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1. Airlines bet on big December after Covid variant setback -

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines are planning for a big December, believing that the recent surge in a highly contagious COVID-19 variant is fading and that holiday travel will soar.

The carriers say that even after encouraging thousands of employees to quit during the height of the pandemic, they will be able to handle the holiday load.

2. American, Southwest post Q3 profits with help from taxpayers -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines and Southwest Airlines posted third-quarter profits thanks to federal pandemic aid – smaller Alaska Airlines turned the trick even without money from taxpayers – and they expect planes to be packed over the holidays.

3. Southwest: We won't put unvaccinated workers on unpaid leave -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines will let unvaccinated employees keep working past early December instead of putting them on unpaid leave if they apply for an exemption on medical or religious grounds.

4. Southwest limits canceled flights after 3 tumultuous days -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines flights appeared to be running closer to normal on Tuesday after the airline canceled nearly 2,400 flights over the previous three days.

By midday Tuesday, Southwest had canceled fewer than 100 flights, or 2% of its schedule, according to tracking service FlightAware. More than 400 other flights were running late.

5. Delta posts $1.2 billion Q3 profit, touts holiday bookings -

Delta Air Lines posted a $1.2 billion profit for the third quarter, helped by the latest installment of federal pandemic aid for the airline industry, and gave an upbeat forecast for the holiday-dominated fourth quarter.

6. Texas governor orders ban on private company vaccine mandate -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas Gov. Greg Abbott issued an executive order Monday to prohibit any entity, including private business, from enforcing a COVID-19 vaccine mandate on workers and called on state lawmakers to pass a similar ban into law.

7. Southwest Airlines flight cancellations continue into Monday -

Southwest Airlines canceled hundreds more flights Monday following a  weekend of major service disruptions.

According to Flightaware, the carrier has cancelled 348 flights Monday and delayed another 303 flights.

8. Southwest is latest airline to mandate vaccines for workers -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines on Monday became the latest U.S. airline to require its employees to be vaccinated against COVID-19.

The Dallas-based company said its workers must be fully vaccinated by Dec. 8 in order to remain at the airline. Employees can seek approval to skip the shots due to medical or religious reasons.

9. Southwest's president retires suddenly; didn't get CEO job -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines President Tom Nealon, who was once seen as a leading candidate for CEO but was passed over this year, has retired.

Southwest said Monday that Nealon, 60, will still serve as an adviser focusing on environmental issues, including plans to reduce carbon emissions. In a statement issued by the airline, Nealon said he was honored to have served Southwest in several jobs, especially president, and looks forward to taking on a strategic role.

10. Airlines say rise in COVID-19 cases is hurting ticket sales -

DALLAS (AP) — Several leading U.S. airlines warned Thursday that the rise in COVID-19 cases due to the delta variant is hurting their bookings and further delaying a recovery for the travel industry.

11. Pilots' union sues Southwest over changes made in pandemic -

DALLAS (AP) — The pilots' union is suing Southwest Airlines, saying that rules the airline put into place before and during the pandemic have changed pay rates and working rules, in violation of federal labor law.

12. July US consumer spending eeks up 0.3% as delta threatens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Growth in U.S. consumer spending slowed in July to a modest increase of 0.3% as infections from the delta variant spread, while inflation over the past 12 months hit its fastest pace in three decades.

13. Southwest trims schedule in effort to solve flight problems -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines will reduce flights for the rest of the year as it tries to restore an operation that stumbled over the summer and now faces lower demand because of the rise in coronavirus cases.

14. Delta Air Lines will make unvaccinated employees pay charge -

Delta Air Lines will charge employees on the company health plan $200 a month if they fail to get vaccinated against COVID-19, a policy the airline's top executive says is necessary because the average hospital stay for the virus costs the airline $40,000.

15. 2 men arrested in Nashville for not wearing masks on flights -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Two men were arrested at the Nashville International Airport for refusing to wear face masks aboard their flights, police said.

Artur Grigoryan didn't wear a mask on an American Airlines flight and was arrested early Tuesday morning, WKRN-TV reported. The flight was delayed and Grigoryan was removed from the plane.

16. TSA extends into January mask rule for airline passengers -

Federal officials are extending into January a requirement that people on airline flights and public transportation wear face masks, a rule intended to limit the spread of COVID-19.

The Transportation Security Administration's current order was scheduled to expire Sept. 13. An agency spokesman said Tuesday that the mandate will be extended until Jan. 18.

17. Delta variant spreads, Southwest no longer sees profit in Q3 -

Southwest Airlines said Wednesday that it no longer expects to turn a profit in the third quarter as a surge in COVID-19 infections fueled by the highly contagious delta variant darkens the outlook for travel.

18. Spirit cancels half its flights; American also struggling -

Spirit Airlines canceled nearly half its schedule for Tuesday, the third straight day of extremely high cancellation numbers at the budget airline.

By early afternoon, the low-cost carrier had canceled about 320 flights, or 47% of its schedule, according to the FlightAware tracking service. Dozens more flights were late. The blame appeared to lie at least partly with a technology outage affecting crew scheduling.

19. Air travel hits another pandemic high, flight delays grow -

DALLAS (AP) — Air travel in the U.S. is hitting new pandemic-era highs, and airlines are scrambling to keep up with the summer-vacation crowds.

Despite rising numbers of coronavirus infections fueled by the delta variant, the U.S. set another recent high mark for air travel Sunday, with more than 2.2 million people going through airport checkpoints, according to the Transportation Security Administration.

20. Flight attendants report high frequency of unruly passengers -

DALLAS (AP) — Nearly one in five flight attendants say they have witnessed physical incidents involving passengers this year, and their union is calling for criminal prosecution of people who act up on planes.

21. A dozen years after last minimum wage hike, is $15 new norm? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The signs and banners are dotted along suburban commercial strips and hanging in shop windows and restaurants, evidence of a new desperation among America's service-industry employers: "Now Hiring, $15 an hour."

22. Airlines cite concerns about fuel shortages at some airports -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — The fuel needle is moving closer to "empty" at some U.S. airports.

American Airlines says it's running into fuel shortages at some smaller and mid-size airports, and in some cases the airline will add refueling stops or fly fuel into locations where the supply is tight.

23. Southwest, American post 2Q profits as air travel picks up -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines and Southwest Airlines both posted second-quarter profits on Thursday thanks to generous federal pandemic relief that covers most of their labor costs.

The reports on Thursday underscored the progress that airlines are making in rebuilding after the coronavirus crushed air travel — and how much farther they must go to fully recover.

24. US airlines say COVID-19 variants aren't hurting bookings -

Rising concern about the fast-spreading delta variant of COVID-19 is creating turbulence for the stocks of big travel companies, but airline executives say they don't see any slowdown in ticket sales, maybe because a high percentage of their best customers are fully vaccinated.

25. Travel stocks slump, with airlines, cruises, hotels tumble -

Air travel in the United States hit another pandemic-era record over the weekend as vacationers jammed airports, but shares of airlines, cruise lines, hotels and almost anything else related to travel tumbled Monday on growing concerns about highly contagious variants of coronavirus.

26. With taxpayers' help, Delta posts $652 million profit in 2Q -

Delta Air Lines is reporting a $652 million profit in the second quarter, helped by hordes of vacation travelers in the U.S. and money from taxpayers, positioning the airline for stronger results once business and international flying recover from the pandemic.

27. United sees more travel rebound, adds flights to warm spots -

United Airlines said Friday it will add nearly 150 flights this winter to warm-weather destinations in the U.S. and will also add flights to beach spots in Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.

28. Tennessee to offer $250 flight vouchers for booking hotels -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee officials are offering 10,000 travelers a $250 flight voucher for four airports in the state if they book certain hotel packages.

Tennessee's Department of Tourist Development says $2.5 million for the "Tennessee on Me" promotion is included in the new state budget signed by Gov. Bill Lee.

29. Southwest, American delays hint at hard summer for travelers -

This summer is already shaping up to be a difficult one for air travelers.

Southwest Airlines customers have struggled with thousands of delays and hundreds of canceled flights this month because of computer problems, staffing shortages and bad weather.

30. US plans to make airlines refund fees if bags are delayed -

The Transportation Department will propose that airlines be required to refund fees on checked baggage if the bags aren't delivered to passengers quickly enough.

The proposal, if made final after a lengthy regulation-writing process, would also require prompt refunds for fees on extras such as internet access if the airline fails to provide the service during the flight.

31. Longtime Southwest CEO will step down next year -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines said Wednesday that longtime CEO Gary Kelly will step down in February and be succeeded by another veteran at the nation's fourth-largest airline.

32. As passengers return to air travel, bad behavior skyrockets -

Air travel can be difficult in the best of times, with cramped planes, screaming babies, flight delays and short tempers.

Throw in a pandemic, and the anxiety level can rise quickly.

That has led to confrontations with flight attendants and other unruly behavior, including occasional fights that get captured and replayed endlessly on social media.

33. Southwest still struggling with flight delays, cancellations -

DALLAS (AP) — Passengers on Southwest Airlines had to deal with canceled flights and delays for a third day on Wednesday, as the airline tried to recover from technology problems that started earlier this week.

34. End of an era: American will drop its in-flight magazine -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — After more than half a century in airplane seatback pockets, the American Airlines in-flight magazine American Way is going away.

An airline spokeswoman said Friday that American will retire the magazine and its online version at the end of June.

35. Southwest bans woman accused of assaulting flight attendant -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines has banned a woman accused of punching a flight attendant in the face last weekend in an incident that highlighted a recent increase in unruly passengers.

An airline executive disclosed the ban Thursday in a message to employees.

36. Woman charged with assaulting Southwest flight attendant -

DALLAS (AP) — San Diego authorities charged a 28-year-old woman with felony battery after an attack on a Southwest Airlines plane in which a flight attendant lost two teeth and suffered other injuries to her face.

37. Southwest says flights are more full and fares are rising -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines said Wednesday that bookings are improving and leisure-travel fares for June are approaching pre-pandemic levels, further signs that the airline industry is recovering from a deep slump.

38. US officials seek big fines against more airline passengers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal regulators are continuing to pursue large penalties against a few airline passengers accused of disrupting flights.

The Federal Aviation Administration said Monday that it will seek fines totaling more than $100,000 against four passengers on recent flights, including a penalty of $52,500 against a man who was arrested after trying to open the cockpit door and striking a flight attendant in the face.

39. FAA approves Boeing fix for jets grounded by electrical flaw -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal regulators have approved a Boeing procedure to fix about 100 jets that have been idled for the past month because of improper electrical grounding of some components, and some of the planes could be flying again in the next few days.

40. US airline bailout helps Southwest post $116 million profit -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines is the first major U.S. airline to report a profit since the pandemic started, as federal payroll aid helped boost the company to net income of $116 million in the first quarter.

41. Study finds that blocking seats on planes reduces virus risk -

A new study says leaving middle seats open could give airline passengers more protection from the virus that causes COVID-19.

Researchers said the risk of passengers being exposed to the virus from an infected person on the plane could be reduced by 23% to 57% if middle seats are empty, compared with a full flight.

42. Airlines pull Boeing Max jets to inspect electrical systems -

Airlines pulled dozens of Boeing Max 737s out of service for inspections after the aircraft maker told them about a possible electrical problem, the latest setback for plane.

Boeing said Friday that the issue affected planes used by 16 airlines, and that it recommended inspections before the planes fly again.

43. 2 new airlines await Americans looking to fly somewhere -

Americans are traveling in the greatest numbers in more than a year, and soon they will have two new leisure-oriented airlines to consider for those trips.

Both hope to draw passengers by filling in smaller strands on the spider web of airline routes crisscrossing the United States.

44. Delta cancels about 100 flights, opens some middle seats -

DETROIT (AP) — Delta Air Lines canceled about 100 flights Sunday due to staff shortages, and it opened up middle seats a month earlier than expected in order to carry more passengers.

The airline says it had over 1 million passengers during the past few days, the highest number since before the coronavirus pandemic began last year.

45. Frontier Airlines hopes IPO rides wave of travel recovery -

Frontier Airlines is betting that the budding recovery in leisure travel is for real.

Shares of the discount carrier began public trading Thursday, edging lower in midday trading. The Denver-based airline and its private owners sought to raise $570 million before costs from the IPO after pricing 30 million shares at $19, the low end of a $19 to $21 target. The stock opened at $18.61, then bumped up to $19.06 before dipping back down to $18.54.

46. Southwest Airlines orders 100 Boeing 737 Max planes -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines said Monday it is expanding its all-Boeing fleet with an order for 100 Max jets instead of buying planes from Europe's Airbus.

Southwest ordered the 150-seat 737 Max 7 and expects the first 30 to show up next year. It is also converting orders for 70 Max 8s to the smaller model.

47. Airlines return to old ways; Southwest drops boarding change -

As Americans slowly return to flying, airlines are dropping some of the changes they made early in the pandemic.

Southwest Airlines has gone back to boarding passengers in lots of 30. During the pandemic, it restricted boarding to 10 passengers at a time to create more space between them.

48. US air travel rises to highest levels yet since pandemic hit -

Across the United States, air travel is recovering more quickly from the depths of the pandemic, and it is showing up in longer airport security lines and busier traffic on airline websites.

The Transportation Security Administration screened more than 1.3 million people both Friday and Sunday, setting a new high since the coronavirus outbreak devastated travel a year ago. Airlines believe the numbers are heading up, with more people booking flights for spring and summer.

49. From job cuts to online commerce, virus reshaped US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At first, it was expected to be brief. At least that was the hope.

Instead, a once-in-a-century pandemic has ground on for a year, throwing millions out of work and upending wide swathes of the American economy. Delivery services thrived while restaurants suffered. Home offices replaced downtown offices. Travel and entertainment spending dried up.

50. US approves new airline from JetBlue founder -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Transportation Department has granted approval for a new airline led by David Neeleman, who started JetBlue Airways two decades ago.

Breeze Aviation Group has up to one year to begin flights using up to 22 planes, the company said Wednesday.

51. US airlines adding jobs, extending rebound from October low -

U.S. airlines are adding jobs as industry employment extends a rebound from a low in October, when tens of thousands of airline workers were briefly laid off after federal payroll aid expired.

Cargo airlines have added jobs while passenger airlines have shed workers, mostly through incentives for workers to quit or take early retirement.

52. Southwest adds nonstop BNA-Destin/Ft. Walton Beach flights -

Southwest Airlines will begin nonstop service from Nashville International Airport to Destin/Ft. Walton Beach on May 6.

The new service will run three times daily.

“Southwest Airlines continues to recognize the strength of this market, and we appreciate their commitment to Nashville,” said Doug Kreulen, BNA president and CEO. “As we emerge from the pandemic, BNA will join with our great airline partners to help lead the economic recovery for this region and beyond.”

53. Airlines push White House to reject testing for US flights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Leaders of several major U.S. airlines met online Friday with White House officials to press their case against requiring coronavirus tests for passengers on domestic flights, saying it would undermine the already fragile industry.

54. Around the globe, virus cancels spring travel for millions -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — They are the annual journeys of late winter and early spring: Factory workers in China heading home for the Lunar New Year; American college students going on road trips and hitting the beach over spring break; Germans and Britons fleeing drab skies for some Mediterranean sun over Easter.

55. Airlines close books on rotten 2020 and, so far, 2021 is grim -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines lost $3.1 billion last year, its first full-year loss since Richard Nixon was president and gasoline sold for about 36 cents a gallon with no extra charge for the attendant who cleaned your windshield.

56. Restaurants to retailers, virus transformed business -

It would be just a temporary precaution. When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon – as soon as New York was safe again.

57. From restaurants to retailers, virus transformed economies -

NEW YORK (AP) — It would be just a temporary precaution.

When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon — as soon as New York was safe again.

58. Southwest warns nearly 7,000 workers of possible furloughs -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines warned nearly 7,000 workers on Thursday that they could lose their jobs unless labor unions accept concessions to help the airline cope with a sharp drop in travel caused by the pandemic.

59. Waiting for passengers, American puts Boeing Max in the air -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines is taking its long-grounded Boeing 737 Max jets out of storage, updating key flight-control software, and flying the planes in preparation for the first flights with paying passengers later this month.

60. Delta won't furlough pilots; job cuts possible at Southwest -

DALLAS (AP) — Delta Air Lines on Wednesday dropped a threat to furlough more than 1,700 pilots after they ratified a cost-cutting agreement that the airline said was needed to help it cope with a downturn caused by the pandemic.

61. FAA clears Boeing 737 Max to fly again -

After nearly two years and a pair of deadly crashes, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has cleared Boeing's 737 Max for flight.

The nation's air safety agency announced the move early Wednesday, saying it was done after a "comprehensive and methodical" 20-month review process.

62. Is it safe yet to fly during the pandemic? -

Is it safe yet to fly during the pandemic? Public health experts say staying home is best to keep yourself and others safe from infection. But if you're thinking about flying for the holidays, you should know what to expect.

63. Future of business travel unclear as virus upends work life -

Brian Contreras represents the worst fears of the lucrative business travel industry.

A partner account executive at a U.S. tech firm, Contreras was used to traveling frequently for his company. But nine months into the pandemic, he and thousands of others are working from home and dialing into video conferences instead of boarding planes.

64. JetBlue is the latest airline to retreat from blocking seats -

The days of airlines blocking seats to make passengers feel safer about flying during the pandemic are coming closer to an end.

JetBlue is the latest to indicate it is rethinking the issue. A spokesman for the carrier said Thursday that JetBlue will reduce the number of seats it blocks after Dec. 1 to accommodate families traveling together over the holidays.

65. Deeper job cuts at Boeing as pandemic throttles air travel -

Boeing said Wednesday that it will cut 7,000 more jobs as it continues to bleed money during a pandemic that has smothered demand for new airline planes.

The company said that when retirements and other employee departures are included, its workforce will shrink to about 130,000 by the end of next year, or 30,000 fewer people than it had at the start of 2020. Just three months ago, the company figured 19,000 workers would leave.

66. American, Southwest, Alaska add to airline loss parade in 3Q -

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines are piling up billions of dollars in additional losses as the pandemic chokes off air travel, but a recent uptick in passengers, however modest, has provided some hope.

67. American, Southwest add to parade of airline losses in 3Q -

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines are piling up billions of dollars in losses as the pandemic causes a massive drop in air travel.

American Airlines on Thursday reported a loss of $2.4 billion and Southwest Airlines lost $1.16 billion in the third quarter, typically a very strong period of air travel that includes most of the summer vacation season.

68. Stocks fall on Wall Street as hopes for new virus aid fade -

Stocks gave up some of their recent gains Monday as Wall Street's hopes that Washington will come through with badly needed aid for the economy before Election Day faded.

The S&P 500 dropped 1.6%, its worst day in more than three weeks. The benchmark index had been up 0.5% in the early going following a report that China's economy grew at a 5% annual rate in the last quarter. The market's slide was broad, though technology, health care and communication stocks bore the brunt of the selling. Treasury yields were mixed.

69. United loses $1.8 billion, aims to shift focus to recovery -

United Airlines financial hole grew deeper over the summer as a modest recovery in air travel slowed down, pushing the carrier to a loss of $1.84 billion in the typically strong third quarter.

The airline said Wednesday that revenue plummeted 78% from a year earlier. The loss was worse than analysts had expected.

70. CEO says Southwest needs union pay cuts to avoid furloughs -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines will cut pay for nonunion workers in January and says union workers must also accept less pay or face furloughs next year as the pandemic continues to hammer the airline business.

71. Congress takes another run at airline bailout; fate unclear -

House Democrats on Friday proposed a new $28.8 billion bailout for the airline industry after the carriers began furloughs of more than 32,000 workers to cut costs during a pandemic that has devastated air travel.

72. Airline furloughs begin as federal pandemic relief expires -

U.S. airlines began furloughing more than 32,000 employees on Thursday after a federal prohibition on job cuts expired.

American Airlines and United Airlines said that they could reverse the furloughs if Congress and the White House quickly agree to provide billions more in taxpayer help to the embattled airline industry.

73. Panel's report blasts Boeing, FAA for crashes, seeks reforms -

A House committee issued a scathing report Wednesday questioning whether Boeing and government regulators have recognized the problems that caused two deadly 737 Max jet crashes and whether either will be willing to make significant changes to fix them.

74. Events -

Business Studio: Maintaining to Creating (The Abundance Shift). Learn the steps needed to make a leaderSHIFT. Recognize the zone you are in, unlock mental blocks and implement creative principles to learn and live by. Thursday, 8-9 a.m. Webex Virtual Event. Registration, information

75. Delta, American join United in dropping most US change fees -

This could be the final boarding call for the $200 ticket-change fee that has enraged so many U.S. airline travelers over the past decade.

Delta Air Lines and American Airlines said Monday that they are dropping the fee on most tickets for domestic flights, copying United Airlines' move one day earlier.

76. Events -

Virtual First Friday Your Small Business Resource. First Friday offers individuals the opportunity to expand their knowledge on best business practices from some of the most successful business leaders in Williamson County. Friday, 8 a.m. Fee: Free. Registration required for this virtual event. Information

77. American Airlines plans 19,000 furloughs, layoffs in October -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines said Tuesday it will cut more than 40,000 jobs, including 19,000 through furloughs and layoffs, in October as it struggles with a sharp downturn in travel because of the pandemic.

78. American Airlines considering cutting flights to many smaller cities -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines is planning to drop flights to up to 30 smaller U.S. cities if a federal requirement to continue those flights expires at the end of next month, an airline executive familiar with the matter said Thursday.

79. FAA spells out design changes needed in grounded Boeing jet -

Federal regulators on Monday outlined a list of design changes they will require in the Boeing 737 Max to fix safety issues that were discovered after two deadly crashes that led to the worldwide grounding of the plane.

80. Southwest tightens face-mask rule, Delta steps up testing -

DALLAS (AP) — Delta Air Lines will provide at-home coronavirus tests for some employees and Southwest Airlines will tighten its rule on face masks by ending exceptions for medical reasons.

"We're simply seeing too many exceptions to the (mask) policy, it has put our flight crews in a really tough spot and also made our customers pretty uncomfortable," Southwest President Tom Nealon said Thursday.

81. American, Southwest add to US airline industry's 2Q losses -

DALLAS (AP) — Delta Air Lines will provide at-home coronavirus tests for some employees, while Southwest and American will tighten their rules on face masks by ending exceptions for medical reasons.

82. American, Southwest add to US airline industry's 2Q losses -

DALLAS (AP) — Major airlines reported huge second-quarter losses Thursday and warned that the recovery in air travel seen in April has stalled as coronavirus cases surge in the U.S.

American posted a loss of more than $2 billion, and Southwest lost $915 million. That pushed the combined loss of the nation's four biggest airlines to more than $10 billion in just three months.

83. United Airlines posts $1.6 billion loss in virus-scarred 2Q -

United Airlines said Tuesday that it lost $1.63 billion in the second quarter as revenue plunged 87%, and it will operate at barely over one-third of capacity through September as the coronavirus throttles air travel.

84. Nashville International Airport opens new concourse -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Nashville International Airport has opened its fourth major concourse, featuring six domestic gates.

The airport says the new Concourse D opened Friday, with 115,000 square feet of terminal space and gates serviced by Southwest Airlines.

85. American Airlines warns 25,000 workers they could lose jobs -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines is notifying about 25,000 workers that their jobs could be eliminated in October because of plunging demand for air travel, adding to the toll that the virus pandemic is taking on the airline industry.

86. "Growth has stalled": Surge in US infections hits Delta -

Delta Air Lines lost $5.7 billion during a brutal three-month stretch in which the coronavirus pandemic brought travel to a near standstill, and any hoped-for recovery has been smothered by a resurgence of infected Americans.

87. Strong demand for virus testing services; snacking surges -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Monday related to the national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

88. American and 4 other airlines reach loan agreements with US -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines and four smaller carriers have reached agreement with the government for billions more in federal loans, a sign of the industry's desperate fight to survive a downturn in air travel caused by the virus pandemic.

89. American and 4 other airlines reach loan agreements with US -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines and four smaller carriers have reached agreement with the government for billions more in federal loans, a sign of the industry's desperate fight to survive a downturn in air travel caused by the virus pandemic.

90. How risky is flying during the coronavirus pandemic? -

How risky is flying during the coronavirus pandemic?

Flying can increase your risk of exposure to infection, but airlines are taking some precautions and you can too.

Air travel means spending time in security lines and airport terminals, which puts you into close contact with other people. As travel slowly recovers, planes are becoming more crowded, which means you will likely sit close to other people, often for hours, which raises your risk.

91. Wall Street stocks claw back a chunk of last week's losses -

Stocks shrugged off a wobbly start to finish solidly higher on Wall Street Monday, as the market clawed back half its losses from last week.

The S&P 500 rose 1.5% after having been down 0.3%. The market rallied after a much healthier-than-expected report on the housing market put investors in a buying mood. Technology, industrial and communications stocks accounted for much of the market's broad gains. European stocks also closed higher. Treasury yields were mixed and oil prices rose.

92. American Airlines will book flights to full capacity -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines will start booking flights to full capacity next week, ending any effort to promote social distancing on its planes while the United States sets records for new reported cases of the coronavirus.

93. Southwest adds more Nashville flights -

Southwest Airlines has extended its published flight schedule from Oct. 31 through Jan. 4, 2021, adding more flights for Nashville.

New routes include additional leisure travel for the autumn and winter holidays.

94. New wing & a prayer: BNA building for uncertain times -

Nashville International Airport should be enjoying its best year ever in 2020. After all, 2019 was a record year for the airport, as was 2018.

In fact, BNA has had seven record-breaking years in a row, with more than 18 million passengers traveling to and from Nashville last year, an increase of 14% compared to 2018. And 2019 and 2018 were the only other years the airport exceeded 1 million passengers every month.

95. Wall Street up as recovery hopes overshadow virus worries -

Stocks closed higher on Wall Street Tuesday, driving the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Average to their highest levels in nearly three months as optimism over the reopening of the economy overshadowed lingering worries about the coronavirus pandemic.

96. Retailers reopening more stores, tourism expanding -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

97. Kroger says isn't pulling back bonuses; airlines see uptick -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Tuesday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

98. Thousands defer plans to leave the military during crisis -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Army Sgt. Antonio Gozikowski was planning to leave the military next month and head to college.

After serving for six years, the dental assistant's goal was to become a dentist, and then return to the Army in a few years with his expanded medical skills. But now, with the coronavirus forcing universities to consider virtual or reduced schooling this fall, he decided to take advantage of a new Army program and extend his military service for six more months.

99. Stocks shake off an early loss and end higher, led by tech -

Stocks shook off an early stumble and scratched out small gains on Wall Street Monday, as the market's momentum slows following its best month in decades.

The S&P 500 added 0.4% and narrowly avoided what would have been its first three-day losing streak in nearly two months. The Dow eked out a 0.1% gain, while the Nasdaq rose 1.2%.

100. It keeps getting worse for imperiled airlines -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Monday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.