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Editorial Results (free)

1. How Tennessee, other U.S. states have banned, limited, protected abortion -

The U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that had provided a constitutional right to abortion. Friday's ruling is expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states. In anticipation of the decision, several states led by Democrats have taken steps to protect abortion access. The decision also sets up the potential for legal fights between the states over whether providers and those who help women obtain abortions can be sued or prosecuted.

2. Watergate 50th meets Jan. 6. Common thread: Thirst for power -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The wreckage of Watergate and Jan. 6 are a half-century apart yet rooted in the same ancient thirst for power at any cost.

Two presidents, wily and profane, tried an end run around democracy.

3. New SBC President commits to move sex abuse reforms forward -

ANAHEIM, California (AP) — The new president of the Southern Baptist Convention said Wednesday he will accelerate sex abuse reforms in the nation's largest Protestant denomination.

Texas pastor Bart Barber's first priority: to assemble a panel of people -- Southern Baptist leaders and experts -- to shepherd this work for the whole convention as mandated by thousands of representatives from local SBC churches.

4. Report: Top Southern Baptists stonewalled sex abuse victims -

The Southern Baptist Convention's Executive Committee — and thousands of its rank-and-file members — now have opportunities to address a scathing investigative report that says top SBC leaders stonewalled and denigrated survivors of clergy sex abuse over two decades while seeking to protect their own reputations.

5. Fall of Mariupol appears at hand; fighters leave steel plant -

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Mariupol appeared on the verge of falling to the Russians on Tuesday as Ukraine moved to abandon the steel plant where hundreds of its fighters had held out for months under relentless bombardment in the last bastion of resistance in the devastated city.

6. As Putin marks Victory Day, his troops make little war gains -

ZAPORIZHZHIA, Ukraine (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin marked his country's biggest patriotic holiday Monday without a major new battlefield success in Ukraine to boast of, as the war ground on through its 11th week with the Kremlin's forces making little or no progress in their offensive.

7. Ukraine: Russia using 'missile terrorism' in wide attacks -

LVIV, Ukraine (AP) — Complaining that the West is "stuffing Ukraine with weapons," Russia bombarded railroad stations and other supply-line targets across the country, as the European Union moved to further punish Moscow for the war Wednesday by proposing a ban on oil imports.

8. Ukraine slams Kyiv attack amid new Mariupol rescue effort -

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Ukraine's leader accused Russia of trying to humiliate the United Nations by raining missiles on Kyiv during a visit by Secretary-General António Guterres, an attack that shattered the capital's tentative return to normality as the focus of the war moved east.

9. Biden pardons former Secret Service agent and 2 others -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has granted the first three pardons of his term, providing clemency to a Kennedy-era Secret Service agent convicted of federal bribery charges that he tried to sell a copy of an agency file and to two people who were convicted on drug-related charges but went on to become pillars in their communities.

10. Possible mass graves near Mariupol shown in satellite images -

ZAPORIZHZHIA, Ukraine (AP) — New satellite images show apparent mass graves near Mariupol, where local officials accused Russia of burying up to 9,000 Ukrainian civilians to conceal the slaughter taking place in the ruined port city that's almost entirely under Russian control.

11. Ukrainian communities in US prepare to support refugees -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — As the United States prepares to accept up to 100,000 Ukrainian refugees following Russia's invasion of their country, existing communities in cities like Sacramento and Seattle are already mobilizing to provide food, shelter and support to those fleeing the war.

12. As Mariupol hangs on, the extent of the horror not yet known -

LVIV, Ukraine (AP) — As Mariupol's defenders held out Monday against Russian demands that they surrender, the number of bodies in the rubble of the bombarded and encircled Ukrainian city remained shrouded in uncertainty, the full extent of the horror not yet known.

13. Russia-Ukraine war: Key things to know about the conflict -

Russia's invasion of Ukraine entered its fourth week on Thursday, with Russian forces largely bogged down outside major cities and shelling them from a distance, raining havoc on civilians.

A Russian airstrike just before dawn Thursday killed 21 people and destroyed a school and community center in Merefa, near the northeast city of Kharkiv, officials said.

14. Glimmers of hope seen at talks as Russia's onslaught goes on -

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Russian forces destroyed a theater in Mariupol where hundreds of people were sheltering and rained fire on other cities Wednesday, Ukrainian authorities said, even as the two sides projected optimism over efforts to negotiate an end to the fighting.

15. Ukrainians evacuate Kyiv suburbs amid deepening crisis -

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Residents of the bombarded suburbs of Ukraine's capital snaked their way across the slippery wooden planks of a makeshift bridge that provided the only way to escape Russian shelling, amid renewed efforts Wednesday to rescue civilians from besieged cities.

16. On cusp of Biden speech, a state of disunity, funk and peril -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In good times or bad, American presidents come to Congress with a diagnosis that hardly differs over the decades. In their State of the Union speeches, they declare "the state of our union is strong" or words very much like it.

17. California adopts nation's 1st 'endemic' virus policy -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California became the first state to formally shift to an "endemic" approach to the coronavirus with Gov. Gavin Newsom's announcement Thursday of a plan that emphasizes prevention and quick reaction to outbreaks over mandated masking and business shutdowns.

18. Rogan dispute draws Spotify into content liability debate -

NEW YORK (AP) — Like Facebook and Twitter, Spotify is learning the limits of deflecting responsibility for what is said on its platform.

Podcasting has sprouted as an industry with few standards about policing offensive or misleading content. That has left Spotify trying to figure out how to keep podcaster Joe Rogan's millions of devoted fans happy without further alienating artists and listeners angry about him amplifying vaccine skeptics and using racial slurs.

19. CFMT grants boost nonprofit agencies in area -

The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, a charitable organization dedicated to enriching the quality of life in Middle Tennessee and beyond, announces $2,664,888 in grants to 439 local nonprofit organizations as part of the 2021 annual grantmaking process.

20. How a Kennedy built an anti-vaccine juggernaut amid COVID-19 -

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Robert F. Kennedy Jr. strode onto the stage at a Southern California church, radiating Kennedy confidence and surveying the standing ovation crowd with his piercing blue Bobby Kennedy eyes. Then, he launched into an anti-vaccine rant. Democrats "drank the Kool-Aid," he told people assembled for a far right conference, branded as standing for "health and freedom."

21. EXPLAINER: Was tornado outbreak related to climate change? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The calendar said December but the warm moist air screamed of springtime. Add an eastbound storm front guided by a La Nina weather pattern into that mismatch and it spawned tornadoes that killed dozens over five U.S. states.

22. WHO chief: Omicron shows need for global accord on pandemics -

GENEVA (AP) — The World Health Organization on Monday is pushing for an international accord to help prevent and fight future pandemics amid the emergence of a worrying new omicron COVID-19 variant.

23. Bradley adds East to real estate group -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has hired Van P. East III to the firm’s real estate practice group as a partner in the Nashville office.

East has extensive experience in commercial real estate, representing clients in purchasing, financing, leasing and selling commercial properties ranging from shopping centers to vacant land. He also works with clients on matters involving closely held business entities, including formations, conversions, mergers, acquisitions and dispositions, as well as restructuring ownership and control.

24. Inflation rises 5.4% from year ago, matching 13-year high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Another surge in consumer prices in September pushed inflation up 5.4% from where it was a year ago, matching the highest shift higher since 2008 as tangled global supply lines continue to create havoc.

25. Chinese banks try to calm fears about developer's debts -

BEIJING (AP) — Trying to dispel investor fears, some Chinese banks are disclosing what they are owed by a real estate developer that is struggling under $310 billion in debt and say they can cope with a potential default.

26. Southern Festival of Books goes virtual -

Humanities Tennessee, the organizer of the 33rd annual Southern Festival of Books: A Celebration of the Written Word, has announced the festival will take place completely online and free-of-charge this year out of an abundance of caution for public health amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

27. Black Americans laud Juneteenth holiday, say more work ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Black Americans rejoiced after President Joe Biden made Juneteenth a federal holiday, but some said that, while they appreciated the recognition at a time of racial reckoning in America, more is needed to change policies that disadvantage too many of their brethren.

28. Biden to sign bill making Juneteenth a federal holiday -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed legislation Thursday establishing a new federal holiday commemorating the end of slavery, saying he believes it will go down as one of the greatest honors he has as president.
Biden signed into law a bill to make Juneteenth, or June 19, the 12th federal holiday. The House voted 415-14 on Wednesday to send the bill to Biden, while the Senate passed the bill unanimously the day before.
"This is a day of profound weight and profound power, a day in which we remember the moral stain, the terrible toll that slavery took on the country and continues to take," Biden said.
Juneteenth commemorates June 19, 1865, when Union soldiers brought the news of freedom to enslaved Black people in Galveston, Texas — two months after the Confederacy had surrendered. That was also about 2 1/2 years after the Emancipation Proclamation freed slaves in the Southern states.
It's the first new federal holiday since Martin Luther King Jr. Day was created in 1983.
The U.S. Office of Personnel Management, which is the human resources office for the federal government, tweeted Thursday that most federal employees will observe the new holiday — Juneteenth National Independence Day — on Friday since June 19 falls on a Saturday this year.
Biden noted the overwhelming support for the bill from lawmakers in both parties.
"I hope this is the beginning of a change in the way we deal with one another," Biden said.
The White House moved quickly after the House debated the bill and then voted for it.
"Our federal holidays are purposely few in number and recognize the most important milestones," said Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y. "I cannot think of a more important milestone to commemorate than the end of slavery in the United States."
Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, speaking next to a large poster of a Black man whose back bore massive scarring from being whipped, said she would be in Galveston on Saturday to celebrate along with Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas.
"Can you imagine?" said Jackson Lee. "I will be standing maybe taller than Sen. Cornyn, forgive me for that, because it will be such an elevation of joy."
The Senate passed the bill on Tuesday under a unanimous consent agreement that expedites the process for considering legislation. It takes just one senator's objection to block such agreements.
The vote comes as lawmakers struggle to overcome divisions on police reform legislation following the killing of George Floyd by police and as Republican state legislators push what experts say is an unprecedented number of bills aimed at restricting access to the ballot box. While Republicans say the goal is to prevent voter fraud, Democrats contend that the measures are aimed at undermining minority voting rights.
Several members of the Congressional Black Caucus went to the floor to speak in favor of the bill. Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman, D-N.J., said she viewed Juneteenth as a commemoration rather than a celebration because it represented something that was delayed in happening.
"It also reminds me of what we don't have today," she said. "And that is full access to justice, freedom and equality. All these are often in short supply as it relates to the Black community."
The bill was sponsored by Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass., and had 60 co-sponsors. Democratic leaders moved quickly to bring the bill to the House floor after the Senate's vote the day before.
Some Republican lawmakers opposed the effort. Rep. Matt Rosendale, R-Mont., said creating the federal holiday was an effort to celebrate "identity politics."
"Since I believe in treating everyone equally, regardless of race, and that we should be focused on what unites us rather than our differences, I will vote no," he said in a press release.
The vast majority of states recognize Juneteenth as a holiday or have an official observance of the day, and most states hold celebrations. Juneteenth is a paid holiday for state employees in Texas, New York, Virginia and Washington.
Rep. Clay Higgins, R-La., said he would vote for the bill and that he supported the establishment of a federal holiday, but he was upset that the name of the holiday included the word "independence" rather than "emancipation."
"Why would the Democrats want to politicize this by coopting the name of our sacred holiday of Independence Day?" Higgins asked.
Rep. Brenda Lawrence, D-Mich., replied, "I want to say to my white colleagues on the other side: Getting your independence from being enslaved in a country is different from a country getting independence to rule themselves."
She added, "We have a responsibility to teach every generation of Black and white Americans the pride of a people who have survived, endured and succeeded in these United States of America despite slavery."
The 14 House Republicans who voted against the bill are Andy Biggs of Arizona, Mo Brooks of Alabama, Andrew Clyde of Georgia, Scott DesJarlais of Tennessee, Paul Gosar of Arizona, Ronny Jackson of Texas, Doug LaMalfa of California, Thomas Massie of Kentucky, Tom McClintock of California, Ralph Norman of South Carolina, Mike Rogers of Alabama, Matt Rosendale of Montana, Chip Roy of Texas and Tom Tiffany of Wisconsin.

...

29. HCA honored by LinkedIn as top company -

Nashville’s HCA Healthcare has been recognized on the 2021 LinkedIn Top Companies ranking, an annual guide that identifies the best places for professionals to grow their careers and develop skills.

30. An unwelcome prank: VW purposely hoodwinks reporters -

NEW YORK (AP) — Journalists are used to being wary about odd pranksters pulling April Fool's Day hoaxes at this time of year. Few expect it from a multi-billion dollar corporation.

Volkswagen admitted Tuesday that it had put out a false news release saying that it had changed the name of its U.S. subsidiary to "Voltswagen of America" in an attempt to be funny and promote a new electric utility vehicle.

31. What? No official state instrument? It has to be banjo -

Tennessee lawmakers, for all their zeal to create official state whatevers, have somehow neglected an obvious category: A state musical instrument.

Shame on them.

“Country, bluegrass, blues, Southern gospel and rock ’n’ roll all trace their roots directly to the Volunteer State,” the Tennessee Historical Society states.

32. After pandemic year, weary world looks back — and forward -

No one has been untouched. Not the Michigan woman who awakened one morning, her wife dead by her side. Not the domestic worker in Mozambique, her livelihood threatened by the virus. Not the North Carolina mother who struggled to keep her business and her family going amid rising anti-Asian ugliness. Not the sixth-grader, exiled from the classroom in the blink of an eye.

33. Not to be sniffed at: Agony of post-COVID-19 loss of smell -

NICE, France (AP) — The doctor slid a miniature camera into the patient's right nostril, making her whole nose glow red with its bright miniature light.

"Tickles a bit, eh?" he asked as he rummaged around her nasal passages, the discomfort causing tears to well in her eyes and roll down her cheeks.

34. Vaccine delays leave grocery workers feeling expendable -

As panicked Americans cleared supermarkets of toilet paper and food last spring, grocery employees gained recognition as among the most indispensable of the pandemic's front-line workers.

A year later, most of those workers are waiting their turn to receive COVID-19 vaccines, with little clarity about when that might happen.

35. Vigorous preparation returns as Biden calls other leaders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new-old ritual is taking shape in the Biden White House, one that starts with bulky briefing packages, war-gaming the "what-ifs," and Oval Office discussions about how to talk to this or that particular U.S. ally or adversary.

36. TN picked for vaccine delivery pilot program -

Tennessee is one of four states selected to participate in a pilot program for delivery of the Pfizer Inc. COVID-19 vaccine now under development.

This program is designed to address distribution challenges posed by requirements for ultracold storage of the vaccine.

37. Top Davidson County commercial sales for October 2020 -

Top commercial real estate sales, October 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

38. Wood Stabell adds pair of attorneys -

Wood Stabell Law Group, PLLC has hired two attorneys, Lin Ye and Ashley Gold. WSLG has now added four attorneys since 2019.

Lin is focusing on corporate law, mergers and acquisitions and health care. With more than 10 years of experience, companies and investors in health care, technology, manufacturing, distribution and other industries have come to rely on Lin to advise them on a wide range of strategic corporate transaction and business arrangements.

39. Smith named president of Tennessee Medical Association -

The Tennessee Medical Association has named Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s M. Kevin Smith, M.D., Ph.D., MMHC of Nashville as 2020-21 president of the member-based nonprofit advocacy organization that represents 9,500 physicians statewide.

40. AP Analysis: Trump bets presidency on 'law and order' theme -

KENOSHA, Wis. (AP) — After struggling for much of the year to settle on a clear and concise reelection message, President Donald Trump appears to have found his 2020 rallying cry.

Four years ago, it was "Build the Wall," a simple yet coded mantra to white America that nonwhite outsiders threatened their way of life. This week, Trump has re-centered his campaign on another three-word phrase that carries a similar racial dynamic: "Law and Order."

41. Nashville real estate, tourism riding vastly different paths -

Residential real estate continues to soar through the pandemic, and those who practice the trade are sympathetic to those that are suffering. Butch Spyridon, president and CEO of the Convention and Visitors Corporation, delivered some sobering statistics recently when he spoke to a group of Realtors.

42. The best, worst from the 111th General Assembly -

Tennessee legislators, having adjourned sine die and high-tailed it homeward, it’s time for a final report card on the 111th session of the General Assembly.

The good news: It wasn’t all bad. The bad news: It wasn’t much good. Here is my highly subjective list of grades:

43. The Dixie Chicks officially change their name to The Chicks -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Grammy-winning country group The Dixie Chicks have dropped the word Dixie from their name, now going by The Chicks.

The band's social media accounts and website were changed on Thursday to the refer to the new name for the band, which is made up of Martie Maguire, Natalie Maines and Emily Strayer. The band also recognized that the name was already in use by a band in New Zealand.

44. Who hasn't heard of COVID-19 by now? More than you think -

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — A half-year into the most momentous pandemic in decades, it's hard to imagine that anyone, anywhere has not heard of the coronavirus. But scores of migrants arriving in Somalia tell United Nations workers every day that they are unaware of COVID-19.

45. May was bad but June could be a record-setter -

In “good news, bad news” news, Greater Nashville Realtors sales data for May carries the headline “Indicators Show Positive Market Moving Forward” and backs it up with hard numbers.

46. Time for a new phase with more safety, stability -

A Nashville friend’s recent Facebook post neatly summed up the escalating turmoil we’ve been living through:

“I can’t believe it’s riot season already. I still have my COVID decorations up.”

47. Loughlin, Giannulli to serve prison time for college scam -

"Full House" Actress Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, agreed to serve prison time as part of a plea deal in the college admissions bribery case, according to court papers filed Thursday.

48. West Coast fishery rebounds in rare conservation 'home run' -

WARRENTON, Ore. (AP) — A rare environmental success story is unfolding in waters off the U.S. West Coast.

After years of fear and uncertainty, bottom trawler fishermen — those who use nets to catch rockfish, bocaccio, sole, Pacific Ocean perch and other deep-dwelling fish — are making a comeback here, reinventing themselves as a sustainable industry less than two decades after authorities closed huge stretches of the Pacific Ocean because of the species' depletion.

49. West Coast fishery rebounds in rare conservation 'home run' -

WARRENTON, Ore. (AP) — A rare environmental success story is unfolding in waters off the U.S. West Coast.

After years of fear and uncertainty, bottom trawler fishermen — those who use nets to catch rockfish, bocaccio, sole, Pacific Ocean perch and other deep-dwelling fish — are making a comeback here, reinventing themselves as a sustainable industry less than two decades after authorities closed huge stretches of the Pacific Ocean because of the species' depletion.

50. Community Foundation announces grant recipients -

The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee has announced $2,397,870 in grants to be awarded to 365 local nonprofit organizations as part of the 2019 annual grant-making process.

CFMT is a charitable organization dedicated to enriching the quality of life in 40 Middle Tennessee counties and beyond.

51. Guthrie honors man who did ‘so much good’ for others -

Red-tailed hawks soar over the town tucked along Ewing Street in the Southern Kentucky farmland where the James Gang (with Jesse, not Joe Walsh) visited, where Robert Penn Warren was raised, tossing rocks and having fun with future major league pitcher Kent Greenfield, and where Bill Longhurst spent his life casting a giant shadow of wisdom, hometown pride and love.

52. Why would you cook? -

It’s the countdown to the biggest eating day of the year. But an afternoon of overindulgence also means a whole lot of cooking. There are onions to chop, potatoes to boil, cans of cream of mushroom soup to open for the ubiquitous green bean casserole and, of course, a plump turkey that will consume all your oven space for at least four hours.

53. Analysis: Trump's 'success' in Syria cedes region to Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump declared success in Syria and created a bumper-sticker moment to illustrate his campaign promise to put a stop to American involvement in "endless wars."

But with his abrupt withdrawal from what he called "bloodstained sand," the Republican president ceded American influence over a huge swath of the region to rivals and may have spun the Middle East into a new season of uncertainty.

54. AP analysis: Wide gaps in legal protection of LGBT workers -

Rumors started circulating around the fire station in Byron, Georgia, within a year after the medical treatments began. The fire chief's once-crewcut hair was growing longer, and other physical changes were becoming noticeable. Keeping quiet was no longer an option.

55. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for August 2019 -

Top commercial real estate sales, August 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

56. Nature’s table: Sunday dinner can be murder in wild -

Sometimes story ideas come from strange places, often from the incongruous rabbit holes we descend led by the hand of restless curiosity. This one starts with a gruesome crime scene.

A decapitated body was found beneath a crepe myrtle bush. The victim? A hummingbird. Most likely suspect? A praying mantis. And, we’re off.

57. Trump warns of treason, civil war; GOP congressman outraged -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is warning that the Democrat-driven impeachment proceedings and any move to oust him from office amount to "treason" and would spark a civil war, prompting outrage from a Republican congressman.

58. Where, when to find Nashville’s best fried chicken -

Nashville is a fried chicken town. Before Hot Chicken blew up across the country (thank you Prince’s for starting the ball rolling and creating hourslong lines on the weekend), there was only fried chicken. Glorious, crispy, unfancied-up fried chicken.

59. Legendary drummer Jimmy Otey dies -

 James “Jimmy” Otey Jr., 73, of Nashville, best-known as a drummer for the likes of Little Richard and Ray Charles, died Thursday.

Mr. Otey, a multi-instrumentalist and showman, was a product of the old Jefferson Street rhythm & blues scene and went on to perform around the world.

60. Bowden joins Stites & Harbison Nashville -

Elizabeth Anne Bowden has joined the Nashville office of Stites & Harbison, PLLC.

She is an attorney in the Creditors’ Rights & Bankruptcy Service Group. Her practice focuses on commercial transactions, litigation, banking, and bankruptcy and creditors’ rights.

61. Nobel laureate Toni Morrison dead at 88 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Nobel laureate Toni Morrison, a pioneer and reigning giant of modern literature whose imaginative power in "Beloved," ''Song of Solomon" and other works transformed American letters by dramatizing the pursuit of freedom within the boundaries of race, has died at age 88.

62. GOP pushes immigration bill, skirting rules as Dems protest -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee upended the rules Thursday for immigration legislation that would extend family detentions as chairman Lindsey Graham muscled the measure forward over the objections of Democrats.

63. Before CMA Fest, ‘Nashville,’ the Titans or Preds, there was Hee Haw -

Nashville’s road to prominence didn’t begin with the ongoing demolition of historic buildings and gutting of neighborhoods. It began 50 years ago with animated dancing pigs and a braying donkey, plenty of big boobs – like Junior Samples and Gunilla Hutton’s – in a “Kornfield,” the greatest country comedians and musicians and guests like Johnny Cash, Mickey Mantle, Ray Charles, Ethel Merman, Garth Brooks and Billy Graham.

64. China blames US for trade dispute, but doesn't escalate -

BEIJING (AP) — China fired back at the U.S. Sunday over the two nations' trade dispute, issuing a report that blamed the conflict on the Trump administration but refrained from escalating the trade war.

65. Tech group eases stance on Huawei as Beijing lashes back -

BEIJING (AP) — The world's largest association of technology professionals backed away from barring from some of its activities employees of Chinese tech giant Huawei, the company at the center of a roiling trade dispute between Washington and Beijing.

66. Cohen claims Trump lawyer shaped false statement to Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's former fixer, Michael Cohen, told Congress it was Trump's personal attorney, Jay Sekulow, who suggested he tell lawmakers that the negotiations for Trump Tower Moscow ended in January 2016, even though they continued for months after that.

67. Vanderbilt University chancellor to resign in August -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Citing health challenges, Vanderbilt University Chancellor Nicholas Zeppos announced Tuesday he plans to resign on Aug. 15 after more than a decade in the role.

Zeppos said he will take a yearlong sabbatical and then return to Vanderbilt as a law professor.

68. Ex-Trump lawyer Michael Cohen's prepared remarks to Congress -

The prepared testimony of Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's former personal lawyer, as obtained by The Associated Press before his appearance Wednesday:

69. Border security brawl seems near a serene resolution -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress is set to resolve its clattering brawl with President Donald Trump in uncommonly bipartisan fashion as lawmakers prepare to pass a border security compromise providing a mere sliver of the billions he's demanded for a wall with Mexico and averting a rekindled government shutdown this weekend.

70. Raley sees the light with distinctive Liberty Common -

Terry Raley says he knows that it takes more than great food to make a memorable meal.

When he opened the doors on December 28 to Liberty Common, a new French restaurant across from Ascend Amphitheater, he knew everything had to be perfect when it came to the guest experience, from the impeccably placed tiles to the totally temperate dining room, no sweaters required.

71. Adams and Reese consolidates offices -

Adams and Reese has announced the consolidation of its Nashville operations in the firm’s downtown location.

After its longtime building on Music Row was sold, Adams and Reese’s Music Row attorneys have moved to the firm’s Nashville office at Fifth Third Center, 424 Church Street, joining a group of more than 30 attorneys and government relations professionals in that location.

72. Bradley partner named top life sciences lawyer -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP partner Lela M. Hollabaugh has been named by Who’s Who Legal as one of the world’s leading life sciences attorneys and is listed in the Product Liability chapter of the 2019 edition of Who’s Who Legal: Life Sciences.

73. Community Foundation awards $2.72M+ to 453 organizations -

The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, a charitable organization dedicated to enriching the quality of life in 40 Middle Tennessee counties and beyond, announces $2,726,800 in grants to 453 local nonprofit organizations as part of the 2018 annual grantmaking process.

74. Wages surge as US adds a robust 250,000 jobs in October -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. businesses ramped up hiring in October, and wages rose by the largest year-over-year amount in nearly a decade, a combination that is pulling a rising share of Americans into the job market.

75. 'Boogeyman' Trump plays to voters' fears to stoke turnout -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Mob rule. A socialist takeover. Terrorists marching on the U.S. border.

As President Donald Trump embraces the role of electoral boogeyman, he's making closing arguments to midterm voters that increasingly resemble a Halloween horror story.

76. Trump wants a hug from Mexican president. Who knew? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump wants a hug from Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto. Who knew?

But Trump said such a gesture would be "very nice" as he wrapped up an unusual, public speakerphone conversation with the outgoing Mexican leader.

77. Events -

Business Studio: Getting the Word Out. Need to let the world know what’s up with your business? Get some fresh ideas about both traditional and non-traditional marketing strategies. Panel discussion with the agencies behind Thistle Farms, Kirkland’s, Ashley Judd, National Museum of African American Music and Mixtroz will share their expertise. You’ll also hear from local small business owners with out-of-the-box marketing strategies that have worked. The Cal Turner Family Center at Meharry Medical College, Room 203, 1011 21st Ave. N. Thursday, 3-5 p.m. Fee: Free. Information

78. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for May 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, May 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

79. Asian American candidates join fight to oust GOP -

Members of the country's fastest growing minority group are running for federal office, dozens of them as Democratic candidates deliberately playing up their Asian roots against a president they say demonizes the immigrants that make America great.

80. Asian American candidates join fight to oust GOP -

Members of the country's fastest growing minority group are running for federal office, dozens of them as Democratic candidates deliberately playing up their Asian roots against a president they say demonizes the immigrants that make America great.

81. US world's biggest supplier of heavy oil refining byproduct -

NEW DELHI (AP) — U.S. oil refineries that are unable to sell a dirty fuel waste product at home are exporting vast quantities of it to India instead.

Petroleum coke, the bottom-of-the-barrel leftover from refining Canadian tar sands crude and other heavy oils, is cheaper and burns hotter than coal. But it also contains more planet-warming carbon and far more heart- and lung-damaging sulfur — a key reason few American companies use it.

82. Longtime country singer, songwriter Mel Tillis dies -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Mel Tillis, the affable longtime country music star who wrote hits for Kenny Rogers, Ricky Skaggs and many others, and overcame a stutter to sing on dozens of his own singles, has died.

83. Urban will headline New Year’s celebration -

GRAMMY-winner Keith Urban will headline Jack Daniel’s Music City Midnight: New Year’s Eve in Nashville for a second consecutive year.

Urban will lead a diverse lineup that includes CMA New Artist of the Year Maren Morris, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees Cheap Trick, 2017 country music breakout artist Carly Pearce, R&B artist Jonny P and the Fisk Jubilee Singers.

84. Events -

Street Food Thursday. Enjoy a gathering of up to 20 local food trucks parked along Deaderick Street between 4th Avenue North and 5th Avenue North.

FRIDAY, OCT. 13

Nashville Steam Open House

Celebrate the Nashville Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway No 576 in Centennial Park, just west of the Parthenon, 27th Ave. North, at the train. Enjoy locomotive tours, vintage automobiles, food trucks, silent auction, kid’s activities and more. 4-9 p.m. Information: Nashvillesteam.org

85. Events -

Hope Grows Fundraising Dinner. Musical guest will be Christian artist Plumb, who will share her story and music. The annual fundraising dinner will be held at The Factory, Jamison Hall. Mike Fisher, retired captain of the Nashville Predators, will be presented with the 2017 Hope Award for his service to the community. Roy Laws Art will be live painting an inspiration piece unique to Hope Grown as the event takes place and will be auctioned at the end to the evening. Tickets: $80-$85. 6-9 p.m. Reservations: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/hope-grows-2017-tickets/ Information: www.therefugecenter.org

86. Songwriter’s education: Byrd learns from the best -

Even beneath his Acme Feed & Seed ball cap, Jon Byrd looks as much like a professor as any other white-haired, balding man in spectacles as he sips coffee and checks his smart phone while enjoying a warm afternoon in the al fresco dining area of a Vanderbilt-area caffeine and pastry dispensary.

87. Patent attorney launches intellectual law practice -

Patent attorney A.J. Bahou has opened Bahou Law, PLLC. Bahou is experienced in trials and mediations, and is a registered patent attorney who practices in the area of electrical and computer engineering technologies, Blockchain, data privacy, cyber security, health care and intellectual property law, including litigation management of patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets.

88. Shumaker brings ‘freaky’ energy to TMA post -

Since becoming president of the Tennessee Medical Association in April, Dr. Nita Shumaker has shrugged off most of the comments about her unique role.

“Everybody thinks it’s so astounding that there’s a second female president in 163 years, but I never felt like any man was holding me back from that position,” says the forthright physician and partner at Galen North Pediatrics.

89. Forrest kerfuffle might be sign of bigger problem -

Legislation that slipped through the House of Representatives honoring an unknown author who penned a Nathan Bedford Forrest apologist biography was enabled by the climate within the Republican-controlled body, a Memphis legislator says.

90. Court reporter shortage means high demand, good pay -

Imagine a courtroom scene and several images might come to mind – a robed judge, a row of pensive jurors, a zealous prosecutor or passionate defense attorney.

But there’s a quiet, busy person in a typical courtroom environment that often goes unnoticed: The court reporter.

91. Trump's budget priorities set small businesses strategizing -

NEW YORK (AP) — The priorities laid out in President Donald Trump's budget message have some small business owners strategizing how they might benefit from a big boost in defense spending, and others thinking about how to make up for revenue they could lose to cuts in grant programs and subsidies.

92. Pedigo to moderate INPUT conference -

Will Pedigo, Nashville Public Television producer, has been selected as a 2017 moderator for INPUT, an international public media conference that presents films and television programs.

Pedigo is one of two U.S. moderators selected in a group of 14 chosen internationally and was a producer fellow at the 2016 INPUT Conference.

93. Over-the-top wedding? Why not? -

When Donte Noble, 30, and Elliott Holt, 38, get married December 17 at the Bridge Building in downtown Nashville, it will be the wedding of their dreams.

Every detail is perfected to exactly what they want, down to the black-and-white dress code to the customized light fixture that will descend at the reception.

94. Daughters of Confederacy: We had to accept Vanderbilt money -

NASHVILLE (AP) - The Tennessee chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy said Tuesday that it had no legal choice but to accept $1.2 million from Vanderbilt University in exchange for relinquishing the naming rights to the private school's Confederate Memorial Hall.

95. Life after ‘Nashville’ for its band of others -

The cancellation of ABC’s “Nashville” has left the show’s worldwide legion of fans disappointed and angry enough to launch a social media push for another network – or online service – to pick up a fifth season of the prime time serial.

96. Events -

Nashville Chamber Business Studio Workshop: Scaling Your Business. In the final workshop of our Business Growth Series, the focus will be on how to scale your company’s growth. In this workshop, attendees will learn how to maintain their growth and use that momentum to take your company to the next level. Refinery Nashville, 438 Houston Street, Suite 263. 3-5 p.m. Complimentary for Chamber members. Future members $30. Registrations and Information: www.nashvillechamber.com

97. Events -

Wild West Comedy Festival. The third annual Wild West Comedy Festival features some of the funniest comedians in the world and unique special events. Through Sunday at various venues. Information: www.wildwestcomedyfestival.com/

98. Go Build Tennessee’s goal: Fill state's construction worker shortage -

The building boom in and around Nashville has led to a well-documented shortage of construction workers, as well as skilled professionals in welding and multiple related fields.

A new program, Go Build Tennessee, aims to help solidify a pipeline of new talent to lessen that crisis.

99. Judge weighs woman's request to quit Trump University suit -

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Tarla Makaeff has fought Donald Trump in court for six years. Now, as the Republican presidential front-runner and his lawyers try to portray the Southern California yoga instructor as the face of a federal class-action lawsuit against Trump University, she wants out.

100. Lovingly baked: Slice of heaven in Berry Hill -

Thick coffee and baked pie aromas mingling inside the tidy building signal I’ve found perfect refuge from the storms of life. All the damned snow. And then the cold rain. Waiting for the sun.