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Editorial Results (free)

1. Consumer spending rebounds despite rising October inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer spending rebounded by a solid 1.3% in October despite inflation that over the past year has accelerated faster than it has at any point in more than three decades.

2. Stocks fall on Wall Street, giving up the week's gains -

Wall Street capped an up-and-down week of trading Friday with a broad sell-off that wiped out the major indexes' gains for the week.

The S&P 500 lost 0.9% and posted its second straight weekly loss. Roughly 80% of the stocks in the benchmark index fell. Technology and communication companies accounted for much of the pullback. Industrial and financial stocks also were big drags on the index. Only the index's health care sector managed a gain.

3. Separating fact from fiction about green cars -

With all the developments in the auto industry you may think your next car will be electric, including a new federal target that would mean half of all new vehicles sold within a decade will have zero emissions. This will be a dramatic – and perhaps unsettling – shift for car shoppers.

4. As Ida leaves Gulf, analysts foresee modest economic damage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With more than 1 million customers in Louisiana and Mississippi having lost power, Hurricane Ida is sure to take a toll on the energy, chemical and shipping industries that have major hubs along the Gulf Coast. But the impact on the overall U.S. economy will likely be modest so long as damage estimates don't rise sharply and refinery shutdowns are not prolonged, economists say.

5. Carbon-capture pipelines offer climate aid; activists wary -

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Two companies seeking to build thousands of miles of pipeline across the Midwest are promising the effort will aid rather than hinder the fight against climate change, though some environmental groups remain skeptical.

6. 4 companies on verge of US opioid lawsuits settlements -

The yearslong effort by state and local governments in the U.S. to force the pharmaceutical industry to help pay to fix a nationwide opioid addiction and overdose crisis took a major step forward Tuesday when lawyers for local governments announced they were on the verge of a $26 billion settlement with the nation's three biggest drug distribution companies and the drugmaker Johnson & Johnson.

7. US opioid lawsuits on verge of settlements with 4 companies -

The yearslong effort by state and local governments in the U.S. to force the pharmaceutical industry to help pay to fix a nationwide opioid addiction and overdose crisis took a major step forward Tuesday when lawyers for local governments announced they were on the verge of a $26 billion settlement with the nation's three biggest drug distribution companies and the drugmaker Johnson & Johnson.

8. Bone McAllester Norton adds Meredith in Sumner -

Bone McAllester Norton PLLC has hired Brandon Meredith, a University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law alumnus, as the firm’s newest attorney at its Sumner County office. Meredith joins Bone McAllester Norton with 13 years of legal experience at Phillips and Ingrum in Gallatin.

9. Nissan Foundation gives $697K to 28 nonprofits -

The Nissan Foundation has announced it is awarding $697,000 in grants to 28 nonprofit organizations for its 2021 grant cycle at metro areas where Nissan has an operational presence. Eight Nashville area agencies will benefit.

10. Millions fear eviction as housing crisis worsens -

NEW YORK (AP) — More than 4 million people say they fear being evicted or foreclosed upon in the coming months just as two studies released Wednesday found that the nation's housing availability and affordability crisis is expected to worsen significantly following the pandemic.

11. What They Want: Divergent goals for Biden, Putin at summit -

GENEVA (AP) — An American president won't side with Moscow over his own intelligence agencies. There will be no talk of a "reset" in Russian relations. And it is highly doubtful that anyone will gaze into Vladimir Putin's eyes and discuss his soul.

12. UN raises global economic forecast to 5.4% growth in 2021 -

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The United Nations on Tuesday responded to the rebounding Chinese and U.S. economies by revising its global economic forecast upward to 5.4% growth for 2021, but it warned that surging COVID-19 cases and inadequate availability of vaccines in many countries threaten a broad-based recovery.

13. German government raises 2021 economic growth forecast -

BERLIN (AP) — Germany is raising its economic growth forecast for the year on the expectation of the gradual lifting of coronavirus restrictions and an anticipated rise in domestic spending, the economy minister said Tuesday.

14. Stites & Harbison raises ABA Health ranking -

The American Bar Association Health Law Section has ranked Stites & Harbison, PLLC sixth in its eighth annual Regional Law Firm Recognition List for the South region for 2020.

The firm improved its ranking by one spot from the previous year’s listing, now having been honored seven consecutive times to the Top 10 list. Stites & Harbison’s Health Care Practice Group draws on the firm’s many years of experience to assist professionals, providers and suppliers in all aspects of the expanding health care industry.

15. China's Huawei says 2020 sales rose despite US sanctions -

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese tech giant Huawei said Wednesday it eked out higher sales and profit last year but growth plunged after its smartphone unit was hammered by U.S. sanctions imposed in a fight with Beijing over technology and security.

16. Weisenseel named Lipscomb executive-in-residence -

Lipscomb University’s College of Business has named longtime finance executive John Weisenseel an executive-in-residence this spring.

Most recently, Weisenseel served as senior vice president and chief financial officer for AllianceBernstein LP, a global asset management firm. There he supervised all global finance and administrative services activities for the $9 billion market cap, $3 billion revenue publicly traded asset manager including SEC financial reporting, investor relations, treasury, tax, financial planning and analysis, strategic plan and financial forecast, real estate and office services functions.

17. House panel seeks storm documents from Texas grid operator -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Oversight Committee is investigating the agency that operates the Texas power grid, seeking information and documents about the lack of preparation for the recent winter storm that caused millions of power outages and dozens of deaths across the state.

18. Fed survey finds modest gains in the US economy in February -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Federal Reserve survey of business conditions across the United States has found that economic activity was expanding at a modest pace in February.

The Fed survey released Wednesday shows that the central bank's business contacts were expressing optimism last month about a stronger rebound as more COVID-19 vaccines are distributed.

19. Stellantis CEO says 4th largest carmaker to be disruptive -

MILAN (AP) — Stellantis CEO Carlos Tavares on Wednesday said the new car company formed from the merger of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles and PSA Peugeot would be a "disruptive" force in the industry, and that both sides would provide technologies to achieve the promised 5 billion euros ($6 billion) in cost savings each year.

20. UN to rich nations: Don't undermine COVAX vaccine program -

BERLIN (AP) — The head of the World Health Organization pleaded with rich countries on Monday to check before ordering additional COVID-19 vaccine shots for themselves whether that undermines efforts to get vaccine shots to poorer nations.

21. Events -

Procurement for Small Businesses (Virtual event). Join Mars associates from both procurement and finance to learn about basic principles and concepts of purchasing practices. The principles include preparing comprehensive proposal requests, evaluating supplier bids, win-win negotiation and more. This is a complimentary event, but pre-registration is required. Thursday, 8:30-9:30 a.m. Information and password

22. Global virus rules for Christmas: Tough, mild or none at all -

In Peru, you can't drive your car on Christmas. In Lebanon, you can go to a nightclub, but you can't dance. In South Africa, roadblocks instead of beach parties will mark this year's festive season.

23. EU looking to reinforce climate credentials during summit -

BRUSSELS (AP) — Five years after the Paris agreement, the European Union's climate credentials will be put to the test as the bloc's leaders meet Thursday to try and seal an agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 55% by the end of the decade compared to 1990 levels.

24. Italy shuts down 4 regions as Europe tries lighter lockdowns -

MILAN (AP) — Luxury fashion boutiques, jewelry shops and most of Milan's flagship department were shuttered Friday, as the center of Italy's vibrant financial capital fell into a gray quiet on the first day of a partial lockdown in four regions aimed at stopping the virus's resurgence.

25. Toyota sees profit slip, holding up despite pandemic -

TOKYO (AP) — Toyota's July-September profit fell 11% from a year earlier as the coronavirus pandemic slammed global demand, but Japan's top automaker appeared to be holding up better than weaker rivals that have sunk into the red.

26. Surge in virus threatens to reverse global economic rebounds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The resurgence of coronavirus cases engulfing the United States and Europe is imperiling economic recoveries on both sides of the Atlantic as millions of individuals and businesses face the prospect of having to hunker down once again.

27. 'Difficult winter': Europe divided on lockdowns; cases soar -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The World Health Organization's Europe director expressed deep concern on Thursday after the region again recorded the highest-ever weekly incidence of cases, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel warned of a "difficult winter" as residents in France braced for life under a new month-long lockdown and Spain's parliament voted to extend the country's state of emergency.

28. Lockdowns, business rollbacks threatened amid surging virus -

The alarming surge in coronavirus cases in Europe and the U.S. is wiping out months of progress against the scourge on two continents, prompting new business restrictions, raising the threat of another round of large-scale lockdowns and sending a shudder through financial markets.

29. France, Germany impose new lockdowns to curb virus spread -

BERLIN (AP) — France announced a full nationwide lockdown for the second time this year and German officials imposed a partial four-week lockdown Wednesday, as governments across Europe sought to stop a fast-rising tide of coronavirus cases.

30. Stocks close higher as companies report solid earnings -

Stocks are closing higher on Wall Street following several solid earnings reports from U.S. companies.

Investors are also monitoring last-ditch efforts in Washington to get more aid for the economy.

31. Europe, US reel as virus infections surge at record pace -

Coronavirus cases around the world have climbed to all-time highs of more than 330,000 per day as the scourge comes storming back across Europe and spreads with renewed speed in the U.S., forcing many places to reimpose tough restrictions eased just months ago.

32. Wood Stabell adds pair of attorneys -

Wood Stabell Law Group, PLLC has hired two attorneys, Lin Ye and Ashley Gold. WSLG has now added four attorneys since 2019.

Lin is focusing on corporate law, mergers and acquisitions and health care. With more than 10 years of experience, companies and investors in health care, technology, manufacturing, distribution and other industries have come to rely on Lin to advise them on a wide range of strategic corporate transaction and business arrangements.

33. Economy plunges 31.4% in spring but big rebound expected -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy plunged at a record rate in the spring but is poised to swing to a record increase in the quarter that is just ending.

The Commerce Department reported Wednesday that the gross domestic product, the economy's total output of goods and services, fell at a rate of 31.4% in the April-June quarter, only slightly changed from the 31.7% drop estimated one month ago.

34. Under virus strain, Europe's leaders plea at UN for unity -

PARIS (AP) — Struggling to contain resurgent virus infections, European leaders decried a collective failure to vanquish the pandemic and told the U.N. General Assembly on Friday that the time has come for countries to reinvent international cooperation.

35. US unemployment rate falls to 8.4% even as hiring slows -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. unemployment dropped sharply in August from 10.2% to a still-high 8.4%, with about half the 22 million jobs lost to the coronavirus outbreak recovered so far, the government said Friday in one of the last major economic reports before Election Day.

36. Smith named president of Tennessee Medical Association -

The Tennessee Medical Association has named Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s M. Kevin Smith, M.D., Ph.D., MMHC of Nashville as 2020-21 president of the member-based nonprofit advocacy organization that represents 9,500 physicians statewide.

37. Walmart's online sales soar as shoppers stock up on supplies -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans turned to Walmart's online business as well as its stores for supplies and home goods as the virus surged in new regions, resulting in soaring sales for the fiscal second quarter.

38. US budget deficit climbs to record $2.81 trillion -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — The U.S. budget deficit climbed to $2.81 trillion in the first 10 months of the budget year, exceeding any on record, the Treasury Department said Wednesday.

The nation's budgetary shortfall is expected to eventually reach levels for the fiscal year that ends Sept. 30 more than double the largest annual deficit on record.

39. Alibaba-backed Ant Group to go public in Shanghai, Hong Kong -

Alibaba-backed Ant Group to go public in Shanghai, Hong Kong

By ZEN SOO AP Technology Writer

HONG KONG (AP) — Ant Group, the online payments arm of e-commerce giant Alibaba Group, announced plans Monday for an initial public stock offering that could become the world's biggest since the coronavirus pandemic began.

40. European Central Bank urges leaders to act on economy -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The European Central Bank hit pause Thursday after deploying massive stimulus measures in recent weeks and urged European leaders to do their part by agreeing on a fund to support the regions hardest hit by the virus outbreak.

41. Fed survey says economy has picked up but outlook cloudy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve says economic activity has picked up in most regions of the country but still remains well below pre-pandemic levels with the country facing high levels of uncertainty.

42. Walgreens lost $1.7B in 3Q as global pandemic tightened grip -

The coronavirus pandemic pushed Walgreens to a $1.7 billion loss it the most recent quarter with customers staying home or limiting shopping to essential supplies from grocery stores.

The drugstore chain said Thursday that the rapidly spreading virus took a bite of between $700 million and $750 million from sales, with much of the damage coming from outside the United States.

43. Brooks Brothers, worn by Lincoln and Kennedy, goes bankrupt -

NEW YORK (AP) — Brooks Brothers, the 200-year-old company that dressed nearly every U.S. president, filed for bankruptcy protection Wednesday, the latest major clothing seller to be toppled by the coronavirus pandemic.

44. 5 key takeaways from a strong June jobs report -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At first glance, the June employment report was a blockbuster.

The U.S. economy produced a record 4.8 million added jobs last month, walloping expectations. And the unemployment rate sank from 13.3% all the way to 11.1%.

45. Stocks sink as virus cases jump, forcing states to backtrack -

Stocks on Wall Street fell sharply Friday as confirmed new coronavirus infections in the U.S. hit an all-time high, prompting Texas and Florida to reverse course on the reopening of businesses.

The combination injected new jitters into a market that's been mostly riding high since April on hopes that the economy will recover from a deep recession as businesses open doors and Americans begin to feel more confident that they can leave their homes again.

46. Banks lead gains for stocks on Wall Street in jumpy trading -

Financial companies led stocks broadly higher on Wall Street Thursday as traders welcomed news that the Federal Reserve and other regulators are removing some limits on the ability of banks to make investments.

47. Stocks slide on Wall Street as new coronavirus cases surge -

Wall Street's recent rally hit a snag Wednesday as new coronavirus cases in the U.S. climbed to the highest level in two months, dimming investors' hopes for a relatively quick economic turnaround.

48. State adopts COVID-19 spending plans -

The state has outlined new spending plans that reflect significant revenue reductions due to the economic impact of COVID-19.

Department of Finance and Administration Commissioner Butch Eley presented state lawmakers with the revised budget plans for the current fiscal year, as well as FY 2020-21, which begins July 1, 2020, and a framework for the following fiscal year, 2021-22.

49. Baker Donelson elects 2 Nashville shareholders -

Baker Donelson has elected 15 new shareholders across the firm, including two attorneys in its Nashville office: Anita Beth Adams and Megan M. Sutton.

A member of Baker Donelson’s Health Law Group, Adams concentrates her practice on advising clients on practice acquisitions, mergers and joint ventures. Her clients include physician practice management companies, physician groups, ambulatory surgery centers and individual physicians.

50. Fed report notes businesses less optimistic about economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Businesses across the country surveyed by the Federal Reserve don't appear to share the Trump administration's optimism about a rapid economic recovery starting this summer.

51. Nissan-Renault alliance to share more parts, technology -

TOKYO (AP) — The auto alliance of Nissan and Renault said Wednesday it will be sharing more vehicle parts, technology and models to save costs as the industry struggles to survive the coronavirus pandemic.

52. EU proposes 750 billion-euro coronavirus recovery fund -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union proposed Wednesday a 750 billion-euro ($825 billion) recovery fund to help countries weather a painful recession triggered by the coronavirus and bridge divisions over the conditions that should be attached for access to the money.

53. College baseball into July? Coaches say it would save money -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A group of Power Five coaches led by Michigan's Erik Bakich is proposing a later start to the college baseball season to trim expenses in the post-coronavirus era, make the game more fan friendly and reduce injury risk to players.

54. Recession-hit Japan's exports, imports fall due to pandemic -

TOKYO (AP) — Recession-hit Japan's exports plunged nearly 22% in April, marking their worst drop in more than a decade, as the coronavirus pandemic slammed global demand for autos, machinery and chemicals.

55. Cagle is appointed counsel to CASE -

Charles W. “Chuck” Cagle, shareholder and chair of the education law and government relations practice group at Lewis Thomason, has been appointed as Tennessee representative and counsel to the Council of Administrators in Special Education.

56. Germany, France propose virus recovery fund for EU economy -

BERLIN (AP) — The leaders of Germany and France agreed Monday on a one-off 500 billion-euro ($543 billion) fund to help the European Union recover from the coronavirus pandemic, a proposal that would add further cash to an arsenal of financial measures the bloc is readying to cope with the outbreak's economic fallout.

57. Companies navigate a world that is vastly changed -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

58. Webb DX to market serology test -

Nashville-based Webb Diagnostic Technologies will begin marketing a point-of-care serology test in the U.S. that can instantly detect antibodies in whole blood, serum and plasma for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, the company has announced.

59. Mayors of largest TN cities launch Economic Restart Task Force -

Nashville and Davidson County Mayor John Cooper, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, Knoxville Mayor Indya Kincannon and Chattanooga Mayor Andy Berke have formed the Tennessee Major Metros Economic Restart Task Force to plan and coordinate the restoration of business activity currently suspended due to COVID-19.

60. Mayors of Tennessee's 4 largest cities launch ‘Restart Task Force’ -

Nashville and Davidson County Mayor John Cooper, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, Knoxville Mayor Indya Kincannon and Chattanooga Mayor Andy Berke today announced the formation of the Tennessee Major Metros Economic Restart Task Force to plan and coordinate the restoration of business activity currently suspended due to COVID-19.

61. Fed notes what most Americans see: A sharp economic downturn -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is noting what most Americans are already acutely aware of: Economic activity contracted sharply and abruptly cross all regions of the country in recent weeks as the country locked down to combat the coronavirus pandemic.

62. Stocks fall as investors brace for earnings hit from virus -

Stocks fell on Wall Street Monday, erasing some of the market's big gains from last week, as investors braced for a sobering first look at how the coronavirus pandemic has hurt company earnings.

The S&P 500 fell 1% after cutting its early losses by more than half toward the end of the day. The benchmark index surged 12% last week, its best gain since 1974.

63. Housing market chills, layoffs, US cos. dial up virus fight -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Wednesday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

64. Consumers get some breaks, but layoffs keep coming -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Tuesday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

65. A guide to surviving financially as the bills come due -

The coronavirus has dealt a financial blow to millions of Americans and now April's bills are coming due.

The good news is there is help available. Reach out immediately to your mortgage lender, student loan servicer or utility provider to see what's available. Other assistance, such as stimulus checks or unemployment benefits, will take more time. The bottom line is that you need to take action to seek certain forms of relief.

66. Stocks extend losses, oil trades below $20 on virus impact -

BANGKOK (AP) — World markets started the week with more losses as countries reported surging numbers of infections from the coronavirus, forcing prolonged shutdowns of travel and business in many regions.

67. Business fallout: National bills coming due, with risk; consumers see it -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

68. Ford pushes for factory restart, union not so sure -

DETROIT (AP) — Ford wants to reopen five North American assembly plants in April that were closed due to the threat of coronavirus.

The three Detroit automakers suspended production at North American factories a week ago under pressure from the United Auto Workers union, which had concerns about members working closely at work stations and possibly spreading the virus.

69. Business fallout: Nissan factories to shut in Africa, India -

The outbreak of the coronavirus that emerged in China in December has dealt an unprecedented shock to the global economy as it continues to spread across the world. Here is a look at some of the latest developments Wednesday:

70. Stites & Harbison elects 3 to management committee -

Stites & Harbison, PLLC recently elected three members to the firm’s six-member management committee, replacing three attorneys who completed their terms of service. The new committee members are Erika Barnes of Nashville and Carol Dan Browning and Richard Wehrle of Louisville. The members rotating off the committee include attorneys Janet Craig and Mandy Wilson Decker (Lexington) and Marjorie Farris (Louisville). The new committee members will serve a two-year term.

71. World walls off as leaders warn viral pandemic will worsen -

ROME (AP) — Sweeping travel bans accelerated across the globe on Thursday, walling regions apart, keeping people inside their homes and slowing the engines of commerce in an effort to stem the viral pandemic unfolding around the world.

72. Wall Street circuit breakers trip ... markets, crude plunge -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. companies buffeted by supply chain chaos and a growing awareness of the scope of a viral outbreak are facing new threats to begin the week. An oil war between Saudi Arabia and Russia sent the price for a barrel of U.S. crude below $34.

73. Economic toll of outbreak deepens, duration remains unknown -

The Dow over the past five days: up 1,293, down 786, up 1,173, down 967. The Dow tumbled 800 points at the opening bell Friday. The VIX, an index known as Wall Street's fear barometer, is hovering at levels not seen since banks began to fall during the financial crisis.

74. Virus ripples through travel, energy, financial markets -

The economic affects of the coronavirus have preceded the spread of the virus itself, with financial markets swinging wildly, companies closing offices or asking employees work from home in affected areas, and throttling air travel across the globe. Following is a brief look at how things are changing in the economy and the workplace today as the outbreak widens.

75. EU commission unveils climate law amid criticism -

BRUSSELS (AP) — Amid fierce criticism from environmental activists, the European Commission unveiled plans Wednesday for its first ever climate law, which will act as the basis of the European Union's aim to make the 27-country bloc climate neutral by 2050.

76. Oil prices fall as coronavirus spreads outside China -

NEW YORK (AP) — With the viral outbreak spreading to more countries, the price of oil has dropped precipitously as global demand weakens even further.

That has sent shares tumbling for oil giants like Exxon and Chevron while smaller producers with idling rigs continue to slash jobs.

77. China virus outbreak chilling recovery for Asian economies -

BANGKOK (AP) — The virus outbreak in China has put South Korea's economy into an "emergency situation," its president says. Japan is on the brink of recession and big manufacturers are forecasting a whole world of woe.

78. Powell: Economy looks resilient despite risk of China virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said Tuesday the U.S. economy appears durable with steady growth and unemployment near a half-century low but faces some risk from the broadening viral outbreak that began in China.

79. Tennessee's school voucher program faces lawsuit -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Advocates for expanding school choices in Tennessee faced their first major road block Thursday after the state's largest communities filed a lawsuit seeking to block a new voucher program from going into effect later this year.

80. How's the economy? Fed increasingly turns to private data -

WASHINGTON (AP) — About a year ago, Federal Reserve officials were nervous. Markets were cratering. Fear about a trade war was rising. The officials needed to know if the turmoil was chilling consumer spending. Problem was, a partial shutdown of the government had halted the release of most economic data.

81. China's virus outbreak weighs on global business -

BEIJING (AP) — Global business is catching a chill from China's virus outbreak. Mink breeders in Denmark called off a fur auction because Chinese buyers can't attend due to travel curbs imposed to contain the disease.

82. Survey: Climate not considered a top 10 risk by CEOs -

DAVOS, Switzerland (AP) — Climate issues are set to be one of the main talking points at the World Economic Forum in the Swiss ski resort of Davos this week, but a survey of CEOs released Monday shows that they are not even ranked among the top ten threats to business growth.

83. EU lays out 1 trillion-euro plan to support Green Deal -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union plans to dedicate a quarter of its budget to tackling climate change and to help shift 1 trillion euros ($1.1 trillion) in investment towards making the economy more environmentally friendly over the next 10 years.

84. Nashville selected to host ‘Super Bowl’ of meetings -

Nashville has been named a host city for the 2022 ASAE Annual Meeting & Exposition.

The event will be held Aug. 20-23 at Music City Center.

The event attracts thousands of association executives and hundreds of exhibitors each year. Commonly known as the “Super Bowl” of meetings, it is the flagship education and exposition for associations and nonprofit organizations in the United States.

85. Bradley welcomes 5 new associates -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has added five associate attorneys in the firm’s Nashville office. They are:

• Bethany Breeze Davenport, tax and bankruptcy practice groups. She earned her J.D. from the University of Kentucky College of Law, where she served as editor-in-chief of the Kentucky Law Journal. She is a graduate of Transylvania University.

86. Stocks rise broadly; S&P 500 ends 3-day losing streak -

Stocks closed broadly higher Wednesday amid renewed hopes on Wall Street that a U.S. trade deal with China may be nearing, despite tough recent talk from President Donald Trump.

The gains snapped a three-day losing streak for the S&P 500, though the benchmark index remains on track for a weekly decline.

87. Housing ‘silver tsunami’ will see smaller impact here -

A newly released analysis by Zillow predicts a flood of homes will come on the market in the next 20 years as Baby Boomers age, creating a ‘silver tsunami’ of available houses.

Seniors 60 or older who will leave 920,000 owner-occupied homes between 2017 and 2027 and from 1.17 million per year 2027-2037.

88. Community Foundation announces grant recipients -

The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee has announced $2,397,870 in grants to be awarded to 365 local nonprofit organizations as part of the 2019 annual grant-making process.

CFMT is a charitable organization dedicated to enriching the quality of life in 40 Middle Tennessee counties and beyond.

89. Japanese automaker Honda cuts profit outlook as sales slip -

TOKYO (AP) — Honda has become the latest automaker to report weaker earnings as global demand softens.

The company said Friday that its profit in the July-September fell 6.7% from a year earlier to 196.5 billion yen ($1.8 billion) as vehicle and motorcycle sales slipped.

90. Fed survey: US economy being hurt by trade battles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy was expanding at a modest pace in September and into October despite the fact manufacturing was being hurt by rising trade tensions and weaker global growth while adverse weather was affecting farmers.

91. Bradley welcomes Davis as litigation associate -

Judea S. Davis is joining Bradley Arant Boult Cummings as an associate in the Litigation Practice Group.

Previously, Davis clerked for Judge Michelle Childs of the U.S. District Court for the District of South Carolina and Judge Garrison Hill of the South Carolina Court of Appeals. She served as a law fellow and law clerk for the Equal Justice Initiative, researching constitutional and criminal law issues and representing clients before the Alabama Board of Pardons and Paroles.

92. Fed officials widely divided on rates at July meeting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials were widely divided at their meeting last month when they decided to cut rates for the first time in a decade, with some arguing for a bigger rate cut while others insisted the Fed should not cut rates at all.

93. Ford 2Q profit falls 86% on cost of overseas restructuring -

DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) — Ford's net profit tumbled 86% in the second quarter due largely to restructuring costs in Europe and South America.

Net income for the April-through-June period dropped to $148 million, or 4 cents per share. Without the charges the company made 28 cents per share. Revenue was flat at $38.9 billion.

94. Stocks hit record highs as investors reward solid earnings -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks steadily gained ground Wednesday and closed broadly higher on Wall Street as investors rewarded solid earnings results from several large companies.

The S&P 500 got off to a weak start but gained steam and closed at a record high. Smaller stocks far outpaced larger ones and gave the Russell 2000 the biggest gain among major indexes. The Nasdaq gained ground all day and also closed at a record. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell.

95. Nashville companies partner on home health -

Ascension Saint Thomas and Nashville-based Contessa are joining together to offer Home Recovery Care, an emerging health care option that brings inpatient care to patients’ homes.

Home Recovery Care will be available for patients at Saint Thomas Midtown and West hospitals this fall, followed by Saint Thomas Rutherford and surrounding communities.

96. Heritage Medical Associates names CEO -

Heritage Medical Associates has hired James Shill as CEO. Shill brings more than 25 years of health care leadership experience to his new role.

Most recently, he served as CEO of Ferguson Medical Group, a multispecialty physician group with locations throughout southeast Missouri. Before that, he held leadership positions with multiple health care organizations in Alaska, including the state’s largest locally-owned medical clinic.

97. US, China wield threats going into high-stakes trade talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. and Chinese negotiators are to resume trade talks Thursday just hours before the United States is set to raise tariffs on Chinese imports in a dramatic escalation of tensions between the world's two biggest economies.

98. Chinese companies brace for tariff hike as trade talks begin -

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese exporters of all sorts of products, from power adapters and computers to vacuum cleaners, are anxiously hoping trade talks in Washington this week will yield a deal that might stave off higher U.S. tariffs on imports from China.

99. Historic Franklin photo contest is underway -

In honor of preservation month, the city of Franklin is conducting the 2019 My Historic Franklin Photo contest with hundreds of dollars in prizes, plus a chance to win two free tickets to the Pilgrimage Music and Cultural Festival in September.

100. US, China wield threats going into high-stakes trade talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. and Chinese negotiators are to resume trade talks Thursday just hours before the United States is set to raise tariffs on Chinese imports in a dramatic escalation of tensions between the world's two biggest economies.