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Editorial Results (free)

1. Stocks little changed after rally wanes -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are sputtering at the close on Wall Street Thursday after an early rally fizzled.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 52 points, or 0.2%, to 27,094, while the S&P 500 was essentially flat at 3,006.

2. Profit flat as Southwest takes $175M hit from Max jet -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines doesn't expect to use Boeing 737 Max jets until January, and it is talking to Boeing about compensation for the grounding, which the airline says cost it $175 million in the second quarter.

3. Profit flat as Southwest takes $175 million hit from Max jet -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines doesn't expect to use Boeing 737 Max jets until January, and it is talking to Boeing about compensation for the grounding, which the airline says cost it $175 million in the second quarter.

4. Southwest planes collide on Nashville airport tarmac -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Two Southwest Airlines planes have collided on the tarmac of Nashville International Airport.

Airline officials say no injuries were reported in Saturday night's collision. An emailed statement from Southwest Airlines spokeswoman Michelle Agnew says the winglet of the St. Louis-bound Southwest Flight 1555 "came into contact" during pushback with the winglet of Southwest Flight 4580, headed for Atlanta.

5. American Airlines extends Boeing plane flight cancellations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — American Airlines said Sunday that it will keep the Boeing 737 Max plane off its schedule until Nov. 3, which is two months longer than it had planned.

In a statement, American said the action will result in the cancellation of about 115 flights per day. It said it "remains confident" that the Boeing plane will be recertified this year. But some airline executives are growing doubtful about that timetable.

6. US stocks notch gains, snap short losing streak -

Gains in energy and internet companies helped drive stocks broadly higher on Wall Street Thursday, snapping a two-day losing streak for the market in an otherwise choppy week of trading.

The gains were initially fueled by rising oil prices, which boosted energy companies following a suspected attack on two oil tankers in the strategic Strait of Hormuz. The sector sustained its gains as a mix of media, internet and consumer-oriented companies took the lead in pushing every major index higher. Small company stocks rose more than the rest of the market.

7. Tech companies lead US stocks broadly higher; oil slumps -

Stocks closed higher on Wall Street for the second straight day Wednesday, extending Tuesday's strong gains as investors bet an interest rate cut could be ahead.

Technology, industrial and health care companies accounted for much of the broad gains, which were tempered by a slide in energy stocks following a 3.4% plunge in the price of U.S. crude oil.

8. FAA chief defends handling of Boeing Max safety approval -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The acting head of the Federal Aviation Administration said Wednesday that Boeing should have done more to explain an automated flight-control system on its 737 Max aircraft before two deadly crashes, but he defended his agency's safety certification of the plane and its decision not to ground the jet until other regulators around the world had already done so.

9. Boeing didn't tell airlines that safety alert wasn't on -

Boeing said Sunday that it discovered after airlines had been flying its 737 Max plane for several months that a safety alert in the cockpit was not working as intended, yet it didn't disclose that fact to airlines or federal regulators until after one of the planes crashed.

10. Boeing CEO defends safety record amid 2 deadly crashes -

The CEO of Boeing defended the company's safety record and declined to take any more than partial blame for two deadly crashes of its best-selling plane even while saying Monday that the company has nearly finished an update that "will make the airplane even safer."

11. Southwest: Boeing didn't say it had deactivated safety alert -

Southwest Airlines says Boeing did not disclose that it had deactivated a safety feature on its 737 Max jets until after one of the airliners crashed last year.

At issue is an alert that tells pilots if a sensor — called an "angle of attack" (AOA) indicator — is transmitting bad data about the pitch of a plane's nose. The sensor's alerts had been operational in previous versions of the 737 but were switched off in the 737 Max.

12. Southwest CEO 'not happy' about Max crisis but backs Boeing -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines executives acknowledge they are upset with Boeing over the grounding of its 737 Max jetliner, a move that has caused the airline to cancel thousands of flights.

But they are still standing by the embattled aircraft maker and deny interest in buying planes from its rival, Airbus.

13. Southwest removes 737 Max from flight schedule until August -

Southwest is removing flights with the troubled Boeing 737 Max aircraft from its schedule through Aug. 5, a period that includes the peak of the airline's busy summer travel season.

The company did not specify how many flights would be cancelled because of the new schedule. It removed all 34 of its Max 8 jets from service on March 13 following two deadly crashes involving other airlines. The grounded aircraft account for a small percentage of the more than 750 Boeing 737 models in the airline's fleet.

14. Boeing makes 96 flights to test software on troubled Max jet -

DALLAS (AP) — Boeing's CEO says crews have made 96 flights to test a software update for its troubled 737 Max jet and will make more in coming weeks as the company attempts to convince regulators to let the plane fly again.

15. Boeing orders and deliveries tumble as Max jet is grounded -

DALLAS (AP) — Orders and deliveries of Boeing's 737 Max plunged in the first quarter as the plane was grounded around the world following a second deadly crash.

Boeing disclosed Tuesday that it received no new orders for the Max in March. It took 29 net orders for 737s in the first three months of the year, but it appeared that only 10 of those involved the Max, the latest version of Boeing's best-selling plane. The buyers were not identified.

16. S&P 500 ekes out gain, enough to extend winning streak -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock indexes took a round trip Monday, erasing their early-morning losses to end the day close to where they started.

The S&P 500 eked out a small gain, enough to prolong its winning streak to eight days, its longest in a year and a half. But the Dow Jones Industrial Average ended lower due to another big loss for Boeing.

17. Delta tops long-running ranking of US airlines -

Delta Air Lines comes in first in a long-running study that ranks U.S. airlines by how often flights arrive on time and other statistical measures.

Researchers who crunch the numbers also say that as a whole, U.S. airlines are getting better at handling baggage and overcrowded flights and are getting fewer complaints.

18. Boeing, FAA say more time needed for fix of troubled 737 Max -

Boeing and U.S. aviation regulators say the company needs more time to finish changes in a flight-control system suspected of playing a role in two deadly crashes.

The Federal Aviation Administration said Monday it anticipates Boeing's final software improvements for 737 Max airliners "in the coming weeks."

19. S&P 500 posts biggest quarterly gain in a decade; Lyft soars -

Stocks finished broadly higher on Friday as Wall Street closed out the first quarter with the market's biggest gain in nearly a decade.

The benchmark S&P 500 index is now up 13.1 percent this year, a drastic turnaround for stocks after a jarring 14 percent sell-off in the last three months of 2018.

20. Health care, tech lead US stocks lower -

Technology and health care companies drove a broad slide in U.S. stocks Wednesday, erasing some of the market's solid gains from a day earlier.

The sell-off put the Dow Jones Industrial Average on track to end the month with a loss and marked the second drop for the benchmark S&P 500 index this week.

21. US stocks end choppy day mixed amid global growth jitters -

U.S. stocks capped a day of choppy trading with an uneven finish Monday as investors wrestled to make sense of newly pessimistic outlooks for the global economy.

Traders also weighed another troubling drop in long-term bond yields, which many see as a warning sign of a possible recession.

22. European, Canadian regulators to do own review of Boeing jet -

Boeing's grounded airliners are likely to be parked longer now that European and Canadian regulators plan to conduct their own reviews of changes the company is making after two of the jets crashed.

23. AP Source: Justice Dept. probing development of Boeing jets -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. prosecutors are looking into the development of Boeing's 737 Max jets, a person briefed on the matter revealed Monday, the same day French aviation investigators concluded there were "clear similarities" in the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Max 8 last week and a Lion Air jet in October.

24. Southwest, mechanics reach tentative deal in labor dispute -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines and a union representing its mechanics could be on the verge of ending a bitter, long-running labor dispute that has triggered hundreds of flight cancellations and raised safety concerns.

25. Regulators challenge Boeing to prove 737 Max jets are safe -

Aviation regulators worldwide laid down a stark challenge for Boeing to prove that its grounded 737 Max jets are safe to fly amid suspicions that faulty software might have contributed to two crashes that killed 346 people in less than six months.

26. Information void in plane crash leads many to take action -

In the days since an Ethiopian Airlines plane crashed after taking off for Nairobi and killed all 157 people aboard, there have been many questions but not a lot of answers.

That absence of information — fear of the unknown — has led dozens of countries to ground the Boeing 737 Max 8, the plane involved in Sunday's crash and another one five months earlier that killed 189 people in Indonesia.

27. Boeing jet under scrutiny after Ethiopia crash -

HEJERE, Ethiopia (AP) — Airlines in Ethiopia, China, Indonesia and elsewhere grounded the Boeing 737 Max 8 jetliner Monday after the second devastating crash of one of the planes in five months. But Boeing said it had no reason to pull the popular aircraft from the skies.

28. CEO says Southwest is losing millions weekly in labor fight -

DALLAS (AP) — The CEO of Southwest Airlines says a spike in planes ruled out of service for mechanical items is costing the carrier millions each week because of delayed and canceled flights.

Gary Kelly didn't give a precise figure Tuesday, but said the financial damage prompted the airline's lawsuit last week against the Aircraft Mechanics Fraternal Association.

29. Southwest grapples with new labor and revenue problems -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines is lashing out at the union representing its mechanics, suggesting that they are purposely grounding planes in order to gain leverage in new contract negotiations.

30. Belt buckles and beer: Federal shutdown hits businesses hard -

WASHINGTON (AP) — From power restaurants in Washington and a belt-buckle maker in Colorado to a brewery in California, businesses that count heavily on federal employees as customers are feeling the punishing effects of the government shutdown.

31. American Airlines posts $319M profit on solid demand -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines said Thursday that it earned a fourth-quarter profit of $319 million, slightly higher than analysts expected, as strong travel demand helped the carrier overcome higher fuel prices.

32. Looking for travel upgrades? Here’s how to get them -

Let’s shatter one myth right now: Airline passengers typically can’t talk their way into upgrades from the cheapest coach seats to first class just by dressing up and asking politely.

Travel providers usually save their best experiences – comfortable seats, spacious hotel suites, quick check-in lines – for those willing to pay more. When upgrades are handed out for free, the goodies typically go to frequent travelers who spend a lot with those providers.

33. Will American Airlines bar customers from changing a ticket? -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — American Airlines is threatening to prohibit customers from making changes to nonrefundable tickets if Congress makes good on a proposal to crack down on unreasonable airline fees.

34. Dow hits another all-time high on mixed day for US stocks -

Wall Street capped a milestone-setting week Friday with a mixed finish for the major U.S. stock indexes and the second all-time high in two days for the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

An afternoon sell-off erased modest gains for the S&P 500 that had the benchmark index on track to eke out its own record high for much of the day.

35. Surge, wind, rain, floods: Hurricane Florence could hit hard -

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Hurricane Florence churned Tuesday toward the Eastern Seaboard as a storm of "staggering" size, forcing a million people to evacuate the coast. Many more were left to wonder where they might be safe if days of torrential rains unleash floods from the mountains to the sea.

36. Retailers, airlines lift US stocks higher, extending gains -

Retailers and airlines helped lift U.S. stocks broadly higher Monday, extending the market's gains from last week.

Consumer-focused companies and industrial stocks grabbed most of the gains. Banks and health care stocks also rose. Energy companies climbed along with the price of U.S. crude oil.

37. Warren Buffett's firm adds to Apple, Teva investments -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Investor Warren Buffett's company added to its stakes in Apple and Israeli drugmaker Teva Pharmaceuticals in the second quarter while tweaking several of its other stock investments.

38. Southwest launches nonstop Atlanta-Nashville flights -

ATLANTA (AP) — Southwest Airlines has begun nonstop flights from Atlanta to a Tennessee city.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports the airline launched the flights from Atlanta to Nashville on Tuesday. It will operate five flights a day Monday through Friday between the cities, and three flights a day on Saturdays and Sundays.

39. Airlines, consumer groups ready for fight over proposed bill -

As summer vacationers start to pack up and head home, Congress is considering a sweeping tally of proposals that could affect travelers, from dictating seat size and legroom to rolling back rules that require airlines to advertise the full price of a ticket.

40. Airlines trim flights, make other tweaks to offset fuel -

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines are bowing to the pressure of higher fuel prices by culling unprofitable flights while trying to boost revenue by being nicer to customers.

American Airlines said Thursday it will join rivals by growing more slowly during the rest of 2018 than it had originally planned.

41. Bookings for Southwest fall after fatal accident -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines says bookings are down since the fatal accident on one of its planes last week.

The company said Thursday that it expects revenue per mile, which tracks average prices, will drop between 1 percent and 3 percent in the April-through-June quarter. It said that 1 to 2 percentage points of the decline is due to slower sales since the April 17 accident that killed a passenger.

42. Facebook leads technology stock rally as US indexes climb -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are rising Thursday as Facebook leads a big rally for technology companies. The social media platform jumped after its recent data privacy scandal didn't appear to affect business in the first quarter. Other big technology companies also moved higher, as did retailers. Chipotle Mexican Grill, Ford and Visa also rose after they gave strong first-quarter reports.

43. Bookings for Southwest fall after fatal accident -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines says bookings are down since the fatal accident on one of its planes last week.

The company said Thursday that it expects revenue per mile, which tracks average prices, will drop between 1 percent and 3 percent in the April-through-June quarter. It said that 1 to 2 percentage points of the decline is due to slower sales since the April 17 accident that killed a passenger.

44. Southwest has been faced with fines, union safety complaints -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines runs its planes hard. They make many short hops and more trips per day than other U.S. airliners, which adds to wear and tear on parts, including the engines.

As the investigation into last week's deadly engine failure continues, Southwest CEO Gary Kelly could face questions about whether the company's low-cost business model — which puts its planes through frequent takeoffs and landings — is putting passengers at risk.

45. Southwest Airlines sought more time for engine inspections -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines sought more time last year to inspect fan blades like the one that snapped off during one of its flights Tuesday in an engine failure that left a passenger dead.

46. Investigators look at engine wear and tear in jet tragedy -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The investigation into a deadly engine failure on a Southwest jet is focusing on whether wear and tear caused a fan blade to snap off, triggering a catastrophic chain of events that killed a passenger and broke a string of eight years without a fatal accident involving a U.S. airliner.

47. Bird strike forces Southwest jet to make emergency landing in Nashville -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A bird strike forced a Southwest Airlines jet to make an emergency landing in Nashville.

The airline said in a statement that the pilot of Flight 577 from Nashville to Phoenix declared an emergency after the bird strike Wednesday morning and safely landed the plane at Nashville International Airport. No injuries were reported.

48. US stocks add to gains as company earnings reports impress -

Technology companies led U.S. stocks solidly higher Tuesday, giving the market its second straight gain.

Consumer-services companies, retailers and health care stocks accounted for a big slice of the broad rally. Banks declined, and oil prices recovered from an early slide.

49. After a day of wobbling, indexes end down -

NEW YORK (AP) — After a jittery afternoon of trading, major U.S. stock indexes fell Wednesday while smaller companies fared better. The Federal Reserve raised interest rates, as investors expected, and said it could raise rates at a quicker pace next year.

50. Surge in airline hiring boosts interest in aspiring pilots -

DALLAS (AP) — Major U.S. airlines are hiring pilots at a rate not seen since before 9/11, and that is encouraging more young people to consider a career in the cockpit.

Hiring is likely to remain brisk for years. Smaller airlines in the U.S. are struggling with a shortage that will continue as they lose pilots to the bigger carriers, which in turn will need to replace thousands of retiring pilots over the next few years.

51. Airline 'bumping' of passengers falls to lowest rate ever -

Airlines bumped passengers off flights at the lowest rate on record last year after United Airlines was pilloried when a passenger was dragged off a full plane.

The Transportation Department said Thursday that airlines bumped about one passenger in every 29,000 in 2017, roughly half the rate of the year before.

52. Losses for airlines, tech mostly offset other stock gains -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks spent a second day flipping between small gains and losses Thursday as investors again looked for hints about the Trump administration's stance on international trade and the dollar. Major indexes ended the day mixed as airlines plunged while biotech drugmakers climbed.
Homebuilders fell sharply after the Commerce Department said sales of new homes dropped in December. Airlines suffered a second day of sharp losses as investors worried about rising costs and the possibility of lower air fares. Retailers and technology companies slipped, but health care companies including Biogen and Celgene rose.
High-dividend stocks such as utilities rallied as bond yields fell, making those stocks more attractive to investors seeking income.
The dollar made small recovery in the afternoon after President Donald Trump said he wants to see a stronger U.S. currency. The dollar has fallen to three-year lows, and it fell further on Wednesday after Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said there were advantages to the dollar's weakness over the last year.
Investors took that to mean the administration wouldn't do much to prop up the dollar. Mnuchin said Thursday that he supports a stronger dollar over a longer term.
The Standard & Poor's 500 index and Dow Jones industrial average still rose enough to set more records, but stocks have wobbled this week as investors monitored the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, to get a sense of how the Trump administration's nationalist stance might affect global trade. Trump is scheduled give a speech there at around 7 a.m. Eastern time Friday.
Julian Emanuel, chief equity and derivatives strategist for BTIG, said investors have mostly tuned out political news in the last year, but it might be time for that to change because after a stretch of historic calm in the markets, volatility is rising slightly.
"Economies and earnings are the drivers of the market long term, but politics needs to be respected," he said.
The S&P 500 inched up 1.71 points, or 0.1 percent, to 2,839.25. The Dow average climbed 140.67 points, or 0.5 percent, to 26,392.79. The Nasdaq composite fell 3.89 points to 7,411.16. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks rose 2.06 points, or 0.1 percent, to 1,601.67. Most of the stocks on the New York Stock Exchange closed lower.
Stocks have been setting record highs regularly for more than a year, and the S&P 500 is up 6.2 percent this month. It's on track for its biggest monthly gain since March 2016, a time when the market was recovering after a sharp plunge.
The dollar edged up to 109.41 yen from 109.05 yen and the euro dipped to $1.2391 from $1.2405.
Among airlines, Alaska Air lost $2.62, or 4.1 percent, to $62.07 and Southwest Airlines sank $2.02, or 3.2 percent, to $60.19. They took even bigger losses Wednesday after United Continental said it plans to add passenger capacity at a faster pace over the next few years. That could increase the chances of a glut of flights and lower fares at the same time airlines are dealing with higher fuel expenses and higher labor costs.
The Commerce Department said sales of new homes fell more than 9 percent in December, partly because of severely cold weather. NVR sank $237.20, or 6.6 percent, to $3,350 while Lennar fell $2.35, or 3.3 percent, to $68.47. Those stocks have made huge gains over the last year because of strong demand for homes and rising prices.
Newell Brands, which makes Sharpie pens and Elmer's glue, plunged to its lowest price in almost five years after it again lowered its forecasts for 2017 and said it will consider selling numerous businesses including Rubbermaid. That's a sharp change in direction for Newell, which less than two years ago paid $13 billion to buy Rubbermaid's parent company Jarden.
Newell also said three directors resigned from its board. The stock plunged $6.42, or 20.6 percent, to $24.81.
Bond prices turned higher. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.62 percent from 2.65 percent.
The European Central Bank didn't make any changes to its stimulus programs. ECB head Mario Draghi said the eurozone economy still needs support to keep raising the rate of inflation toward healthier levels. It will continue to buy 30 billion euros ($36 billion) in bonds per month until at least September.
While major exporters like technology and industrial companies have benefited from the decline in the dollar, it has hurt smaller and more U.S.-focused companies, which have not done as well as the rest of the stock market over the last year.
Benchmark U.S. crude lost 10 cents to $65.51 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, used to price international oils, gained 41 cents to $70.94 per barrel in London.
Wholesale gasoline remained at $1.92 a gallon. Heating oil rose 1 cent to $2.12 a gallon. Natural gas fell 6 cents to $3.45 per 1,000 cubic feet.
Gold picked up $6.60 to $1,362.90 an ounce, and after strong gains over the last few days it's at its highest price since August 2016. Silver gained 13 cents to $17.62 an ounce. Copper fell 1 cent to $3.22 a pound.
Germany's DAX lost 0.9 percent and the British FTSE 100 fell 0.4 percent. The CAC 40 in France dipped 0.3 percent. Japan's Nikkei 225 sank 1.1 percent while Hong Kong's Hang Seng slipped 0.9 percent. South Korea's Kospi surged 1 percent.
____
AP Markets Writer Marley Jay can be reached at http://twitter.com/MarleyJayAP His work can be found at https://apnews.com/search/marley%20jayt

...

53. Southwest agrees to pay $15 million over collusion claims -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines will pay $15 million to settle class-action lawsuits that accuse the four biggest U.S. carriers of conspiring to boost prices by holding down the supply of tickets for sale.

54. Even procrastinators can find deals on holiday travel -

DALLAS (AP) — So you polished off the pumpkin pie at Thanksgiving, watched Black Friday and Cyber Monday come and go, and now — just now — you're thinking that it might be time to make your Christmas travel reservations.

55. Airlines bump fewer passengers off oversold flights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Airlines are bumping fewer passengers off oversold planes after taking to heart the public anger over a man being violently dragged from his seat earlier this year.

The U.S. Department of Transportation said Thursday that airlines bumped 2,745 passengers between July and September.

56. JetBlue to stop selling tickets on a dozen travel websites -

NEW YORK (AP) — JetBlue will stop selling tickets on a dozen discount travel websites in hopes of driving customers to the airline's site and reducing the company's costs.

JetBlue Airways Corp. said Thursday that the change was the first step in revamping its system of selling tickets online.

57. JetBlue to stop selling tickets on a dozen travel websites -

NEW YORK (AP) — JetBlue will stop selling tickets on a dozen discount travel websites in hopes of driving customers to the airline's site and reducing the company's costs.

JetBlue Airways Corp. said Thursday that the change was the first step in revamping its system of selling tickets online.

58. Soaring airline stocks help lift Wall Street to new heights -

NEW YORK (AP) — Airline and automaker stocks took off on Tuesday and helped U.S. indexes push a bit further into record territory. Trading was again quiet overall, with only modest moves for bond yields, commodities and other markets.

59. American Airlines CEO: We'll never lose money again -

GRAPEVINE, Texas (AP) — The CEO of American Airlines says the once-volatile industry has changed so radically that his company will never lose money again.

Even in a bad year, Doug Parker says, the world's biggest airline should earn about $3 billion in profit before taxes.

60. Southwest: Disasters will cut 3Q revenue by $100 million -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines says hurricanes and earthquakes will cut $100 million from third-quarter revenue by causing the carrier to cancel about 5,000 flights.

The airline said Thursday in a regulatory filing that a closely watched figure of revenue for every seat flown one mile will be flat to down 1 percent for the quarter, compared with a year earlier.

61. Hospitality industry job fair set for Oct. 3 -

Job seekers are invited to a hospitality industry job fair on Oct. 3 as the city brings together employers in the tourism and convention sectors for a hiring event.

The job fair will take place 11 a.m.-5 p.m. in the Davidson Ballroom of the Music City Center. This is the third time the hospitality industry has come together to host a job fair as Nashville’s tourism and convention sectors continue to grow. It is free and open to the public.

62. Harvey knocks out more refineries, shifting global oil flows -

DALLAS (AP) — Hurricane Harvey is sending pump prices higher for U.S. motorists and causing temporary shifts in the flow of oil and gasoline around the world after taking down a huge chunk of U.S. refining capacity.

63. Analyst estimates United could take big hit from Harvey -

DALLAS (AP) — One big Harvey loser: United Airlines.

An airline analyst estimates the carrier could lose $266 million from Houston flight cancellations caused by flooding from Tropical Storm Harvey.

64. Trump seeks to privatize US air traffic control system -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Monday that the nation's air traffic control system needed a modern makeover and urged Congress to approve a privatization plan that he said would increase safety and reduce wait times for passengers.

65. Get ready for busy travel season; airlines could set record -

DALLAS (AP) — If you're planning a big vacation trip this summer, move over. You're going to have lots of company.

By air or car, traveler numbers are expected to rise over last year thanks to a decent economy and stable gasoline prices.

66. Lawmakers to airlines: Improve service or Congress steps in -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Frustrated Republicans and Democrats on Tuesday warned top airline executives to improve customer services or face congressional intervention after a passenger was dragged from a United Airlines flight in an incident the company's chief executive called a "mistake of epic proportions."

67. Southwest Airlines to end practice of overbooking flights -

Southwest Airlines plans to stop overbooking flights — an industry practice implicated in an ugly incident on a United Airlines flight that has damaged United's reputation with the flying public.

Last year Southwest bumped 15,000 passengers off flights, more than any other U.S. airline. Carriers say they sometimes sell more tickets than there are seats because often a few passengers don't show up.

68. Video of passenger getting dragged off flight sparks uproar -

CHICAGO (AP) — Video of police officers dragging a passenger from an overbooked United Airlines flight sparked an uproar Monday on social media, and a spokesman for the airline insisted that employees had no choice but to contact authorities to remove the man.

69. Another drop for oil prices pulls stock indexes lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stock indexes sank Tuesday after yet another drop in the price of oil dragged down shares across the energy industry. Other areas of the market saw modest losses as investors wait to hear from the Federal Reserve, which began a two-day policy meeting on interest rates.

70. Airline cancellations pile up as storm disrupts travel plans -

U.S. airlines have already canceled more than 6,000 flights Monday and Tuesday as a late-winter storm is expected to dump enough snow to disrupt travel in the Northeast.

Southwest Airlines, which carries more domestic passengers than any other airline, doesn't expect to operate any flights Tuesday at 14 airports stretching from Washington to Portland, Maine.

71. Bond yields rise, stocks push to records as economy cruises -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks and bond yields punched higher Wednesday, and U.S. indexes set records again, following more encouraging news on the U.S. economy.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 11.67 points, or 0.5 percent, to 2,349.25. It's the seventh straight gain for the index and its longest winning streak in three and a half years.  The Dow Jones industrial average rose 107.45 points, or 0.5 percent, to 20,611.86. The Nasdaq composite rose 36.87, or 0.6 percent, to 5,819.44. Seven stocks rose on the New York Stock Exchange for every five that fell.

72. Airlines increase on-time arrivals, reduce canceled flights -

The chances that your flight will be on time and won't get canceled appear to be looking up.

The federal Department of Transportation reported Tuesday that 86.5 percent of U.S. flights in November arrived on time, an improvement over both the previous month and November 2015.

73. Gov't proposal envisions phone calls on airline flights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Airlines could let passengers make in-flight phone calls using Wi-Fi under a proposal from federal regulators.

Flight attendants and others have complained that the calls could be disruptive. But the Department of Transportation said Thursday that it envisioned allowing the calls if airlines tell all customers about the policy when they buy their tickets.

74. US stocks slip; real estate falls and banks climb -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks dodged bigger losses and finished barely lower on Wednesday. Health care companies fell and Apple pulled technology companies down, but banks rose.

Earlier in the day, stocks had appeared to be headed for a second day of notable losses, but they recovered some of that lost ground in late trading. Weak earnings for major companies hurt real estate investment trusts and health care companies. Tech stocks slid as investors were unimpressed with Apple's latest results. Banks continued to report strong earnings and Boeing boosted industrial companies.

75. Samsung changes Note 7 output schedule after fire reports -

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Samsung's crisis with its Galaxy Note 7 smartphone deepened Monday as the company confirmed it has adjusted its production following reports that newly released versions offered as replacements for recalled fire-prone devices have also overheated or caught fire.

76. Travelers in US change plans ahead of Hurricane Matthew -

NEW YORK (AP) — Travelers along the East Coast are preparing for delays and cancelations as Hurricane Matthew heads toward the U.S.

Some airlines have already canceled flights Thursday and Friday in parts of Florida and are weighing suspensions up through Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina, depending on where the hurricane strikes. Cruise lines are shuffling ship itineraries and many frantic vacationers are looking at insurance policies to see if they are covered.

77. Spivey says parting shots at Harwell not about Durham -

Fallout from Jeremy Durham’s House expulsion keeps piling up. In the latest brouhaha, outgoing Rep. Billy Spivey is calling for an investigation into a report of alleged abuse by House Chief Clerk Joe McCord involving a female staff member working in the office of House Speaker Beth Harwell.

78. Tech and consumer companies lead US stocks higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rebounded Tuesday and climbed after a survey showed consumer confidence is at a nine-year high, a sign Americans will keep spending in the months to come. Technology and consumer stocks made the largest gains.

79. US stock indexes mixed; Nasdaq ekes out another record high -

Even on a day when the major U.S. stock indexes barely budged, the market notched another milestone.

The Nasdaq composite eked out a gain, pushing the tech-heavy index to its second record-high close in a row. The Dow Jones industrial average and Standard & Poor's 500 index drifted in the opposite direction, closing slightly in the red.

80. Historic commercial flight from US lands in Cuba -

SANTA CLARA, Cuba (AP) — The first commercial flight between the United States and Cuba in more than a half century landed in the central city of Santa Clara on Wednesday morning, re-establishing regular air service severed at the height of the Cold War.

81. Southwest outage, cancelled flights cost an estimated $54M -

DALLAS (AP) — The cancellation of more than 2,000 Southwest Airlines flights due to a computer outage last month will cost the carrier an estimated $54 million.

The Dallas Morning News (http://bit.ly/2aV2tcm ) reported the lost revenue and increased cost estimates based on a Southwest investor advisory released Wednesday.

82. Delta cancels more flights in wake of computer-system outage -

DALLAS (AP) — Travelers on Delta Air Lines endured hundreds more canceled and delayed flights on Tuesday as the carrier slogged through day two of its recovery from a global computer outage.

By early afternoon, Delta said it had canceled about 530 flights as it moved planes and crews to "reset" its operation.

83. Complexity makes airline computer systems vulnerable -

DALLAS (AP) — Twice in less than a month, a major airline was paralyzed by a computer outage that prevented passengers from checking in and flights from taking off.

Last month, it took Southwest days to recover from a breakdown it blamed on a faulty router. On Monday, it was Delta's turn, as a power outage crippled the airline's information technology systems and forced it to cancel or delay hundreds of flights. Delta employees had to write out boarding passes by hand, and at one airport they resurrected a dot-matrix printer from the graveyard of 1980s technology.

84. Delta resumes some service after hours of global outage -

LONDON (AP) — Twelve hours after a power outage knocked out its computer systems worldwide, Delta Air Lines was struggling Monday to resume normal operations and clear backlogs of passengers stranded by canceled flights.

85. Pilots' union seeks ouster of Southwest CEO after IT outage -

DALLAS (AP) — Two major unions at Southwest Airlines are demanding that the carrier replace CEO Gary Kelly because of the technology outage that caused the airline to cancel or delay thousands of flights in July.

86. Southwest Airlines still dealing with delays after outage -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest passengers endured a third straight day of canceled and delayed flights as the airline struggled to resume normal operations on Friday.

Tracking service FlightStats Inc. reported that by mid-afternoon about 300 Southwest flights had been canceled and 1,200 more delayed. Southwest canceled nearly 1,500 flights and 4,500 others were delayed Wednesday and Thursday.

87. Stock indexes listless, remain close to record levels -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stock indexes were listless in midday trading Thursday after the European Central Bank held interest rates at record lows and a series of U.S. companies reported mixed earnings.

88. Congress passes aviation bill to close airport security gaps -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress passed an aviation bill Wednesday that attempts to close gaps in airport security and shorten screening lines, but leaves thornier issues unresolved.

The bill also extends the Federal Aviation Administration's programs for 14 months at current funding levels. It was approved in the Senate by a vote of 89 to 4. The House had passed the measure earlier in the week and it now goes to President Barack Obama, who must sign the bill by Friday when the FAA's current operating authority expires to avoid a partial agency shutdown.

89. US gives tentative OK to flights to Cuba from 10 US cities -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Scheduled commercial airline service to Havana from 10 American cities won tentative government approval Thursday, advancing President Barack Obama's effort to normalize relations with Cuba.

90. US says airlines are improving at on-time performance -

Airlines are doing a better job of sticking to their schedules, and consumer complaints are falling.

The Department of Transportation said Monday that 84.5 percent of flights on the largest 12 U.S. airlines arrived on time during April, better than the previous month and up from 81.8 percent in April 2015.

91. US airlines to start scheduled flights to Cuba -

HAVANA (AP) — Six airlines won permission Friday to resume scheduled commercial air service from the U.S. to Cuba for the first time in more than five decades, another milestone in President Barack Obama's campaign to normalize relations between the Cold War foes.

92. American will reward fliers based on dollars, not miles -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines is following other airlines by basing perks like free flights on how much passengers spend on tickets, not how many miles they fly.

The change, which matches those at Delta Air Lines and United Airlines, starts with flights on Aug. 1 and rewards American's highest-paying passengers.

93. Airlines say Congress is contributing to long airport lines -

DALLAS (AP) — As airport security lines get longer, the finger-pointing over blame is growing too.

The nation's leading airlines, already feuding with the Transportation Security Administration, are now taking on Congress.

94. Alaska, JetBlue top annual survey of North American airlines -

Alaska Airlines and JetBlue Airways still rank highest in the annual J.D. Power survey of passengers on the nine largest North American airlines, and the firm says overall traveler satisfaction with the industry is at a 10-year high.

95. Alaska Air buys Virgin America to expand West Coast flights -

NEW YORK (AP) — Alaska Air Group Inc. is buying Virgin America in a deal worth $2.6 billion, making Alaska the biggest carrier on the West Coast and reigniting the debate over airline consolidation.

96. Airlines dodge legislation aimed at curbing excessive fees -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Senate panel approved an aviation policy bill Wednesday after a partisan fight over whether airlines gouge consumers with fees for basic services like checked bags, seat assignments and ticket changes.

97. Southwest offers new nonstop service to Charlotte -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Officials say Southwest Airlines will begin offering nonstop flights out of Nashville to Charlotte, North Carolina.

Nashville International Airport officials say that in addition to the new service to Charlotte, Southwest will add one additional daily flight each to the cities of Denver, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and Los Angeles.

98. US, Cuba sign deal on commercial flights -

HAVANA (AP) — The United States and Cuba signed an agreement on Tuesday morning to resume commercial air traffic for the first time in five decades, starting the clock on dozens of new flights operating daily by next fall.

99. Southwest Airlines' 4Q profit soars on cheaper jet fuel -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines Co. earned a record fourth-quarter profit of $536 million as fuel costs fell by nearly one-third and offset lower fares and rising labor costs.

100. US stocks rise as energy stocks bounce back from big loss -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are climbing Thursday, led by big gains in energy companies as the prices of crude oil and natural gas recover from steep plunges the day before. Telecom stocks also rose after Verizon reported strong fourth-quarter results.