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Editorial Results (free)

1. Starbucks hits sales record as customers return to stores -

Starbucks saw record sales in the third quarter as the impact of the pandemic receded and customers flocked to its stores.

But the company's shares fell after it lowered its forecast for sales growth in China, its second-largest market outside the U.S.

2. Oat milk maker Oatly to raise $1.4 billion in public debut -

Oatly, the world's largest oat milk company, will raise $1.4 billion in an initial public offering Thursday on the Nasdaq stock exchange, capitalizing on a global surge in demand for its products.

Oatly priced its shares at $17 apiece ahead of the IPO, giving the company a valuation of nearly $10 billion. It will trade under the ticker symbol "OTLY."

3. Amazon wins EU court fight over $300 million tax ruling -

BRUSSELS (AP) — In the latest setback to European Union efforts to tackle corporate tax avoidance, a court on Wednesday annulled a ruling by the European Commission that a tax deal between Amazon and Luxembourg's government amounted to illegal state support.

4. Despite virus, Atlantic City casinos reinvesting millions -

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — With COVID-19 restrictions limiting how many people can gamble inside, and revenue and profits plunging, this might not sound like the best time for Atlantic City's casinos to be spending big on renovations.

5. McDonald's comes roaring back as restrictions ease -

The bounce back for McDonald's as restrictions were lifted across the U.S. was so strong in the first quarter that the company surpassed sales during the same period even in 2019, long before the pandemic broadsided the country.

6. More than 400 businesses back LGBTQ rights act -

More than 400 companies – including Tesla, Pfizer, Delta Air Lines and Amazon – have signed on to support civil rights legislation for LGBTQ people that is moving through Congress, advocates said Tuesday.

7. Stocks rise, erasing most of S&P 500's weekly losses -

Stocks closed out a choppy week of trading with a broad rally, though the gains were not enough to keep the S&P 500 from its first weekly loss in the last five.

The benchmark index rose 1.1% Friday, clawing back all of its losses from a day earlier. It posted a 0.1% loss for the week. The gains were shared broadly by nearly every sector in the index. Technology companies accounted for a big slice of the rally, along with banks, communication stocks and companies that rely on consumer spending. The utilities and consumer staples sectors closed slightly lower. Treasury yields inched higher.

8. Restaurants, delivery apps still at odds as demand grows -

Diners got used to delivery during the pandemic, and the habit may stick long after dining rooms reopen. But restaurants and delivery companies remain uneasy partners, haggling over fees and struggling to make the service profitable for themselves and each other.

9. Big-business pushback against voting measures gains momentum -

Big business has ratcheted up its objections to proposals that would make it harder to vote, with several hundred companies and executives signing a new statement opposing "any discriminatory legislation."

10. Businesses, philanthropy unite to fight racial wealth gap -

NEW YORK (AP) — The CEOs of Starbucks and Goldman Sachs will join leaders from philanthropy and academia in a new initiative to address the racial wealth gap in the United States.

The initiative is called NinetyToZero, so named for the roughly 90% wealth gap between white and Black Americans. Its leaders describe the goal as providing a roadmap for organizations to "counteract centuries of discrimination, segregation, and financial exploitation," according to the group's launch plans announced Tuesday.

11. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos might step down without stepping away -

Even after stepping aside as CEO, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos appears likely to keep identifying new frontiers for the world's dominant e-commerce company. His successor, meanwhile, gets to deal with escalating efforts to curtail its power.

12. Wall Street recovers some of last week's drop, silver climbs -

Stocks notched broad gains on Wall Street Monday, clawing back some of their losses following the market's worst weekly loss since October.

The S&P 500 rose 1.6%. The benchmark index was coming off a 3.3% slide last week, when volatility spiked as online traders hoping to inflict damage on hedge funds fueled a frenzy in GameStop and a few other stocks.

13. PepsiCo goes Beyond Meat in new partnership -

PepsiCo and Beyond Meat are creating a joint venture to develop snacks and drinks made from plant-based proteins.

The companies didn't reveal what kinds of products they will make Tuesday, saying they're still in development.

14. Restaurants to retailers, virus transformed business -

It would be just a temporary precaution. When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon – as soon as New York was safe again.

15. From restaurants to retailers, virus transformed economies -

NEW YORK (AP) — It would be just a temporary precaution.

When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon — as soon as New York was safe again.

16. Stock indexes end mixed as damage to the economy piles up -

U.S. stock indexes closed mostly lower Thursday following more evidence that the pandemic is tightening its grip on the economy while Congress remains in a stalemate over how to do something about it.

17. Top CEOs met to plan response to Trump's election denial -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Only a few of America's CEOs have made public statements about President Donald Trump's refusal to accept his election loss, but in private, many are alarmed and talking about what collective action would be necessary if they see an imminent threat to democracy.

18. 'Our house is on fire': Suburban women lead a Trump revolt -

TROY, Mich. (AP) — She walks with the determination of a person who believes the very fate of democracy might depend on the next door she knocks on, head down, shoulders forward. She wears nothing fussy, the battle fatigues of her troupe: yoga pants and sneakers. She left her Lincoln Aviator idling in the driveway, the driver door open -- if this house wasn't the one to save the nation, she can move quickly to the next.

19. Pandemic pushes start of holiday shopping earlier than ever -

NEW YORK (AP) — Add last-minute holiday shopping to the list of time-honored traditions being upended by the coronavirus pandemic. Retailers are kicking off the holiday season earlier than ever this year in hopes of avoiding big in-store crowds and shipping bottlenecks in November and December.

20. China becoming battleground for plant-based meat makers -

HONG KONG (AP) — China has become a battleground for plant-based meat companies looking to tap into the world's largest market for meat-consumption.

American plant-based meat company Impossible Foods Inc. said Thursday it is awaiting regulatory approval to enter the China market, while rivals such as Beyond Meat have pushed forward with plans to set up production in China despite edgy relations between Beijing and Washington.

21. Zoom stock surges, market value tops Boeing, Starbucks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Zoom surged in early trading Tuesday, making the video conferencing company more valuable than well-established companies in the auto and aviation industries.

The shares rose 40.8% to $458.08, pushing Zoom's market value to more than $129 billion, after it reported explosive growth during the second quarter as more people paid for subscriptions, giving them more control over virtual meetings. Zoom's revenue more than quadrupled from the same time last year to $663.5 million and profits blew past Wall Street forecasts.

22. More companies pledge to give workers time to vote -

A growing number of U.S. companies are pledging to give workers time off to vote in the presidential election this November, an effort that's gaining steam despite the government's reluctance to make Election Day a federal holiday.

23. More companies pledge to give workers time to vote -

A growing number of U.S. companies are pledging to give workers time off to vote in the presidential election this November, an effort that's gaining steam despite the government's reluctance to make Election Day a federal holiday.

24. The 2 costs that can make or break your nest egg -

If you earn a decent income but have trouble saving, the culprits could be the roof over your head and the car in your driveway.

Retirement savers who contribute more to their 401(k)s

often spend less on housing and transportation than their peers, a study by the Employee Benefit Research Institute and J.P. Morgan Asset Management reveals.

25. Beyond Meat's 2Q sales jump as more try plant-based burgers -

More people are throwing plant-based burgers on the grill this summer.

Beyond Meat, which makes pea protein-based burgers and sausages, said Tuesday its second quarter revenue jumped 69% to $113 million as more households tried its products in the U.S. and elsewhere.

26. Wall Street rallies as Fed keeps rates pinned at record low -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street rallied on Wednesday, and the S&P 500 climbed 1.2% for its best day in two weeks after the Federal Reserve kept the accelerator floored on its support for the economy.

27. McDonald's to require masks at all U.S. restaurant locations -

NEW YORK (AP) — McDonald's says it will be requiring customers to wear face coverings when entering its U.S. restaurants as the number of new virus cases continue to surge in many states.

The move, announced Friday, will be in effect on Aug. 1.

28. Report: Disney cuts back on Facebook, Instagram ads -

MENLO PARK, California (AP) — The Walt Disney Co. has "dramatically" slashed its advertising budget on Facebook and Facebook-owned Instagram, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal.

29. Target, CVS join growing list of retailers requiring masks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target, CVS Health and Publix Super Markets on Thursday joined the growing list of national chains that will require customers to wear face masks regardless of where cities or states stand on the issue.

30. Walmart latest retailer to require customers to wear masks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart will require customers to wear face coverings at all of its namesake and Sam's Club stores, making it the largest retailer to introduce such a policy that has otherwise proven difficult to enforce without state and federal requirements.

31. Retail bankruptcy filings keep coming, coffee habits change -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Friday related to the national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

32. A pinch where it hurts: Can Facebook weather the ad boycott? -

On Wednesday, more than 500 companies officially kicked off an advertising boycott intended to pressure Facebook into taking a stronger stand against hate speech. CEO Mark Zuckerberg has agreed to meet with its organizers early next week.

33. Wall Street stocks claw back a chunk of last week's losses -

Stocks shrugged off a wobbly start to finish solidly higher on Wall Street Monday, as the market clawed back half its losses from last week.

The S&P 500 rose 1.5% after having been down 0.3%. The market rallied after a much healthier-than-expected report on the housing market put investors in a buying mood. Technology, industrial and communications stocks accounted for much of the market's broad gains. European stocks also closed higher. Treasury yields were mixed and oil prices rose.

34. Can job market sustain its gains? Uncertainties cloud future -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Layoffs are slowing, unemployment is declining and hiring is gradually rising, suggesting that a steady rebound may be afoot in the U.S. job market.

Or is it?

So many uncertainties are overhanging the economy that no one knows whether hiring will expand steadily in the months ahead or merely plateau as employers recall only enough of their laid-off staffers to partially reopen for business.

35. Starbucks takes $3 billion hit to revenue during pandemic -

Starbucks took a virus-related revenue hit potentially exceeding $3 billion in its third quarter.

The brewer said in a regulatory filing Wednesday that the virus outbreak also slashed its operating income between $2 billion and $2.2. billion as the virus raged.

36. Brands weigh in on national protests over police brutality -

As thousands of protesters take to the streets in response to police killings of black people, companies are wading into the national conversation but taking care to get their messaging right.

Netflix's normally lighthearted Twitter account took on a more somber tone on Saturday: "To be silent is to be complicit. Black lives matter. We have a platform, and we have a duty to our Black members, employees, creators and talent to speak up." That got retweeted over 216,000 times and "liked" over a million times.

37. America's business of prisons thrives even amid a pandemic -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — As factories and other businesses remain shuttered across America, people in prisons in at least 40 states continue going to work. Sometimes they earn pennies an hour, or nothing at all, making masks and hand sanitizer to help guard others from the coronavirus.

38. What's shopping in a pandemic like? Drive to your local mall -

NEW YORK (AP) — Many Americans are getting their first taste of what pandemic shopping looks like at their local mall.

Simon Property Group, the nation's largest mall operator, reopened several dozen shopping centers across Texas, Georgia and roughly ten other states between Friday and Monday.

39. Earnings season is in full swing and uncertainty is certain -

The most active week of the earnings season is on and the rush of quarterly reports Tuesday, 39 in all, captured the maneuvering of companies from almost every sector as they feel their way through an unprecedented economic shockwave.

40. Skeletal flights for airlines; economic signals flash red -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

41. Housing market chills, layoffs, US cos. dial up virus fight -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Wednesday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

42. Govts pledge aid as global commerce seizes in face of virus -

Governments and central banks are scrambling to find ways to keep businesses from going bankrupt as the virus outbreak grinds the world economy to a halt.

A day after Wall Street endured its worst daily drop since the crash of 1987, European markets wavered, as did U.S futures markets. There is tremendous volatility, with the extent of economic damage from the pandemic still anyone's guess. Factories are closed, retail stores are closed, travel has ground almost to a halt and billions of people are sheltering at home, going outside only to find essential supplies.

43. Virus seizes markets; it's no longer business as usual -

Global markets and businesses big and small opened the week to a landscape seemingly altered by the coronavirus pandemic. National retail chains have closed all stores. Banks are taking steps to keep cash on hand, lots of it. Markets in Asia, Europe and the U.S. are plunging. Following is a quick look at how the outbreak is impacting the financial and business sector, as well as millions of workers and customers.

44. A look at some of the hardest hit sectors in the S&P 500 -

Seven weeks after the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed in the U.S., the outbreak is now classified as a pandemic and it's doing widespread damage to critical economic sectors of the global economy. Airlines are dropping routes because people are not flying, workers are staying home, public events that raise millions of dollars for local communities have been canceled and oil prices have sunk to near $30 a barrel. Here's a look at some of the hardest hit sectors in the S&P 500, and how far they've fallen in the past 30 days.

45. Starbucks stores might go drive-thru only or limit seating -

Some Starbucks stores in the U.S. and Canada may become drive-thru only while others could limit the number of people allowed inside, the company said, one day after the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of coronavirus a pandemic.

46. Companies trim outlooks, travel and staff as virus spreads -

ALTERED EXPECTATIONS: General Electric Co. General Electric believes the viral outbreak could have a negative impact of about $300 million to $500 million on its first-quarter industrial free cash flow. Operating profit for the period could be hurt by about $200 million to $300 million. GE said that the expectations are incorporated into its full-year 2020 outlook.

47. US economy grew at 2.1% rate in Q4 but virus threat looms -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy grew at an annual rate of 2.1% in the final quarter of last year, but damage from the spreading coronavirus is likely depressing growth in the current quarter and for the rest of the year.

48. Lady Vols' Key erases ‘a lot of mistakes’ with blocked shots -

Her last name fits her perfectly because Tamari Key does her best work in that area on the basketball court.

Although most players thrive on scoring, the 6-foot-5 Tennessee freshman center takes more pride in preventing points.

49. Virus impact: Airlines extend flights suspensions -

BEIJING (AP) — Airlines are extending their suspension of flights to mainland China, while more retailers are putting an estimate on the economic damage they expect to incur from the virus outbreak in China.

50. Trump's economy: Solid and steady but vulnerable to threats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A portrait of a robust U.S. economy is sure to take center stage Tuesday night when President Donald Trump gives his third State of the Union address. It is an economy that has proved solid and durable, yet hasn't fulfilled many of Trump's promises.

51. US advises no travel to China, where virus deaths top 200 -

BEIJING (AP) — The U.S. advised against all travel to China as the number of cases of a worrying new virus spiked more than tenfold in a week, including the highest death toll in a 24-hour period reported Friday.

52. Commerce secretary: China virus could bring jobs back to US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross suggested Thursday that the viral outbreak in China might offer an unexpected benefit for the U.S. economy: It could encourage American manufacturers in China to return to the United States.

53. Stocks post modest gains at end of a wobbly day of trading -

Major U.S. stock indexes finished higher Thursday after a late burst of buying led by technology and financial companies reversed an early slide.

News of a spike in the number of confirmed cases and fatalities from a virus outbreak in China put investors in a selling mood for most of the day, overshadowing a batch of mostly solid company earnings reports.

54. Fed leaves key rate alone but sees virus among global risks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve kept its key interest rate unchanged at a low level Wednesday amid an economy that looks solid but faces potential global threats, including from China's viral outbreak.

55. Stocks tumble as virus fears spark sell-off; Dow falls 453 -

U.S. stocks fell sharply Monday, sending the Dow Jones Industrial Average down by more than 450 points, as investors grappled with fresh worries about the spread of a new virus in China that threatens global economic growth.

56. Starbucks expands presence in low-income communities -

DETROIT (AP) — Starbucks is expanding a program that tries to help low-income communities by opening coffee shops and hiring local workers.

The Seattle-based company plans to open or remodel 85 stores by 2025 in rural and urban communities across the U.S. That will bring to 100 the total number of community stores Starbucks has opened since it announced the program in 2015. Each store will hire local staff — including construction crews and artists — and will have dedicated community event spaces.

57. VU women, 11-4, learn to ‘fight and claw and scrap’ -

Vanderbilt’s women’s basketball team came out in new gray and black uniforms in their Southeastern Conference opener against Auburn.

That wasn’t the only difference for the Commodores, who are off to an 11-4 start, including a 1-1 mark in the SEC through Sunday, a 68-60 loss to Florida.

58. San Francisco cafes are banishing disposable coffee cups -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A new cafe culture is brewing in the San Francisco area, where a growing number of coffee houses are banishing paper to-go cups and replacing them with everything from glass jars to rental mugs and BYO cup policies.

59. Amid climate change concern, GM rolls out big new Chevy SUVs -

MILFORD, Mich. (AP) — Global concerns about climate change are not stopping General Motors from making large SUVs for U.S. drivers.

GM on Tuesday rolled out the next generation of its big truck-based SUVs with more space and features. They're also heavier with only a small improvement in gas mileage.

60. For banks, data on your spending habits could be a gold mine -

NEW YORK (AP) — There's a powerful new player watching what you buy so it can tailor product offerings for you: the bank behind your credit or debit card.

For years, Google and Facebook have been showing ads based on your online behavior. Retailers from Amazon to Walgreens also regularly suction up your transaction history to steer future spending and hold your loyalty.

61. Amazon spends big to remake Seattle's liberal City Council -

SEATTLE (AP) — Brian Sweeney has a long list of complaints about Amazon, from the way it treats warehouse workers to the low taxes it pays and its effort to win concessions from cities to bring in jobs. So when he learned the online retail giant – which is building an "operations center of excellence" in Nashville that is expected to hire 5,000 employees – had poured $1 million into remaking the Seattle City Council with more business-friendly candidates, he pulled out his wallet.

62. Stocks fall on fresh trade worries -

Wall Street closed out a volatile week with losses Friday as investors worried that upcoming trade talks aimed at resolving the costly trade war between Washington and Beijing could be in trouble.

The selling, which erased modest early gains for the market, snapped a three-week win streak for the S&P 500. The benchmark index is still up 2.2% for September.

63. Stocks rise on fresh optimism ahead of US-China trade talks -

Stocks rose on Wall Street Thursday after the U.S. and China took steps to ease tensions in their costly trade war, putting investors in a buying mood.

Technology, financial and consumer-focused stocks helped power the modest rally, which extended the market's solid gains from the day before despite losing some momentum in the final hour of trading. The benchmark S&P 500 index closed within 0.6% of its all-time high set July 26.

64. To boost workforce, medical schools try to sell rural life -

BRISTOL, Va. (AP) — On a field trip to the Birthplace of Country Music Museum, Ashish Bibireddy put on headphones and scrolled through a jukebox of music from an influential 1927 recording session.

65. Big business to Supreme Court: Defend LGBTQ people from bias -

NEW YORK (AP) — More than 200 corporations, including many of America' best-known companies, are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that federal civil rights law bans job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.

66. Analysis: Cohen hearing stokes touchy topic of impeachment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Michael Cohen's testimony is just the beginning.

The House oversight hearing with President Donald Trump's former attorney, coming in advance of special counsel Robert Mueller's report, heralds what Democrats in Congress view as the long days ahead providing checks and balances on the Oval Office.

67. Analysis: Cohen hearing stokes touchy topic of impeachment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Michael Cohen's testimony is just the beginning.

The House oversight hearing with President Donald Trump's former attorney, coming in advance of special counsel Robert Mueller's report, heralds what Democrats in Congress view as the long days ahead providing checks and balances on the Oval Office.

68. Lawmakers, first responders sound alarm on 9/11 fund -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 17 years after the 9/11 attacks, first responders and their advocates were back at the Capitol Monday urging Congress to ensure that a victims' compensation fund does not run out of money.

69. The importance of right name for restaurants, column -

With apologies to both Shakespeare and Star Trek fans, the theme for my first Ledger column, “By Any Other Name,’’ hints at the peculiar challenge of naming things.

As a dedicated food writer, storyteller, features columnist and critic for more than 20 years, I had to come up with a name for this new, dedicated space generously offered to me by Lyle Graves and Cindy Smith. It will appear here, until further notice, every other week, starting today.

70. Democrats uneasy about potential Howard Schultz bid -

SEATTLE (AP) — For a businessman who grew a small coffee roaster into an inescapable global chain, who ensured that even his part-time workers had benefits and who has given about $150,000 to Democratic campaigns, former Starbucks Chairman Howard Schultz is generating tepid — or even hostile — responses within the party as he weighs a presidential bid in 2020.

71. Stocks rise but still end the week lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are closing higher on Wall Street but still wound up with a weekly loss, ending a four-week winning streak.

Technology and industrial stocks wound up with the biggest gains on Friday. Apple climbed 3.3 percent and Boeing added 1.7 percent.

72. Some smart ways to rein in your holiday spending -

The holidays are a huge deal in the Weston household – and every year, the expenses threatened to gallop out of control.

Keeping the holiday joyous and less stressful means keeping a firm rein on our spending. Here’s what we do, as well as smart frugal tips from others:

73. Stocks end a strong week with losses as Apple shares skid -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks slipped Friday as Apple absorbed its worst loss in more than four years. Thanks to gains over the previous three days, the S&P 500 index finished with its biggest weekly increase since March.

74. Will American Airlines bar customers from changing a ticket? -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — American Airlines is threatening to prohibit customers from making changes to nonrefundable tickets if Congress makes good on a proposal to crack down on unreasonable airline fees.

75. VUMC, Advance Financial make new Forbes’ list -

Two Nashville-based organizations, Advance Financial and Vanderbilt University Medical Center, have been named to Forbes’ first-ever ranking of The Best Employers for New Graduates.

Forbes partnered with market research company Statista to conduct an independent survey of more than 10,000 young professionals working for companies that have at least 1,000 employees within the United States.

76. Good for business? Nike gets political with Kaepernick ad -

NEW YORK (AP) — Why do it? Nike has touched off a furor by wading into football's national anthem debate with an ad featuring Colin Kaepernick, the former 49ers quarterback who was the first athlete to kneel during "The Star-Spangled Banner" to protest police brutality against blacks and hasn't played a game since 2016.

77. Stocks waver along with US-Canada trade talks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks hardly budged Friday as the U.S. and Canada were unable to complete a trade deal, but the two sides intend to continue negotiating next week.

Energy companies slipped along with oil prices Friday and high-dividend stocks also fell. Technology companies and retailers made some modest gains. Trading was very light ahead of the Labor Day holiday in the U.S. on Monday.

78. Kroger to phase out plastic bags at all stores -

CINCINNATI (AP) — The nation's largest grocery chain has begun to phase out the use of plastic bags as more Americans grow uncomfortable with their impact on the environment.

Kroger Co. will start Thursday at its QFC stores in and around Seattle, with the goal of using no plastic bags at those stores at some point next year. The company said it will be plastic-bag free at all of its nearly 2,800 stores by 2025.

79. Kroger to phase out plastic bags at all stores -

CINCINNATI (AP) — The nation's largest grocery chain will be plastic-bag free at all of its nearly 2,800 stores by 2025.

Kroger Co., which orders about 6 billion bags each year, will begin phasing out their use immediately at one of its chains based in Seattle, a city that has been proactive on reducing plastic use.

80. Stage set for races for 3 open US House seats in Tennessee -

MEMPHIS (AP) — The stage is set for spirited races for three open U.S. House seats in Tennessee.

Voters on Thursday chose Republican and Democratic candidates in House districts where longtime GOP Congressman John Duncan Jr. retired and fellow Republicans Marsha Blackburn and Diane Black moved on to seek other political jobs. The races for all nine House seats in Tennessee will be decided in the Nov. 6 general election.

81. Inflation, gas prices, tariffs squeeze consumers -

The price of a can of Coca-Cola? Likely going up. A package of Pampers? That too. Plane tickets? They also may be more expensive. These items and more may cost more in the coming months as people start feeling the effects of higher fuel prices and raw-material costs as well as a range of tariffs.

82. California court: Workers must be paid for off-clock tasks -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The California Supreme Court says Starbucks and other employers in the state must pay workers for minutes they routinely spend off the clock on tasks such as locking up or setting the store alarm.

83. Stites & Harbison adds litigator from Memphis -

Stites & Harbison, PLLC has hired Jonathan Wolf to its Nashville office. Wolf joins the Intellectual Property & Technology and Domestic Relations/Family Law service groups.

Wolf works with clients on a wide range of copyright, trademark and other intellectual property law litigation and transactional matters related to the media and entertainment industry, as well as domestic relations/family law matters.

84. Marriott hotels eliminating plastic straws by 2019 -

DETROIT (AP) — Marriott International plans to remove plastic straws and drink stirrers from all of its 6,500 hotels and resorts worldwide by next year.

The world's largest hotel company said Wednesday that the move will eliminate approximately 1 billion straws and 250 million stirrers by July 2019.

85. Image issue: Papa John's still tied to founder under fire -

NEW YORK (AP) — Papa John's founder John Schnatter is no longer board chairman after using a racial slur, but his image is still part of the pizza chain's logo and he remains the company's largest shareholder.

86. Starbucks, citing ocean threat, is ditching plastic straws -

NEW YORK (AP) — Starbucks will eliminate plastic straws from all of its locations within two years, citing the environmental threat to oceans.

The company becomes the largest food and beverage company to do so as calls to cut waste globally grow louder . Plastic straws have become a flashpoint.

87. Stocks finish mostly higher as tech and media companies lead -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rose Wednesday as investors bet that technology companies and small, domestically-focused firms will continue to do well even if the trade dispute between the U.S. and China gets worse. Media companies jumped after Disney reached a new deal with Twenty-First Century Fox.

88. Seattle to repeal homeless-aid tax after Amazon objects -

SEATTLE (AP) — Amazon balked, and Seattle is backing down. City leaders said they plan to repeal a tax on large companies such as Amazon and Starbucks as they face mounting pressure from businesses, an about-face just a month after unanimously approving the measure to help pay for efforts to combat a growing homelessness crisis.

89. Seattle tax opposed by Amazon will be likely be rescinded -

SEATTLE (AP) — Seattle city leaders said Monday they will work to repeal a tax on large businesses just one month after unanimously approving the measure to help pay for affordable housing and homeless services.

90. US stocks edge higher as technology, retail companies rise -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks finished mostly higher Tuesday as weeks of up-and-down trading, much of it related to trade tensions, gave way to smaller moves. Technology companies, retailers, and U.S.-focused companies kept rising while banks fell with interest rates.

91. Walmart offers employees new perk: cheap access to college -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart is offering its employees a new perk: affordable access to a college degree. America's largest private employer, which in the past has helped its workers get their high school or equivalency degree, hopes the new benefit will help it recruit and retain higher quality entry-level employees in a tight U.S. labor market.

92. Starbucks to close 8,000-plus stores for anti-bias training -

Starbucks is closing more than 8,000 U.S. stores for a few hours Tuesday to conduct anti-bias training in the company's latest effort to deal with the fallout over the arrest of two black men at one of its shops in Philadelphia.

93. Starbucks opens restrooms following racial firestorm -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Starbucks has adopted an open-bathroom policy following the arrest last month of two African American men at a coffee shop in Philadelphia.

Chairman Howard Schultz says he doesn't want the company to become a public bathroom, but feels employees can make the "right decision a hundred percent of the time," if that choice is removed at the store level.

94. New wrinkles on senior living -

Retirement isn’t what it used to be. And for many people, retirement isn’t even what it was when they started the transition. There are so many variables and options, retirees need to be open to change and ready for surprises, even if their plan is to stay at home forever.

95. US stocks close modestly higher, add to gains from last week -

U.S. stocks closed modestly higher Monday, extending the market's gains from last week.

Technology companies and banks accounted for much of the latest gains, outweighing losses among beverage makers and other consumer goods companies.

96. Black men arrested at Starbucks settle for $200K program -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Two black men arrested for sitting at a Philadelphia Starbucks without ordering anything settled with the city Wednesday for a symbolic $1 each and a promise from officials to set up a $200,000 program for young entrepreneurs.

97. Stocks finish mixed as Amazon leads retail rally; Exxon dips -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks finished with a split decision Friday after a wobbly day of trading. Amazon led a rally among retailers, but Exxon Mobil dragged energy companies lower to end an uneven week on Wall Street.

98. Men arrested at Starbucks say they feared for their lives -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Rashon Nelson initially brushed it off when the Starbucks manager told him he couldn't use the restroom because he wasn't a paying customer.

He thought nothing of it when he and his business partner, Donte Robinson, were approached at their table and were asked if they needed help. The 23-year-old entrepreneurs declined, explaining they were just waiting for a business meeting.

99. Starbucks to close stores for an afternoon for bias training -

NEW YORK (AP) — Starbucks, moving swiftly to confront a racially charged uproar over the arrest of two black men at one of its stores in Philadelphia, plans to close more than 8,000 U.S. stores for several hours next month to conduct racial-bias training for nearly 175,000 workers.

100. Starbucks to train workers on 'unconscious bias,' CEO says -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Starbucks wants to add training for store managers on "unconscious bias," CEO Kevin Johnson said Monday, as activists held more protests at a Philadelphia store where two black men were arrested when employees said they were trespassing.