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Editorial Results (free)

1. Japan suspends new flight reservations as omicron spreads -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan continued its aggressive stance against a new coronavirus variant on Wednesday, asking international airlines to stop taking new reservations for all flights arriving in the country until the end of December in a further tightening of already strict border controls.

2. EU decides against emergency summit on omicron for now -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union has decided against holding a special remote summit of the bloc's leaders on the omicron coronavirus variant for the time being, an official said Wednesday.

The EU's 27 health ministers will first assess the situation next Tuesday before it will be put to the leaders in the Dec. 16 regularly planned summit, an EU official said on condition of anonymity because the meeting hadn't been officially announced.

3. Omicron unravels travel industry's plans for a comeback -

Tourism businesses that were just finding their footing after nearly two years of devastation wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic are being rattled again as countries throw up new barriers to travel in an effort to contain the omicron variant.

4. WHO warns that new virus variant poses 'very high' risk -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The World Health Organization says the global risk from the omicron variant of the coronavirus is "very high" based on early evidence, and it could lead to surges with "severe consequences."

5. COVID's 'not done with us': Nations rush to contain omicron -

BRUSSELS (AP) — Taking an act-now-ask-questions-later approach, countries around the world slammed their doors shut again to try to keep the new omicron variant at bay Monday as more cases of the mutant coronavirus emerged and scientists raced to figure out just how dangerous it might be.

6. WHO chief: Omicron shows need for global accord on pandemics -

GENEVA (AP) — The World Health Organization on Monday is pushing for an international accord to help prevent and fight future pandemics amid the emergence of a worrying new omicron COVID-19 variant.

7. Biden praises Canada, Mexico as leaders discuss strains -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Reviving three-way North American summitry after a five-year break, President Joe Biden on Thursday joined with the leaders of Canada and Mexico to declare their nations can work together and prove "democracies can deliver" even as they sort out differences on key issues.

8. Biden bill includes boost for union-made electric vehicles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden and Democrats in Congress are looking to give U.S. automakers with union employees the inside track on the burgeoning electric vehicle market, triggering vocal opposition from foreign trade partners and Republicans who worry that manufacturers in their home states will be placed at a competitive disadvantage.

9. Efforts to cut car, plane and ship emissions get small boost -

GLASGOW, Scotland (AP) — Several countries and companies announced plans Wednesday to stop selling cars that run on gasoline or diesel over the next two decades, as part of efforts to clamp down on a significant source of planet-warming emissions.

10. Railroads fight with unions in court over vaccine mandates -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Another major railroad has gone to court to determine whether it has the authority to require all its employees to get vaccinated against the coronavirus.

BNSF railroad filed a lawsuit Sunday against its major unions over its mandate. It joins Norfolk Southern and Union Pacific, which both filed similar lawsuits against the unions last month. The unions, which have filed some of their own lawsuits in response, argue that the railroads should have negotiated with them before imposing their mandates.

11. High court struggles with government secrets case -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court struggled Monday with whether to allow a lawsuit by Muslim men claiming religious bias by the FBI to go forward despite the government's objection that doing so could reveal national security secrets.

12. High court to hear secrets case over Muslim surveillance -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is preparing to hear a case about the government's ability to get lawsuits thrown out of court by claiming they would reveal secrets that threaten national security.

13. American plagued by major flight cancellations for 4th day -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines struggled to fix its operation but still canceled more than 350 flights on Monday as disruptions caused by staffing shortages at the big carrier continued for a fourth straight day.

14. An "eraser button?" Focused ideas could help bridle Big Tech -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Break up Big Tech? How about shrinking the tech companies' shield against liability in cases where the content they push to users causes harm? Or creating a new regulator to strictly oversee the industry?

15. Bradley adds East to real estate group -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has hired Van P. East III to the firm’s real estate practice group as a partner in the Nashville office.

East has extensive experience in commercial real estate, representing clients in purchasing, financing, leasing and selling commercial properties ranging from shopping centers to vacant land. He also works with clients on matters involving closely held business entities, including formations, conversions, mergers, acquisitions and dispositions, as well as restructuring ownership and control.

16. Tennessee lawmakers OK $900M Ford incentive package -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers on Wednesday committed to spending nearly $900 million on state incentives, infrastructure upgrades and more as part of a sweeping plan with Ford Motor Co. to build an electric vehicle and battery plant near Memphis.

17. Energy crunch hits global recovery as winter approaches -

Power shortages are turning out streetlights and shutting down factories in China. The poor in Brazil are choosing between paying for food or electricity. German corn and wheat farmers can't find fertilizer, made using natural gas. And fears are rising that Europe will have to ration electricity if it's a cold winter.

18. White House: LA port going 24/7 to ease shipping backlog -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House said Wednesday it has helped broker an agreement for the Port of Los Angeles to become a 24-hour, seven-days-a-week operation, part of an effort to relieve supply chain bottlenecks and move stranded container ships that are driving prices higher for U.S. consumers.

19. McGlinchey adds Schwegler to corporate law team -

Michael Schwegler has joined McGlinchey Stafford’s Nashville office where he will work in its national business corporate practice.

Schwegler has represented lenders, creditors and businesses in commercial and consumer lending transactions, consumer finance regulation and compliance, real estate, workouts, bankruptcy and commercial litigation matters.

20. Union jobs? Ford's plan for new EV factories raises question -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Ford's blockbuster announcement this week that it would build four sprawling new factories in Kentucky and Tennessee by 2025 and hire nearly 11,000 workers raised a big unanswered question: Just how good will those jobs be?

21. Ford to add 10,800 jobs in Tennessee, Kentucky for electrics -

GLENDALE, Ky. (AP) — Ford and a partner company say they plan to build three major electric-vehicle battery factories and an auto assembly plant by 2025 — a dramatic investment in the future of EV technology that will create an estimated 10,800 jobs and shift the automaker's future manufacturing footprint toward the South.

22. Supreme Court orders 'Remain in Mexico' policy reinstated -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court says the Biden administration likely violated federal law in trying to end a Trump-era program that forces people to wait in Mexico while seeking asylum in the U.S.

23. Top Davidson County commercial sales for July 2021 -

Top commercial real estate sales, July 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

24. Pandemic prompts changes in how future teachers are trained -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Before last year, a one-credit technology course for students pursuing master's degrees in education at the University of Washington wasn't seen as the program's most relevant. Then COVID-19 hit, schools plunged into remote learning, and suddenly material from that course was being infused into others.

25. European economy grows 2%, ending double-dip recession -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Europe emerged from a double-dip recession in the second quarter with stronger than expected growth of 2.0% over the quarter before, according to official figures released Friday, as restrictions eased, consumers started spending built-up savings and major companies showed stronger results.

26. Biden pushing federal workers — hard — to get vaccinated -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is announcing strict new testing, masking and distancing requirements for federal employees who can't — or won't — show they've been vaccinated against the coronavirus, aiming to boost sluggish vaccine rates among the millions of Americans who draw federal paychecks and to set an example for employers around the country.

27. Top Davidson County commercial sales for Q2 2021 -

Top commercial real estate sales, second quarter 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

28. Biden's 3rd trip to reddish Ohio pushes his economic agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden just can't quit Ohio — even if it rejected him in last year's election.

The Democrat travels to Cincinnati on Wednesday to push his economic policies. It's the third visit of his presidency to Ohio, the only state he lost that he has visited multiple times.

29. China's June exports surge 32%, import growth slows -

BEIJING (AP) — China's exports surged in June while import growth slowed to a still-robust level as its economic rebound from the coronavirus leveled off.

Exports rose 32.2% from a year earlier to $281.4 billion, accelerating from May's 28% growth, customs data showed Tuesday. Imports grew 36.7% to $229.9 billion, but that was down from the previous month's explosive 51% rise.

30. Pfizer to discuss COVID-19 vaccine booster with US officials -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pfizer says it plans to meet with top U.S. health officials Monday to discuss the drugmaker's request for federal authorization of a third dose of its COVID-19 vaccine as President Joe Biden's chief medical adviser acknowledged that "it is entirely conceivable, maybe likely" that booster shots will be needed.

31. New UAW president will face huge post-pandemic challenges -

DETROIT (AP) — Ray Curry is taking over leadership of the United Auto Workers perhaps the most critical juncture in the union's history.

The UAW's International Executive Board on Monday named Curry, its secretary-treasurer, as union president, replacing Rory Gamble, who retires on Wednesday.

32. Black Americans laud Juneteenth holiday, say more work ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Black Americans rejoiced after President Joe Biden made Juneteenth a federal holiday, but some said that, while they appreciated the recognition at a time of racial reckoning in America, more is needed to change policies that disadvantage too many of their brethren.

33. Biden to sign bill making Juneteenth a federal holiday -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed legislation Thursday establishing a new federal holiday commemorating the end of slavery, saying he believes it will go down as one of the greatest honors he has as president.
Biden signed into law a bill to make Juneteenth, or June 19, the 12th federal holiday. The House voted 415-14 on Wednesday to send the bill to Biden, while the Senate passed the bill unanimously the day before.
"This is a day of profound weight and profound power, a day in which we remember the moral stain, the terrible toll that slavery took on the country and continues to take," Biden said.
Juneteenth commemorates June 19, 1865, when Union soldiers brought the news of freedom to enslaved Black people in Galveston, Texas — two months after the Confederacy had surrendered. That was also about 2 1/2 years after the Emancipation Proclamation freed slaves in the Southern states.
It's the first new federal holiday since Martin Luther King Jr. Day was created in 1983.
The U.S. Office of Personnel Management, which is the human resources office for the federal government, tweeted Thursday that most federal employees will observe the new holiday — Juneteenth National Independence Day — on Friday since June 19 falls on a Saturday this year.
Biden noted the overwhelming support for the bill from lawmakers in both parties.
"I hope this is the beginning of a change in the way we deal with one another," Biden said.
The White House moved quickly after the House debated the bill and then voted for it.
"Our federal holidays are purposely few in number and recognize the most important milestones," said Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y. "I cannot think of a more important milestone to commemorate than the end of slavery in the United States."
Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, speaking next to a large poster of a Black man whose back bore massive scarring from being whipped, said she would be in Galveston on Saturday to celebrate along with Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas.
"Can you imagine?" said Jackson Lee. "I will be standing maybe taller than Sen. Cornyn, forgive me for that, because it will be such an elevation of joy."
The Senate passed the bill on Tuesday under a unanimous consent agreement that expedites the process for considering legislation. It takes just one senator's objection to block such agreements.
The vote comes as lawmakers struggle to overcome divisions on police reform legislation following the killing of George Floyd by police and as Republican state legislators push what experts say is an unprecedented number of bills aimed at restricting access to the ballot box. While Republicans say the goal is to prevent voter fraud, Democrats contend that the measures are aimed at undermining minority voting rights.
Several members of the Congressional Black Caucus went to the floor to speak in favor of the bill. Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman, D-N.J., said she viewed Juneteenth as a commemoration rather than a celebration because it represented something that was delayed in happening.
"It also reminds me of what we don't have today," she said. "And that is full access to justice, freedom and equality. All these are often in short supply as it relates to the Black community."
The bill was sponsored by Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass., and had 60 co-sponsors. Democratic leaders moved quickly to bring the bill to the House floor after the Senate's vote the day before.
Some Republican lawmakers opposed the effort. Rep. Matt Rosendale, R-Mont., said creating the federal holiday was an effort to celebrate "identity politics."
"Since I believe in treating everyone equally, regardless of race, and that we should be focused on what unites us rather than our differences, I will vote no," he said in a press release.
The vast majority of states recognize Juneteenth as a holiday or have an official observance of the day, and most states hold celebrations. Juneteenth is a paid holiday for state employees in Texas, New York, Virginia and Washington.
Rep. Clay Higgins, R-La., said he would vote for the bill and that he supported the establishment of a federal holiday, but he was upset that the name of the holiday included the word "independence" rather than "emancipation."
"Why would the Democrats want to politicize this by coopting the name of our sacred holiday of Independence Day?" Higgins asked.
Rep. Brenda Lawrence, D-Mich., replied, "I want to say to my white colleagues on the other side: Getting your independence from being enslaved in a country is different from a country getting independence to rule themselves."
She added, "We have a responsibility to teach every generation of Black and white Americans the pride of a people who have survived, endured and succeeded in these United States of America despite slavery."
The 14 House Republicans who voted against the bill are Andy Biggs of Arizona, Mo Brooks of Alabama, Andrew Clyde of Georgia, Scott DesJarlais of Tennessee, Paul Gosar of Arizona, Ronny Jackson of Texas, Doug LaMalfa of California, Thomas Massie of Kentucky, Tom McClintock of California, Ralph Norman of South Carolina, Mike Rogers of Alabama, Matt Rosendale of Montana, Chip Roy of Texas and Tom Tiffany of Wisconsin.

...

34. Lucky number: Biden is 13th US president to meet the queen -

LONDON (AP) — Imagine trying to make an impression on someone who's met, well, almost everyone.

Such is the challenge for President Joe Biden, who is set to sip tea with Queen Elizabeth II on Sunday at Windsor Castle after a Group of Seven leaders' summit in southwestern England.

35. Schumer recommending 2 voting rights lawyers to be judges -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate's top Democrat is recommending President Joe Biden nominate two prominent voting rights attorneys to serve as judges on the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and on the federal bench in Manhattan.

36. Chinese exports jump, gap with US grows as tensions persist -

BANGKOK (AP) — China's exports and imports surged in May and its politically sensitive surplus with the U.S. grew as the pandemic was waning in important markets in the West.

Customs data released Monday showed China's exports rose 28% from a year earlier and imports soared 51%, but growth was leveling off after the country's stunning recovery from the slump early in 2020.

37. Supreme Court throws abortion fight into center of midterms -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In agreeing to hear a potentially groundbreaking abortion case, the Supreme Court has energized activists on both sides of the long-running debate who are now girding to make abortion access a major issue in next year's midterm elections.

38. As GOP restricts voting, Democrats move to expand access -

Last year, for the first time in more than a quarter-century, Democrats in Virginia took control of the statehouse and the governor's mansion. Since then, one priority has become clear: expanding voting rights.

39. What insurrection? Growing number in GOP downplay Jan. 6 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — What insurrection?

Flouting all evidence and their own first-hand experience, a small but growing number of Republican lawmakers are propagating a false portrayal of the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, brazenly arguing that the rioters who used flagpoles as weapons, brutally beat police officers and chanted that they wanted to hang Vice President Mike Pence were somehow acting peacefully in their violent bid to overturn Joe Biden's election.

40. Immigration groups launch $50 million effort for citizenship -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A coalition of immigration advocacy groups is launching a $50 million effort aimed at defending President Joe Biden on immigration and pressuring lawmakers from both parties to pass a pathway to citizenship.

41. European countries scramble to tamp down latest virus surge -

BOCHNIA, Poland (AP) — European countries scrambled Monday to tamp down a surge in COVID-19 cases and ramp up vaccinations, hoping to spare hospitals from becoming overwhelmed by the pandemic's latest deadly wave of infections.

42. Biden boosts offshore wind energy, wants to power 10M homes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is moving to sharply increase offshore wind energy along the East Coast, saying Monday it is taking initial steps toward approving a huge wind farm off the New Jersey coast as part of an effort to generate electricity for more than 10 million homes nationwide by 2030.

43. Giant container ship that blocked Suez Canal is finally free -

SUEZ, Egypt (AP) — Salvage teams on Monday freed a colossal container ship stuck for nearly a week in the Suez Canal, ending a crisis that had clogged one of the world's most vital waterways and halted billions of dollars a day in maritime commerce.

44. Happy Monday? England embarks on major easing of lockdown -

LONDON (AP) — It's being dubbed Happy Monday, with open-air swimmers donning their wetsuits for the first time in months and rusty golfers doing their best to get their drives down the middle of the fairway.

45. EU sets out virus pass plan to allow free travel by summer -

BRUSSELS (AP) — With summer looming and tourism-reliant countries anxiously waiting for the return of a steady influx of tourism income amid the coronavirus pandemic, the European Union's executive body presented a proposal Wednesday that would allow European citizens and residents — vaccinated or not — to travel freely across the 27-nation region by the summer.

46. Labor movement targets Amazon as a foothold in the South -

BESSEMER, Ala. (AP) — The South has never been hospitable to organized labor. But that may be changing, with an important test in Alabama, where thousands of workers at an Amazon campus are deciding whether to form a union.

47. US still open to Iran nuclear talks after Iran's rejection -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration said Sunday it remains open to talks with Iran over the 2015 nuclear deal despite Tehran's rejection of an EU invitation to join a meeting with the U.S. and the other original participants in the agreement.

48. EU leaders seek to inject energy into slow vaccine rollout -

BRUSSELS (AP) — European Union leaders are gathering Thursday to try to inject new energy into the bloc's lagging coronavirus vaccination efforts as concern mounts that new variants might spread faster than authorities can adapt.

49. Rush Limbaugh, 'voice of American conservatism,' has died -

PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Rush Limbaugh, the talk radio host who ripped into liberals, foretold the rise of Donald Trump and laid waste to political correctness with a merry brand of malice that made him one of the most powerful voices on the American right, died Wednesday. He was 70.

50. Vaccine delays leave grocery workers feeling expendable -

As panicked Americans cleared supermarkets of toilet paper and food last spring, grocery employees gained recognition as among the most indispensable of the pandemic's front-line workers.

A year later, most of those workers are waiting their turn to receive COVID-19 vaccines, with little clarity about when that might happen.

51. Biden signs immigration orders as Congress awaits more -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed a second spate of orders to undo his predecessor's immigration policies, demonstrating the powers of the White House and its limitations without support from Congress.

52. Biden asks high court to put off wall, asylum cases -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration has asked the Supreme Court to put off arguments over two controversial Trump administration policies that have been challenged in court now that President Joe Biden has taken steps to unwind them.

53. Fiat Chrysler agrees to plead guilty, pay $30M in UAW probe -

DETROIT (AP) — Fiat Chrysler Automobiles US has agreed to plead guilty and pay a $30 million fine for a corruption scandal at the union that represents its factory workers, authorities said Wednesday.

54. 'At 6 p.m., life stops': Europe uses curfews to fight virus -

PARIS (AP) — As the wan winter sun sets over France's Champagne region, the countdown clock kicks in.

Laborers stop pruning the vines as the light fades at about 4:30 p.m., leaving them 90 minutes to come in from the cold, change out of their work clothes, hop in their cars and zoom home before a 6 p.m. coronavirus curfew.

55. Fauci: Vaccinations are increasing in a 'glimmer of hope' -

The U.S. ramped up COVID-19 vaccinations in the past few days after a slower-than-expected start, bringing the number of shots dispensed to about 4 million, government health officials said Sunday.

56. Breakthrough: UK and EU reach post-Brexit trade agreement -

BRUSSELS (AP) — Just a week before the deadline, Britain and the European Union struck a free-trade deal Thursday that should avert economic chaos on New Year's and bring a measure of certainty for businesses after years of Brexit turmoil.

57. Church vandalism exposes divisions over faith and politics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vandalism at four downtown Washington churches after rallies in support of President Donald Trump are exposing rifts among people of faith as the nation confronts bitter post-election political divisions.

58. Keep cool: Germany preps vaccine drive as COVID cases hit 1M -

TUTTLINGEN, Germany (AP) — Hulking gray boxes are rolling off the production line at a factory in the southern town of Tuttlingen, ready to be shipped to the front in the next phase of Germany's battle against the coronavirus as it became the latest country to hit the milestone of 1 million confirmed cases Friday.

59. Chartis buys Jarrard Phillips Cate & Hancock -

Jarrard Phillips Cate & Hancock, Inc., a Nashville-based communications and change management firm serving the health care industry, has been acquired by The Chartis Group of Chicago, a leading health care advisory and analytics firm.

60. Judge orders US to stop expelling children who cross border -

HOUSTON (AP) — A federal judge on Wednesday ordered the Trump administration to stop expelling immigrant children who cross the southern border alone, halting a policy that has resulted in thousands of rapid deportations of minors during the coronavirus pandemic.

61. Biden filling top White House team with campaign veterans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden announced a raft of top White House staff positions on Tuesday, drawing from the senior ranks of his campaign and some of his closest confidants to fill out an increasingly diverse White House leadership team.

62. UT Martin basketball coach found dead at 50 -

MARTIN (AP) — UT Martin basketball coach Anthony Stewart was found dead Sunday just before the start of his fifth season with the Skyhawks. He was 50.

"We are stunned to hear this tragic news," athletic director Kurt McGuffin said. "Coach Stewart was a true leader to every one of the young men he coached. He emphasized the meaning of a college degree and instilled professionalism in each of his student-athletes. We ask for privacy during this difficult time."

63. Civil War shaped Nashville's racial divide -

When it comes to talking about New Nashville and Old Nashville, historian David Ewing says many people new to the area might have a vision that only goes back 10 years even or 50 years. But the reality of it is Old Nashville goes back much longer than that.

64. 3 key Trump policies teed up for Supreme Court action -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Controversial Trump administration policies on the census, asylum seekers and the border wall, held illegal by lower courts, are on the Supreme Court's agenda Friday.

The most pressing case before the justices when they meet privately, and by telephone because of the coronavirus pandemic, involves the census. They are considering the Trump administration's appeal to be allowed to exclude people living in the U.S. illegally from the population count that will be used to allocate seats in the House of Representatives — and by extension the Electoral College — among the states for the next 10 years.

65. Virus surges in France, Marseille fights against closures -

MARSEILLE, France (AP) — Angry restaurant and bar owners demonstrated in Marseille on Friday to challenge a French government order to close all public venues as of Saturday to battle resurgent virus infections.

66. Trump praises QAnon conspiracists, appreciates support -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Wednesday praised the supporters of QAnon, a convoluted, pro-Trump conspiracy theory, and suggested he appreciates their support of his candidacy.

Speaking during a press conference at the White House, Trump courted the support of those who put stock in the conspiracy theory, saying, "I heard that these are people that love our country." It was Trump's first public comment on the subject and continued a pattern of president appearing unwilling to resoundingly condemn extremists who support his candidacy.

67. Mazda-Toyota boosts investment in Alabama plant by $830M -

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (AP) — Mazda Toyota Manufacturing, the new joint-venture between the two auto companies, on Thursday announced an additional $830 million investment in its new Alabama plant.

Gov. Kay Ivey said in a news release that the investment in the new auto facility is now $2.3 billion, up from the $1.6 billion originally announced in 2018. The additional money will be used to incorporate cutting edge manufacturing technologies into production lines and training for the 4,000 workers the plant is projected to eventually employ, the governor's office said.

68. Tennessee appeals court listens to school voucher arguments -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee continued to defend its school voucher program Wednesday, with attorneys asking a state appeals court to reverse a judge's ruling declaring the program illegal.

Davidson County Chancellor Anne C. Martin ruled in May that the school voucher law violated the Tennessee Constitution's "home rule," which says the Legislature can't pass measures singling out individual counties without local support.

69. John Lewis mourned as 'founding father' of 'better America' -

ATLANTA (AP) — John Lewis was celebrated as an American hero during his funeral Thursday as former President Barack Obama and others called on people to follow Lewis' example and fight injustice.

70. Stimulus package breaks new ground in European unity -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — European leaders took a historic step towards sharing financial burdens among the EU's 27 countries by agreeing to borrow and spend together to pull the economy out of the deep recession caused by the virus outbreak.

71. Disney delays Southern California theme park reopenings -

ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) — Disney is postponing the mid-July reopening of its Southern California theme parks until it receives guidelines from the state, the company announced Wednesday.

Disney had hoped to reopen Disneyland and Disney California Adventure in Anaheim on July 17 after a four-month closure due to the coronavirus. But the state has indicated it won't issue guidelines until after July 4, the company said.

72. TN high court won't take over Tennessee voucher lawsuit -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee's highest court declined Thursday to take up an appeal of a lawsuit challenging the legality of a school voucher program that would let parents use public tax dollars for private school tuition.

73. Tennessee asks high court to take over voucher lawsuit -

NASHVILLE (AP) — School voucher advocates are asking the Tennessee Supreme Court to take up the case of a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a program that would let parents use public tax dollars for private school tuition.

74. Europe reopens widely; China gives $2 billion to virus fight -

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Europe reopened more widely on Monday, allowing people into the Acropolis in Athens, shops in Italy, museums in Belgium, golf courses in Ireland and beer gardens in Bavaria. China announced it will give $2 billion to the fight against the coronavirus.

75. Judge blocks Tennessee from implementing voucher program -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee judge on Thursday blocked the state from implementing a contentious school voucher program just days after ruling the program unconstitutional.

The attorney general's office and school choice advocates had sought permission to continue processing applications while the legal battle over the state's voucher program — also known as education savings accounts — moves its way through the courts.

76. Store workers become enforcers of social distancing rules -

NEW YORK (AP) — Sandy Jensen's customer-service job at a Sam's Club in Fullerton, California, normally involves checking member ID cards at the door and answering questions. But the coronavirus has turned her into a kind of store sheriff.

77. In reversal, Lee says state no longer implementing vouchers -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Gov. Bill Lee's office announced Wednesday the state has hit pause on a new school voucher program, reversing course just a day after the Republican encouraged parents to apply despite a recent court declaring the program unconstitutional and unenforceable.

78. Tennessee seeks permission to continue voucher program -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee is seeking permission to continue implementing a new school voucher program just days after a judge deemed the law unconstitutional and unenforceable.

The request comes after Gov. Bill Lee raised eyebrows when he announced Tuesday that the state would continue to encourage parents to apply for the vouchers — also known as education savings accounts — despite the judge's order declaring the program "unconstitutional, unlawful and unenforceable."

79. Judge weighs Tennessee voucher program arguments -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee judge on Wednesday weighed a wide range of arguments surrounding the legal battle over the state's much-debated school voucher program, noting that she plans on making a decision soon to ensure parents have enough time to plan ahead for the 2020-21 school year.

80. Judge weighs Tennessee voucher program arguments -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee judge on Wednesday weighed a wide range of arguments surrounding the legal battle over the state's much-debated school voucher program, noting that she plans on making a decision soon to ensure parents have enough time to plan ahead for the 2020-21 school year.

81. Tennessee voucher program challenge heads to court Wednesday -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A push to block a new Tennessee education voucher program that would allow eligible families to use public tax dollars on private schooling tuition is headed for a court hearing Wednesday.

82. Hit hard by closures, Tennessee tourist spots eager to open -

MEMPHIS (AP) — Like other tourist spots in Tennessee, Casey Jones Village in Jackson has taken a financial hit since nonessential businesses closed in March as part of the response to the new coronavirus outbreak.

83. 26 million have sought US jobless aid in 4 weeks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 4.4 million laid-off workers applied for U.S. unemployment benefits last week as job cuts escalated across an economy that remains all but shut down, the  government said Thursday.

84. New Trump advisory groups to consult on reopening US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Tuesday that he's enlisting advisers from nearly all sectors of American commerce, the medical field and elected office to help shape his plans to reopen the coronavirus-battered economy.

85. Groups seek to block Tennessee school voucher implementation -

NASHVILLE (AP) — As Tennessee schools currently remain closed to help curb the spread of the new coronavirus, state officials are accepting applications for a new education voucher program that would allow eligible families to use public tax dollars on private tuition during the upcoming school year.

86. Scramble for virus supplies strains global solidarity -

ROME (AP) — San Marino needed medical masks. Badly.

The tiny republic, wedged next to two of Italy's hardest-hit provinces in the COVID-19 outbreak, had already registered 11 deaths by March 17 — a sizeable number in a country of just 33,000, and a harbinger of worse to come. So authorities sent off a bank transfer to a supplier in Lugano, Switzerland, to pay for a half-million masks, to be shared with Italian neighbors.

87. Outbreak: bankruptcies, layoffs, quiet skies and empty rails -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments on Thursday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

88. Virus forces Europeans to ask: How united do we want to be? -

BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — Europe's fractured union came under new pressure this weekend, as Italy and Spain pleaded for urgent European help to withstand the virus ordeal but Germany showed reluctance to plunge into any radical new solutions.

89. As outbreak blows up finances, EU nations balk at solidarity -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union is taking unprecedented action to help member countries endure the massive economic shock of the virus outbreak, but some nations are resisting the idea of shared borrowing to cover the heavy costs - suggesting that even during this crisis there are limits to solidarity in a bloc that is trying to reaffirm itself after Brexit.

90. World virus infections hit 200,000; Borders jammed in Europe -

BERLIN (AP) — Desperate travelers choked European border crossings on Wednesday after nations implemented strict controls in an attempt to slow the spread of the COVID-19 virus, creating traffic jams miles long and slowing the passage of trucks carrying critical supplies.

91. Judge: School choice advocates can intervene in voucher case -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee judge on Friday agreed to allow school choice advocates to intervene in a lawsuit challenging the legality of the state's school voucher program.

That means the Liberty Justice Center, the Institute for Justice and the Beacon Center of Tennessee will all have a chance to defend the much-debated voucher program as the case moves through the courts.

92. AP FACT CHECK: Trump hypes 'comeback,' impeachment acquittal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump says the world is witnessing a great American economic revival that he brought on by reversing course from the Obama years. Yet the economy is not so different from the robust one he inherited and disparages at every turn.

93. Tourism even locals can sink their teeth into -

Locals are accustomed to seeing tour buses slowly wind their way through Nashville, the guide pointing out where Dolly records when she’s in town or where Tammy Wynette lived.

But who’s in that small group of determined people resolutely marching down Broadway with a slightly peckish look on their faces? It’s the food tour people. They don’t care where country music stars hang out. They only have one question: What’s on the menu?

94. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's exaggerated 'great American comeback' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The "great American comeback" President Donald Trump claimed in his State of the Union speech drew on falsehoods about U.S. energy supremacy, health care and the economy as well as distortions about his predecessor's record.

95. Trump's economy: Solid and steady but vulnerable to threats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A portrait of a robust U.S. economy is sure to take center stage Tuesday night when President Donald Trump gives his third State of the Union address. It is an economy that has proved solid and durable, yet hasn't fulfilled many of Trump's promises.

96. Emails: Companies urged Lee to veto anti-LGBT adoption law -

NASHVILLE (AP) — As Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee's office sought to downplay potential consequences over an anti-LGBT adoption proposal, multiple big companies reached out to his administration warning the state's reputation would suffer if the Republican were to enact it.

97. Stocks give up early gains and end mixed on Wall Street -

Major U.S. stock indexes ended mixed Wednesday after an early rally powered by strong gains in technology companies faded in the final minutes of trading.

The wobbly finish left the benchmark S&P 500 with a 0.1% loss. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed with a gain of less than 0.1%, while the Nasdaq composite inched 0.1% higher. Bond prices rose, pulling yields lower.

98. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for 2019 -

Top commercial real estate sales, 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

99. Trump peace plan delights Israelis, enrages Palestinians -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump unveiled his long-awaited Middle East plan Tuesday, winning immediate praise from a beaming Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu but a swift rejection from the Palestinians, who called it "nonsense."

100. Tennessee governor signs anti-LGBT adoption bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee has become the latest state to assure continued taxpayer funding of faith-based foster care and adoption agencies even if those organizations exclude LGBT families and others based on religious beliefs.