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Editorial Results (free)

1. Add rent to the rising costs bedeviling small businesses -

NEW YORK (AP) — The rent has come due for America's small businesses and at a very inopportune time.

Landlords were lenient about rent payments during the first two years of the pandemic. Now, many are asking for back rent, and some are raising the current rent as well. Meanwhile, most of the government aid programs that helped small businesses get through the pandemic have ended while inflation has sharply pushed up the cost of supplies, shipping, and labor.

2. Did corporate greed fuel inflation? It's not biggest culprit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Furious about surging prices at the gasoline station and the supermarket, many consumers feel they know just where to cast blame: On greedy companies that relentlessly jack up prices and pocket the profits.

3. Do you need a grad degree to compete right now? -

More U.S. workers than ever hold a graduate degree. Years of intensifying job requirements and headlines declaring a master’s “the new bachelor’s degree” nudged a record number of students into grad school.

4. Powell reinforces expectations of sharp rate hike next month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve must move faster than it has in the past to rein in high inflation, Chair Jerome Powell said Thursday, signaling that sharp interest rate increases are likely in the coming months, beginning at the Fed's next policy meeting in May.

5. Fed casting its inflation fight as battle against inequality -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the Federal Reserve intensifies its efforts to tame high inflation, its top officials are casting their aggressive drive in a new light: As a blow against economic inequality.

That thinking marks a sharp reversal from the conventional view of the Fed's use of interest rates. Normally, the steep rate hikes the Fed is planning for the coming months would be seen as a particular threat to disadvantaged and lower-income households. These groups are most likely to suffer if rate hikes weaken an economy, cause unemployment to rise and sometimes trigger a recession.

6. US inflation soared 7.9% in past year, a fresh 40-year high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Propelled by surging costs for gas, food and housing, consumer inflation jumped 7.9% over the past year, the sharpest spike since 1982 and likely only a harbinger of even higher prices to come.

7. Fed officials agree on a March rate hike but little else -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A worsening inflation picture has touched off a range of opinions from the Federal Reserve's policymakers about just how fast they should raise interest rates beginning at their next meeting in March.

8. US inflation jumped 7.5% in the past year, a 40-year high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation soared over the past year at its highest rate in four decades, hammering America's consumers, wiping out pay raises and reinforcing the Federal Reserve's decision to begin raising borrowing rates across the economy.

9. Buyers vie for fewer homes as listings decline -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Hoping to buy a home that fits your needs and budget in the next few weeks? You might want to settle in for a long search.

The inventory of homes for sale nationally dropped to its lowest level in more than two decades last month. And a snapshot of this month so far isn't encouraging, with the number of homes on the market running well below year-ago levels.

10. Fed to signal rate hike as it launches risky inflation fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With inflation punishing consumers and threatening the economy, the Federal Reserve this week will likely signal its intent to begin raising interest rates in March for the first time in three years. The Fed's challenges will get only harder from there.

11. Wells Fargo's $5.8 billion profit easily tops expectations -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Wells Fargo easily beat Wall Street expectations for the fourth quarter with interest rates beginning to take off, likely another boost for the nation's largest mortgage lender going forward.

12. Fed officials now seeing US job market near full recovery -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. job market is nearly at levels healthy enough that the central bank's low-interest rate policies are no longer needed, Federal Reserve officials concluded last month, according to minutes of the meeting released Wednesday.

13. Pressure on Fed's Powell is rising as inflation worsens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell surely expected to have some breathing room after taking the first step this month to dial back the Fed's emergency aid for the economy.

14. 'Burned out'? Why won't more women return to the job market? -

NEW YORK (AP) — There was a time when Naomi Peña could seemingly do it all: Work a full-time job and raise four children on her own.

But when the viral pandemic struck early last year, her personal challenges began to mount and she faced an aching decision: Her children or her job?

15. More COVID-19 shots, studies offer hope for US schools -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Officials offered new hope for the safety of U.S. schoolchildren threatened by COVID-19 on Friday as Gulf Coast hospitals already full of unvaccinated patients braced for the nightmare scenario of a major hurricane causing a wave of fractures, cuts and heart attacks without enough staff to treat the injured.

16. Rosengren: Fed should begin slowing stimulus efforts by fall -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston added his voice Monday to a growing number of people, inside and outside the Fed, who say the central bank should soon begin to dial back its extraordinary aid for an economy that is strongly recovering from the pandemic recession.

17. Wells Fargo beats expectations with $6 billion profit in 2Q -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Wells Fargo had its most profitable quarter in two years, easily beating Wall Street estimates as the global economy continues its rapid improvement in the wake of the virus pandemic.

18. Fed officials discuss timing of reducing bond purchases -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials began discussing at their meeting last month the mechanics of reducing their huge monthly bond purchases that are used to keep longer-term interest rates in check.

19. Fed survey: Economy rebounding, helped by stimulus, vaccines -

A Federal Reserve survey has found that the economy was rebounding in late February through early April, helped by billions of dollars in a new round of stimulus payments and the stepped-up rollout of coronavirus vaccines.

20. Wells Fargo earned $4.74 billion in Q1, topping estimates -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Wells Fargo had its best quarter in a year and a half, posting a profit of $4.74 billion and freeing up more than a billion dollars that had been set aside for potential loan defaults at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic.

21. Powell: Higher inflation temporary, no rate hikes in sight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell suggested Thursday that inflation will pick up in the coming months but that it would likely prove temporary and not enough for the Fed to alter its record-low interest rate policies.

22. Google antes up $2.6M to settle pay, job discrimination case -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Google will pay $2.6 million to more than 5,500 employees and past job applicants to resolve allegations that the internet giant discriminated against female engineers and Asians in California and Washington state.

23. California measure aims to pay off 80% of most unpaid rent -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California Gov. Gavin Newsom and the state's top two legislative leaders pledged Monday to pay off 80% of most people's unpaid rent that has piled up during the coronavirus pandemic — but only if landlords agree to forgive the other 20%.

24. California proposal would extend eviction rule through June -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California plans to extend eviction protections through the end of June while using federal money to pay off up to 80% of most tenants' unpaid rent, according to an agreement announced Monday between Gov. Gavin Newsom and the state's top two legislative leaders.

25. Biden inherits damaged economy, with signs of hope emerging -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has inherited a badly damaged economy pulverized by the pandemic, with 10 million fewer jobs than a year ago and as many as one in 6 small businesses shut down.

26. Restaurants to retailers, virus transformed business -

It would be just a temporary precaution. When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon – as soon as New York was safe again.

27. From restaurants to retailers, virus transformed economies -

NEW YORK (AP) — It would be just a temporary precaution.

When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon — as soon as New York was safe again.

28. Fed to weigh further options for aiding US economy in peril -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve's policymakers face an unusual conundrum as they meet this week: A short-term economic outlook that is worsening even while the longer-term picture is brightening thanks to the emergence of coronavirus vaccines.

29. Blockbuster IPO market still calls for cautious approach -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Wall Street has rolled out the welcome mat for companies going public this year, boosting proceeds from initial public offerings to the highest level in six years.

IPOs slowed sharply in the spring due to the pandemic, but they surged in the summer as the market recovered from a steep slump and rallied to new highs. And so far, betting on IPOs has paid off.

30. Blockbuster IPO market still calls for cautious approach -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Wall Street has rolled out the welcome mat for companies going public this year, boosting proceeds from initial public offerings to the highest level in six years.

IPOs slowed sharply in the spring due to the pandemic, but they surged in the summer as the market recovered from a steep slump and rallied to new highs. And so far, betting on IPOs has paid off.

31. Biden taps ex-Fed chair Yellen to lead treasury -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden has chosen former Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen to serve as treasury secretary, a pivotal role in which she would help shape and direct his economic policies, according to a person familiar with the transition plans.

32. Mnuchin denies trying to hinder incoming administration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin denied that he is attempting to limit the choices President-elect Joe Biden will have to promote an economic recovery by ending several emergency loan programs being run by the Federal Reserve.

33. Fed's Powell says virus spike threatens U.S. economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said Tuesday that the nationwide surge in confirmed coronavirus could slow the economy in the months ahead by discouraging consumers from spending.

34. Fed signals readiness to do more for economy as virus rages -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve kept its benchmark interest rate at a record low near zero Thursday and signaled its readiness to do more if needed to support an economy under threat from a worsening coronavirus pandemic.

35. Use COVID-19 crisis to build helpful money habits -

As millennials, we’ve learned about money the hard way. From the Great Recession to stratospheric student loan debt to a pandemic, there’s been no shortage of life giving us lemons.

While the long-term economic effects of the pandemic are yet to be fully realized, you may have noticed one positive trend in the short term: For once, your debt may have dropped.

36. Home prices climb to record in pandemic as buyers seek space -

NEW YORK (AP) — A renter most of his adult life, Clarence Swann became fearful that landlords would use the coronavirus pandemic as an excuse to gouge their tenants. So, with a desire to move near family, the retired veteran bought his first home last month at the age of 74.

37. Panic grocery buying slows; iPhone sales plummeted in March -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

38. Mortgage applications plunged 29.4% last week -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed as it continues to spread across the world. Here is a look at some of the latest developments Wednesday related to the global economy, particular economic sectors, and the workplace:

39. US manufacturing might vs virus; drinking at home -

The rapid spread of the coronavirus since it was first reported in China has dealt an unprecedented shock to the global economy. Here's a look at developments Tuesday as central banks, businesses and workers attempt to navigate a global outbreak that has brought economic activity to a standstill.

40. Govts pledge aid as global commerce seizes in face of virus -

Governments and central banks are scrambling to find ways to keep businesses from going bankrupt as the virus outbreak grinds the world economy to a halt.

A day after Wall Street endured its worst daily drop since the crash of 1987, European markets wavered, as did U.S futures markets. There is tremendous volatility, with the extent of economic damage from the pandemic still anyone's guess. Factories are closed, retail stores are closed, travel has ground almost to a halt and billions of people are sheltering at home, going outside only to find essential supplies.

41. Virus seizes markets; it's no longer business as usual -

Global markets and businesses big and small opened the week to a landscape seemingly altered by the coronavirus pandemic. National retail chains have closed all stores. Banks are taking steps to keep cash on hand, lots of it. Markets in Asia, Europe and the U.S. are plunging. Following is a quick look at how the outbreak is impacting the financial and business sector, as well as millions of workers and customers.

42. Market swings and a wave of cancellations as virus spreads -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Seven weeks after the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed in the U.S., the outbreak is now classified as a pandemic and it's doing widespread damage to critical economic sectors of the global economy.

43. Wall Street circuit breakers trip ... markets, crude plunge -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. companies buffeted by supply chain chaos and a growing awareness of the scope of a viral outbreak are facing new threats to begin the week. An oil war between Saudi Arabia and Russia sent the price for a barrel of U.S. crude below $34.

44. Economic toll of outbreak deepens, duration remains unknown -

The Dow over the past five days: up 1,293, down 786, up 1,173, down 967. The Dow tumbled 800 points at the opening bell Friday. The VIX, an index known as Wall Street's fear barometer, is hovering at levels not seen since banks began to fall during the financial crisis.

45. Fed survey finds coronavirus impacting parts of US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve's latest nationwide survey of business conditions has found that the coronavirus outbreak has begun to impact tourism and disrupt manufacturing chains in parts of the United States.

46. Millennials are defying stereotypes with finances -

Read almost any article about millennials and you’ll come away with the distinct impression that this generation is royally screwing up.

That they’re suffocated by student debt. That they spend frivolously. And that they’re behind on everything from owning a home to starting a family.

47. Zuckerberg defends Facebook's currency plans before Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg endured hours of prickly questioning from lawmakers Wednesday as he defended the company's new globally ambitious project to create a digital currency while also dealing with widening scrutiny from U.S. regulators.

48. Wells Fargo appoints Scharf, Wall Street cheers -

Wells Fargo named its third CEO in as many years as the bank attempts to put behind it a series of recent scandals.

Wells Fargo said Friday that Charles Scharf will take over for C. Allen Parker, who has led the San Francisco bank since March after its second CEO stepped down in quick succession.

49. Why a US-China deal that once looked close now seems far off -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A deal seemed so close.

As recently as May, the Trump administration and China seemed on the verge of resolving their dispute over Beijing's combative trade policies.

Then it all collapsed. A cease-fire, declared by Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping in June, failed to stick.

50. Facebook plans its own currency for 2 billion-plus users -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook already rules daily communication for more than two billion people around the world. Now it wants its own currency, too.

The social network unveiled an ambitious plan Tuesday to create a new digital currency similar to Bitcoin for global use, one that could drive more e-commerce on its services and boost ads on its platforms.

51. US hiring slows amid trade tensions, weaker global economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. hiring stumbled in May as employers added just 75,000 jobs, a sign that businesses have become more cautious in the face of weaker global growth and widening trade conflicts.

52. US consumer prices rise 0.3% on higher gas, housing costs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer prices increased 0.3% in April, led by more expensive gasoline, apartment rents and appliances.

The Labor Department said Friday that the consumer price index climbed 2% in the year ending in April. Excluding the volatile food and energy categories, core prices increased 0.1% last month and 2.1% from a year ago.

53. State of small business more mixed than administration says -

NEW YORK (AP) — As Small Business Week approaches, the nation's smallest companies in the aggregate are by many accounts doing fairly well. They're not, however, thriving en masse in direct response to Trump administration and Republican policies.

54. US stocks cap holiday shortened week with modest gains -

The major U.S. stock indexes capped a holiday shortened week with slight gains Thursday, reversing some of the modest losses from a day earlier.

The marginal upward move was not enough to keep the benchmark S&P 500 index from snapping a string of three straight weekly gains.

55. US home price gains fall to lowest in more than 6 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices rose at their slowest pace in more than six years in January, as higher mortgage rates last year weighed on sales.

The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index increased 3.6 percent in January from a year earlier. That's down from a 4.1 percent pace the previous month.

56. CEO of troubled Wells Fargo says bank is stronger -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The CEO of beleaguered Wells Fargo told Congress Tuesday that the bank has cleaned up its act after a series of scandals that affected millions of customers.

But Democrats — and some Republicans — on the House Financial Services Committee didn't seem to be buying it.

57. Analysis: Falling home sales not helping middle-class buyers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When home sales weaken, prices typically do, too, and buyers benefit.

Not quite this time. Home purchases in many areas of the country have dipped, and price gains have slowed. Yet a rising number of middle-class Americans are finding that home ownership is unaffordable.

58. US home price growth slowed in October -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home price growth slowed in October, a likely consequence of higher mortgage rates having worsened affordability and causing sales to fall.

The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index rose 5 percent from a year earlier, down from an annual gain of 5.2 percent in September, according to a Wednesday report.

59. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's economic fiction: 'record' GDP, jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is distorting the truth on U.S. economic growth and jobs, pointing to record-breaking figures that don't exist and not telling the full story on black unemployment.

60. Why many Americans aren't benefiting from robust US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — "The economy," Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell declared this week, "is doing very well."

And it is. Steady hiring has shrunk unemployment to 3.8 percent — the lowest since the 1960's. Consumers are spending. Taxes are down. Inflation is tame. Factories are busy. Demand for homes is strong. Household wealth is up.

61. Dow plunges 1,175 points in worst day for stocks since 2011 -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones industrial average plunged more than 1,100 points Monday as stocks took their worst loss in six and a half years. Two days of steep losses have erased the market's gains from the start of this year and ended a period of record-setting calm for stocks.

62. Big pay gains for US workers contribute to Wall St. sell-off -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pay raises, the U.S. economy's Achilles' heel in its long recovery from the Great Recession, finally showed signs of accelerating last month — a trend that fanned inflation fears and sent bond yields rising and stocks sinking.

63. 5 Things: How Yellen's Fed tenure will be remembered -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When Janet Yellen leaves the Federal Reserve this weekend after four years as chair, her legacy will include having shattered a social barrier: She is the first woman to have led the world's most powerful central bank, a position that carries enormous sway over the global economy.

64. Yellen to step down from Federal Reserve board -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Janet Yellen on Monday submitted her resignation from the Federal Reserve board to President Donald Trump, announcing that she will leave the board when her successor is sworn in as Fed chairman.

65. Questions arise over departure of first woman to lead Fed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly four years into Janet Yellen's history-making turn as the first woman to lead the Federal Reserve, the economy is growing, the unemployment rate is low and the stock market is setting record highs.

66. Yellen calls risks of inflation 'two-sided' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen on Thursday said she believed the risks concerning inflation are "two-sided," stressing that price gains could both accelerate or slow down.

Testifying for the second day before Congress, Yellen sought to expand on remarks she had made Wednesday before the House Financial Services Committee in an apparent effort to adjust views in financial markets.

67. Where's my raise? 5 reasons pay isn't rising much for many -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Eight years after the Great Recession ended, the economy is steadily churning out jobs, and the unemployment rate is at a 16-year low.

Yet for most Americans, a key measure of economic health — pay growth — still lags behind pre-recession norms.

68. Yellen says Fed close to achieving its economic goals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen says the economy has come a long way in recovering from the 2008 financial crisis, and the Fed is getting close to achieving its goals of maximum employment and stable inflation.

69. Federal Reserve sees growth pickup at end of 2016 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy grew a bit faster at the end of last year, spurred by healthier sales for manufacturers and steady hiring that is slowly pushing up wages.

The Federal Reserve said Wednesday that its survey of economic conditions around the country found that growth was modest or moderate in 10 of its 12 districts. That is an improvement from seven in the previous report. Growth was slight in the Cleveland district and largely unchanged in New York.

70. Fed reports modest growth around nation in new survey -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve reports that the U.S. economy grew at a modest rate this fall, with solid gains in consumer spending helping offset lingering weakness in exports.

The Fed's survey of economic conditions around the country found that seven of its 12 districts described growth as modest to moderate. Another three districts — Philadelphia, Cleveland and Kansas City — saw a "slight" pace of growth. Richmond viewed activity as mixed, and New York said activity had been flat.

71. US economy grows a bit faster in September, Fed says -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. economic growth picked up a bit as summer ended and fall began, supported by modest hiring, an uptick in consumer spending, and steady homebuilding, according to the Federal Reserve.

72. Fed survey finds modest growth across most of the US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The economy and hiring continued to expand modestly across most of the United States from mid-May until the end of June, leaving some firms unable to find skilled workers, the Federal Reserve said Wednesday.

73. SEC says Peavy, Sanchez among athletes defrauded in scheme -

HOUSTON (AP) — Several professional athletes, including San Francisco Giants pitcher Jake Peavy, Denver Broncos quarterback Mark Sanchez and retired Houston Astros pitcher Roy Oswalt, were cheated out of more than $30 million by an investment adviser in a Ponzi-like scheme, federal investigators said Tuesday.

74. Fed survey finds modest growth, higher wages in many regions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve said Wednesday that the economy grew at a modest pace in much of the country from April to mid-May, leading to tightening labor markets and higher wages.

75. Goodbye, empty nest: Millennials staying longer with parents -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Many of America's young adults appear to be in no hurry to move out of their old bedrooms.

For the first time on record, living with parents is now the most common arrangement for people ages 18 to 34, an analysis of census data by the Pew Research Center has found.

76. Fed's surprise message: June hike likely if economy improves -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Catching many investors off guard, the Federal Reserve made clear Wednesday that an interest rate hike in June is likely if the economy keeps improving.

The minutes of their most recent meeting in late April showed that Fed officials widely felt it would be time to raise rates at their June 14-15 meeting as long as hiring and economic growth strengthened and inflation showed signs of accelerating toward the Fed's 2 percent target rate.

77. Low rates, troubled loans send bank profits lower -

PHOENIX (AP) — 2016 is getting off to a lousy start for major U.S. banks. Energy loans are turning bad, low interest rates are making it hard to make profitable loans, and markets have been volatile.

78. Some big US banks have 6 months shape up plans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Five of the biggest U.S. banks have six months to get their disaster plans in shape. That's the message regulators issued Wednesday after giving the banks failing grades for the strategies they would deploy if they tumbled into bankruptcy.

79. US home prices rise at a solid clip in December -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices increased at a solid clip in December, helped by a healthy job market and low mortgage rates.

The Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller 20-city home price index rose 5.7 percent from a year earlier, same as the annual increase in November.

80. Waller elects 6 new partners in Nashville -

Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP has elected six new partners from the firm’s Nashville office, Nate Bailey, Steven E. Blumenthal, Todd R. Hambidge, Michael T. Harmon, Aron Z. Karabel and Trevor Sava.

81. Fed says economy expanded somewhat in 9 of 12 districts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve says the economy expanded across most of the United States in December and early January.

The Fed says in its latest snapshot of the economy that most of its 12 regional bank reported steady growth. The Atlanta and San Francisco banks described growth as "moderate." The Philadelphia, Cleveland, Richmond, Chicago, St. Louis, Minneapolis and Dallas banks called the economy's expansion "modest."

82. US home prices climb in October, helped by solid job market -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Steady job growth, low mortgage rates and tight inventories helped fuel rising U.S. home prices in October.

The Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller 20-city home price index rose 5.5 percent in the 12 months ending in October, up from a 5.4 percent pace in September, according to a report released Thursday.

83. US stocks slip, led by weakness in the energy sector -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks retreated modestly Wednesday after comments from Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen implied that Fed policymakers are still considering raising interest rates in December.

84. Fed official: Central bank has made no decision on rate hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A voting member of the Federal Reserve is cautioning that the Fed has yet to decide when to raise interest rates even though it issued a statement this week that said a rate hike was possible in December.

85. 2 Fed officials think data will justify rate hike this year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's a question whose answer seems to be in constant flux: When will the Federal Reserve finally raise interest rates?

Two voting members of the Fed's policy committee weighed in Friday with a similar view: That a rate hike remains likely by the end of 2015 but that any Fed decision will depend on how the economy fares between now and then.

86. US home prices rise steadily in July, lifted by higher sales -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices rose at a solid pace in July, as would-be buyers competed for a diminished supply of available housing.

The Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller 20-city home price index climbed 5 percent in July from a year earlier. That's up from a 4.9 percent annual pace in June.

87. Fed report finds economy growing at moderate pace in summer -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve's latest look at business conditions nationwide finds that the economy kept expanding during the summer. Housing and auto sales were two bright spots.

However, manufacturers were starting to feel pressure from an economic slowdown in China. The oil industry was also being hit by the drop in energy prices.

88. Strong home sales, limited supply lift US home prices in May -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices rose steadily in May, pushed higher by a healthy increase in sales this year.

The Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller 20-city home price index climbed 4.9 percent in May from 12 months earlier, down slightly from a 5 percent pace in April, according to S&P Dow Jones Indices.

89. Fed sees moderate economic growth around country this spring -

WASHINGTON(AP) — The U.S. economy was growing at a moderate pace in most regions of the country in April and May, as consumers ramped up spending at retailers and auto dealers, the Federal Reserve said Wednesday.

90. Why I skipped the bank and took out a loan from my 'peers' -

NEW YORK (AP) — When I realized I was paying off six different credit cards and not getting anywhere, I decided to consolidate my debt, like millions of other Americans.

I visited my local bank, asked for a $15,000 loan but was offered an interest rate higher than my cards were charging.

91. Why homebuyers face a tough spring -

Eager to buy your first home this spring? Already own, but want to trade up? Be warned: there'll be plenty of competition.

Bidding wars have broken out in hot real-estate markets like Denver and Los Angeles, where there aren't enough houses to meet demand. The lack of supply is a key reason home sales nationwide have yet to return to healthy levels following the housing collapse in 2008.

92. Don't panic, college seniors: Jobs for grads likely to grow -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The consulting and accounting firm EY is aggressively recruiting on college campuses this spring. The company formerly known as Ernst & Young plans to hire 9,000 graduates from U.S. universities this year, up from 7,500 in 2014. But recruiting isn't as easy as it used to be.

93. Unemployment rate for recent college grads rose in 2014 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The consulting and accounting firm EY is aggressively recruiting on college campuses this spring. The company formerly known as Ernst & Young plans to hire 9,000 graduates from U.S. universities this year, up from 7,500 in 2014. But recruiting isn't as easy as it used to be.

94. Fed minutes: Officials split widely on rate hike timing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fed officials disagreed widely last month on when they might begin lifting interest rates from record lows.

Minutes of the March 17-18 meeting released Wednesday reveal that several policymakers predicted a rate hike in June, while others concerned about low inflation didn't think a rate hike would be warranted until later this year. Still others said the economy wouldn't be strong enough for an increase until 2016.

95. Yellen: A rate increase may be warranted later this year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Friday that continued improvement in the U.S. economy means an increase in the Fed's key interest rate could come later this year.

But Yellen stressed that any rate increases would likely be very gradual.

96. Fed survey finds US economy growing at moderate pace -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy was growing at a moderate pace through mid-February despite severe winter storms that had disrupted activity in some regions, the Federal Reserve reported Wednesday.

97. Fed survey finds moderate economic growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy was growing at a moderate pace in December and early January, helped by gains in sales of autos and other consumer products, increased factory production and a pickup in tourism in various parts of the country, the Federal Reserve reported Wednesday.

98. US stocks inch further into record territory -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market stayed at record levels on Monday as investors remained confident that stimulus measures from the world's central banks would help revive global economic growth.

99. Fed survey finds moderate growth nationwide -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy was strengthening in most regions of the country in September to early October, helped by gains in consumer spending, manufacturing and commercial construction, according to the Federal Reserve's latest survey of business conditions.

100. US job growth is rising solidly, so why isn't pay? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Where are the pay raises? Employers in the United States are hiring at a brisk pace. Unemployment has sunk to a nearly healthy rate. Jobs are being filled across a range of industries.