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Editorial Results (free)

1. Website for free virus tests is coming. How will it work? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Under criticism after weeks of shortages, President Joe Biden's administration is working to make COVID-19 rapid test kits more available and accessible to Americans by boosting supply and lowering costs. A new federal website to request free test kits launches Wednesday, with the first shipments going out to Americans by the end of the month. In addition, most Americans will be able to get reimbursed for tests that they purchase starting Saturday.

2. Federal testing website launches next week, 4 tests per home -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal website where Americans can request free COVID-19 tests will begin accepting orders on Wednesday as the White House looks to address nationwide shortages, but supplies will be limited to just four free tests per home.

3. How to have wedding you want for less money -

This one goes out to all you lovebirds who got engaged over the holidays and are now left planning a wedding with zero event-planning experience.

Somehow you’re expected to craft a day that’s traditional, yet modern. Well-attended, yet intimate. It’s about you as a couple, but also shouldn’t be offensive to any of your guests. And most crucially, don’t overspend, but make sure it looks expensive.

4. Inflation squeezes holiday budgets for low-income shoppers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Emarilis Velazquez is paying higher prices on everything from food to clothing.

Her monthly grocery bill has ballooned from $650 to almost $850 in recent months. To save money, she looks for less expensive cuts of meat and has switched to a cheaper detergent. She also clips coupons and shops for her kids' clothing at thrift stores insted of Children's Place.

5. Inflation a worry for most economies, but not Japan -

Surging prices are haunting consumers and confounding economic planners in the U.S. and other countries, but not in Japan, where sparking inflation has proven an elusive goal.

While the Federal Reserve and most other central banks are shifting into inflation-fighting mode, the Bank of Japan on Friday chose to reduce its corporate bond purchases but will continue pumping tens of billions of dollars into the economy in hopes of eventually attaining its elusive 2% inflation target and getting the economy to grow faster.

6. Postal hike doesn't stop catalogers from stuffing mailboxes -

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A big postal rate increase over the summer hasn't stopped catalog retailers from stuffing mailboxes this holiday season.

The U.S. Postal Service says more than 300 million catalogs flooded into people's mailboxes last month, and the overall number of catalogs has grown 12% over last year, officials said.

7. Waverly hospital to join Ascension Saint Thomas -

Ascension Saint Thomas and Three Rivers Hospital have signed a definitive agreement for the Waverly facility to become part of Ascension Saint Thomas. The transaction is expected to be completed in spring 2022.

8. Resale is making gains in December holiday gift shopping -

NEW YORK (AP) — Second hand. Like new. Thrift. Buy Nothing. Gently used. There are lots of ways to describe consumption in the booming resale market.

Add "Merry Christmas!" to the list.

Resale has taken off among those looking to save the planet and spend less on gifts during what can be the most wasteful time of the year — the December holidays. This year's supply chain delays have provided extra motivation.

9. How to effectively shop for holidays at the last minute -

Supply chain snags. Sold-out merchandise. Empty shelves. Hefty shipping fees. Inflation. There are plenty of complications working against you this holiday shopping season.

And despite warnings to shop early because of pandemic-related delays, some of us didn’t prioritize holiday shopping in October and November.

10. US jobless rate sinks to 4.2% as many more people find jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's unemployment rate tumbled last month to its lowest point since the pandemic struck, even as employers appeared to slow their hiring — a mixed picture that pointed to a resilient economy that's putting more people to work.

11. 'Buy now, pay later' catches on just in time for holidays -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — As Americans shop for the holidays, they will likely see a swarm of offers to get their gifts now but pay for them later in fixed monthly installments.

Fueled by several hot Silicon Valley startups as well as a push by the big credit card companies, "buy now, pay later" is now available for purchasing a $1,500 Peloton exercise bicycle as well as a $60 floral bouquet. Thousands of retailers, big and small, often have an option on their websites to pay for a purchase in installments at checkout. In the case of credit cards, customers are being allowed to create fixed payment plans days or even a few weeks after the purchase.

12. Biden puts focus on infrastructure amid new virus concerns -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden visits a Minnesota community college Tuesday to highlight how his $1 trillion infrastructure law will create jobs and help train workers.

The trip occurs at a crucial pivot point for Biden, who is facing the threat of the new omicron strain of the coronavirus and high levels of inflation as vital parts of his agenda are still awaiting congressional approval. Biden needs to get his nearly $2 trillion social and economic agenda through the Senate, as well as temporarily fund the government and preserve its ability to borrow as the debt limit could be breached in December.

13. Walmart said she shoplifted; jury awards her $2.1 million -

MOBILE, Ala. (AP) — An Alabama woman who says she was falsely arrested for shoplifting at a Walmart and then threatened by the company after her case was dismissed has been awarded $2.1 million in damages.

14. Consumer spending rebounds despite rising October inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer spending rebounded by a solid 1.3% in October despite inflation that over the past year has accelerated faster than it has at any point in more than three decades.

15. The Santa experience this year is a mix of laps, distancing -

NEW YORK (AP) — Santa is back this year, but he pleads caution as he continues to tiptoe through the pandemic.

"Be smart. Be caring. If you have the tiniest tickle in your throat, the tiniest feeling, worry about yourself and worry about everybody else, and know Santa will always be there next year," said 57-year-old Kevin Chesney, who's been donning the big red suit since he was a kid.

16. Target to keep stores closed on Thanksgiving going forward -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target will no longer open its stores on Thanksgiving Day, making permanent a shift to the unofficial start of the holiday season that was suspended during the pandemic.

To limit crowds in stores, retailers last year were forced to turn what had become a weekend shopping blitz into an extended event, with holiday sales beginning as early as October.

17. US stocks shuffle lower, pulling indexes further from highs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stock indexes shuffled lower on Wall Street Wednesday, pulling a bit further off their record heights.

The S&P 500 fell 12.23 points, or 0.3%, to 4,688.67 after earlier drifting between a tiny gain and a 0.4% decline. It's sitting just 13.03 points below its all-time high set a week and a half ago.

18. Four reasons to shop Small Business Saturday -

When you think about holiday shopping, your mind probably goes to big-box retailers before your neighborhood bookstore or antique shop. But in a time marked by widespread supply chain disruptions and inflation, underdog small businesses deserve our attention.

19. Target tames global supply backups; sales surge 13.2% in Q3 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target delivered another strong quarter, overcoming a slew of challenges from inflationary pressures to congested ports.

Third-quarter profits rose nearly 47%, while sales increased 13.2%, both exceeding expectations and the Minneapolis company raised projections for fourth-quarter comparable store sales.

20. Defying inflation, Americans ramped up spending last month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Many Americans have taken a darker view of the economy as inflation has worsened. Yet so far, they appear no less willing to spend freely at retailers — an encouraging sign for the crucial holiday shopping season.

21. US stock indexes end wobbly day mostly lower on Wall Street -

Stocks closed mostly lower after wobbling most of Monday on Wall Street as the market comes off its first weekly loss in six weeks and investors move past the recent round of mostly solid corporate earnings.

22. Amazon stumbles on slower sales growth, higher labor costs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon isn't just grappling with the easing of pandemic-induced shopping splurges. The online retail behemoth is also contending with surging costs as it navigates a snarled supply chain and labor shortages.

23. "Buy it when you see it." Retailers dread holiday shortages -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Perfect Pigg, a gift shop owned by Ginger Pigg, is the go-to place for residents of Cumming, Georgia, to pick up gift items like kids toys and home goods.

But this year, store shelves might be a little sparse. Because of bottlenecks in the global supply chain, many stores like Pigg's are scrambling to try to get all the inventory they can ahead of the crucial holiday shopping season.

24. Workers fed up with nights, weekends seek flexible schedules -

NEW YORK (AP) — After struggling to hire workers for its outlet store in Dallas, Balsam Hill finally opened on Sept. 1. But the very next day, the online purveyor of high-end artificial holiday trees was forced to close after four of its five workers quit.

25. How the toy shortage could affect your holidays -

Many popular toys could sell out long before the holidays, thanks to ongoing pandemic-related disruptions. This could be a disaster – or a great opportunity to reshape how we celebrate.

We can shop earlier and more thoughtfully, resisting the last-minute scramble for “must-have” items that really aren’t. We can choose classic over trendy, handmade over mass-produced. We can swap experiences for stuff and even make this a learning opportunity for our children.

26. Events -

Second Ave. Design Input Community Meeting. Metro Planning Department, Civic Design Center, NDOT, GHP, Hawkins Partners and Kimley-Horn, will host a virtual public meeting to preview draft design concepts for First Ave. N., Second Ave. N. and Riverfront Park. Wednesday, 6-7:30 p.m. Register

27. Companies scraping for staff ahead of the holidays -

NEW YORK (AP) — All employers want for Christmas is some holiday help. But they might not get their wish.

Companies that typically hire thousands of seasonal workers are heading into the holidays during one of the tightest job markets in decades, making it unlikely they'll find all the workers they need. For shoppers, it might mean a less than jolly holiday shopping experience, with unstaffed store aisles and online orders that take longer than usual to fill.

28. Events -

Chamber West: On the Road to Transit. An update on transit in Nashville from Steve Bland, CEO of WeGo Public Transit and Faye DiMassimo, senior adviser for transportation and infrastructure for Metro Nashville, on the development of the Hillsboro Transit Center and other changes on the horizon for public transit. Hampton Inn & Suites-Green Hills, 2324 Crestmoor Road, Nashville. Wednesday, 8:30-9:30 a.m. Information

29. Toymakers race to get products on shelves amid supply clogs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Running out of time to get its products on store shelves ahead of the holidays, the Basic Fun toy company made an unprecedented decision: It's leaving one-third of its iconic Tonka Mighty Dump Trucks destined for the U.S. in China.

30. Amazon eyes 125K more hires, $18+ per hour average salary -

Amazon wants to hire 125,000 delivery and warehouse workers and said Tuesday that it is paying new hires an average of $18 an hour in a tight job market as more people shop online.

Competition for hourly workers has become fierce, and many companies are offering higher pay, sign-on bonuses and other incentives. Last week, package delivery company UPS promised to handout job offers in 30 minutes after candidates apply for many of the 100,000 holiday workers it plans to hire.

31. 5 ways to curb impulse spending as finances return to normal -

Since the COVID-19 vaccine started becoming available in the U.S., there have been more opportunities to impulse spend on items and experiences that you didn’t get to enjoy early in the pandemic.

32. Be ready to work for Labor Day bargains this year -

This Labor Day, some Americans will have extra cash on hand for holiday weekend shopping.

Some people padded their savings accounts by staying home during the pandemic. And some set aside the advance payments of the child tax credit they received, says Amna Kirmani, marketing professor at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business.

33. With sales still surging, Best Buy raises prospects for 2021 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Best Buy raised its sales outlook for the year after breezing past Wall Street expectations in the second quarter.

The nation's largest consumer electronics chain joined the slew of other major retailers like Walmart, Target and Macy's putting up banner numbers, suggesting that Americans have continued to be spend even as the delta variant spreads.

34. Target extends streak even as online sales growth cools -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target's streak of strong results extended into its latest quarter but its skyrocketing online sales growth has come back to earth.

The Minneapolis retailer reported Wednesday that sales at its stores that have been open for at least a year rose 8.7% in the three-month period that ended July 31. That was on top of a 10.9% growth in the same 2020 span.

35. Shipping snags prompt US firms to mull retreat from China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Game maker Eric Poses last year created The Worst-Case Scenario Card Game, making a wry reference to the way the coronavirus had upended normal life.

He had no idea.

In a twist that Poses never could have predicted, his game itself would become caught up in the latest fallout from the health crisis: a backlogged global supply chain that has delayed shipments around the world and sent freight costs rocketing.

36. Walmart mandates vaccines for workers at headquarters -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart is requiring that all workers at its headquarters as well as managers who travel within the U.S. be vaccinated against COVID-19 by Oct. 4.

The Bentonville, Arkansas-based retailer is also reversing its mask policy for its employees, including vaccinated ones, who work in stores, clubs, distribution facilities and warehouses. Going forward, they will be required to wear masks in areas with high infection rates.

37. Amazon delivers a mixed bag of 2Q results, shares slide -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon on Thursday turned in a mixed bag of results for its fiscal second quarter, coming up short of Wall Street expectations in revenue but beating on profits.

During the three-month period ended June 30, the Seattle-based company reported profit of $7.78 billion, or $15.12 per share compared to $5.24 billion, or $10.30 a share, during the year-ago period. Revenue jumped 27% to $113.08 billion.

38. Bitcoin jumps on speculation that Amazon considering crypto -

NEW YORK (AP) — Bitcoin's price surged again Monday after speculation that Amazon may be entering the cryptocurrency sector after it posted a job seeking a "digital currency and blockchain product lead."

39. Free samples are back at Costco, but with safety in mind -

NEW YORK (AP) — When Pat Curry spotted bite-sized wood-fire rotisserie chicken with portabella mushroom at her local Costco in early June, she felt "giddy." After a 14-month hiatus, free samples were back.

40. Events -

Industry Roundtable. A new way to network. Industry Roundtables meet once a quarter, grouped by industry to promote community over competition. Coffee will be provided and a Chamber team member will be at each meeting, in an effort to better connect our members to resources. First United Methodist Church, 149 W Main Street, Gallatin. Thursday. Insurance and financial services, 8-9 a.m. Real estate and lending, 9-10 a.m. Information

41. Events -

TPAC Job Fair. The Tennessee Performing Arts Center will host job fairs July 7, 5-7 p.m., and July 10, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., to fill part-time positions for bartenders, security officers, stagehands and a variety of other roles in guest services. July 10, Metro Public Health Department will be onsite offering Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. Free parking will be available on Deaderick Street. No pre-registration is required. Information

42. Is Japan's remarkable vaccine drive in time for Olympics? -

TOKYO (AP) — After months of frustration and delay, Japan has hit the remarkable benchmark of 1 million vaccines a day. But with the Olympics set to start in less than a month, and only a small portion of the country vaccinated, a question lingers: Is it enough?

43. The Teamsters have a new mission: Unionize Amazon workers -

NEW YORK (AP) — One of the nation's largest union is aiming to unionize Amazon workers.

Representatives from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, a union that represents 1.4 million workers, voted on Thursday to make organizing Amazon workers a priority. That means it will create a division focused on Amazon and set aside money for the effort.

44. SVP-Singer purchased by Platinum Equity -

SVP-Singer Holdings, Inc., with corporate headquarters in La Vergne, has reached a definitive agreement for Platinum Equity to acquire a controlling stake in the company along with its wholly owned subsidiaries.

45. Want a job? Employers say: Talk to the computer -

A day after her interview for a part-time job at Target last year, Dana Anthony got an email informing her she didn't make the cut.

46. Stores expect strong sales as children return to classrooms -

NEW YORK (AP) — As more children go back to the physical classroom, families are expected to spend robustly on a wide range of items, particularly trendy clothing like cropped tops, for the critical back-to-school season, according to one key spending measure.

47. Amazon to hold Prime Day over 2 days in June -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon said Wednesday that it will hold its annual Prime Day over two days in June this year, the earliest it has ever held the sales event.

Typically, Amazon holds Prime Day in July. Amazon has said it was holding it earlier due to the Olympics, which starts next month and take people's attention away. Last year, Amazon postponed Prime Day to October because of the pandemic and used the sales event to kickoff holiday shopping early.

48. US stocks cling to modest gains and end the week higher -

Stocks capped a listless day of trading on Wall Street with modest gains Friday and the S&P 500's first weekly gain in three weeks.

Gains in technology and health care companies outweighed a slide in communications stocks, retailers and elsewhere in the market. The S&P 500 rose 0.1% and notched a 1.2% gain for the week.

49. Shoppers go back to stores, but retailers face challenges -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans are going back to one of their favorite pastimes: store shopping.

With more people getting vaccinated and dropping their face masks, retailers from Walmart to Macy's are seeing an eager return to their stores after more than a year of their customers migrating online during the pandemic.

50. Set your strategy for traditional Memorial Day sales -

Last Memorial Day, Americans were dizzy from the pandemic, recession and widespread shutdowns. Many had shopping for hand sanitizer and toilet paper on the brain.

But this May, life seems to be blooming again ahead of the unofficial start of summer.

51. Target's profit surges as Americans cast restrictions aside -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target's sales and profits surged in the first quarter as its customers, emerging from the pandemic, returned in big numbers for dresses, cosmetics and luggage.

Sales at stores opened at least a year jumped 18% in the three-month period that ended May 1. That follows a 6.9% increase in the previous quarter. Online sales soared 50% after rocketing 118% higher in the final quarter of 2020.

52. Retailer results so far show people are going out, spending -

NEW YORK (AP) — At Walmart, sales of teeth whitener are popping as customers take their masks off. So are travel items. Macy's says that special occasion dressing like prom dresses are on the upswing as well as luggage, men's tailored clothing, and dressy sandals.

53. Walmart sales still boom as pandemic eases, stimulus helps -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart blew past Wall Street projections in the first quarter with U.S. stimulus payments to Americans helping to boost sales and the company raised its expectations for the year.

54. Amazon's profit more than triples as pandemic boom continues -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon's pandemic boom isn't showing signs of slowing down. The company said Thursday that its first-quarter profit more than tripled from a year ago, fueled by the growth of online shopping. It also posted revenue of more than $100 billion, the second quarter in a row that the company has passed that milestone.

55. Fed keeps key rate near zero, sees inflation as 'transitory' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is keeping its ultra-low interest rate policies in place, a sign that it wants to see more evidence of a strengthening economic recovery before it would consider easing its support.

56. Even as economy heats up, Fed to stick with near-zero rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hiring is accelerating as Americans increasingly venture out to shop, eat at restaurants and travel, and inflation pressures are even picking up after lying dormant for years. Yet this week, the Federal Reserve is all but sure to reiterate its commitment to ultra-low interest rates.

57. Amazon warehouse workers reject union bid in Alabama -

Workers at an Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama handed the online retail giant a decisive victory when they voted against forming a union and cut off a path that labor activists had hoped would lead to similar efforts throughout the company and beyond.

58. Target to spend more than $2B at Black-owned businesses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target will spend a total of more than $2 billion at Black-owned businesses by 2025 as part of its effort to advance racial equity.

That's a significant increase in overall spending on Black-owned businesses, according to Target, though it declined be more specific Wednesday.

59. Target powers through pandemic; sales growth explodes in 2020 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target will plow $4 billion into its business each year for the next several years to redo its stores and add new ones as well as speed up its delivery network, as the discounter aims to keep up with increasingly demanding shoppers shaped by the pandemic.

60. Vaccine delays leave grocery workers feeling expendable -

As panicked Americans cleared supermarkets of toilet paper and food last spring, grocery employees gained recognition as among the most indispensable of the pandemic's front-line workers.

A year later, most of those workers are waiting their turn to receive COVID-19 vaccines, with little clarity about when that might happen.

61. 5 challenges awaiting Amazon's new CEO -

NEW YORK (AP) — In 1995, few could imagine that the modest online bookstore built by Jeff Bezos would turn into a $1.7 trillion behemoth that sells everything from diapers to sofas, produces movies, owns a grocery chain and provides cloud computing services to businesses all over the globe.

62. US consumer spending fell 0.2% in December -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumers slowed their spending by 0.2% in December, cutting back for a second straight month in a worrisome sign for an economy struggling under the weight of a still out-of-control pandemic.

63. China economy grows in 2020 as rebound from virus gains -

BEIJING (AP) — China eked out 2.3% economic growth in 2020, likely becoming the only major economy to expand as shops and factories reopened relatively early from a shutdown to fight the coronavirus while the United States, Japan and Europe struggled with rising infections.

64. Retail group: Holiday sales up 8.3% amid big spending shift -

NEW YORK (AP) — The nation's largest retail trade group said Friday that holiday sales soared 8.3%, far exceeding its forecast even as the coronavirus kept shoppers away from physical stores.

65. U.S. retail sales fell in December for 3rd straight month -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans cut back on spending in December for the third-straight month as a surge in virus cases kept people away from stores during the critical holiday shopping season.

The U.S. Commerce Department said Friday that retail sales fell a seasonally adjusted 0.7% in December from the month before, a decline Wall Street analysts weren't expecting. Sales also fell in October and November, even as retailers tried to get people shopping for Christmas gifts early by offering deals before Halloween.

66. Seven credit card perks to prioritize in the new year -

As you lay the groundwork for 2021 financial resolutions, take inventory of your credit cards to see if they’re still in line with your goals and priorities.

With the pandemic upending spending patterns, possibly for the foreseeable future, an audit of the benefits and costs of your cards can reveal which ones are getting the job done and saving you money, which ones are a drag on your finances – and what features you might want to look for in a new card. Here are some credit card features to prioritize.

67. Target continues to thrive in whirlwind retail environment -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target's strong sales streak extended through a pandemic-shrouded holiday season after a hard push online and an increased effort to provide alternatives to customers who are trying to minimize risk.

68. Retailers brace for flood of returns from online shopping -

NEW YORK (AP) — A huge surge in online shopping during the pandemic has been a savior for retailers, but it comes at a price.

Shoppers are expected to return twice as many items as they did during last year's holiday period, costing companies roughly $1.1 billion, according to Narvar Inc., a software and technology company that manages online returns for hundreds of brands.

69. Restaurants to retailers, virus transformed business -

It would be just a temporary precaution. When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon – as soon as New York was safe again.

70. The holidays could make or break struggling stores -

NEW YORK (AP) — Clothing stores and specialty retailers are offering big discounts and heavily promoting curbside pickup in hopes of rescuing a lackluster holiday shopping season in which surging coronavirus cases have kept many shoppers at home.

71. From restaurants to retailers, virus transformed economies -

NEW YORK (AP) — It would be just a temporary precaution.

When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon — as soon as New York was safe again.

72. Retailers urge shoppers to buy early amid shipping crunch -

NEW YORK (AP) — A number of retailers, including J.C. Penney, Lowe's and Kohl's, are telling shoppers they need to place their online orders soon or else pay expedited shipping fees if they want to get their packages delivered in time for the holidays.

73. California's health order falling on many deaf ears -

MANHATTAN BEACH, Calif. (AP) — In the Southern California oceanside city of Manhattan Beach, one arm of government is urging residents to stay home except for essential needs while another is encouraging them to get out and shop and even providing places where they can sit down to relax, eat takeout and watch the sun set on the Pacific.

74. Europe gets new blast of stimulus to counter virus surge -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The European Central Bank unleashed another half-trillion euro ($600 billion) wave of stimulus as a winter surge in COVID-19 infections shuts down large parts of the economy and wipes out pre-Christmas sales revenue ahead of the region's most important holiday.

75. Europe gets new blast of stimulus to counter virus surge -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The European Central Bank unleashed another half-trillion euro ($600 billion) wave of stimulus as a winter surge in COVID-19 infections shuts down large parts of the economy and wipes out pre-Christmas sales revenue ahead of the region's most important holiday.

76. Be effective with your generosity -

If you’re fortunate enough to be able to donate money this year, plenty of causes need your attention.

In a year like 2020, choosing where to direct your dollars is like picking your favorite child. Should your money go toward nonprofits providing basic needs, organizations fighting for social justice or a campaign to help local small businesses stay afloat? If you prefer donating your time, how do you give back when volunteer events are limited by the pandemic?

77. Sephora to take over cosmetics in Kohl's stores -

NEW YORK (AP) — Sephora will be replacing all cosmetics areas at Kohl's with 2,500 square foot shops, starting with 200 locations in the fall of year.

It will expand to at least 850 stores by 2023, the companies announced Tuesday.

78. Is shopping in stores safe during the pandemic? -

Is shopping in stores safe during the pandemic? There are ways to reduce risk, but health experts advise avoiding it when possible.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says holiday shopping in crowded stores is a "higher risk" activity and that people should limit any in-person shopping, including at supermarkets.

79. Holiday trends to watch: Adult Play-Doh; stores that ship -

NEW YORK (AP) — The pandemic is turning this into a holiday shopping season like no other.

Toy companies are targeting stuck-at-home grown-ups with latte-smelling Play-Doh and Legos that turn into Warhols. Those who added a puppy to their family during the pandemic will see tons of gift options for their new furry friend. And with more people shopping online, stores are doing double duty as shipping centers to try to get gifts to doorsteps as fast as possible.

80. Virus keeps Black Friday crowds thin, shoppers shift online -

NEW YORK (AP) — The raging coronavirus pandemic kept crowds thin at malls and stores across the country on Black Friday, but a surge in online shopping offered a small beacon of hope for struggling retailers after months of slumping sales and businesses toppling into bankruptcy.

81. Left for dead, twice, RadioShack gets another shot online -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — RadioShack, a fixture at the mall for decades, has been pulled from brink of death, again.

It's the most prized name in the basket of brands that entrepreneur investors Alex Mehr and Tai Lopez have scooped up since the coronavirus pandemic bowled over the U.S. retail sector and sent a number of chains into bankruptcy protection. Those brands so far include Pier1, Dressbarn and Modell's.

82. Best Buy reports 3Q results that exceed Wall Street views -

NEW YORK (AP) — Best Buy Co. reported fiscal third-quarter results that blew through analysts' expectations as the nation's largest consumer electronics retailer enjoyed surging demand for items like home theater and appliances that help people learn, cook, work and connect in their homes during the pandemic.

83. Conquer Black Friday from the comfort of your couch -

‘Twas days before Black Friday when all around the country, shoppers were gearing up for a day full of shopping.

OK, so maybe you haven’t exactly been gearing up for the day after Thanksgiving. Maybe you haven’t done any research at all.

84. Shops, gyms to reopen in England under new COVID-19 plan -

LONDON (AP) — Haircuts, shopping trips and visits to the pub will be back on the agenda for millions of people when a four-week lockdown in England comes to an end next week, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said Monday.

85. Retail trade group sees solid holiday sales despite pandemic -

NEW YORK (AP) — The National Retail Federation, the nation's largest retail trade group, expects that holiday sales could actually exceed growth seen in prior seasons, despite all the uncertainty surrounding the pandemic.

86. 3Q loss for Macy's, but early holiday kickoff eases pain -

NEW YORK (AP) — Macy's swung to a loss and sales tumbled 22% as the department store chain struggled to bring shoppers back to stores during a pandemic.

But the beleaguered retailer did better than most had expected because it was able to get its customers thinking about holiday shopping early for safety reasons, and to avoid the expected shipping crush this year.

87. Target gains steam heading into crucial holiday season -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target is the latest big box U.S. retailer to show that it's prospering during the pandemic.

The Minneapolis company reported Wednesday that its online sales surged 155% in the three months that ended Oct. 31. Sales at its stores opened for a least a year rose 10%. Customer traffic rose 4.5% and average dollars spent rose nearly 16%.

88. Weak 0.3% US October sales gain spreads some holiday unease -

NEW YORK (AP) — Retail sales in the U.S. grew a sluggish 0.3% in October, even as retailers offered early holiday discounts online and in stores.

A surge in coronavirus infections nationwide and the expiration of a $600 weekly boost to unemployment checks over the summer has slowed spending by Americans and contributed to the slowest retail sales growth since this spring, when the pandemic shuttered stores, theaters, restaurants and work places.

89. Huawei selling Honor phone brand in face of US sanctions -

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese tech giant Huawei is selling its budget-price Honor smartphone brand in an effort to rescue the struggling business from damaging U.S. sanctions imposed on its parent company.

90. UK economy bounces back in summer but faces wintry chills -

LONDON (AP) — The British economy remained nearly 10% smaller at the end of the third quarter despite posting a record bounceback in the summer, when many of the restrictions that had been placed on businesses to control the pandemic were lifted. The imposition of new limits on public life in the autumn means the economy will likely end the year even smaller.

91. U.S. bankruptcy court approves sale of J.C. Penney -

NEW YORK (AP) — J.C. Penney is on course to emerge from bankruptcy by Thanksgiving, after a U.S. bankruptcy court approved the sale of the ailing 118-year-old retailer to its two largest landlords and its primary lenders.

92. CoolSprings Galleria, Crossings operator files for bankruptcy -

NEW YORK (AP) — Two mall operators — including CBL, which operates CoolSprings Galleria and Coolsprings Crossing — filed for bankruptcy protection Monday, hurt by the coronavirus pandemic that has forced their tenants to permanently close stores or not pay rent.

93. JC Penney sees bankruptcy protection exit by Christmas -

NEW YORK (AP) — J.C. Penney believes it will emerge from bankruptcy protection before Christmas under a new ownership agreement that would save tens of thousands of jobs.

The beleaguered, century-old retailer said Wednesday that it has filed a draft asset purchase agreement with the two biggest mall owners in the U.S. Substantially all of J.C. Penney's retail and operating assets will be acquired by Brookfield Asset Management Inc. and Simon Property Group through a combination of cash and new term loan debt.

94. Pandemic is paving the way for generation of smarter shoppers -

Before March, shoppers would go to the mall or grocery store – without masks – and scout out the latest sales.

Now, shopping looks much different.

“The way consumers approach shopping has understandably changed as a result of COVID-19,” says Katherine Cullen, senior director for industry and consumer insights at the National Retail Federation.

95. Walmart to spread out deals to avoid Black Friday crowds -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart says it will spread out its traditional one-day Black Friday deals over three weekends in November in an effort to reduce crowds in its stores during a pandemic.

The nation's largest retailer said Wednesday that more of its doorbuster deals will be reserved for online, as a way to steer more shoppers away from its stores.

96. Pandemic pushes start of holiday shopping earlier than ever -

NEW YORK (AP) — Add last-minute holiday shopping to the list of time-honored traditions being upended by the coronavirus pandemic. Retailers are kicking off the holiday season earlier than ever this year in hopes of avoiding big in-store crowds and shipping bottlenecks in November and December.

97. Amazon: Nearly 20,000 workers tested positive for COVID-19 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon said Thursday that nearly 20,000 of its front-line U.S. workers have tested positive or been presumed positive for the virus that causes COVID-19.

But the online retail behemoth, revealing the data for the first time, said that the infection rate of its employees was well below that seen in the general U.S. population. The disclosure comes after months of pressure from Amazon workers and labor groups calling for the company to divulge the COVID-19 numbers.

98. Try touchless payment to avoid dirty money, COVID-19 risk -

If you’re looking for a self-improvement task in this pandemic era, try teaching yourself to use contactless payments with your phone or “tap-to-pay” credit and debit cards.

Any germaphobe will tell you that the surfaces of bills and coins have always been gross. And handing your credit card to a cashier who has the sniffles and a hacking cough? Even in pre-pandemic times, also gross.

99. Amazon to kick off holiday shopping with October Prime Day -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon is aiming to kickstart the holiday shopping season early this year.

The company is holding its annual Prime Day over two days in October this year, after the pandemic forced it to postpone the sales event from July. It's the first time Prime Day is being held in the fall, and Amazon is positioning it as a way to get people to start their holiday shopping.

100. Retail sales rise for 4th straight month as growth slows -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans kept spending in August, but the pace of that growth is slowing as millions of people who lost jobs have now lost a $600 a week boost in their unemployment checks.

Retail sales rose 0.6% last month, the fourth consecutive month of growth, the U.S. Commerce Department said Wednesday. The increase in July was 0.9%.