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Editorial Results (free)

1. President's windmill hatred is a worry for booming industry -

BLOCK ISLAND, R.I. (AP) — The winds are blowing fair for America's wind power industry, making it one of the fastest-growing U.S. energy sources.

Land-based turbines are rising by the thousands across America, from the remote Texas plains to farm towns of Iowa. And the U.S. wind boom now is expanding offshore, with big corporations planning $70 billion in investment for the country's first utility-scale offshore wind farms.

2. Feds charge 2 dozen in billion dollar Medicare brace scam -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal agents on Tuesday broke up a billion dollar Medicare scam that peddled unneeded orthopedic braces to hundreds of thousands of seniors. Two dozen people were charged, including doctors accused of writing bogus prescriptions.

3. Ex-Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort guilty of 8 charges -

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) — Paul Manafort, the longtime political operative who for months led Donald Trump's winning presidential campaign, was found guilty of eight financial crimes Tuesday in the first trial victory of the special counsel investigation into the president's associates.

4. What does Mueller have? Manafort trial offers glimpse -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The trial of President Donald Trump's onetime campaign chairman will open this week with tales of lavish spending, secret shell companies and millions of dollars of Ukrainian money flowing through offshore bank accounts and into the political consultant's pocket.

5. Report: Commerce secretary Ross has stake in firm tied to Putin orbit -

NEW YORK (AP) — Newly leaked documents show that Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, the Trump administration's point man on trade and manufacturing policy, has a stake in a company that does business with a gas producer partly owned by the son-in-law of Russian President Vladimir Putin.

6. Warming Arctic spurs battles for riches, shipping routes -

LANCASTER SOUND, Nunavut (AP) — From a distance, the northern shores of Baffin Island in the Arctic appear barren — a craggy world of snow-capped peaks and glaciers surrounded by a sea of floating ice even in the midst of summer.

7. AP Exclusive: US probing banking of ex-Trump campaign chief -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. Treasury Department agents have recently obtained information about offshore financial transactions involving President Donald Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, as part of a federal anti-corruption probe into his work in Eastern Europe, The Associated Press has learned.

8. Panama Papers database of offshore companies goes live -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — A group of investigative journalists on Monday published the names of thousands of offshore companies at the heart of a massive trove of data on the finances of the rich and powerful that has become known as the Panama Papers.

9. Why few Americans in Panama Papers? Lawyer doesn't want them -

PANAMA CITY (AP) — Rich and influential people around the globe have found themselves under siege since a major data leak revealed their ties to secretive financial accounts and shell companies in low-tax havens used to hide wealth.

10. EU threatens to sanction tax havens like Panama -

BERLIN (AP) — The European Union has threatened to sanction countries like Panama if they continue to refuse to cooperate fully to fight money laundering and tax evasion, after a leak of data showed the tiny country remains a key destination for people who want to hide money.

11. Offshore accounts are for more than laundering money -

Offshore accounts conjure images of bad behavior by the rich and shady, and for good reason: they have been used to dodge taxes, fund organized crime and facilitate corruption. But many people use offshore accounts for more than just hiding bribes and laundering money.

12. German paper says it won't publish all offshore files -

BERLIN (AP) — The German newspaper that first obtained the so-called Panama Papers, a vast trove of documents on offshore companies, said Thursday that it won't publish all the files, arguing that not all are of public interest.

13. Politicians, celebs deny abuse of offshore accounts -

BERLIN (AP) — The president of Ukraine became the latest prominent politician to deny wrongdoing Wednesday after his name was linked to secretive offshore accounts arranged by a Panama law firm.

The revelations have raised suspicion that such offshore entities were set up to avoid taxes, but Petro Poroshenko denied that was the purpose in his case. Rather, he said, it was necessary to create an offshore holding company to put his candy business in a blind trust when he became president of Ukraine in 2014.

14. A look at offshore accounts used to hide wealth, avoid taxes -

TOKYO (AP) — Privacy has a price. For the super-wealthy, it can also have a big payoff.

The use of offshore accounts and favorable laws in certain countries can allow rich individuals and families to keep their money hidden from the eyes of tax authorities, regulators and others in their home country.

15. Panama rejects money-launder label following documents leak -

PANAMA CITY (AP) — Panamanians have long shrugged off their country's checkered reputation as a financial haven for drug lords, tax dodgers and corrupt oligarchs. If they're crooks, they've learned from the world's wealthy nations, they like to joke.

16. A look at offshore accounts used to hide wealth, avoid taxes -

TOKYO (AP) — An investigation published by an international coalition of more than 100 media outlets, based on 11.5 million records of offshore holdings, details how politicians, celebrities and other famous people use banks, law firms and offshore shell companies to hide their assets.

17. Trove of data on offshore accounts prompts probe, questions -

BERLIN (AP) — The release of a vast trove of documents and data on offshore financial dealings of wealthy, famous and powerful people around the world is raising questions over the widespread use of such tactics to avoid taxes and skirt financial oversight.

18. Shell move dims oil prospects, delights environmentalists -

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Royal Dutch Shell has abandoned its long quest to become the first company to produce oil in Alaska's Arctic waters, darkening the nation's long-term oil prospects and delighting environmental groups that tried to block the project.

19. Shell president: 'Oil will be required for a long time' -

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The president of Shell Oil Co. said exploratory drilling off Alaska's northwest coast is going well despite stormy weather last week that caused the company to halt operations for a few days.

20. Shell to cut jobs to cope with long period of cheap oil -

LONDON (AP) — Royal Dutch Shell announced deep cuts to jobs and investment on Thursday as the global energy giant prepares for a prolonged period of low oil prices.

Shell expects to eliminate 6,500 staff and contractor positions this year as it seeks to reduce operating costs by 10 percent, the Netherlands-based company said Thursday. The company also plans to reduce capital investment by $7 billion, or 20 percent.

21. Shell clears major US government hurdle for Arctic drilling -

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Royal Dutch Shell's Arctic drilling program has cleared a major bureaucratic hurdle to begin drilling for oil and gas off Alaska's northwestern coast this summer.

The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management on Monday approved the multi-year exploration plan in the Chukchi Sea for Shell after reviewing thousands of comments from the public, Alaska Native organizations and state and federal agencies.

22. Groups want review of Shell's Arctic regulatory filings -

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Two groups petitioned the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday for an investigation of Royal Dutch Shell PLC and what the groups call misstatements in regulatory filings regarding the risk of a catastrophic oil spill from Arctic offshore drilling.

23. Shell's $70 billion takeover could herald wave of mergers -

LONDON (AP) — Oil and gas company Shell has agreed to buy British rival BG Group for 47 billion pounds ($69.7 billion) in cash and stock, in a deal that may signal a new wave of mega-mergers as the energy industry tries to adapt to lower prices.

24. Exxon CEO talks Arctic oil drilling, risks, lessons -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Arctic is the next great frontier for oil and gas — and one of the most environmentally fragile places on earth.

An Energy Department advisory council study adopted last week said the U.S. should start exploring for oil and gas in the Arctic soon in order to feed future demand, and that the industry is ready to safely exploit the Arctic's huge reserves, despite recent mishaps.

25. Shell to stop drilling in Alaska in 2014 -

AMSTERDAM (AP) — Shell, Europe's largest oil company, will stop drilling for oil in Alaska this year as it cuts back on investments and tries to reverse a steep drop in earnings.

Incoming CEO Ben van Beurden said Royal Dutch Shell PLC will cut capital spending by around $10 billion this year and sell assets to become more efficient.

26. Congress members seek investigation of Shell barge -

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Members of Congress are calling for an investigation of Royal Dutch Shell PLC's Arctic offshore drilling operations as salvagers develop plans to move a company drill ship off rocks near an Alaska island, where it ran aground in a fierce year end storm.

27. No leaks detected from grounded Shell drill barge -

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — There's no indication of a fuel leak from a petroleum drilling vessel that ran aground on a remote Alaska island, the Coast Guard said of a maritime accident that has refueled debate over oil exploration in the U.S. Arctic Ocean.

28. BP sells some Gulf of Mexico assets for $5.55B -

LONDON (AP) — Oil company BP said Monday it is selling some deep-water assets in the Gulf Mexico to Plains Exploration & Production Co. for $5.55 billion, a big step in the BP's drive to cover the cost of its oil well blowout in the Gulf two years ago and concentrate investment elsewhere.

29. Oil price falls as crude supply rises -

Oil prices fell Wednesday as U.S. supplies of crude rose for the first time in a month and finance ministers from industrialized nations pleaded with top producers to help lower crude prices and help the global economy.

30. Going offshore: Your money can live like a millionaire's -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Movie super spies James Bond and Jason Bourne use them. So do real-life presidential candidate Mitt Romney, who says he pays his taxes, and untold numbers of Americans who don't. Swiss banks and their secretive counterparts around the globe may sound like the exclusive province of the wealthy, the mysterious or the shady, but anybody can legally open an offshore account.

31. Obama to expand drilling off Alaska, in Gulf -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration cautiously offered up more areas in the Gulf of Mexico and off Alaska's coast to oil and gas drilling Tuesday but didn't go far enough to satisfy Republicans pushing to greatly expand drilling as a way to create jobs and wean the country off foreign oil.

32. Oil wavers on debt ceiling, tropical storm -

NEW YORK (AP) — Oil was lower Thursday afternoon, as traders waited to learn more about the possible impact of a tropical storm in the Gulf of Mexico, the wrangling over the debt ceiling in Washington and the debt crisis in Europe.