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Editorial Results (free)

1. US stocks slip deeper into a slump as recession fears grow -

Stocks fell on Wall Street and put major indexes deeper into a slump as recession fears grow.

The S&P 500 fell 1% Monday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average and the Nasdaq also fell.

The losses were broad and included banks, health care companies and retailers. The British pound slumped to an all-time low against the dollar and investors continued to dump British government bonds in displeasure over a sweeping tax cut plan announced in London last week.

2. Titans now must be road warriors coming off 1st victory -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans finally made a stand on their home field and got the ball to Derrick Henry along with the rest of their new playmakers to notch their first victory of the season.

3. Europe's outlook 'darkening,' ECB head hedges on recession -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The head of the European Central Bank said Monday that the economic outlook "is darkening" and she expects business activity to "slow substantially" in the coming months as high energy and food prices pushed up by the war in Ukraine sap consumer spending power.

4. Boston Fed's Collins says 'modest slowdown' is possible -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Susan Collins, the new president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, said Monday that a higher unemployment rate will be needed to bring down inflation from unusually high levels, but also suggested any economic downturn would likely be modest.

5. Civil rights law targets 'cancer alley' discrimination -

RESERVE, La. (AP) — Sprawling industrial complexes line the drive east along the Mississippi River to the majority-Black town of Reserve, Louisiana. In the last seven miles the road passes a massive, rust-colored aluminum-oxide refinery, then the Evonik chemical plant, then rows of white tanks at the Marathon oil refinery.

6. Beleaguered Titans' O-line protects Tannehill well in win -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Saving Ryan Tannehill from the Las Vegas Raiders' pass rush led by five-time Pro Bowl defensive end Chandler Jones seemed a difficult task for the Tennessee Titans.

Turns out Tannehill was sacked only once in Tennessee's 24-22 win Sunday over the Raiders. Too little and way too late to be of any help to the Raiders.

7. Trump allies create a new super PAC called MAGA Inc. -

NEW YORK (AP) — Top allies of former President Donald Trump are creating a new super PAC that's expected to serve as the main vehicle for his midterm spending and could become a key part of his campaign infrastructure should he move forward with a 2024 White House run.

8. White House hosts local officials, touts impact of policies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House on Thursday launched a new effort to show local governments what it can do for their communities, hosting North Carolina officials to highlight funding opportunities and hear firsthand how coronavirus relief, infrastructure dollars and other policies are faring locally.

9. Wall Street ends lower as global central banks raise rates -

Stocks closed lower on Wall Street, deepening their losses for the week, as central banks around the world raised interest rates to fight inflation. The S&P 500 fell 0.8% Thursday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell about half as much, and the Nasdaq composite lost 1.4%. Central banks in Europe and Asia increased rates a day after the Federal Reserve made another big rate hike and signaled more were on the way. The goal is to cool down economies by making it more expensive to borrow money. The yield on the 2-year Treasury, which tends to follow expectations for Fed action, rose significantly.

10. Titans, Raiders mired at 0-2, eye each other for 1st victory -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans and Las Vegas Raiders are in an NFL group no team ever wants to be mired in: 0-2 and stuck at the bottom of their divisions.

If these teams can avoid a tie Sunday in Music City, at least someone will walk away with the first victory of the season and a chance to start building some momentum.

11. Average US long-term mortgage rates climb to 6.29% this week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates jumped by more than a quarter-point this week to their highest level since 2008 as the Federal Reserve intensified its effort to tamp down decades-high inflation and cool the economy.

12. More Americans apply for jobless aid last week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans filing for jobless benefits rose slightly last week with the Federal Reserve pushing hard to cool the economy and tamp down inflation.

Applications for unemployment benefits for the week ending Sept. 17 rose by 5,000 to 213,000, the Labor Department reported Thursday. Last week's number was revised down by 5,000 to 208,000, the lowest figure since May.

13. Bank of England hikes rates but avoids more aggressive step -

LONDON (AP) — Britain's central bank raised its key interest rate Thursday by another half-percentage point to the highest level in 14 years, but it avoided more aggressive steps to tame inflation that the U.S. Federal Reserve and other banks have taken.

14. Powell's stark message: Inflation fight may cause recession -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve delivered its bluntest reckoning Wednesday of what it will take to finally tame painfully high inflation: Slower growth, higher unemployment and potentially a recession.

15. White House hosts local officials, touts impact of policies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House has a new effort to show local governments what it can do for their communities, hosting North Carolina officials to highlight funding opportunities and hear firsthand how coronavirus relief, infrastructure dollars and other policies are faring locally.

16. US has sent $8.28 billion in pandemic funds to local lenders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — On the same day the Federal Reserve gave a sobering report on the U.S. economy's trajectory, administration officials highlighted how they have kept some of the nation's smallest businesses afloat through the pandemic.

17. Swiss central bank enacts biggest-ever hike to key rate -

GENEVA (AP) — Switzerland's central bank carried out the biggest hike ever to its key interest rate Thursday, following the U.S. Federal Reserve and other central banks around the world in aggressive moves to clamp down on inflation.

18. Titans' Taylor Lewan, Bud Dupree sit out practice -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Three-time Pro Bowl left tackle Taylor Lewan did not practice Wednesday as the Tennessee Titans went through a walk-through session.

Titans coach Mike Vrabel said that veteran Dennis Daley was the plan at left tackle Monday night when Lewan was hurt on their first offensive play and carted to the locker room in a 41-7 loss to Buffalo on Monday night.

19. Legal Aid Society promotes Oswald -

Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands, Tennessee’s largest nonprofit law firm, has promoted Zac Oswald to senior deputy director of client services.

Oswald will continue to lead the firm’s housing practice group while taking on additional leadership responsibilities across the firm. Oswald had previously served as managing attorney of Legal Aid Society’s Gallatin office since 2018 and joined the firm as a staff attorney in 2014.

20. Stocks slump on Wall Street as Fed steps up inflation fight -

Wall Street closed sharply lower after the Federal Reserve stepped up its fight against inflation by raising interest rates.

The S&P 500 lost 1.7% Wednesday, as did the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

21. Bank CEOs warn of 'daunting' challenges from inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In what has become an annual ritual, the CEOs of the major U.S. banks appeared in front of Congress on Wednesday to sell themselves as shepherds of a helpful industry at a time of financial and economic distress for many Americans.

22. US gas prices tick up, ending 99-day streak of lower costs -

A 99-day run of falling gasoline prices — a streak that gave consumers a glimmer of hope that red-hot inflation might be cooling — has ended, with pump prices still much higher than a year ago.

23. US home sales slipped, prices grew more slowly in August -

Sales of previously occupied U.S. homes slowed in August for the seventh month in a row, as sharply higher mortgage rates and rising prices made homebuying less affordable, further cooling the once red-hot housing market.

24. Fed attacks inflation with another big hike and expects more -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Intensifying its fight against high inflation, the Federal Reserve raised its key interest rate Wednesday by a substantial three-quarters of a point for a third straight time and signaled more large rate hikes to come — an aggressive pace that will heighten the risk of an eventual recession.

25. Wall Street CEOs appear on Capitol Hill as election looms -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In what has become an annual ritual, the CEOs of the major U.S. banks appeared in front of Congress on Wednesday to sell themselves as shepherds of a helpful industry at a time of financial and economic distress for many Americans.

26. How steep Fed rate hikes affect your finances -

NEW YORK (AP) — Mortgage rates have jumped, home sales have slumped and credit cards and auto loans have gotten pricier. Savings rates are slightly juicier, though.

As the Federal Reserve has rapidly increased interest rates, many economists say they fear that a recession is inevitable in the coming months — and with it, job losses that could cause hardship for households already hurt worst by inflation.

27. Putin sets partial military call-up, won't 'bluff' on nukes -

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered a partial mobilization of reservists in Russia on Wednesday, risking a deeply unpopular step that follows a string of humiliating setbacks for his troops nearly seven months after invading Ukraine.

28. Stocks close lower ahead of Fed decision on interest rates -

Stocks closed lower on Wall Street ahead of a key decision on interest rates by the Federal Reserve.

The S&P 500 fell 1.1% Tuesday. The Nasdaq composite and the Dow Jones Industrial Average also lost ground. Treasury yields were mostly higher.

29. US stocks rise ahead of expected interest rate hike by Fed -

Stocks closed higher on Wall Street after swaying between small gains and losses much of the day as investors brace for another big interest rate increase this week from the Federal Reserve.

The S&P 500 rose 0.7% on Monday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average and the Nasdaq also gained ground. Treasury yields moved higher.

30. Titans CB Fulton, RB Hilliard out for Week 2 vs. Bills -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans ruled starting cornerback Kristian Fulton and running back Dontrell Hilliard out for Monday night's game in Buffalo because of hamstring injuries.

Neither player practiced all week. Reserve guard Jamarco Jones also was ruled out after missing practice Friday and Saturday because of an elbow injury.

31. Europe's central bank to use climate scores as it buys bonds -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The European Central Bank said Monday that it will give corporations climate scores before it buys their bonds and intends to prioritize those doing more to reveal and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, filling in details of its efforts to help Europe meet its environmental goals.

32. How much 'pain'? Fed to signal more rate hikes ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell bluntly warned in a speech last month that the Fed's drive to curb inflation by aggressively raising interest rates would "bring some pain." On Wednesday, Americans may get a better sense of how much pain could be in store.

33. Treasury recommends exploring creation of a digital dollar -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is moving one step closer to developing a central bank digital currency, known as the digital dollar, saying it would help reinforce the U.S. role as a leader in the world financial system.

34. Service sector remains strong despite inflation's grip -

NEW YORK (AP) — The largest part of the U.S. economy is holding up against the hottest inflation in four decades and the threat of a potential recession.

Hotels, restaurants and other businesses that provide services have managed to keep gaining ground through the summer, according to the latest survey from the Institute for Supply Management. The sector has been expanding since May, and August's gain was the biggest so far this year.

35. Mortgage rates hit 6%, first time since 2008 housing crash -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates climbed over 6% this week for the first time since the housing crash of 2008, threatening to sideline even more homebuyers from a rapidly cooling housing market.

36. Fewer Americans file for jobless benefits again last week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell again last week to a four-month low even as the Federal Reserve continues its aggressive interest rate cuts to bring inflation under control.

37. As sales decline, inventory, prices rise, especially condos -

“Market Activity decreased significantly as the rates rose 200 basis points since the start of the second quarter.”

That’s the August assessment from Steve Jolly, whose tenure as president of the Greater Nashville Realtors could have come at a better time. His predecessors had nothing, it seems, but good news to report as the market enjoyed a long winning streak.

38. US wholesale inflation declines in August to still-high 8.7% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation at the wholesale level jumped 8.7% in August from a year earlier, a slowdown from July yet still a painfully high level that suggests prices will keep spiking for months to come.

39. Driven by consumers, US inflation grows more persistent -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. inflation is showing signs of entering a more stubborn phase that will likely require drastic action by the Federal Reserve, a shift that has panicked financial markets and heightens the risks of a recession.

40. Titans place AJ Moore, Da'Shawn Hand on injured reserve -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans placed defensive back A.J. Moore and defensive lineman Da'Shawn Hand on injured reserve Tuesday.

41. Markets shudder on dashed inflation hopes; Dow falls 1,250 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks tumbled to their worst day in more than two years Tuesday, knocking the Dow Jones Industrial Average down more than 1,250 points, following Wall Street's humbling realization that inflation is not slowing as much as hoped.

42. US inflation still stubbornly high despite August slowdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lower gas costs slowed U.S. inflation for a second straight month in August, but most other prices across the economy kept rising — evidence that inflation remains a heavy burden for American households.

43. Trump's PAC faces scrutiny amid intensifying legal probes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sitting on top of more than $115 million across several political committees, Donald Trump has positioned himself as a uniquely indomitable force in the GOP who would almost certainly have the resources to swamp his rivals if he launched another presidential campaign.

44. Wall Street rallies ahead of high-stakes inflation report -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks climbed again Monday, as Wall Street made its final moves ahead of a high-stakes report that will hopefully show inflation hammered the economy less hard last month.

The S&P 500 rose 43.05, or 1.1%, to 4,110.41 for its fourth straight gain. That's its longest winning streak since July, in the early days of the market's bounce back from its battering earlier in the year.

45. Biden's midterm self-edit: Less talk about inflation woes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has stopped talking so much about inflation worries.

His remarks in Columbus, Ohio, in suburban Washington at a Democratic fundraiser, at a Cabinet meeting and in Labor Day speeches in Milwaukee and Pittsburgh were all missing a once-common refrain about families at the kitchen table straining under the rising costs of food and gasoline.

46. Titans blow 13-point lead, then miss potential winning FG -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans started exactly the way they wanted, jumping out to a double-digit lead.

Finishing was the issue.

The Titans blew a 13-point lead Sunday, then drove down the field to set up Randy Bullock for a 47-yard field goal to beat the New York Giants. The kicker on his sixth NFL team yanked the game-winning attempt wide left to turn a season-opening win into a 21-20 loss.

47. EXPLAINER: Ukraine's nuclear power plant shutdown cuts risks -

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — The forced shutdown of Ukraine's endangered and crippled Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant — Europe's largest — significantly reduces the risk of a radiation disaster that has haunted the world for weeks.

48. Stocks end broadly higher, breaking a 3-week losing streak -

Wall Street added to its recent gains Friday with a broad rally that broke the market's three-week losing streak.

The S&P 500 closed 1.5% higher, its third straight increase, and ended with a 3.7% gain for the week. That makes it the benchmark index's best week going back to July.

49. Titans, S Malik Hooker agree on multiyear contract extension -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans and safety Amani Hooker agreed to terms Friday on a multiyear contract extension.

Terms of the deal were not announced. The Titans open the season Sunday by hosting the New York Giants.

50. Stocks recover from a stumble on Wall Street and end higher -

The stock market recovered from a midday stumble and ended higher, staying on track for its first weekly gain in four weeks.

The S&P 500 rose 0.7% Thursday. The Nasdaq composite and the Dow Jones Industrial average also ended higher after bumpy rides of their own.

51. Long-term mortgage rates now at highest point since 2008 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates jumped again this week, hitting the highest levels in almost 14 years and pushing even more would-be buyers out of the market.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday that the 30-year rate jumped to 5.89% from 5.66% last week. That's the highest the long-term rate has been since November of 2008, just after the housing market collapse set off the Great Recession. One year ago, the rate stood at 2.88%.

52. Powell: Higher rates unlikely to cause deep US recession -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The last time the Federal Reserve faced inflation as high as it is now, in the early 1980s, it jacked up interest rates to double-digit levels — and in the process caused a deep recession and sharply higher unemployment.

53. Fewer Americans apply for jobless aid last week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits last week fell to its lowest level since May despite repeated attempts by the Federal Reserve to cool the economy and bring inflation under control.

54. Titans QB Tannehill has 'burning fire' after playoff loss -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The questions came at Ryan Tannehill in a variety of ways Wednesday, with reporters trying to draw out any remaining emotion from the Tennessee Titans quarterback's last game.

The man starting his 11th NFL season on Sunday in the opener against the visiting New York Giants didn't bite.

55. Stocks charge higher on Wall Street, erasing weekly losses -

Stock indexes on Wall Street closed solidly higher Wednesday, placing the market on pace to break a 3-week losing streak.

The S&P 500 rose 1.8% Wednesday, its biggest single-day gain in four weeks, with roughly 95% of the stocks in the benchmark index closing higher.

56. Fed's Brainard: Rates to rise higher, stay elevated longer -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve will need to continue lifting its short-term interest rate to a level that restricts economic growth and keep it there for an extended period, a top Fed official said Wednesday.

57. China's export growth sinks in August, imports shrink -

BEIJING (AP) — China's trade weakened in August as high energy prices, inflation and anti-virus measures weighed on global and Chinese consumer demand, while imports of Russian oil and gas surged.

Exports rose 7% over a year ago to $314.9 billion, decelerating from July's 18% expansion, customs data showed Wednesday. Imports contracted by 0.2% to $235.5 billion, compared with the previous month's already weak 2.3% growth.

58. Stocks drift lower, extending losses into 4th straight week -

Stocks drifted lower on Wall Street, extending the market's losses into a 4th straight week.

The S&P 500 fell 0.4% Tuesday. Technology companies posted some of the biggest losses, pulling the Nasdaq composite down even more. The Dow Jones Industrial Average also fell.

59. Titans tap next man up experience replacing Harold Landry -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans are days away from kicking off their new season and already have placed two players on injured reserve.

Losing Pro Bowl linebacker Harold Landry III hurts the most.

60. Stocks shed early gains, end lower for 3rd straight week -

Stocks gave up an early rally and closed lower Friday, marking their third losing week in a row and extending Wall Street's late-summer slump.

Major stock indexes initially climbed broadly following the government's latest job market report, which showed employers slowed their hiring in August. The report put traders in a buying mood, stoking cautious optimism that the Federal Reserve may not need to raise interest rates as aggressively in its ongoing bid to tame inflation.

61. EXPLAINER: 5 key takeaways from the August jobs report -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation's job market last month delivered what the Federal Reserve and nervous investors had been hoping for: A Goldilocks-style hiring report.

Job growth was solid — not too hot, not too cold. And more Americans began looking for work, which could ease worker shortages over time and defuse some of the inflationary pressures that the Fed has made its No. 1 mission.

62. Lower US job gain in August could aid Fed's inflation fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's employers added a healthy number of jobs last month, yet slowed their hiring enough to potentially help the Federal Reserve in its fight to reduce raging inflation.

63. Titans OLB Harold Landry tears ACL in practice -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans placed Pro Bowl linebacker Harold Landry III on injured reserve Friday.

The Titans did not cite a reason for Landry going on IR. A person with direct knowledge of the injury confirmed reports that Landry tore an ACL in practice Wednesday. The person spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because the Titans have not commented on the nature of Landry's injury.

64. When autumn leaves start to fall, will Wall Street follow? -

NEW YORK (AP) — Welcome to the worst month of the year for Wall Street.

Since 1950, September has brought an average loss of 0.5% for the S&P 500. That's 10 times worse than the next-worst month, February.

65. Fed is hoping August hiring report will show slowdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Raging inflation has so scrambled the economy that it's come to this: If Friday's jobs report for August were to show a significant hiring slowdown, the Federal Reserve — and even the White House — would likely welcome it.

66. Fewer Americans file for jobless benefits last week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fewer Americans filed for unemployment benefits last week as the labor market continues to shine despite weakening elements of the U.S. economy.

Applications for jobless aid for the week ending Aug. 27 fell by 5,000 to 232,000, the Labor Department reported Thursday.

67. Stocks end lower in choppy trading, on pace for weekly loss -

Stocks closed lower in another day of choppy trading on Wall Street, on pace for a weekly loss after several days of declines. Losses in technology and retail stocks outweighed gains in communications and other sectors. The S&P 500 lost nearly 1% Wednesday after wavering between gains and losses. The Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq composite also lost ground. Bed Bath & Beyond lost almost a quarter of its value after announcing a major restructuring and a stock sale. Treasury yields were mixed and energy prices fell. The market closed August broadly lower after surging in July.

68. McMath’s value adds up to better job security -

Former Titans general manager Floyd Reese had a lot of sayings when evaluating players for the roster. One of his favorites: “The more you can do...”

The point being, a player’s value to the team rises with the number of skills he possesses. That applies to wide receiver Racey McMath, whose role appears to be increasing as he approaches his second season in Tennessee.

69. Russia halts gas through major pipeline, citing maintenance -

BERLIN (AP) — Russia's Gazprom halted the flow of natural gas through a major pipeline from Russia to Europe early Wednesday, a stoppage that it announced in advance and has said will last three days.

70. US consumers more confident in August as gas prices dip -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Following three straight monthly declines, U.S. consumer confidence rebounded in August as inflation moderated and gas prices fell.

The Conference Board said Tuesday that its consumer confidence index rose in August to 103.2 from 95.3 in July.

71. Job vacancies rose in July, dashing Fed hopes for cooling -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of open jobs in the United States rose in July after three months of declines, a sign that employers are still urgently seeking workers despite a weakening economy and high inflation.

72. Wall Street closes lower, adding to last week's losses -

Stocks closed lower on Wall Street, adding to their recent losses as traders realized how determined the Federal Reserve is to keep interest rates high to fight inflation.

The S&P 500 gave back almost 1% Monday. Technology companies were the biggest drag on the index.

73. Stocks sink after Fed's Powell says rates will stay high -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are ending sharply lower after the head of the Federal Reserve dashed Wall Street's hopes that it may soon ease up on rate hikes in its effort to tame inflation. The S&P 500 lost 3.4% Friday, its biggest drop in two months, after Jerome Powell said the Fed will likely need to keep interest rates high enough to slow the economy for some time in order to beat back the high inflation sweeping the country. Tech stocks led the way lower, pulling the Nasdaq composite down even more. Higher rates help corral inflation, but they also hurt asset prices.

74. Powell: Fed's inflation fight could bring 'pain,' job losses -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell delivered a stark warning Friday about the Fed's determination to fight inflation with more sharp interest rate hikes: It will likely cause pain for Americans in the form of a weaker economy and job losses.

75. Hints of cooling prices, but Fed vows firm inflation stance -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation eased last month as energy prices tumbled, raising hopes that the surging costs of everything from gasoline to food may have peaked.

According to a Commerce Department report Friday that is closely watched by the Federal Reserve, consumer prices rose 6.3% in July from a year earlier after posting an annual increase of 6.8% in June, the biggest jump since 1982. Energy prices made the difference in July: They dropped last month after surging in June.

76. US stocks rise again as countdown to Fed speech nears end -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are closing higher on Wall Street, clawing back more of their recent losses, as the countdown clicks closer to zero for a highly anticipated speech about interest rates.

The S&P 500 rose 1.4% Thursday. Stocks have drifted through gains and losses since tumbling Monday to their worst day in months, as traders hold off on making big moves overall.

77. Climate change alters life at Fed's Jackson Hole conference -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) — When officials of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City sought a location for an annual economic symposium in 1981, they chose Jackson Hole, Wyoming, for a simple reason: It had fly-fishing.

78. Average US long-term mortgage rates rise; 30-year at 5.55% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates rose this week as inflation worries remained at the fore and the slowdown in economic growth weighs on the housing market.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday that the 30-year rate increased to 5.55% from 5.13% last week. Last year at this time, the rate stood at 2.87%.

79. Government revision shows economy shrank 0.6% last quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy shrank at a 0.6% annual rate from April through June, the government said Thursday in an upgrade from its initial estimate. It marked a second straight quarter of economic contraction, which meets one informal sign of a recession.

80. Fewer Americans claim jobless benefits last week -

NEW YORK (AP) — Fewer Americans filed for unemployment benefits last week as the labor market continues to stand out as one of the strongest segments of the U.S. economy.

Applications for jobless aid for the week ending Aug. 20 fell by 2,000 to 243,000, the Labor Department reported Thursday.

81. Stocks close higher as Wall Street awaits Fed speech -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are closing higher as Wall Street recovered some of this week's steep losses ahead of a highly anticipated speech by the Federal Reserve chair later this week.

The S&P 500 ended 0.3% higher Wednesday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq also inched higher.

82. Paul Newman's daughters sue late actor's charity foundation -

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A new lawsuit has exposed a deep rift between two of Paul Newman's daughters and the late actor's charitable foundation funded by profits from the Newman's Own line of food and drink products.

83. Titans trim to 80 by placing rookie kicker on reserve list -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans are making sure they keep undrafted rookie kicker Caleb Shudak around a bit longer.

The Titans placed Shudak on the reserve/physically unable to perform list Tuesday. The move trimmed their roster to 80 by the NFL deadline Tuesday afternoon.

84. Titans eager to return to postseason to snap 3-game skid -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans have strung together six straight winning seasons, three consecutive playoff berths and back-to-back AFC South titles capped by earning the AFC's No. 1 seed.

Only Kansas City has a longer consecutive winning streak at nine seasons.

85. Stocks drift as steadying yields calm Wall Street after fall -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks drifted to a mixed close on Wall Street, as steadying Treasury yields help calm the market following its worst tumble in months.

The S&P 500 slipped 0.2% Tuesday. It's coming off Monday's 2.1% drop, which came on the heels of its first losing week in the last five.

86. EXPLAINER: Why is Wall Street back on the roller coaster? -

NEW YORK (AP) — And back down goes Wall Street. After getting mauled most of the year, prices for all kinds of investments steadied in the summer and were heading back up. The recovery was so strong that some investors wondered if Wall Street's "bear market" was coming to an end.

87. German gas storage 80% full, progresses despite Russian cuts -

BERLIN (AP) — Germany's natural gas storage facilities are now more than 80% full, showing steady progress despite a drastic reduction in deliveries from Russia amid the war in Ukraine.

Gas storage in Europe's biggest economy has reached 80.14% of capacity, according to industry figures released Tuesday. The head of Germany's network regulator, Klaus Mueller, tweeted that storage is "being filled steadily" but cautioned that a planned three-day halt to deliveries through the Nord Stream 1 pipeline from Russia next week "could temporarily dampen" the effort.

88. Stocks fall broadly on Wall Street, extending market losses -

Another broad stock market sell-off on Monday deepened Wall Street's losses from last week, leaving the S&P 500 with its biggest slide since mid-June.

The benchmark index fell 2.1%, nearly doubling its losses from last week, when it broke a four-week winning streak. The Dow Jones Industrial Average slumped 1.9% and the Nasdaq dropped 2.5%.

89. Stocks end higher on Wall Street after more choppy trading -

Another day of choppy trading on Wall Street ended with modest gains for stocks Thursday and the benchmark S&P 500 barely back into the green for the week.

The S&P 500 rose 0.2% after shifting between small gains and losses for much of the day. It's now up 0.1% for the week.

90. Average long-term mortgage rates retreat slightly this week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates came back down slightly this week after the key 30-year loan rate jumped nearly a quarter point last week.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday that the 30-year rate fell to 5.13% from 5.22% last week. Last year at this time, the rate stood at 2.86%.

91. Fewer Americans file for jobless benefits last week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Slightly fewer Americans filed for unemployment benefits last week as the labor market continues to stand out as one of the strongest segments of the U.S. economy.

Applications for jobless aid for the week ending August 13 fell by 2,000 to 250,000, the Labor Department reported Thursday. Last week's number, which raised some eyebrows, was revised down by 10,000.

92. How new Colorado River cuts will impact states, residents -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Arizona and Nevada residents won't face bans on watering their lawns or washing their cars despite more Colorado River water shortages.

But U.S. officials announced Tuesday there will be less water available next year for them from the river that serves 40 million people in the West and Mexico and a farm industry worth billions of dollars. Observers warn that a reckoning is still coming for the growing region because the water crisis is expected to generate future cuts.

93. Stocks slip on Wall Street, erasing weekly gains for S&P 500 -

Stocks on Wall Street closed broadly lower Wednesday as drops by big technology companies wiped out the S&P 500's gains for the week.

The benchmark index fell 0.7%, snapping a three-day winning streak. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 0.5% and the tech-heavy Nasdaq slid 1.3%.

94. Companies plan $2.6B investment in major Alaska oil project -

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Two oil and gas companies have announced plans to invest $2.6 billion into developing a major oil field on Alaska's North Slope.

Australia-based Santos and Spain-based Repsol made the announcement, which was lauded by state political leaders, the Anchorage Daily News reported.

95. BofA CEO: Struggling Americans feel they are in a recession -

NEW YORK (AP) — The CEO of Bank of America said the recent debate over whether the U.S. economy is technically in a recession or not is missing the point. What matters is that current economic conditions are negatively impacting those who are most vulnerable.

96. Fed saw evidence of a slowing economy at its last meeting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials saw signs that the U.S. economy was weakening at their last meeting but still called inflation "unacceptably high'' before raising their benchmark interest rate by a sizable three-quarters of a point in their drive to slow spiking prices.

97. US retail sales were flat in July as inflation takes a toll -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The pace of sales at U.S. retailers was unchanged last month as persistently high inflation and rising interest rates forced many Americans to spend more cautiously.

Retail purchases were flat after having risen 0.8% in June, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday. Economists had expected a slight increase.

98. Wall Street extends winning streak to 4th week -

Stocks are closing higher on Wall Street, giving the S&P 500 its first 4-week winning streak since November.

The benchmark index gained 1.7% Friday, and other indexes also rose. Technology stocks drove much the rally.

99. Stocks closing mixed after new signs of cooling inflation -

NEW YORK (AP) — An afternoon pullback left stock indexes on Wall Street mixed, erasing most of their morning gains fueled by another encouraging report about inflation. The S&P 500 closed 0.1% lower Thursday.

100. US key 30-year mortgage rate jumps back over 5%, now 5.22% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates soared this week in a continued volatile market as the key 30-year loan rate jumped back over 5%.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reports that the 30-year rate rose to 5.22% from 4.99% last week. By contrast, the rate stood at 2.87% a year ago.