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Editorial Results (free)

1. US consumer spending rises 0.2% in September -

WASHINGTON (AP) — American consumers modestly stepped up their spending in September, but their incomes grew fast enough to let them save more, too.

The Commerce Department said Thursday that consumer spending rose 0.2% last month, matching August's increase but coming in slightly below economists' expectations. Incomes grew 0.3% lifting the U.S. savings rate to 8.3% in September, highest since March.

2. Stocks climb after Fed cuts rates -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rose broadly after the Federal Reserve lowered interest rates for the third time this year.

The gains Wednesday were enough to push the S&P 500 to its second record high this week.

3. Trial Lawyers name Welborn to state committee -

Butler Snow attorney Joseph F. Welborn III has been named to the American College of Trial Lawyers’ Tennessee State Committee.

Welborn has more than 28 years of trial experience in business and commercial litigation including shareholder, corporate merger and acquisition, banking, contractual, real estate, intellectual property and business tort disputes. He also is experienced in representing individuals and businesses in civil rights litigation, as well as catastrophic personal injury and wrongful death cases.

4. Formula remains the same: Run Henry, play tough defense -

The Titans have their first two-game win streak this season and will put it to the test against the Panthers on Sunday in Charlotte.

The Panthers suffered their first lost since Kyle Allen took over as the starting quarterback, getting thumped 51-13 by the undefeated 49ers on Sunday. The key for the Titans may be to keep winning the turnover battle.

5. Fed cuts rates for a 3rd time but signals it will now pause -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve cut its benchmark interest rate Wednesday for the third time this year to try to sustain the economic expansion in the face of global threats. But it indicated that it won't cut again in the coming months unless the economic outlook worsens.

6. US economy grows at modest 1.9% rate in third quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy slowed to a modest growth rate of 1.9% in the summer as consumer spending downshifted and businesses continued to trim their investments in response to trade war uncertainty and a weakening global economy.

7. Fed is expected to cut rates but may offer little guidance -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is set to cut its benchmark interest rate Wednesday for a third time this year to help sustain the U.S. economic expansion in the face of widespread trade tensions and slower global growth.

8. US stocks cap wobbly day of trading with modest losses -

Technology companies led stocks lower on Wall Street Tuesday as a wobbly day of trading ended with modest losses for the market.

Health care stocks jumped on stronger-than-expected reports from drugmakers, but losses by internet and media companies held the market in check following a mixed report from Google's parent.

9. Here's the single phrase to watch for from the Fed this week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Economists and investors who are trying to get a fix on what the Federal Reserve may do in the months ahead have zeroed in on a single phrase in the statement it has issued after its most recent policy meetings.

10. Stocks set another record. The champagne's still corked. -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are back at a record. Don't feel excited? Neither does Wall Street.

After a shaky few months, the stock market has pushed through worries about President Donald Trump's trade wars, weakening corporate profits and the slowing global economy to set another all-time high. The S&P 500 closed Monday at 3,039.42, eclipsing the previous record set on July 26.

11. Stocks post gains on solid earnings, US-China trade optimism -

The S&P 500 closed just short of an all-time high Friday as investors welcomed solid company earnings reports and an encouraging update on trade talks between the U.S. and China.

Technology, communications services and financial stocks powered the rally. The index ended within 0.1% of its record set July 26. It also notched its third straight weekly gain.

12. Iconic AmEx 'Green Card' turns 50, gets a needed revamp -

NEW YORK (AP) — For 50 years, the American Express "Green Card" has been everywhere its card members wanted to be.

Launched in 1969, the Green Card gave travelers a sense of importance they didn't feel carrying travelers' cheques. For many people, it was their first AmEx card. Over time, however, the Green Card became neglected in favor of its fancier siblings, the Gold and Platinum Cards.

13. US durable goods orders fall 1.1% in September -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Orders to U.S. factories for big-ticket manufactured goods tumbled in September by the largest amount in four months while a closely watched category that tracks business investment fell for a second month.

14. US durable goods orders fall 1.1% in September -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Orders to U.S. factories for big-ticket manufactured goods tumbled in September by the largest amount in four months while a closely watched category that tracks business investment fell for a second month.

15. Titans kicker Ryan Succop designated to return from IR -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee kicker Ryan Succop has been designated to return from injured reserve, allowing him to return to practice with the Titans.

The Titans announced the move Wednesday.

Succop was put on injured reserve Sept. 4, needing more time to recover from offseason surgery on his right, kicking leg. Succop went through his usual pregame kicking routine last weekend. He cannot be added to the active roster until Monday at the earliest.

16. Iconic AmEx 'Green Card' turns 50, gets a needed revamp -

NEW YORK (AP) — For 50 years, the American Express "Green Card" has been everywhere its card members wanted to be.

Launched in 1969, the Green Card gave travelers a sense of importance they didn't feel carrying travelers' cheques. For many people, it was their first AmEx card. Over time, however, the Green Card became neglected in favor of its fancier siblings, the Gold and Platinum Cards.

17. Uncertainties escalate for Fed as it weighs another rate cut -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve finds itself in an unusually delicate spot as it considers how much more to try to stimulate an economy that's still growing and adding jobs but also appears vulnerable.

18. Zuckerberg defends Facebook's currency plans before Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg endured hours of prickly questioning from lawmakers Wednesday as he defended the company's new globally ambitious project to create a digital currency while also dealing with widening scrutiny from U.S. regulators.

19. Kessel scores twice, leads Coyotes past Predators 5-2 -

GLENDALE, Ariz. (AP) — The way Phil Kessel had been playing for the Arizona Coyotes at the start of the season, scoring a goal was just a matter of time.

The veteran forward put it all together Thursday night, scoring his first two goals for Arizona, and Christian Dvorak scored his third goal in two games as the Coyotes beat the Nashville Predators 5-2.

20. GM strike pushed US factory output down 0.5% in September -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. factory output slumped 0.5% in September, as a strike at General Motors caused a steep decline in auto production amid broader struggles for manufacturers.

The Federal Reserve said Tuesday that manufacturing production has fallen 0.9% over the past 12 months, a reflection of the disruptions and uncertainties caused by the U.S.-China trade war. The figures showed some stability, however, as factory output increased during the recently ended third quarter after having declined for the first six months of the year.

21. US single family-home construction ticks up, apartments fall -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home building fell last month after reaching a 12-year high in August, driven by a sharp decline in the construction of new apartments. Yet single-family home construction ticked higher for a fourth month.

22. US home construction fell 9.4% last month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home building fell last month, driven by a sharp decline in the construction of new apartments.

The Commerce Department said Thursday that housing starts dropped 9.4% to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.26 million. The construction of new apartments plunged 28.3% to an annual pace of 327,000.

23. GM strike pushed US factory output down 0.5% in September -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. factory output slumped 0.5% in September, as a strike at General Motors caused a steep decline in auto production amid broader struggles for manufacturers.

The Federal Reserve said Tuesday that manufacturing production has fallen 0.9% over the past 12 months, a reflection of the disruptions and uncertainties caused by the U.S.-China trade war.

24. Fed survey: US economy being hurt by trade battles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy was expanding at a modest pace in September and into October despite the fact manufacturing was being hurt by rising trade tensions and weaker global growth while adverse weather was affecting farmers.

25. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for September 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, September 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

26. Bank of America 3Q profits fall 19% due to charge -

NEW YORK (AP) — Bank of America's third quarter profits fell 19% from a year ago as the bank wrote down the value of its long-time joint venture payment processor First Data.

Excluding that non-cash charge the bank topped expectations, though it's being pressured by falling interest rates.

27. IMF downgrades outlook for world economy, citing trade wars -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The International Monetary Fund is further downgrading its outlook for the world economy, predicting that growth this year will be the weakest since the 2008 financial crisis, primarily because of widening global conflicts.

28. Hunter Biden denies doing anything wrong in Ukraine, China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hunter Biden, acknowledging that his family name created business opportunities, rejected assertions by President Donald Trump that he did anything wrong by engaging in foreign work in Ukraine and China.

29. AP analysis: Wide gaps in legal protection of LGBT workers -

Rumors started circulating around the fire station in Byron, Georgia, within a year after the medical treatments began. The fire chief's once-crewcut hair was growing longer, and other physical changes were becoming noticeable. Keeping quiet was no longer an option.

30. Fed plans more Treasury purchases to control lending rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve said Friday that it will buy short-term Treasury bills each month until the second quarter of 2020 to inject cash into the banking system and make it easier to control overnight lending rates.

31. Fed approves rules loosening Dodd-Frank bank restrictions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is easing restrictions imposed on banks following the 2008 financial crisis, giving a victory to the banking industry and President Donald Trump.

The Fed on Thursday approved a set of rule changes that implement legislation passed by Congress last year to loosen restrictions, particularly for smaller community banks, imposed by the Dodd-Frank Act passed in 2010.

32. US consumer prices unchanged in September -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Overall consumer prices were unchanged in September as a big decline in energy costs offset small gains in other areas.

The flat reading in the Consumer Price Index for September followed a tiny 0.1% August increase and left prices over the past 12 months rising at a modest annual rate of 1.7%, the Labor Department reported Thursday.

33. Facebook CEO to appear before Congress on currency plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will appear before Congress this month as the tech giant is under pressure from lawmakers and regulators over its massive market power and record of privacy breaches.

34. Fed officials were sharply divided over September rate cut -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials were sharply divided last month when they decided to cut their key policy rate for a second time this year, a split that indicates the path forward for future rate cuts remains cloudy.

35. Better used-car trim packages can provide more value -

Americans tend to want all the “bells and whistles” on their new cars. Today’s shoppers are opting for higher trim levels and costlier option packages, an Edmunds’ analysis shows.

36. Powell faces key question: What's wrong with low inflation? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When out shopping, most Americans like lower prices. But the Federal Reserve sees things a little differently.

Fed Chairman Jerome Powell instead says that low inflation, along with low interest rates, are "longer-term challenges" for the United States.

37. Josi scores twice as Predators beat struggling Sharks 5-2 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Roman Josi extended San Jose's early-season woes.

Josi scored two early goals, and the Nashville Predators beat the Sharks 5-2 on Tuesday night, dropping San Jose to 0-4.

Kyle Turris, Filip Forsberg and Dante Fabbro also scored for the Predators, who have won two of three to start the season.

38. Powell sees cooler US hiring in possible hint of rate cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said Tuesday that U.S. job growth since early last year was not as robust as thought, a hint that the Fed may be ready to keep cutting interest rates to support the economy.

39. IMF chief: Trade conflicts fuel synchronized global slowdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The new head of the 189-nation International Monetary Fund warned Tuesday that the world economy is in the grips of a "synchronized global slowdown" that will result in slower growth for 90% of the world this year.

40. US producer prices drop 0.3% in September -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. producer prices fell in September, another sign that inflation remains tame more than 10 years into America's economic expansion.

The Labor Department says its producer price index, which measures inflation before it reaches consumers, fell 0.3% last month, the first drop since June and the biggest since January. Even core wholesale prices, which exclude volatile food and energy prices, tumbled 0.3%.

41. Fed's odd dilemma: Low unemployment but pressure to do more -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With the nation's unemployment rate at its lowest point since human beings first walked on the moon, you might expect the Federal Reserve to be raising interest rates to keep the economy from overheating and igniting inflation.

42. US consumer borrowing up $17.9B in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumer borrowing increased at a solid pace in August, helped by the biggest jump in auto and student loans in three years.

Total credit rose $17.9 billion after a $23 billion increase in July, the Federal Reserve reported Monday.

43. Titans waive kicker after 4 missed field goals -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans have released kicker Cairo Santos a day after he missed three field goals and had a fourth blocked.

The Titans announced the move Monday.

Santos missed field goals from 50, 36 and 53 yards with a 36-yarder blocked by Darryl Johnson in a 14-7 loss to Buffalo on Sunday. Santos apologized at his locker after the game with the native of Sao Paulo, Brazil, saying he'd never had a day like that anywhere.

44. Chairman: Federal reserve must avoid political pressures -

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell on Monday stressed the importance of an independent central bank "absolutely free" from politics in the wake of increasing pressure from President Donald Trump urging the central bank to lower interest rates.

45. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's tale about Romney unrest, impeachment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing an impeachment inquiry, President Donald Trump is turning to a familiar playbook to defend himself: blasting the inquiry as illegal, attacking his investigators and critics alike, and deriding the whistleblower process as all-but-rigged.

46. Business economists foresee slowdown in US growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation's business economists think President Donald Trump's trade war with China will contribute to a sharp slowdown in economic growth this year and next, raising concerns about a possible recession starting late next year.

47. Titans' kicker misses 4 field goals in 14-7 loss to Bills -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Cairo Santos pulled his first field goal attempt wide left from 50 yards, tried to fix the issue and overcorrected, yanking his next attempt from 36 yards wide right.

It only got worse for Tennessee's replacement kicker and the Titans.

48. Fed will provide cash to bolster short-term lending market -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve plans to continue pumping money into a crucial corner of the financial markets that banks and others use for short-term loans but that has suffered recent shortfalls.

49. Fed chairman says goal is to keep economy in 'good place' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said Friday that the U.S. economy is facing some risks at the moment, but overall it is in a "good place" and the Fed's main job is to "keep it there as long as possible."

50. US adds modest 136,000 jobs, lowering unemployment to 3.5% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy added a modest 136,000 jobs in September, a gain that managed to help lower the unemployment rate to a new five-decade low of 3.5% but also suggested rising caution among employers.

51. US stocks rebound from sell-off as Fed rate cut odds improve -

Technology and health care companies helped U.S. stocks rebound broadly from an early sell-off Thursday, snapping the market’s steep two-day skid.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average swung from a loss of more than 330 points to a gain of more than 120 after another disappointing economic report raised expectations among investors that the Federal Reserve will cut interest rates again to help keep the U.S. economy growing. The S&P 500 and Nasdaq also recovered from the early rout.

52. Stocks drop again to worst loss in weeks on economy worries -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks tumbled again on Wednesday as worries about a weakening global economy boomeranged around the world.

For a second straight day, the S&P 500 dropped to its worst loss in five weeks. The latest wave of selling came after a report showed hiring by U.S. companies slowed more than economists expected last month, with mining and manufacturing particularly weak. It added to worries that shook markets a day earlier, when a reading on U.S. manufacturing showed the sharpest contraction in a decade.

53. UT LB Banks apologizes for his conduct during arrest -

KNOXVILLE (AP) — Tennessee linebacker Jeremy Banks has issued an apology through the school after video was released showing him cursing and saying that “where I’m from, we shoot at cops” during his arrest last month following a traffic stop.

54. Go big! Heavy-duty pickups get more style, power -

Until recently, heavy-duty trucks have been the reserve of ranchers, horse owners and your neighbor who owns a paving company – tough trucks for people who do tough work.

But the latest heavy-duty pickups deliver new heights of towing and hauling performance while also offering as many high-end features as a luxury sedan.

55. Stocks sink as US manufacturing shrinks again amid trade war -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks sank to their worst loss in five weeks on Tuesday after a surprisingly limp report on the nation's manufacturing stirred worries about the economy's strength.

The report showed that manufacturing weakened in September for the second straight month as President Donald Trump's trade war with China dragged on confidence and factory activity. It dashed economists' expectations that August's contraction had been an aberration, and stocks and bond yields immediately reversed course to drop sharply lower following the report.

56. AP FACT CHECK: Trump wrongly blames Fed for factory woes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is wrongly blaming the Federal Reserve for a slump in U.S. manufacturing.

In a tweet Tuesday, he essentially argues that the Fed's rate hikes last year pushed up the value of the dollar, which makes U.S. goods more expensive overseas. His argument is a distortion that attempts to downplay the negative consequences from escalating a trade war with China.

57. US manufacturing sinks to decade-low, stoking economic fear -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. factory activity hit a decade low last month in the face of President Donald Trump's trade conflicts, adding to a weakening picture of the global economy.

The Institute for Supply Management, an association of purchasing managers, said Tuesday that its manufacturing index shrank for a second straight month to 47.8% in September, down from 49.1% in August. Any reading below 50 signals that the sector is contracting.

58. Stocks climb as markets cap turbulent quarter with calm end -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks climbed on Monday and gave one last nudge to ensure the S&P 500 emerged from yet another tumultuous quarter with a modest gain.

As has been the case throughout the quarter, movements in President Donald Trump's trade war with China helped drive the market on Monday. Investors found encouragement after China said that its top trade negotiator will lead talks with the United States that are expected to take place next week. The Trump administration also calmed some worries that it may limit U.S. investment in Chinese companies.

59. AP FACT CHECK: Trump untruths on Ukraine, impeachment fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A whistle blew, an impeachment inquiry swung into motion and the president at the center of it all rose defiantly to his own defense, not always in command of the facts.

A CIA officer, in a complaint filed under federal whistleblower protections that preserve anonymity, alleged President Donald Trump abused his office in pressing for a Ukrainian investigation of a Democratic rival, Joe Biden. That revelation persuaded Democrats to move ahead with an inquiry that could produce articles of impeachment. Trump has reacted with anger, with weekend tweets that made the groundless accusation that Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff, the Intelligence Committee chairman taking the lead in the impeachment review , criticized him "illegally."

60. Fiat Chrysler to pay $40M fine for overstating sales numbers -

DETROIT (AP) — Fiat Chrysler is paying $40 million to settle with U.S. securities regulators who say the automaker misled investors by overstating its monthly sales numbers over a five-year period.

61. Wells Fargo appoints Scharf, Wall Street cheers -

Wells Fargo named its third CEO in as many years as the bank attempts to put behind it a series of recent scandals.

Wells Fargo said Friday that Charles Scharf will take over for C. Allen Parker, who has led the San Francisco bank since March after its second CEO stepped down in quick succession.

62. US durable goods orders edge up slight 0.2% in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Orders to U.S. factories for big-ticket manufactured goods showed a slight increase in August but a key sector that tracks business investment plans declined, likely reflecting fallout from President Donald Trump's trade wars.

63. US consumer spending rises just 0.1% in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) — American consumers boosted their spending by just 0.1% in August, the smallest gain in six months, even as their incomes rose at a solid pace.

Personal income increased 0.4%, up from a small gain in the previous month, the Commerce Department said Friday. A measure of inflation preferred by the Federal Reserve was flat, but excluding the volatile food and energy categories, core prices ticked up 0.1%.

64. US long-term mortgage rates fall; 30-year at 3.64% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. long-term mortgage rates fell this week following a sharp rise the week before, making September the most volatile month for the key 30-year loan since March.

Mortgage rates have been running near historic lows, spurring prospective homebuyers, amid an uncertain economic outlook. Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday the average rate on the 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage dropped to 3.64% from 3.73% last week. By contrast, the average rate stood at 4.72% a year ago.

65. China releases more pork from reserve to cool prices -

BEIJING (AP) — China's government is releasing more pork from stockpiles to help cool surging prices ahead of celebrations of the Communist Party's 70th anniversary in power.

The government said Thursday it will auction off 10,000 tons of pork, the country's staple meat. It was the second release in two weeks following a similar announcement Sept. 18.

66. LBs Ignont and Reid, WR Jones leave Tennessee's team -

KNOXVILLE (AP) — Tennessee linebackers Will Ignont and Shanon Reid and wide receiver Jacquez Jones have left the team.

Volunteers coach Jeremy Pruitt confirmed the exits of all three players Wednesday, one day after multiple reports indicated Reid and Jones had entered the transfer portal.

67. US consumer confidence drops as economic uncertainties rise -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumer confidence fell sharply in September, a likely indication that growing economic uncertainties are taking a toll on American households.

The Conference Board, a business research group, said Tuesday that its consumer confidence index fell to 125.1 in September from a revised August reading of 134.2. Consumers' assessments of both current economic conditions and expectations for the next six months slipped.

68. Late burst of selling leaves US stock indexes little changed -

A listless day on Wall Street ended Monday with major indexes closing little changed as modest gains from earlier in the afternoon faded in the final minutes of trading.

The S&P 500 index slipped less than 0.1%, while the Nasdaq inched 0.1% lower. The Dow Jones Industrial Average notched a 0.1% gain. The stock indexes spent most of the afternoon holding on to slight gains following a wobbly morning in the market as investors digested some weak economic figures out of Germany.

69. Stocks fall on fresh trade worries -

Wall Street closed out a volatile week with losses Friday as investors worried that upcoming trade talks aimed at resolving the costly trade war between Washington and Beijing could be in trouble.

The selling, which erased modest early gains for the market, snapped a three-week win streak for the S&P 500. The benchmark index is still up 2.2% for September.

70. Fed announces plans to provide more support for repo market -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve says it will keep pumping cash into a vital but obscure corner of U.S. financial markets in coming weeks.

The New York Federal Reserve Bank, which handles the central bank's interactions with financial markets, said Friday that it will offer daily repurchase or "repo" operations of at least $75 billion through Oct. 10. The aim is to maintain the Fed's key policy rate within its target range.

71. 2 Federal Reserve officials highlight deep divisions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two Federal Reserve officials who dissented from this week's quarter-point rate cut on Friday highlighted the current deep divisions at the central bank.

Eric Rosengren, head of the Fed's Boston regional bank and one of two officials who opposed the rate cut, said Friday that the additional stimulus was not needed. He said it ran the risk of inflating the price of risky assets and encouraging households and business to take on too much debt.

72. Average 30-year mortgage rate rises to 3.73% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. long-term mortgage rates shot up this week, yet they stayed close to the historic lows that appear to be helping the real estate market.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac says the average rate on the 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage increased to 3.73% from 3.56% last week. The rate averaged 4.65% a year ago, when the higher government debt from President Donald Trump's tax cuts enabled borrowing costs to rise. But as the economic outlook has become less certain, the Federal Reserve has cut interest rates and borrowing costs have tumbled in ways that are generally aiding homebuyers.

73. President Trump says Fed Chair Powell's job is 'safe' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite all of his attacks on the Federal Reserve, President Donald Trump says Chairman Jerome Powell's job is safe.

Asked in an interview with Fox News if Powell's job was safe, Trump said, "It's safe. Yes, it's safe. I mean, sure, why not."

74. Japan central bank stands pat after Fed rate cut -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan's central bank opted Thursday to keep its monetary policy unchanged despite the growing signs of trouble that prompted the Federal Reserve to cut its benchmark rate.

The Bank of Japan said in its policy statement that exports, industrial output and business sentiment had been affected by the slowdown in overseas markets.

75. Japan central bank stands pat after Fed rate cut -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan's central bank opted Thursday to keep its monetary policy unchanged despite the growing signs of trouble that prompted the Federal Reserve to cut its benchmark rate.

The Bank of Japan said in its policy statement that exports, industrial output and business sentiment had been affected by the slowdown in overseas markets.

76. Stocks sink then recover after Fed cut -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are rebounding at the close of trading, led by banks and big tech names, after the Federal Reserve delivered an expected cut in interest rates.

Stocks initially fell after the Fed announcement, after the Fed showed its members are divided about the upcoming path for interest rates. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped as much as 210 points

77. What the Fed's rate cut means for you -

The Federal Reserve has cut its benchmark interest rate again, big news for the U.S. economy but something that will likely have a muted impact on Americans' personal finances, experts say.

That's because the reduction doesn't offset the increases of recent years. And as the key rate creeps closer to zero, financial institutions are less eager to pass borrowing benefits along. Lower rates could also further dampen the perks of savings.

78. Quessenberry’s TD caps years of struggle -

David Quessenberry was in the spotlight for the Tennessee Titans in Sunday’s loss to the Indianapolis Colts after catching the Titans’ first TD of the game on a tackle eligible play.

It’s odd enough that a guy wearing No. 72 is celebrating a reception in the end zone. But for Quessenberry, an extra offensive tackle, that moment Sunday was a fitting tribute to what he’s been through just to get himself back onto an NFL roster.

79. Trump names hostage envoy O'Brien national security adviser -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Wednesday he's naming hostage negotiator Robert O'Brien, who Trump had monitor the criminal case in Sweden against American rapper A$AP Rocky, as his new national security adviser.

80. US home building climbs 12.3% in August to 12-year high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The pace of U.S. home construction jumped 12.3% last month to a 12-year high on a surge in apartment building.

The Commerce Department said Wednesday that housing starts came in at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.36 million, the most since June 2007 and up from a revised 1.22 million, as builders overcame a shortage of skilled workers and available land.

81. A divided Fed reduces rates but might not cut again this year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A sharply divided Federal Reserve cut its benchmark interest rate Wednesday for a second time this year but declined to signal that further rate cuts are likely this year.

The Fed's move reduces its key short-term rate — which influences many consumer and business loans — by an additional quarter-point to a range of 1.75% to 2%.

82. China releases stockpiled pork to cool price surge -

BEIJING (AP) — China's government is releasing pork from stockpiles to help cool surging prices ahead of Oct. 1 celebrations of the Communist Party's 70th anniversary in power.

The price of pork, China's staple meat, has soared almost 50% from a year ago due to a devastating outbreak of African swine fever that killed or prompted authorities to destroy pigs. That has pushed up global pork prices as importers buy foreign supplies.

83. US stock indexes edge up as oil gives up half of its spurt -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock indexes ticked closer to record heights on Tuesday, but the modest moves belied plenty of churning underneath.

Oil prices and energy stocks slumped to give back nearly half of their huge gains from a day earlier. Rising prices for technology stocks and companies that sell to consumers, though, more than made up for those losses. Treasury yields fell a second straight day as the Federal Reserve opened a two-day meeting on interest rates, where investors expect it to announce a cut for the second time in as many months.

84. 3 things to watch for from the Federal Reserve on Wednesday -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When it previously met in late July, the Federal Reserve cut its benchmark interest rate for the first time since America's financial system stood on the edge of collapse more than a decade ago.

85. US factory production rose at healthy pace in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. factory output increased in August at a solid clip, reversing a sharp drop in July, as production of metals, machinery and chemicals all rose.

The Federal Reserve said Tuesday that manufacturing production climbed 0.5% last month, after a 0.4% drop in July.

86. US stocks close lower as spike in crude oil rattles market -

Airlines, cruise lines and other companies in fuel-dependent industries dragged U.S. stocks lower Monday after an attack on Saudi Arabia's biggest oil processing facility sent crude prices soaring.

87. With Trump trade war a threat, Fed is set to cut rates again -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For a second straight time, the Federal Reserve is set to cut interest rates this week to try to protect the economy from the consequences of a global slowdown and President Donald Trump's trade war with China.

88. AP FACT CHECK: Trump myths on economy, Dems' selective facts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The country described by the Democrats running for president is mired in child poverty, riven with economic unfairness and broken in its approach to health care, crime and guns. The country presented by President Donald Trump is roaring and ascendant , shattering all economic records for performance.

89. Stocks mostly lower as tech shares drop -

The S&P 500 notched its third straight weekly gain Friday, even as the major U.S. stock indexes ended the day mostly lower.

A slide in technology stocks, along with losses in consumer-focused and real estate companies, offset solid gains elsewhere in the market, including big Wall Street banks and industrial stocks.

90. The Fed and ECB aim to avoid downturns but with limited ammo -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank are struggling mightily to invigorate their economies at a time when growth is slowing, governments remain on the sidelines and the banks' usual stimulative tools appear less effective than in the past.

91. Senate approves Trump nominee Bowman for Federal Reserve -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate has confirmed President Donald Trump's nomination of Michelle Bowman to serve a full 14-year term on the seven-member Federal Reserve board.

92. US consumer prices up slight 0.1% in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumer prices slowed in August, rising by a slight 0.1%, reflecting a big drop in the cost of gasoline and other energy products.

The tiny increase in the consumer price index followed a much bigger 0.3% rise in July which had been driven by a jump in energy prices, the Labor Department reported Thursday.

93. European Central Bank deploys new stimulus to help economy -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The European Central Bank delivered a new blast of monetary stimulus Thursday to help the shaky economy in the face of uncertainties like the U.S.-China trade conflict and Brexit.

94. US consumer prices up slight 0.1% in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumer prices slowed in August, rising by a slight 0.1%, reflecting a big drop in the cost of gasoline and other energy products.

The Labor Department says the tiny increase in its consumer price index followed a much bigger 0.3% rise in July which had been driven by a jump in energy prices. With energy costs falling in August for a third month out of the past four, the overall price increase slowed leaving consumer prices rising a modest 1.7% over the past year.

95. European Central Bank deploys new stimulus to help economy -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The European Central Bank delivered a new blast of monetary stimulus Thursday to help the shaky economy in the face of uncertainties like the U.S.-China trade conflict and Brexit.

96. US stocks notch solid gains as China eases trade tensions -

Stocks notched broad gains on Wall Street Wednesday as investors drew encouragement from China's move to exempt some U.S. products from a recent round of tariffs.

Technology, health care and communication services stocks powered much of the rally. The benchmark S&P 500 index, which had been essentially flat since Friday, is on track for its third straight weekly gain.

97. Events -

Street Eats. A gathering of as many as 20 local food trucks along Deaderick Street between Fourth Avenue North and Fifth Avenue North. Thursdays, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Information

98. US wholesale prices up tiny 0.1% in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. wholesale prices edged up a slight 0.1% in August as energy prices took a big plunge, a further sign that inflation is remaining tame.

The Labor Department said Wednesday that the gain in its producer price index, which measures inflation pressures before they reach the consumer, followed a modest 0.2% rise in July. Core inflation, which excludes food and energy, rose a stronger 0.3%.

99. As Europe eyes economic stimulus, Trump says why not US? -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The European Central Bank appears to be preparing a new shot of stimulus to prop up the economy, amid broader questions about whether central banks like the ECB and the U.S. Federal Reserve can re-energize global growth on their own.

100. As 9/11 dawns, Trump blasts Fed members as 'boneheads' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump says the U.S. is missing out economically because "Boneheads" at the Federal Reserve won't lower interest rates at his insistence.

The Fed is meeting next week and is expected to trim its benchmark rate by another quarter point after cutting the rate for the first time in a decade in July. Trump has been pressuring Fed chairman Jerome Powell to drop rates to zero. The rate currently is in a range of 2% to 2.25%.