes roaring back as restrictions ease -

The bounce back for McDonald's as restrictions were lifted across the U.S. was so strong in the first quarter that the company surpassed sales during the same period even in 2019, long before the pandemic broadsided the country.

54. More than 400 businesses back LGBTQ rights act -

More than 400 companies – including Tesla, Pfizer, Delta Air Lines and Amazon – have signed on to support civil rights legislation for LGBTQ people that is moving through Congress, advocates said Tuesday.

55. Stocks rise, erasing most of S&P 500's weekly losses -

Stocks closed out a choppy week of trading with a broad rally, though the gains were not enough to keep the S&P 500 from its first weekly loss in the last five.

The benchmark index rose 1.1% Friday, clawing back all of its losses from a day earlier. It posted a 0.1% loss for the week. The gains were shared broadly by nearly every sector in the index. Technology companies accounted for a big slice of the rally, along with banks, communication stocks and companies that rely on consumer spending. The utilities and consumer staples sectors closed slightly lower. Treasury yields inched higher.

56. Restaurants, delivery apps still at odds as demand grows -

Diners got used to delivery during the pandemic, and the habit may stick long after dining rooms reopen. But restaurants and delivery companies remain uneasy partners, haggling over fees and struggling to make the service profitable for themselves and each other.

57. Big-business pushback against voting measures gains momentum -

Big business has ratcheted up its objections to proposals that would make it harder to vote, with several hundred companies and executives signing a new statement opposing "any discriminatory legislation."

58. Businesses, philanthropy unite to fight racial wealth gap -

NEW YORK (AP) — The CEOs of Starbucks and Goldman Sachs will join leaders from philanthropy and academia in a new initiative to address the racial wealth gap in the United States.

The initiative is called NinetyToZero, so named for the roughly 90% wealth gap between white and Black Americans. Its leaders describe the goal as providing a roadmap for organizations to "counteract centuries of discrimination, segregation, and financial exploitation," according to the group's launch plans announced Tuesday.

59. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos might step down without stepping away -

Even after stepping aside as CEO, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos appears likely to keep identifying new frontiers for the world's dominant e-commerce company. His successor, meanwhile, gets to deal with escalating efforts to curtail its power.

60. Wall Street recovers some of last week's drop, silver climbs -

Stocks notched broad gains on Wall Street Monday, clawing back some of their losses following the market's worst weekly loss since October.

The S&P 500 rose 1.6%. The benchmark index was coming off a 3.3% slide last week, when volatility spiked as online traders hoping to inflict damage on hedge funds fueled a frenzy in GameStop and a few other stocks.

61. PepsiCo goes Beyond Meat in new partnership -

PepsiCo and Beyond Meat are creating a joint venture to develop snacks and drinks made from plant-based proteins.

The companies didn't reveal what kinds of products they will make Tuesday, saying they're still in development.

62. Restaurants to retailers, virus transformed business -

It would be just a temporary precaution. When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon – as soon as New York was safe again.

63. From restaurants to retailers, virus transformed economies -

NEW YORK (AP) — It would be just a temporary precaution.

When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon — as soon as New York was safe again.

64. Stock indexes end mixed as damage to the economy piles up -

U.S. stock indexes closed mostly lower Thursday following more evidence that the pandemic is tightening its grip on the economy while Congress remains in a stalemate over how to do something about it.

65. Top CEOs met to plan response to Trump's election denial -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Only a few of America's CEOs have made public statements about President Donald Trump's refusal to accept his election loss, but in private, many are alarmed and talking about what collective action would be necessary if they see an imminent threat to democracy.

66. 'Our house is on fire': Suburban women lead a Trump revolt -

TROY, Mich. (AP) — She walks with the determination of a person who believes the very fate of democracy might depend on the next door she knocks on, head down, shoulders forward. She wears nothing fussy, the battle fatigues of her troupe: yoga pants and sneakers. She left her Lincoln Aviator idling in the driveway, the driver door open -- if this house wasn't the one to save the nation, she can move quickly to the next.

67. Pandemic pushes start of holiday shopping earlier than ever -

NEW YORK (AP) — Add last-minute holiday shopping to the list of time-honored traditions being upended by the coronavirus pandemic. Retailers are kicking off the holiday season earlier than ever this year in hopes of avoiding big in-store crowds and shipping bottlenecks in November and December.

68. China becoming battleground for plant-based meat makers -

HONG KONG (AP) — China has become a battleground for plant-based meat companies looking to tap into the world's largest market for meat-consumption.

American plant-based meat company Impossible Foods Inc. said Thursday it is awaiting regulatory approval to enter the China market, while rivals such as Beyond Meat have pushed forward with plans to set up production in China despite edgy relations between Beijing and Washington.

69. Zoom stock surges, market value tops Boeing, Starbucks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Zoom surged in early trading Tuesday, making the video conferencing company more valuable than well-established companies in the auto and aviation industries.

The shares rose 40.8% to $458.08, pushing Zoom's market value to more than $129 billion, after it reported explosive growth during the second quarter as more people paid for subscriptions, giving them more control over virtual meetings. Zoom's revenue more than quadrupled from the same time last year to $663.5 million and profits blew past Wall Street forecasts.

70. More companies pledge to give workers time to vote -

A growing number of U.S. companies are pledging to give workers time off to vote in the presidential election this November, an effort that's gaining steam despite the government's reluctance to make Election Day a federal holiday.

71. More companies pledge to give workers time to vote -

A growing number of U.S. companies are pledging to give workers time off to vote in the presidential election this November, an effort that's gaining steam despite the government's reluctance to make Election Day a federal holiday.

72. The 2 costs that can make or break your nest egg -

If you earn a decent income but have trouble saving, the culprits could be the roof over your head and the car in your driveway.

Retirement savers who contribute more to their 401(k)s

often spend less on housing and transportation than their peers, a study by the Employee Benefit Research Institute and J.P. Morgan Asset Management reveals.

73. Beyond Meat's 2Q sales jump as more try plant-based burgers -

More people are throwing plant-based burgers on the grill this summer.

Beyond Meat, which makes pea protein-based burgers and sausages, said Tuesday its second quarter revenue jumped 69% to $113 million as more households tried its products in the U.S. and elsewhere.

74. Wall Street rallies as Fed keeps rates pinned at record low -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street rallied on Wednesday, and the S&P 500 climbed 1.2% for its best day in two weeks after the Federal Reserve kept the accelerator floored on its support for the economy.

75. McDonald's to require masks at all U.S. restaurant locations -

NEW YORK (AP) — McDonald's says it will be requiring customers to wear face coverings when entering its U.S. restaurants as the number of new virus cases continue to surge in many states.

The move, announced Friday, will be in effect on Aug. 1.

76. Report: Disney cuts back on Facebook, Instagram ads -

MENLO PARK, California (AP) — The Walt Disney Co. has "dramatically" slashed its advertising budget on Facebook and Facebook-owned Instagram, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal.

77. Target, CVS join growing list of retailers requiring masks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target, CVS Health and Publix Super Markets on Thursday joined the growing list of national chains that will require customers to wear face masks regardless of where cities or states stand on the issue.

78. Walmart latest retailer to require customers to wear masks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart will require customers to wear face coverings at all of its namesake and Sam's Club stores, making it the largest retailer to introduce such a policy that has otherwise proven difficult to enforce without state and federal requirements.

79. Retail bankruptcy filings keep coming, coffee habits change -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Friday related to the national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

80. A pinch where it hurts: Can Facebook weather the ad boycott? -

On Wednesday, more than 500 companies officially kicked off an advertising boycott intended to pressure Facebook into taking a stronger stand against hate speech. CEO Mark Zuckerberg has agreed to meet with its organizers early next week.

81. Wall Street stocks claw back a chunk of last week's losses -

Stocks shrugged off a wobbly start to finish solidly higher on Wall Street Monday, as the market clawed back half its losses from last week.

The S&P 500 rose 1.5% after having been down 0.3%. The market rallied after a much healthier-than-expected report on the housing market put investors in a buying mood. Technology, industrial and communications stocks accounted for much of the market's broad gains. European stocks also closed higher. Treasury yields were mixed and oil prices rose.

82. Can job market sustain its gains? Uncertainties cloud future -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Layoffs are slowing, unemployment is declining and hiring is gradually rising, suggesting that a steady rebound may be afoot in the U.S. job market.

Or is it?

So many uncertainties are overhanging the economy that no one knows whether hiring will expand steadily in the months ahead or merely plateau as employers recall only enough of their laid-off staffers to partially reopen for business.

83. Starbucks takes $3 billion hit to revenue during pandemic -

Starbucks took a virus-related revenue hit potentially exceeding $3 billion in its third quarter.

The brewer said in a regulatory filing Wednesday that the virus outbreak also slashed its operating income between $2 billion and $2.2. billion as the virus raged.

84. Brands weigh in on national protests over police brutality -

As thousands of protesters take to the streets in response to police killings of black people, companies are wading into the national conversation but taking care to get their messaging right.

Netflix's normally lighthearted Twitter account took on a more somber tone on Saturday: "To be silent is to be complicit. Black lives matter. We have a platform, and we have a duty to our Black members, employees, creators and talent to speak up." That got retweeted over 216,000 times and "liked" over a million times.

85. America's business of prisons thrives even amid a pandemic -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — As factories and other businesses remain shuttered across America, people in prisons in at least 40 states continue going to work. Sometimes they earn pennies an hour, or nothing at all, making masks and hand sanitizer to help guard others from the coronavirus.

86. What's shopping in a pandemic like? Drive to your local mall -

NEW YORK (AP) — Many Americans are getting their first taste of what pandemic shopping looks like at their local mall.

Simon Property Group, the nation's largest mall operator, reopened several dozen shopping centers across Texas, Georgia and roughly ten other states between Friday and Monday.

87. Earnings season is in full swing and uncertainty is certain -

The most active week of the earnings season is on and the rush of quarterly reports Tuesday, 39 in all, captured the maneuvering of companies from almost every sector as they feel their way through an unprecedented economic shockwave.

88. Skeletal flights for airlines; economic signals flash red -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

89. Housing market chills, layoffs, US cos. dial up virus fight -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Wednesday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

90. Govts pledge aid as global commerce seizes in face of virus -

Governments and central banks are scrambling to find ways to keep businesses from going bankrupt as the virus outbreak grinds the world economy to a halt.

A day after Wall Street endured its worst daily drop since the crash of 1987, European markets wavered, as did U.S futures markets. There is tremendous volatility, with the extent of economic damage from the pandemic still anyone's guess. Factories are closed, retail stores are closed, travel has ground almost to a halt and billions of people are sheltering at home, going outside only to find essential supplies.

91. Virus seizes markets; it's no longer business as usual -

Global markets and businesses big and small opened the week to a landscape seemingly altered by the coronavirus pandemic. National retail chains have closed all stores. Banks are taking steps to keep cash on hand, lots of it. Markets in Asia, Europe and the U.S. are plunging. Following is a quick look at how the outbreak is impacting the financial and business sector, as well as millions of workers and customers.

92. A look at some of the hardest hit sectors in the S&P 500 -

Seven weeks after the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed in the U.S., the outbreak is now classified as a pandemic and it's doing widespread damage to critical economic sectors of the global economy. Airlines are dropping routes because people are not flying, workers are staying home, public events that raise millions of dollars for local communities have been canceled and oil prices have sunk to near $30 a barrel. Here's a look at some of the hardest hit sectors in the S&P 500, and how far they've fallen in the past 30 days.

93. Starbucks stores might go drive-thru only or limit seating -

Some Starbucks stores in the U.S. and Canada may become drive-thru only while others could limit the number of people allowed inside, the company said, one day after the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of coronavirus a pandemic.

94. Companies trim outlooks, travel and staff as virus spreads -

ALTERED EXPECTATIONS: General Electric Co. General Electric believes the viral outbreak could have a negative impact of about $300 million to $500 million on its first-quarter industrial free cash flow. Operating profit for the period could be hurt by about $200 million to $300 million. GE said that the expectations are incorporated into its full-year 2020 outlook.

95. US economy grew at 2.1% rate in Q4 but virus threat looms -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy grew at an annual rate of 2.1% in the final quarter of last year, but damage from the spreading coronavirus is likely depressing growth in the current quarter and for the rest of the year.

96. Lady Vols' Key erases ‘a lot of mistakes’ with blocked shots -

Her last name fits her perfectly because Tamari Key does her best work in that area on the basketball court.

Although most players thrive on scoring, the 6-foot-5 Tennessee freshman center takes more pride in preventing points.

97. Virus impact: Airlines extend flights suspensions -

BEIJING (AP) — Airlines are extending their suspension of flights to mainland China, while more retailers are putting an estimate on the economic damage they expect to incur from the virus outbreak in China.

98. Trump's economy: Solid and steady but vulnerable to threats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A portrait of a robust U.S. economy is sure to take center stage Tuesday night when President Donald Trump gives his third State of the Union address. It is an economy that has proved solid and durable, yet hasn't fulfilled many of Trump's promises.

99. US advises no travel to China, where virus deaths top 200 -

BEIJING (AP) — The U.S. advised against all travel to China as the number of cases of a worrying new virus spiked more than tenfold in a week, including the highest death toll in a 24-hour period reported Friday.

100. Commerce secretary: China virus could bring jobs back to US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross suggested Thursday that the viral outbreak in China might offer an unexpected benefit for the U.S. economy: It could encourage American manufacturers in China to return to the United States.