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Editorial Results (free)

1. Stocks rally again, close out best month since Nov. 2020 -

Stocks racked up more gains Friday as Wall Street closed out its best month since November 2020, a welcome breather for investors after a punishing year for the market.

The S&P 500 index, a benchmark for many stock funds, rose 1.4% and finished 9.1% higher for July. A rebound in technology stocks, big retailers and other companies that rely on direct consumer spending helped power the index's broad gains this month. The index is still down 13.3% for the year.

2. Southwest posts record revenue but warns of rising costs -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines' second-quarter profit doubled to $760 million on record revenue, but the carrier warned that rising costs and lower productivity are likely to continue in the second half of the year.

3. Economics of war: Pain for Europe now, later for Russia -

Across Europe, signs of distress are multiplying as Russia's war in Ukraine drags on. Food banks in Italy are feeding more people. German officials are turning down the air conditioning as they prepare plans to ration natural gas and restart coal plants.

4. UK inflation rate hits new 40-year high of 9.1% -

LONDON (AP) — Britain's inflation rate hit a new 40-year high of 9.1% in the 12 months to May, figures showed Wednesday, as Russia's war in Ukraine drove food and fuel prices ever higher.

The Office for National Statistics said consumer price inflation rose slightly from 9% in April, itself the highest level since 1982.

5. WTO ministers reach deals on fisheries, food, COVID vaccines -

GENEVA (AP) — After all-night talks, members of the World Trade Organization early Friday reached a string of deals and commitments aimed to limit overfishing, broaden production of COVID-19 vaccines in the developing world, improve food security and reform a 27-year-old trade body that has been back on its heels in recent years.

6. WTO talks down to the wire with no major deals yet in sight -

GENEVA (AP) — Talks went down to the wire Thursday as the World Trade Organization was set to wrap up its first ministerial-level meeting in more than four years, with no firm deal so far on issues like food security, the fight against overfishing in the seas, and efforts to broaden access to COVID-19 vaccines.

7. OECD slashes global economic outlook on Russia-Ukraine war -

LONDON (AP) — Russia's war in Ukraine and the energy and food crises it worsened will severely drag down global economic growth and push up inflation this year, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development said Wednesday.

8. Inflation divide: The wealthy splurge, the poorest pull back -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans at the low end of the income rung are once again struggling to make ends meet.

A confluence of factors — the expiration of federal stimulus checks and surging inflation on staples like gas and food — are driving an even bigger wedge between the haves and have-nots.

9. Texas shooting is new test for Biden's long battle over guns -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden, then the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, surveyed the collection of black, military-style rifles on display in the middle of the room as he denounced the sale of guns whose "only real function is to kill human beings at a ferocious pace."

10. World Food Program chief presses billionaires 'to step up' -

DAVOS, Switzerland (AP) — The head of the U.N.'s World Food Program is telling billionaires it's "time to step up" as the global threat of food insecurity rises with Russia's war in Ukraine, saying he's seen encouraging signs from some of the world's richest people, like Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos.

11. Memphis street being renamed for member of The Bar-Kays -

MEMPHIS (AP) — James Alexander, the last surviving member of The Bar-Kays band that backed soul music star Otis Redding, will have a street renamed after him in his hometown of Memphis, Tennessee, Stax Museum said.

12. Ukraine war threatens food supplies in fragile Arab world -

BEIRUT (AP) — Layal Aswad was already exhausted by Lebanon's devastating two-year economic collapse. Now, as Russia's invasion of Ukraine sends food and energy prices soaring even further, she finds herself struggling to put food on the table for her family of four.

13. Russian stock market, crushed by war, opens with big limits -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Russian stock market opened Thursday for limited trading under heavy restrictions for the first time since Moscow invaded Ukraine, coming almost a month after prices plunged and the market was shut down as a way to insulate the economy.

14. Staples, Milsap, Booker T. lead Memphis music hall class -

MEMPHIS (AP) — Singers Mavis Staples and Ronnie Milsap and keyboardist Booker T. Jones lead a versatile group of musicians named to this year's class of the Memphis Music Hall of Fame.

The hall said it announced its newest members during a ceremony Tuesday. Established in 2012, the hall includes members of the music world with ties to Memphis, including B.B. King, Otis Redding, Carla Thomas, Tina Turner, Three 6 Mafia and Elvis Presley.

15. War in Ukraine will take global economic toll, group warns -

Russia's war in Ukraine will disrupt commerce and clog up supply chains, slashing economic growth and pushing prices sharply higher around the globe, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development warned Thursday.

16. Russia's invasion of Ukraine leaves global trade in tatters -

MIAMI (AP) — Sanctions on Russia are starting to wreak havoc on global trade, with potentially devastating consequences for energy and grain importers while also generating ripple effects across a world still struggling with pandemic-induced supply chain disruptions.

17. What to watch in Biden's 1st State of the Union address -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden sat through many State of the Union speeches as a senator and vice president. On Tuesday night, he'll deliver the address himself.

But it comes at a challenging time for Biden, who is weighed down by public disapproval of his handling of the economy and the pandemic. The address also comes days after Russia opened war against Ukraine, despite U.S.-led efforts to prevent military conflict. And it follows Biden's announcement last week of his candidate for an opening on the Supreme Court.

18. Surging inflation is forcing people and businesses to adapt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A warehouse worker in Tennessee is running up against price increases that far exceed her modest pay raise.

The owner of a pastry business in Massachusetts has had to reduce his product offerings and personally absorb higher costs.

19. Stocks edge higher after another choppy day on Wall Street -

Wall Street capped another wobbly day of trading Wednesday with an uneven finish for the major stock indexes ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday in the U.S.

The S&P 500 rose 0.2% after wavering between small gains and losses most of the morning. The benchmark index regained its footing in the final hour of trading.

20. Yes, there are turkeys for Thanksgiving – for a price -

Turkeys may not be able to fly very far. But their prices can soar — along with the costs of other holiday staples like cranberry sauce and pie filling.

The Thanksgiving table hasn't been spared the price inflation that is rampant elsewhere in the economy because of strong consumer demand and labor shortages.

21. Soaring prices a heavy burden for consumers as holidays near -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A worsening surge of inflation for such bedrock necessities as food, rent, autos and heating oil is setting Americans up for a financially difficult Thanksgiving and holiday shopping season.

22. US economy slowed to a 2% rate last quarter in face of COVID -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hampered by rising COVID-19 cases and persistent supply shortages, the U.S. economy slowed sharply to a 2% annual growth rate in the July-September period, the weakest quarterly expansion since the recovery from the pandemic recession began last year.

23. Loop hopes to go mainstream with reusable packaging -

Reusable packaging – from stainless steel ice cream containers to glass jars of soap – is about to become more common at groceries and restaurants worldwide.

Loop, a two-year-old company that collects and sanitizes reusable containers, said Wednesday it's expanding after successful trials at groceries in France and Japan. Kroger and Walgreens in the U.S., Tesco in the United Kingdom and Woolworths in Australia are among the chains partnering with Loop to sell household staples in reusable packages. McDonald's, Burger King and Tim Hortons have also signed on.

24. Marks & Spencer blames Brexit for store closures in France -

LONDON (AP) — British retailer Marks & Spencer said Thursday that it will close 11 of its stores in France, mainly in Paris, as a result of fresh and chilled food supply issues related to Britain's departure from the European Union.

25. Stocks slip as Fed report signals 'downshift' in economy -

Stocks are closing lower on Wall Street Wednesday following a Federal Reserve report that shows U.S. economic activity slowed this summer amid rising worries over resurgent coronavirus cases and mounting supply chain problems and labor shortages.

26. 'Varsity Blues' trial promises fresh insights in old scandal -

BOSTON (AP) — The first trial in the "Operation Varsity Blues" college admissions bribery scandal will begin this week, with the potential to shed light on investigators' tactics and brighten the spotlight on a secretive school selection process many have long complained is rigged to favor the rich.

27. Be ready to work for Labor Day bargains this year -

This Labor Day, some Americans will have extra cash on hand for holiday weekend shopping.

Some people padded their savings accounts by staying home during the pandemic. And some set aside the advance payments of the child tax credit they received, says Amna Kirmani, marketing professor at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business.

28. Metro Council approves grants to 21 nonprofits -

Metro Council has approved 21 Opportunity Grants to nonprofits working to enhance community safety and reduce violence in Nashville-Davidson County. This is the first round of funding from the $2 million Community Safety Partnership Fund, which Metro Nashville created with Governor’s Grant dollars earlier this year.

29. As Herschel Walker eyes Senate run, a turbulent past emerges -

ATLANTA (AP) — At first glance, Herschel Walker has a coveted political profile for a potential Senate candidate in Georgia.

He was a football hero at the University of Georgia before his long NFL career. He's a business owner whose chicken products are distributed across the U.S. And he's a Black conservative with backing from former President Donald Trump, a longtime friend.

30. Tennessee might have listened to Frist on COVID-19 -

I’ve long been of the belief that the best thing Bill Frist did for Tennessee and the whole of the United States was to retire from the Senate in 2007. I have now reassessed that stance.

A brief update here, for context:

31. Wall Street hits another record; energy stocks, banks gain -

Stocks finished broadly higher on Wall Street Thursday, adding to the gains that helped the market close out its best first half of a year since the dotcom bubble.

The S&P 500 rose 0.5%, marking its sixth straight gain and fourth consecutive record high. The price of U.S. crude oil rose more than 2%, giving a boost to energy companies. Bond yields edged higher and helped lift bank stocks. Health care and communication companies also helped lift the market. The consumer staples sector was the only laggard, weighed down by a pullback in shares of Walgreens Boots Alliance.

32. Lucky number: Biden is 13th US president to meet the queen -

LONDON (AP) — Imagine trying to make an impression on someone who's met, well, almost everyone.

Such is the challenge for President Joe Biden, who is set to sip tea with Queen Elizabeth II on Sunday at Windsor Castle after a Group of Seven leaders' summit in southwestern England.

33. Engel & Völkers partners with Pareto -

Engel & Völkers Nashville has partnered with Pareto Realty and will collectively do business under the Engel & Völkers name. Led by license partner Neal Clayton, this announcement adds 18 real estate advisers to Engel & Völkers Nashville, expanding its real estate service into Williamson County.

34. Amazon to buy MGM, studio behind James Bond and 'Shark Tank' -

NEW YORK (AP) — Online shopping giant Amazon is buying MGM, the movie and TV studio behind James Bond, "Legally Blonde" and "Shark Tank," with the hopes of filling its video streaming service with more stuff to watch.

35. US stock indexes mixed as tech rebound fades; Peloton drops -

Major U.S. stock indexes closed mixed Wednesday after an early technology company rebound faded, tempering the market's recovery from a sell-off a day earlier.

The S&P 500 eked out a 0.1% gain after having been up 0.7% in the early going. The Dow Jones Industrial Average managed a 0.3% gain, while the tech-heavy Nasdaq slid 0.4%.

36. Stocks rise, erasing most of S&P 500's weekly losses -

Stocks closed out a choppy week of trading with a broad rally, though the gains were not enough to keep the S&P 500 from its first weekly loss in the last five.

The benchmark index rose 1.1% Friday, clawing back all of its losses from a day earlier. It posted a 0.1% loss for the week. The gains were shared broadly by nearly every sector in the index. Technology companies accounted for a big slice of the rally, along with banks, communication stocks and companies that rely on consumer spending. The utilities and consumer staples sectors closed slightly lower. Treasury yields inched higher.

37. Vanderbilt hires Shea Ralph from UConn as new women's coach -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Vanderbilt has hired Shea Ralph away from UConn to help revive the Commodores' struggling women's basketball program, which hasn't reached the NCAA Tournament since 2014.

Athletic director Candice Lee announced the hiring Tuesday, a week after firing Stephanie White following five seasons.  Ralph will be introduced at a news conference Wednesday.

38. Reboot your budget to prep for reopening -

Picture cruising your car deep into 2021 and never glancing in the rearview mirror. Vaccines, travel and a hope of normalcy are finally on the horizon.

With so much to look forward to, it's understandable to not want to look back.

39. Baseball glove is the sweetest smell of spring -

Baseball and I are celebrating our 60th anniversary together this year, dating back to when I first put on a cap and T-shirt for the Staples Athletics in Moss Point, Mississippi.

It’s been quite a ride, filled with moments memorable, and less so. Have I mentioned the time I pitched a no-hitter and hit a home run? That was pretty much the peak of my athletic career.

40. Gains for bank stocks help lead major US indexes higher -

Stocks shook off a weak start and closed broadly higher Wednesday, nudging the Dow Jones Industrial Average to another all-time high.

The S&P 500 rose 1.1% after having been down 0.6% in the early going. Gains in financial, technology and industrial stocks powered the comeback. Utilities fell.

41. Late gains reverse most of an early slide on stock market -

A late-afternoon burst of buying on Wall Street helped reverse most of a stock market sell-off Tuesday, nudging the S&P 500 to its first gain after a five-day losing streak.

The benchmark index eked out a 0.1% gain after having been down more than 1.8% earlier. The Nasdaq lost 0.5% as technology stocks fell for a sixth straight day. The tech-heavy index had been down nearly 4%. The Dow Jones Industrial Average, which is less exposed to tech stocks than the two other indexes, managed to rise 0.1%.

42. US officials: Pilot error caused Kobe Bryant chopper crash -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The pilot who crashed the helicopter carrying Kobe Bryant, killing all nine aboard, made a series of poor decisions that led him to fly blindly into a wall of clouds where he became so disoriented he thought he was climbing when the craft was plunging toward a Southern California hillside, federal safety officials said Tuesday.

43. Stax Museum offers virtual tours, online concert in February -

MEMPHIS (AP) — The Stax Museum of American Soul Music in Tennessee is offering virtual "field trips" and an online concert in honor of Black History Month.

The Memphis-based museum said Monday the online tours will take viewers through the history of the Stax Records label, which produced soul music by Otis Redding, Sam & Dave, Carla Thomas, the Staples Singers, Booker T. and the MGs and others.

44. Top Davidson County commercial sales for October 2020 -

Top commercial real estate sales, October 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

45. COVID-19: 'The Bitter End' for nation's live music venues? -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The venerable New Orleans funk band Galactic purchased the historic music club Tipitina's in late November 2018 and, according to bassist Robert Mercurio, was making a go of it.

"It's a tight-margin business but we were making our notes and fulfilling our bills and whatnot. So, it was moving along in a good direction," he said.

46. Civil War shaped Nashville's racial divide -

When it comes to talking about New Nashville and Old Nashville, historian David Ewing says many people new to the area might have a vision that only goes back 10 years even or 50 years. But the reality of it is Old Nashville goes back much longer than that.

47. Pilgrimage Festival announces 2021 dates -

Pilgrimage Music and Cultural Festival producers have scheduled the next event for Sept. 25-26 following a one-year hiatus due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Also, in support of local musicians, the festival announced it has launched a special vintage merchandise sale on the website for a limited time with net proceeds to benefit MusiCares.

48. Restaurant workers had it made ... and then -

It was the equivalent of a massive rug being pulled out from under tens of thousands of people statewide.

The COVID-19 pandemic of 2020 blew up the hospitality industry, abruptly sending servers, bartenders and cooks – all of whom were in high demand and could change jobs on a whim during Nashville’s restaurant boom – home without a whiff of certainty about when they’d be able to come back.

49. Trump says virus in US will get worse before it gets better -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump warned on Tuesday that the "nasty horrible'" coronavirus will get worse in the U.S. before it gets better, but he also tried to paint a rosy picture of efforts to conquer the disease that has claimed more than 140,000 American lives in just five months.

50. Tennessee GOP Senate race a new test for Trump's endorsement -

NASHVILLE (AP) — President Donald Trump's endorsement clout will get another test in the Aug. 6 open Republican U.S. Senate primary in Tennessee.

Bill Hagerty, Trump's former ambassador to Japan, has the president's endorsement in a race against Manny Sethi, a Nashville trauma surgeon who doesn't disagree with Trump on a whole lot, either — other than his preference of candidate.

51. LL Bean inks first wholesaler partnerships in US -

FREEPORT, Maine (AP) — L.L. Bean is expanding from its original model of direct-to-customer catalog sales and in-stores sales with an agreement to sell products in Nordstrom, Staples and sporting goods chain SCHEELS.

52. Small businesses worldwide fight for survival amid pandemic -

Hour after hour in the dark, Chander Shekhar's mind raced ahead to morning.

More than three months had dragged by since the coronavirus forced Shekhar to shut down his business — a narrow, second-floor shop racked with vibrantly colored saris, on a block in New York's Jackson Heights neighborhood once thronged with South Asian immigrant shoppers. Today, finally, he and other merchants were allowed to reopen their doors.

53. Trading racism claims, Tennessee House stays in tense divide -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee House continued to simmer Wednesday after Republicans spiked a resolution the night before for a young black woman shot and killed this year. Speaker Cameron Sexton even kicked off the morning session by telling leaders of both parties to meet with him afterward.

54. Trading racism claims, Tennessee House stays in tense divide -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee House continued to simmer Wednesday after Republicans spiked a resolution the night before for a young black woman shot and killed this year. Speaker Cameron Sexton even kicked off the morning session by telling leaders of both parties to meet with him afterward.

55. Virus-proofing sports facilities presents a big challenge -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The jersey-wearing camaraderie. The scent of sizzling sausages. The buzz before a big game.

The distinctive atmosphere of live sports, that feeling in the air, will return in time as pandemic restrictions are eased. But will that very air be safe in a closed arena with other fans in attendance?

56. Tennessee official: Fear of virus not reason to vote by mail -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Fear of contracting the coronavirus doesn't meet the criteria to vote by mail due to illness in Tennessee, state officials said Tuesday, as they recommended preparing as though all 1.4 million registered voters who are at least 60 will cast ballots by mail in the August primary election.

57. Kingfish Ingram wins 5 Blues Music Awards in online show -

MEMPHIS (AP) — Guitarist Christone "Kingfish" Ingram took home five Blues Music Awards in an online ceremony that featured appearances by Bonnie Raitt, Robert Cray and other musicians.

The awards show Sunday was moved online due to the coronanavirus outbreak. The program included performances recorded by nominees at home and flashbacks from past shows, The Blues Foundation said in a news release.

58. 'We don't know how it will end': Hunger stalks amid virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When all this started — when the coronavirus began stalking humanity like an animal hunting prey, when she and her husband lost their restaurant jobs overnight as the world shut down to hide, when she feared not being able to feed her family — Janeth went outside with a red kitchen towel.

59. Hit hard by closures, Tennessee tourist spots eager to open -

MEMPHIS (AP) — Like other tourist spots in Tennessee, Casey Jones Village in Jackson has taken a financial hit since nonessential businesses closed in March as part of the response to the new coronavirus outbreak.

60. Online grocery services struggle to meet spike in demand -

LONDON (AP) — A pandemic forcing everyone to stay home could be the perfect moment for online grocery services. In practice, they've been struggling to keep up with a surge in orders, highlighting their limited ability to respond to an unprecedented onslaught of demand.

61. Turn out the lights, the party’s over -

He’s seen fire and he’s seen rain, but his violinist and accompanying vocalist, Andrea Zonn, says James Taylor never thought that he’d see a time when a virus from China would wipe out his spring and, likely, summer schedules.

62. Macy's, Kohl's, Gap to furlough majority of their workers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Macy's, Kohl's and Gap Inc. all said Monday they will stop paying tens of thousands of employees who were thrown out of work when the chains temporarily closed their stores and sales collapsed as a result of the pandemic.

63. Macy's to furlough majority of its 125,000 workers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Macy's says it will temporarily stop paying tens of thousands of employees who were thrown out of work when the chain closed its stores in response to collapsing sales during the pandemic.

64. Lawsuit challenges Tennessee false campaign literature law -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A political action committee is challenging a Tennessee law that criminalizes publishing false campaign literature, arguing that such bans violate the U.S. Constitution.

The nonpartisan group Tennesseans for Sensible Election Laws filed the complaint earlier this month against Attorney General Herbert Slatery and the Davidson County district attorney general's office.

65. A pot shop at your door: Home delivery surges amid outbreak -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — One company rushed to expand its delivery fleet. Another has seen sales triple. The global coronavirus pandemic has left millions of people locked out of bars, restaurants and theaters, but it's been an unexpected boost for some U.S. pot shops.

66. Govts pledge aid as global commerce seizes in face of virus -

Governments and central banks are scrambling to find ways to keep businesses from going bankrupt as the virus outbreak grinds the world economy to a halt.

A day after Wall Street endured its worst daily drop since the crash of 1987, European markets wavered, as did U.S futures markets. There is tremendous volatility, with the extent of economic damage from the pandemic still anyone's guess. Factories are closed, retail stores are closed, travel has ground almost to a halt and billions of people are sheltering at home, going outside only to find essential supplies.

67. UK ramps up virus fight; 12-week isolation for over-70s -

LONDON (AP) — British authorities on Monday dramatically ramped up measures to combat the new coronavirus, urging all U.K. residents to avoid unnecessary contact with others and telling people in the most vulnerable groups to stay at home for three months.

68. Special sound, stolen in dead of night -

Stellar Nashville drummer Martin Lynds still possesses magnificent chops. But he may never again sound just like Martin Lynds.

Vile human coyotes who prey on their brethren – the majority of us, for whom grace and trust are signposts – have chomped into his soul.

69. Delay of game: Still no rules for online sports betting -

What were the odds it would take more than a year to implement online betting in Tennessee?

The Tennessee Education Lottery Corporation has hit a standstill in the adoption of rules for online sports betting. Nevertheless, hope remains that sports fans in Tennessee will be able to legally bet online in time for the 2020 football season.

70. Tennessee reps decide not to decide on Confederate statue -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Republican-led legislative panel has decided not to decide, for now, whether it thinks a bust of a former Confederate general and early Ku Klux Klan leader should be removed from the Tennessee Capitol.

71. Tennessee lawmakers debate Confederate bust removal -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers appear divided over a proposal supporting the removal of a bust honoring a former Confederate general and early Ku Klux Klan leader from the state's Capitol.

If approved by the GOP-controlled Legislature, the measure would encourage replacing the bust of Nathan Bedford Forrest with an "appropriate tribute to a deserving Tennessean."

72. Slight gains send Dow Jones Industrial Average above 29,000 -

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above 29,000 points for the first time and the S&P 500 index hit its second record high in three days Wednesday.

The milestones came on a day when the market traded in a narrow range as investors weighed the latest batch of corporate earnings reports and the widely anticipated signing of an initial trade deal between the U.S. and China.

73. Look for fewer bills as legislators eye early adjournment, re-election -

So far, fewer than 100 bills have been filed for consideration in this year’s session of the 111th Tennessee General Assembly, but they include laws on hot-button issues such as school vouchers, vaping, immigration, guns and gender.

74. Bradley welcomes 5 new associates -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has added five associate attorneys in the firm’s Nashville office. They are:

• Bethany Breeze Davenport, tax and bankruptcy practice groups. She earned her J.D. from the University of Kentucky College of Law, where she served as editor-in-chief of the Kentucky Law Journal. She is a graduate of Transylvania University.

75. U of Phoenix agrees to $50M settlement over false ad claims -

The University of Phoenix and its parent company have agreed to pay $50 million in cash and cancel $141 million in student debt to settle allegations of deceptive advertisement brought by the Federal Trade Commission.

76. Americana awards honor John Prine, Brandi Carlile, others -

NASHVILLE (AP) — John Prine's winning streak has continued at the Americana Music Association's annual awards ceremony in Nashville, though his two-year reign as Americana artist of the year has ended.

77. Walmart rolls out unlimited grocery delivery subscription -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart is rolling out an unlimited grocery delivery subscription service this fall as it races to gain an advantage in the competitive fresh food business.

The service will charge an annual membership fee of $98 for subscribers to access unlimited same-day delivery, which will be offered in 1,400 stores in 200 markets. By year-end, it will extend to a total of 1,600 stores — or more than 50% of the country.

78. Americana awards honor John Prine, Brandi Carlile, others -

NASHVILLE (AP) — John Prine's winning streak has continued at the Americana Music Association's annual awards ceremony in Nashville, though his two-year reign as Americana artist of the year has ended.

79. Why streaming services are the new credit card rewards binge -

When it comes to credit card rewards, it's not all about gas, groceries and restaurants anymore. Issuers are moving beyond suburban staples to include millennial-friendly categories such as transit and streaming subscriptions.

80. Why streaming services are the new credit card rewards binge -

When it comes to credit card rewards, it's not all about gas, groceries and restaurants anymore. Issuers are moving beyond suburban staples to include millennial-friendly categories such as transit and streaming subscriptions.

81. Stocks recover after economic worries set off an early skid -

U.S. stocks turned higher Wednesday afternoon as investors shook off early jitters that had briefly pulled the Dow Jones Industrial Average down more than 580 points.

Technology and consumer staples stocks powered much of the gains, offsetting losses in banks, energy and elsewhere.

82. S&P 500 snaps 2-day losing streak; mixed finish for stocks -

Wall Street capped a day of listless trading Tuesday with modest gains, narrowly avoiding a three-day losing streak for the S&P 500 index.

A last-minute burst of buying nudged the benchmark index into positive territory after spending most of the day flat or down.

83. US stocks cap milestone-setting week with modest losses -

Bond yields rose and stocks mostly bounced back from an early slide to finish with modest losses Friday, a downbeat end on Wall Street to an otherwise milestone-setting week for the broader market.

84. When does a phone cease being a phone? -

My phone has suddenly, annoyingly decided that it will no longer make or accept calls.

It’s still “smart,” in the sense that it continues to do many things that would have seemed magical not so very long ago.

85. Possible outcome of Trump-Xi meeting: A truce in trade war -

WASHINGTON (AP) — American businesses are bracing for a painful escalation in President Donald Trump's trade war with China.

Yet they might just get a reprieve.

If history repeats itself — and most analysts are betting it will — Trump and President Xi Jinping will agree to some kind of cease-fire when they meet late this week at a Group of 20 international summit in Osaka, Japan.

86. Stocks post small losses; investors look ahead to Fed -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks ended a choppy week of trading with modest losses Friday as investors look forward to getting more clues about the direction of interest rates.

Technology shares drove the declines, and energy stocks also fell a day after leading the market. Some late-day gains in banks and insurers helped temper the market's losses.

87. 'I don't care if I never get back' -

Lightsabers glowed from the stands. One fan wore a Dark Side jersey. The Sounds came out in R2-D2 jerseys.

It was the start of Star Wars Weekend at First Tennessee Park as Nashville hosted the New Orleans Baby Cakes on May 31.

88. US stocks climb after US suspends tariffs on Mexican goods -

Technology companies and banks helped power stocks higher on Wall Street Monday as investors welcomed news that the U.S. and Mexico averted a trade war and potentially damaging tariffs.

The latest gains extend the market's winning streak to a fifth day. That follows the strongest week for stocks since November in what has been a marked turnaround for the market after escalating trade tensions fueled a turbulent skid in May.

89. US stocks climb on hope of US-Mexico trade deal -

U.S. stocks finished higher Thursday as optimism that the U.S. and Mexico can work out a deal before costly tariffs kick in next week helped power the market to its third straight gain.

A modest rally gained strength in the final hour of trading after Bloomberg reported that the U.S. was considering delaying a 5% tariff on Mexican goods that is set to go into effect on Monday.

90. US stocks, bond yield slump, signaling market jitters -

U.S. stocks fell broadly Tuesday as anxious investors shifted money into bonds, sending yields to their lowest level in nearly two years.

Rising bond prices, which pull yields lower, are typically a sign that traders feel jittery about long-term growth prospects and would rather put their money into safer holdings.

91. US stocks rebound, but S&P 500 ends with 3rd weekly loss -

Stocks on Wall Street notched modest gains Friday, erasing some of the market's steep losses from a day earlier.

The upbeat finish to a turbulent week still left the market with its third straight weekly loss.

92. Against all odds -

Against all odds, legal online sports betting will soon be available in Tennessee, possibly in time for the SEC Championship football game, the college football national championship game, the Super Bowl and most of the Predators’ and college basketball seasons.

93. Casada chief of staff resigns amid allegations -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Republican Tennessee House speaker's chief of staff resigned Monday amid allegations that he sent sexually explicit and racist text messages, and after admitting he used cocaine inside a legislative office building when he held a previous job.

94. Bass, Berry & Sims adds pro bono program -

Bass, Berry & Sims has launched a comprehensive pro bono program that will provide opportunities and incentives for the firm’s attorneys to give back to the community.

One of the key components of the program includes the BBS Fellowship, which will allow up to two attorneys across the firm’s four offices to spend up to six months serving full-time in a pro bono capacity within the community. The first BBS Fellowship placement began April 22 with attorney Angie Bergman starting a six-month fellowship at the Choosing Justice Initiative to advocate for bail reform in Nashville’s criminal courts.

95. Tennessee House OKs sports betting bill, clearing key hurdle -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A bill that would allow sports betting in Tennessee passed the House on Wednesday, a key hurdle in a state that has been historically hesitant to expand gambling.

The legislation that passed 58-37 would allow and regulate statewide mobile and interactive sports gambling for people 21 years old and up. Brick-and-mortar betting locations would be prohibited.

96. Bradley wins Chapter 11 Reorganization of the Year -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has won the 2018 Chapter 11 Reorganization of the Year ($50 to $100 million) Award from M&A Advisor for the firm’s role in the Chapter 11 case of Vanguard Healthcare and its 17 subsidiaries.

97. Accused lawmaker Staples resigns leadership position -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Democratic Tennessee lawmaker says he's resigning from his leadership position after a House ethics panel concluded he violated the General Assembly's sexual harassment policy.

98. Ethics panel: House Democrat violated sexual harassment rule -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Democratic Tennessee lawmaker has been instructed to take "preventative action" after a House ethics panel found he violated the General Assembly's sexual harassment policy.

99. Sports betting bill gains traction in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee bill to legalize sports betting is gaining traction.

A House committee advanced Democratic Rep. Rick Staples' legislation Tuesday to allow statewide mobile and interactive sports gambling, without brick-and-mortar betting locations.

100. Lawmaker apologizes, denies investigation amid claims -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Democratic Tennessee lawmaker on Thursday apologized for having his behavior possibly misinterpreted after being accused of sexual misconduct, but denied he was under investigation.