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Editorial Results (free)

1. Kids and cars: Today's teens in no rush to start driving -

DETROIT (AP) — Michael Andretti has a 21-year-old son with zero interest in obtaining a driver's license. Rideshare apps get him where he wants to go.

In New Jersey, the 16-year-old daughter of a local short track racer took a five-minute driving lesson on a golf cart through their yard before turning over the keys. "That's it, I'm done. Don't like it," Kat Wilson told their father.

2. Mercedes sketches out all-electric scenario by decade's end -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Daimler AG's luxury car brand Mercedes-Benz says it is stepping up its transition to electric cars, doubling the share of sales planned by 2025 and sketching out a market scenario in which new car sales would "in essence" be fully electric by the end of the decade.

3. Ford, Argo AI to deploy autonomous vehicles on Lyft network -

DETROIT (AP) — Ford Motor Co. and a self-driving vehicle company it partly owns will join with the Lyft ride-hailing service to offer autonomous rides on the Lyft network.

4. Tennessee’s sports betting in decline -

Tennessee’s sports betting volume declined to its lowest level since the first month of legalized wagering in the state.

May’s modest month-over-month drop in wagering from April is an expected result during what is the traditional offseason for sports betting, and the decline is in line with a nationwide trend of declining revenue over the last two months, according to PlayTenn analysts, which tracks the Tennessee gaming market.

5. Tennessee continues to reel in new companies -

A couple of months into a season of reopening, Tennessee is faring well in terms of existing companies coming back online and the influx of new operators, says Bob Rolfe, commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

6. Rory Gamble, who led UAW through scandal, pandemic, retires -

DETROIT (AP) — Rory Gamble, a former Ford Motor Co. factory worker who led the United Auto Workers through one of the most turbulent periods in its history, is retiring effective June 30 after nearly a half-century of union membership.

7. VW, Ford unveil SUVs at China auto show under virus controls -

SHANGHAI (AP) — Volkswagen, Ford and Chinese brands unveiled new SUVs for China on Monday at the Shanghai auto show, the industry's biggest marketing event in a year overshadowed by the coronavirus pandemic.

8. US investigating possible air bag failures in GM vehicles -

DETROIT (AP) — The U.S. government's highway safety agency is investigating complaints that the air bags may not inflate in a crash on thousands of General Motors vehicles.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says the probe covers nearly 750,000 Chevrolet, Cadillac and GMC vehicles from the 2020 and 2021 model years. Most are full-size pickup trucks and SUVs.

9. Chip shortage forces more production cuts by GM -

DETROIT (AP) — The global shortage of semiconductors has forced General Motors to further cut production at six North American factories as chip supplies seem to be growing tighter.

The shutdowns likely will crimp dealer inventory of vehicles made at the plants, but GM says it has managed to keep factories humming that make hot-selling and very profitable full-size pickup trucks and SUVs.

10. Biofuels producers, farmers not sold on switch to electric -

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — The president and auto industry maintain the nation is on the cusp of a gigantic shift to electric vehicles and away from liquid-fueled cars, but biofuels producers and some of their supporters in Congress aren't buying it. They argue that now is the time to increase sales of ethanol and biodiesel, not abandon them.

11. BMW ramping up move into electric cars -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — German automaker BMW said Wednesday it intends to speed its rollout of new electric cars, vowing to bring battery-powered models to 50% of global sales by 2030. The company underlined the point by unveiling a new all-electric model three months ahead of plan.

12. Automakers embrace electric vehicles. But what about buyers? -

DETROIT (AP) — The world's major automakers have made something abundantly clear: They believe electric vehicles will dominate their industry in the years ahead.

Yet for that to happen, they'll need to sell the idea to people like Steve Bock.

13. 'Umbrella of stress' on GM staff, 2 years after plant closed -

When General Motors ended a half-century of building cars in Ohio's blue collar corner, 1,600 workers had to decide whether to accept the automaker's offer to move to another factory.

Those with enough seniority retired. A few started new careers. Everyone else from GM's shuttered assembly plant in Lordstown went as far away as Texas, Tennessee, and Missouri, some leaving behind their families so they could hang onto their pensions and high-paying union jobs.

14. Big comfort in GLS, Escalade, Navigator -

Among luxury SUVs, the Cadillac Escalade has long made no apologies about being big and brash. Now Cadillac has redesigned the Escalade for 2021 with a new look and an infusion of new technology. Do these updates make it the best large luxury SUV you can buy?

15. New or used? Price hikes squeeze US auto buyers either way -

FENTON TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) — The viral pandemic has triggered a cascade of price hikes throughout America's auto industry — a surge that has made both new and used vehicles unaffordable for many.

Prices of new vehicles far outpaced overall consumer inflation over the past year. In response, many buyers who were priced out of that market turned to used vehicles. Yet their demand proved so potent that used-vehicle prices soared even more than new ones did.

16. Autoworkers face uncertain future in an era of electric cars -

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — When General Motors boldly announced its goal last month to make only battery-powered vehicles by 2035, it didn't just mark a break with more than a century of making internal combustion engines. It also clouded the future for 50,000 GM workers whose skills — and jobs — could become obsolete far sooner than they knew.

17. Apple posts big quarter on fast sales start for iPhone 12 -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Apple's delayed launch of its latest iPhones unleashed a holiday buying frenzy that propelled sales of the trendsetting company's most popular product to its fastest start in years.

18. Five new trucks, SUVs to look forward to in ’21 -

Every new year ushers in a new batch of cars, trucks and SUVs from just about every automaker. Some of these new models create little more than passing interest, while others threaten to burn out the internet with hype.

19. High-flying Tesla stock takes a hit on 1st day in S&P 500 -

DETROIT (AP) — In the middle of last year, Tesla's losses were piling up, sales weren't enough to cover expenses and big debt payments loomed. The situation was so bad that one influential Wall Street analyst raised the possibility that Tesla wouldn't be able to pay its bills and would have to be restructured financially.

20. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's made-up car plants, court revisionism -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and his GOP allies are playing loose with the facts when it comes to a successor for the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Seeking to justify a possible confirmation vote before the Nov. 3 election, Trump asserted over the weekend that many high court nominations were made in an election year and "in all cases, they went forward." That's clearly not true.

21. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's torrent of falsehoods, Biden missteps -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Playing defense on his handling of the coronavirus, President Donald Trump is letting the falsehoods fly.

Over the weekend, he railed against cases of voting fraud that didn't exist, asserted that COVID-19 was "rounding a corner" despite what his top health advisers say and blasted Joe Biden for supposed positions on energy and health care that his Democratic rival doesn't hold.

22. More companies pledge to give workers time to vote -

A growing number of U.S. companies are pledging to give workers time off to vote in the presidential election this November, an effort that's gaining steam despite the government's reluctance to make Election Day a federal holiday.

23. More companies pledge to give workers time to vote -

A growing number of U.S. companies are pledging to give workers time off to vote in the presidential election this November, an effort that's gaining steam despite the government's reluctance to make Election Day a federal holiday.

24. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's baseless claim of 'deep state' at FDA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is leveling unfounded attacks on his Food and Drug Administration and distorting the science on effective treatments for COVID-19.

Heading this week into the Republican National Convention, he asserted that the agency is slow-walking vaccines and treatments for the coronavirus in a bid to undermine his November reelection effort. There's no evidence of that, and one of his former FDA commissioners on Sunday rejected the accusation as groundless.

25. Tesla's spent a year terrifying, electrifying Wall Street -

DETROIT (AP) — Tesla's losses were mounting last summer, massive debt payments were looming, and both Wall Street and federal regulators had run out of patience with the erratic behavior of CEO Elon Musk.

26. Amazon looks to self-driving future by acquiring Zoox -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon said Friday that it is buying self-driving technology company Zoox, which is developing an autonomous vehicle for a ride-hailing service that people would request on their phones.

27. Ford temporarily halts work at 2 plants; Rolls cuts jobs -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Wednesday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

28. Job cuts continue as financial aid lends support -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Wednesday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

29. Auto workers' tenuous return a ray of hope in jobs crisis -

DETROIT (AP) — Defying a wave of layoffs that has sent the U.S. job market into its worst catastrophe on record, at least one major industry is making a comeback: Tens of thousands of auto workers are returning to factories that have been shuttered since mid-March due to fears of spreading the coronavirus.

30. Reached the end of your lease? You have options during pandemic -

The coronavirus pandemic has significantly changed the way we live and conduct business in this country. Take, for instance, the act of terminating a vehicle lease.

Edmunds analysts had anticipated more than a million leased vehicles coming back to car dealerships this quarter. But due to countless shelter-in-place orders, many people will face the question of how to safely handle their vehicle’s lease return or whether they can return their vehicle at all.

31. With factories dark, GM profit slumps 88%; 2Q likely worse -

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors' first-quarter net income fell 88%, but it still managed to make $247 million despite the arrival of the global coronavirus pandemic.

U.S. automakers suspended production in much of the world in late March. For GM, that clipped revenue for the quarter by 6%, to $32.7 billion, but that's not as bad as industry analysts had been expecting.

32. Trump predicts 'spectacular' rebound as economy plunges -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Trying to dispel economic gloom, President Donald Trump said Thursday that he's anticipating a major rebound in the coming months and a "spectacular" 2021.

While economists are warning of serious long-term damage as the country plunges into recession because of the coronavirus, Trump is predicting a strong fourth quarter thanks to pent-up demand.

33. How to seek car payment relief during the pandemic -

Tens of millions of Americans have filed for unemployment benefits in the past few weeks as the coronavirus pandemic has taken hold in the U.S. and shut down business on a large scale. When people are struggling to keep up with their bills, they often prioritize their basic needs and move their car payment to the bottom of the list.

34. US 'wasted' months before preparing for coronavirus pandemic -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After the first alarms sounded in early January that an outbreak of a novel coronavirus in China might ignite a global pandemic, the Trump administration squandered nearly two months that could have been used to bolster the federal stockpile of critically needed medical supplies and equipment.

35. States demand ventilators as feds ration limited supply -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two weeks ago, the Pentagon promised to make as many as 2,000 military ventilators available as the federal government strains to contend with the coronavirus pandemic. As of Wednesday, less than half had been allocated, despite a desperate need across the country.

36. States demand ventilators as feds ration limited supply -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two weeks ago, the Pentagon promised to make as many as 2,000 military ventilators available as the federal government strains to contend with the coronavirus pandemic. As of Wednesday, less than half had been allocated, despite a desperate need across the country.

37. US manufacturing might vs virus; drinking at home -

The rapid spread of the coronavirus since it was first reported in China has dealt an unprecedented shock to the global economy. Here's a look at developments Tuesday as central banks, businesses and workers attempt to navigate a global outbreak that has brought economic activity to a standstill.

38. Trump's economic aid could approach $1T, senators say -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is asking Congress to unleash a torrent of emergency economic aid — including direct checks to Americans — an effort unseen since the Great Recession to shore up households and the economy amid the coronavirus crisis.

39. White House seeks $850B economic stimulus amid virus crisis -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House is proposing a roughly $850 billion economic rescue package Tuesday amid the coronaviru s outbreak, a sweeping stimulus for businesses and taxpayers unseen since the Great Recession of 2008.

40. Economic toll of virus goes global and hits close to home -

Seven weeks after the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed in the U.S., the spread of the virus that causes the disease has done widespread damage to critical economic sectors in the country.

Airlines are cutting capacity, people are working from home, major public events that raise millions of dollars for local communities have been cancelled, including this year's St. Patrick's Day parade in Boston. The Associated Press is publishing a running tally of the affects of the coronavirus on people, businesses, and the economy.

41. China's virus outbreak weighs on global business -

BEIJING (AP) — Global business is catching a chill from China's virus outbreak. Mink breeders in Denmark called off a fur auction because Chinese buyers can't attend due to travel curbs imposed to contain the disease.

42. Trump's economy: Solid and steady but vulnerable to threats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A portrait of a robust U.S. economy is sure to take center stage Tuesday night when President Donald Trump gives his third State of the Union address. It is an economy that has proved solid and durable, yet hasn't fulfilled many of Trump's promises.

43. Tesla passes $100 billion, teeing up big payout for Musk -

DETROIT (AP) — The meteoric rise of Tesla shares that pushed the company's value over $100 billion could turn into a supercharged payday for CEO Elon Musk.

Stock in Tesla Inc. rose another 6.3% Wednesday, pushing the market value of the electric vehicle and solar panel maker past a critical milestone in Musk's pay package. He could get stock options that are worth stock option package that's worth close to $400 million.

44. US trade deficit falls 8.2% to $43.1B in November -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit fell in November to the lowest level in more than three years as U.S. exports rose while imports declined, putting the country on track to see the first annual decline in the trade deficit in six years.

45. Orders for big-ticket manufactured goods slide 2% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Orders to U.S. factories for big-ticket manufactured goods fell by the largest amount in six months, led by a large decrease in orders for defense aircraft and parts. A closely watched category that tracks business investment ticked up 0.1%.

46. Amid climate change concern, GM rolls out big new Chevy SUVs -

MILFORD, Mich. (AP) — Global concerns about climate change are not stopping General Motors from making large SUVs for U.S. drivers.

GM on Tuesday rolled out the next generation of its big truck-based SUVs with more space and features. They're also heavier with only a small improvement in gas mileage.

47. Housing ‘silver tsunami’ will see smaller impact here -

A newly released analysis by Zillow predicts a flood of homes will come on the market in the next 20 years as Baby Boomers age, creating a ‘silver tsunami’ of available houses.

Seniors 60 or older who will leave 920,000 owner-occupied homes between 2017 and 2027 and from 1.17 million per year 2027-2037.

48. Ford Mustang SUV starts a blitz of new electric vehicles -

DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) — Ford is unveiling its first all-electric SUV, marking the start of an avalanche of battery-powered vehicles coming from mainstream and luxury automakers during the next two years that industry analysts say will boost electric vehicle sales.

49. Autoworkers from closed plants fight new GM contract -

DETROIT (AP) — If they can close our plant, they can close yours, too. That's the message from workers at three shuttered General Motors factories that didn't get new products under the tentative contract agreement reached last week between GM and the United Auto Workers, who have been on strike against the company across the U.S. for over six weeks now.

50. GM workers to stay on picket line until vote on new contract -

DETROIT (AP) — Striking General Motors workers will stay on the picket lines for at least another week until they vote on a tentative contract with the company.

Factory-level officials from the United Auto Workers union voted to recommend the agreement to members at a daylong meeting in Detroit Thursday. But they also voted not to return to factories unless members approve the deal.

51. GM strike pushed US factory output down 0.5% in September -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. factory output slumped 0.5% in September, as a strike at General Motors caused a steep decline in auto production amid broader struggles for manufacturers.

The Federal Reserve said Tuesday that manufacturing production has fallen 0.9% over the past 12 months, a reflection of the disruptions and uncertainties caused by the U.S.-China trade war. The figures showed some stability, however, as factory output increased during the recently ended third quarter after having declined for the first six months of the year.

52. Fed survey: US economy being hurt by trade battles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy was expanding at a modest pace in September and into October despite the fact manufacturing was being hurt by rising trade tensions and weaker global growth while adverse weather was affecting farmers.

53. GM workers worry about paying bills as strike continues -

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — Nearly four weeks into the United Auto Workers' strike against General Motors, employees are starting to feel the pinch of going without their regular paychecks.

They're scaling back at the grocery, giving up on eating at restaurants and some are taking on part-time jobs while trying to get by on weekly strike pay of $250.

54. GM workers worry about paying bills as strike continues -

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — Nearly four weeks into the United Auto Workers' strike against General Motors, employees are starting to feel the pinch of going without their regular paychecks.

They're scaling back at the grocery, giving up on eating at restaurants and some are taking on part-time jobs while trying to get by on weekly strike pay of $250.

55. Survey: Businesses added just 135,000 jobs in September -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. companies added a modest 135,000 jobs in September, a private survey found, a sign that hiring is slowing as the trade war takes a toll on the economy and employers grow cautious.

56. Go big! Heavy-duty pickups get more style, power -

Until recently, heavy-duty trucks have been the reserve of ranchers, horse owners and your neighbor who owns a paving company – tough trucks for people who do tough work.

But the latest heavy-duty pickups deliver new heights of towing and hauling performance while also offering as many high-end features as a luxury sedan.

57. UAW strike could cost GM about $1 billion - and counting -

DETROIT (AP) — The 16-day strike by auto workers has cost General Motors about $1 billion according to at least one estimate, while a parts shortage forced the company to close pickup truck and transmission plants in Mexico.

58. GM electric car push could mean fewer and lower paying jobs -

DETROIT (AP) — If U.S. consumers ever ditch fuel burners for electric vehicles, then the United Auto Workers union is in trouble.

Gone would be thousands of jobs at engine and transmission plants across the industrial Midwest, replaced by smaller workforces at squeaky-clean mostly automated factories that mix up chemicals to make batteries.

59. UAW strike puts Trump, GOP in political bind in key states -

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Democrats were quick to back working-class United Auto Workers in their strike against General Motors, delivering doughnuts and holding picket signs outside factories to show solidarity. It's a union they long have aligned with politically.

60. AP FACT CHECK: Trump team distortions on fuel economy rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and his team are distorting the facts in explaining the administration's decision to stop California from setting its own emission standards for cars and trucks.

61. VW, Ford broaden alliance to autonomous, electric vehicles -

NEW YORK (AP) — Volkswagen will sink $2.6 billion into a Pittsburgh autonomous vehicle company that's mostly owned by Ford as part of a broader partnership on electric and self-driving vehicles, the companies confirmed Friday.

62. Lee Iacocca, engineer of Chrysler's turnaround, dies at 94 -

DETROIT (AP) — Lee Iacocca, the auto executive and master pitchman who put the Mustang in Ford's lineup in the 1960s and became a corporate folk hero when he resurrected Chrysler 20 years later, has died in Bel Air, California. He was 94.

63. Ford restructuring to cost 12,000 jobs in Europe -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Carmaker Ford said Thursday it is shedding 12,000 jobs in Europe to increase profitability, part of a global trend of cost cuts by automakers facing shifting consumer tastes and heavy investments in electric cars.

64. Ford restructuring to cost 12,000 jobs in Europe -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Carmaker Ford said Thursday it is shedding 12,000 jobs in Europe to increase profitability, part of a global trend of cost cuts by automakers facing shifting consumer tastes and heavy investments in electric cars.

65. AP FACT CHECK: Trump fudges facts on economy, 2020 voting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An eye toward his 2020 campaign, President Donald Trump is turning to a familiar playbook of exaggerated boasts about economic performance and overdrawn complaints about a race tilted against him.

66. Discontinued car models offer value – with a price -

Model year 2019 marks the end of the line for some notable Ford and General Motors sedans. As a result, dealers will be slashing prices to try to move these discontinued models out of their inventory.

67. Construction begins on Element by Westin -

Noble Investment Group has broken ground on the Element by Westin Nashville. The West End hotel will be the brand’s debut in Nashville and will open in 2020. The upscale, lifestyle hotel will be a part of the 19-acre mixed-use development oneC1TY at Charlotte Avenue and 28th Avenue North.

68. Renault delays decision on Fiat Chrysler marriage proposal -

PARIS (AP) — Renault has delayed a decision on whether to merge with Fiat Chrysler, a deal that could reshape the global auto industry as carmakers race to make electric and autonomous vehicles for the masses.

69. Trump lifts tariffs on Mexico, Canada, delays auto tariffs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bogged down in a sprawling trade dispute with U.S. rival China, President Donald Trump took steps Friday to ease tensions with America's allies — lifting import taxes on Canadian and Mexican steel and aluminum and delaying auto tariffs that would have hurt Japan and Europe.

70. US stocks extend gains after recovering from early slide -

Stocks reversed an early slide on Wall Street and finished broadly higher Wednesday, giving the market its second straight gain in a week of bumpy trading.

Big technology and communications companies, including Microsoft, Apple and Google parent Alphabet, led the rally as the market shrugged off an initial stumble. Banks took heavy losses following a sharp drop in bond yields.

71. Uber, Lyft losses keep competitors at bay -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A fare war between Uber and Lyft has led to billions of dollars in losses for both ride-hailing companies as they fight for passengers and drivers.

But in one way it has been good for investors who snatched up the newly public companies' stock: The losses have scared off the competition, giving the leaders a duopoly in almost every American city.

72. Sleek new SUVs dominate reveals at New York auto show -

Auto shows may be waning in importance as companies find other ways to introduce new products, but the New York International Auto Show still has a healthy list of new vehicle debuts.

In keeping with the dramatic shift from cars to sport utilities, most of the new models are SUVs.

73. Hiring rebounds as US employers add a solid 196,000 jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hiring rebounded in March as U.S. employers added a solid 196,000 jobs, up sharply from February's scant gain and evidence that many businesses still want to hire despite signs that the economy is slowing.

74. Ride-hailing giants face bumpy road to profitability -

NEW YORK (AP) — Ride-hailing giants Uber and Lyft have redefined what we expect from transportation, hooking customers on the immediacy of on-demand rides with a few clicks on a smartphone.

But whether the companies can turn their popularity into profits is a question investors are asking as both companies prepare to offer shares to the public.

75. Heavy duty: Detroit 3 all roll out biggest pickups this year -

DETROIT (AP) — Nicole Foster-Beck asks a lot of the heavy-duty pickup truck she uses on her 43-acre horse farm east of Dallas.

Aside from the daily hauling, her 2015 GMC Sierra has to be powerful enough to pull a heavy eight-horse trailer to competitions, yet cushy enough to keep people comfortable on trips as far away as Kentucky.

76. Ford and Cadillac SUVs, Toyota sports car star at auto show -

DETROIT (AP) — SUVs and a big pickup truck will get top billing at Detroit's auto show this year, but there are some surprise sports cars and electric vehicles on the agenda.

Press days for the show begin Monday, although there are a couple of unveils set for before the show starts

77. Detroit show has SUVs, horsepower, but electric cars are few -

DETROIT (AP) — Automakers have promised to start selling hordes of electric cars in the next few years, but only two will be unveiled at the big Detroit auto show that kicks off this week — and those aren't even ready for production.

78. US stocks drift in a quiet close to another winning week -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock indexes nestled a hair lower on Friday after the falling price of oil weighed on energy companies, but the S&P 500 nevertheless closed out its third straight winning week following a brutal stretch in December.

79. Ford revamps Explorer SUV for 1st time since 2011 model year -

DETROIT (AP) — Ford's aging Explorer big SUV is getting a major revamp as it faces growing competition in the market for family haulers with three rows of seats.

The company unveiled the new version Wednesday night at Ford Field, home of the NFL's Detroit Lions. It comes just before next week's press days at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, where the new SUV will be on display.

80. GM says it has 2,700 jobs for workers, some in Spring Hill -

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors' plans to lay off 14,000 salaried and blue-collar workers might not be as bad as originally projected.

The company said Friday that 2,700 out of the 3,300 U.S. factory jobs slated for elimination will now be saved. Blue-collar workers will still lose jobs at four U.S. plants slated for closure next year, but most will be able to find employment at eight other GM factories where jobs are being added. Some would have to relocate.

81. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's mangled truths on Russia probe, Cohen -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump can't seem to get his facts straight when it comes to the Russia investigation.

Facing pressure as his former advisers are caught lying by special counsel Robert Mueller, Trump is launching fresh attacks on the probe as politically biased and Mueller as hopelessly "conflicted." This runs counter to ethics experts in Trump's Justice Department who concluded that Mueller — a Republican — could fairly lead the probe into possible coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 election.

82. AP FACT CHECK: Entire Trump tweet on immigrant aid is wrong -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is spreading a false claim from supporters that people who are in the United States illegally receive more in federal assistance than the average American gets in Social Security benefits.

83. Trump warns GM could lose subsidies over layoffs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Tuesday that he was "very disappointed" that General Motors was closing plants in the United States and warned that the White House was "now looking at cutting all GM subsidies," including for its electric cars program.

84. GM slashes thousands of jobs in tech shift -

DETROIT (AP) — Even though unemployment is low, the economy is growing and U.S. auto sales are near historic highs, General Motors is cutting thousands of jobs in a major restructuring aimed at generating cash to spend on innovation.

85. GM to lay off up to 14K workers, close as many as 5 plants -

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors will cut up to 14,000 workers in North America and put five plants up for possible closure as it abandons many of its car models and restructures to focus more on autonomous and electric vehicles, the automaker announced Monday.

86. US brands falter in Consumer Reports auto reliability survey -

DETROIT (AP) — U.S. auto companies such as General Motors, Tesla and Ford faltered this year in Consumer Reports' reliability rankings as readers reported more mechanical trouble and fewer problems with infotainment systems.

87. Tech stock rally helps snap losing streak as rough week ends -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rebounded Friday, clawing back some of the week's steep losses, but the turbulent trading of the last few days left no doubt that the relative calm the markets enjoyed all summer had been shattered.

88. Automakers seek flexibility at hearing on mileage standards -

DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) — Automakers sought flexibility while environmental groups blasted the Trump administration's proposal to roll back fuel economy standards at a public hearing on the plan in the industry's backyard.

89. 2019 highlights: Notable new cars hitting showrooms -

The 2019-model-year vehicles are hitting dealerships right now. Trucks are a big deal, and new and improved full-size pickups from General Motors and Ram will offer buyers a bumper crop of choices.

90. Dueling pickups, popular SUV among new models coming in 2019 -

DETROIT (AP) — From new top-selling pickup trucks to an essential range extension for an electric car to the most popular SUV in the country, the 2019 model year for new vehicles has something for everyone.

91. PSA succeeds where GM failed: making Opel profitable -

PARIS (AP) — PSA Group, the maker of Peugeot and Citroen cars, is doing what General Motors failed to do in 20 years: make the mass market brands Opel Vauxhall profitable.

The French company, which bought Opel Vauxhall from GM last year, said Tuesday that the unit made an operating profit of 502 million euros ($588 million) in the first six months of the year. Under GM, the brands lost $20 billion since last making a full-year profit in 1999.

92. Auto industry cries foul as Trump moves toward car tariffs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Having started a trade war with China and enraged U.S. allies with steel tariffs, President Donald Trump is primed for his next fight. He is targeting a product at the heart of the American experience: cars.

93. Tesla Model 3 buyers lose patience and maybe tax credits -

DETROIT (AP) — In March of 2016, Keith Reynolds flew from California to Atlanta so he could claim his spot in line at 4 a.m., and get a three-hour head start on his West Coast competitors.

Tesla was taking $1,000 deposits for its new electric car, the Model 3, priced starting at $35,000. And Reynolds had to have one. He managed to land near the top of the waiting list.

94. US added 213,000 jobs in June; unemployment rose to 4 pct. -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers kept up a brisk hiring pace in June by adding 213,000 jobs, a sign of confidence in the economy despite the start of a potentially punishing trade war with China.

95. US stocks tick higher, but trade worries stop an early rally -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks finished mostly higher Friday, but they surrendered most of an early gain as worries about rising tariffs once again dampened investors' enthusiasm as the second quarter came to an end.

96. Trump tells world's top automakers to build more cars in US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump told leaders of the world's top automakers on Friday that he wants to see more cars built in the United States as his administration weighs plans to reduce gas mileage and pollution requirements enacted during the Obama administration.

97. Auto executives to meet with Trump on gas mileage standards -

Executives from 10 auto companies will meet with President Donald Trump and cabinet officials on Friday to discuss the administration's plan to reduce gas mileage and pollution requirements enacted during the Obama administration.

98. AP Exclusive: Transport safety rules sidelined under Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — On a clear, dry June evening in 2015, cars and trucks rolled slowly in a herky-jerky backup ahead of an Interstate 75 construction zone in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Barreling toward them: an 18-ton tractor-trailer going about 80 mph.

99. Before buying used car, consider luxury alternative -

Most car shoppers know that a used car can be a fantastic value. In the long run, a used car will usually cost less than a new one and will virtually always be cheaper than leasing a car every three years.

100. European car sales at highest level in 10 years -

MILAN (AP) — Car sales in Europe topped the 15-million mark for the first time in a decade in 2017, the fourth straight year of higher registrations, the association of European carmakers said Wednesday.