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Editorial Results (free)

1. Russia breaks record again for COVID-19 deaths, infections -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia's daily tolls of coronavirus infections and deaths surged to another record on Friday, a quickly mounting figure that has put a severe strain on the country's health care system.

2. Russia marks pandemic high of infections, deaths -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia on Thursday recorded the highest daily numbers of coronavirus infections and deaths since the start of the pandemic, a rapidly surging toll that has severely strained the nation's health care system.

3. Americans quit their jobs at a record pace in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) — One reason America's employers are having trouble filling jobs was starkly illustrated in a report Tuesday: Americans are quitting in droves.

The Labor Department said that quits jumped to 4.3 million in August, the highest on records dating back to December 2000, and up from 4 million in July. Hiring also slowed in August, the report showed, and the number of jobs available fell to 10.4 million, from a record high of 11.1 million the previous month.

4. Russia's new COVID-19 infections, deaths near all-time highs -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia's daily coronavirus infections and deaths hovered near all-time highs Monday amid sluggish vaccination rates and the Kremlin's reluctance to toughen restrictions.

Russia's state coronavirus task force reported 29,409 new confirmed cases — the highest number this year and just slightly lower than the pandemic record reached in December.

5. Pentagon climate plan: War-fighting in hotter, harsher world -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new Pentagon plan calls for incorporating the realities of a hotter, harsher Earth at every level in the U.S. military, from making worsening climate extremes a mandatory part of strategic planning to training troops how to secure their own water supplies and treat heat injury.

6. Russia's infections reach the highest level so far this year -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia's daily coronavirus infections soared Thursday to their highest level so far this year as authorities have struggled to control a surge in new cases amid a slow pace in vaccinations and few restrictions in place.

7. Coronavirus deaths in Russia surpass 900 a day for 1st time -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia's daily coronavirus death toll surpassed 900 on Wednesday for the first time in the pandemic, a record that comes amid the country's low vaccination rate and the government's reluctance to impose tough restrictions to control new cases.

8. Virus deaths in Russia hit record for third time this month -

MOSCOW (AP) — Coronavirus deaths in Russia hit a record for the third time this month on Tuesday, and new infections once again exceeded 25,000 a day — a surge that comes as vaccination rates in the country remain stagnantly low and the government shuns imposing tough restrictions to stem the spread.

9. From paints to plastics, a chemical shortage ignites prices -

In an economy upended by the coronavirus, shortages and price spikes have hit everything from lumber to computer chips. Not even toilet paper escaped.

Now, they're cutting into one of the humblest yet most vital links in the global manufacturing supply chain: The plastic pellets that go into a vast universe of products ranging from cereal bags to medical devices, automotive interiors to bicycle helmets.

10. MTSU poll: Statewide growth in second quarter -

A new economic report from Middle Tennessee State University shows the state’s housing market continues to show signs of a recovery from the impact of COVID-19.

The MTSU Business and Economic Research Center’s statewide analysis for the second quarter “showed mostly positive outcomes,” with home sales increasing overall from the previous quarter and home prices up from the previous year across the state, noted report author Murat Arik, director of the BERC at MTSU.

11. Green energy takes hold in unlikely places with Ford project -

GLENDALE, Ky. (AP) — When Ford revealed plans to ramp up its commitment to the fledgling electric vehicle sector, the automaker chose to create thousands of jobs and pump billions in investments into two states where Republican leaders have vilified the push for green energy and defended fossil fuels.

12. New homes sales rise for second straight month in August -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Sales of new homes in the U.S. rose modestly in August as rising prices continue to sideline potential buyers.

Sales of new homes last month rose 1.5%, the Commerce Department reported Friday, reaching a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 740,000. That's more than economists had expected and follows an increase in July, which was revised upward to a seasonally adjusted rate of 729,000 houses. July's jump came after three consecutive declines in April, May and June as builders grappled with surging lumber prices and a shortage of workers.

13. WHO reports global decline in new COVID-19 cases -

The number of new COVID-19 cases continued to fall last week, with 3.6 million new cases reported globally, down from 4 million new infections the previous week, the World Health Organization said.

14. Stocks fall on Wall Street, giving up the week's gains -

Wall Street capped an up-and-down week of trading Friday with a broad sell-off that wiped out the major indexes' gains for the week.

The S&P 500 lost 0.9% and posted its second straight weekly loss. Roughly 80% of the stocks in the benchmark index fell. Technology and communication companies accounted for much of the pullback. Industrial and financial stocks also were big drags on the index. Only the index's health care sector managed a gain.

15. Surprise uptick in spending by Americans as delta spread -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans continued to spend at a brisk pace last month in the face of rising COVID-19 infections, though much of it was done online and not at restaurants or other sectors in the U.S. economy beleaguered by the arrival of the delta variant.

16. Japan exports slow as supply chain hiccups hit factories -

Japan's exports rose 26% in August from a year earlier, preliminary data released Thursday showed, below analysts' forecasts, as supply chain disruptions hit manufacturers.

The 6.6 trillion yen ($60 billion) in exports compared with 5.2 trillion yen a year earlier, when the economy was just beginning to recover from the initial impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

17. Separating fact from fiction about green cars -

With all the developments in the auto industry you may think your next car will be electric, including a new federal target that would mean half of all new vehicles sold within a decade will have zero emissions. This will be a dramatic – and perhaps unsettling – shift for car shoppers.

18. Amazon eyes 125K more hires, $18+ per hour average salary -

Amazon wants to hire 125,000 delivery and warehouse workers and said Tuesday that it is paying new hires an average of $18 an hour in a tight job market as more people shop online.

Competition for hourly workers has become fierce, and many companies are offering higher pay, sign-on bonuses and other incentives. Last week, package delivery company UPS promised to handout job offers in 30 minutes after candidates apply for many of the 100,000 holiday workers it plans to hire.

19. McDonald's introducing McPlant vegan burger in UK, Ireland -

McDonald's will begin selling a vegan burger in the United Kingdom and Ireland this month.

The McPlant burger, developed with Beyond Meat, features a plant-based patty on a vegan sesame bun with vegan cheese, vegan sauce and other toppings. Both the patty and cheese are made with pea protein.

20. Europe sees higher inflation on fleeting factors like oil -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Consumer prices spiked higher than expected in Europe in August, boosted in large part by more expensive fuel. Economists say the jump is temporary, but it could raise questions about how persistent higher inflation might turn out to be.

21. As Ida leaves Gulf, analysts foresee modest economic damage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With more than 1 million customers in Louisiana and Mississippi having lost power, Hurricane Ida is sure to take a toll on the energy, chemical and shipping industries that have major hubs along the Gulf Coast. But the impact on the overall U.S. economy will likely be modest so long as damage estimates don't rise sharply and refinery shutdowns are not prolonged, economists say.

22. TikTok to let users shop through app with Shopify deal -

TikTok users will soon be able to buy stuff directly through the short videos on the app — something they had only been able to do through ads until now.

Canadian e-commerce company Shopify said Tuesday that businesses will be able to add a shopping tab to their TikTok profiles to create a "mini-storefront" that links directly to their online store for checkout.

23. July home sales up 1% as prices reach unprecedented levels -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sales of new homes rose a modest 1% in July after a string of declines as new home prices soar to record levels.

Sales last month reached a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 708,000, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday. Sales had fallen in April, May and June as builders confronted surging lumber prices and a shortage of workers.

24. Dairy farmers eligible for pandemic-related assistance -

BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) — Help is on the way for dairy farmers who got a lower price for their products because of pandemic-related market abnormalities, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said Thursday.

25. Under delta, supply chain strains, Toyota slashes production -

TOKYO (AP) — Toyota is scaling back production in North America and Japan as the surging coronavirus pandemic in Southeast Asia and elsewhere crimps supplies.

Japan's top automaker said Thursday that it will cut back production at home by 40%, affecting 14 auto assembly plants in the country.

26. How AI-powered tech landed man in jail with scant evidence -

CHICAGO (AP) — Michael Williams' wife pleaded with him to remember their fishing trips with the grandchildren, how he used to braid her hair, anything to jar him back to his world outside the concrete walls of Cook County Jail.

27. TVA plans to switch 1,200 vehicles to electric by 2030 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The nation's largest public utility plans to switch out 1,200 of its vehicles for electric ones by 2030, furthering its role in that market for a power supplier that also plans to help add charging stations across the region, the utility's top official said Wednesday.

28. Japan's imports, exports grow on overseas economic rebound -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan's exports in July jumped 37% from a year ago, the government said Wednesday, highlighting an overseas recovery from the coronavirus pandemic.

Imports also grew, rising 28.5%, according to Finance Ministry data, for the second straight month of a trade surplus for the world's third largest economy.

29. Japan ekes out economic growth in recovery from pandemic -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan's economy grew at an annual rate of 1.3% in the last quarter, raising hopes for a gradual recovery from the painful impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

The Cabinet Office reported Monday seasonally adjusted gross domestic product, or GDP, the sum of the value of a nation's products and services, grew 0.3% in April-June, marking a reversal from the 0.9% contraction in the previous quarter for the world's third-largest economy.

30. Poll: Mortgage shoppers still seeking human interaction -

With the pandemic gaining speed once again, many Realtors and sellers are concerned as to how the market will be affected. With the Nashville market having its best two years in history during the pandemic, most are not worried.

31. EXPLAINER: What the $65B broadband service plan will do -

The Senate's $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure plan includes a $65 billion investment in broadband that the White House says will "deliver reliable, affordable, high-speed internet to every household."

32. Smyrna Nissan plant to close for 2 weeks due to chip shortage -

DETROIT (AP) — Nissan says its huge factory in Smyrna, Tennessee, will close for two weeks starting Monday due to computer chip shortages brought on by a coronavirus outbreak in Malaysia.

The shutdown is among the longest at any U.S. auto plant of this size since the semiconductor shortage, which has hobbled auto production worldwide, started to hit late last year.

33. Toyota reports record profit amid pandemic, keeps forecasts -

TOKYO (AP) — Toyota reported Wednesday a record 897.8 billion yen ($8.2 billion) profit for the fiscal first quarter, underlining the Japanese automaker's resilience even amid the coronavirus pandemic.

34. China orders mass testing in Wuhan as COVID outbreak spreads -

BEIJING (AP) — China suspended flights and trains, canceled professional basketball league games and announced mass coronavirus testing in Wuhan on Tuesday as widening outbreaks of the delta variant reached the city where the disease was first detected in late 2019.

35. Evictions expected to spike as federal moratorium ends -

BOSTON (AP) — Evictions, which have mostly been on pause during the pandemic, are expected to ramp up on Monday after the expiration of a federal moratorium as housing courts take up more cases and tenants are locked out of their homes.

36. EXPLAINER: Detailing Japan's new COVID state of emergency -

TOKYO (AP) — Coronavirus infection cases have reached daily records in Tokyo, which is now playing host to the Olympics. The Japanese government has declared the capital and several other regions under a "state of emergency" during the entire Games. With such a global sporting event unfolding, what does that mean? Here's a rundown.

37. European economy grows 2%, ending double-dip recession -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Europe emerged from a double-dip recession in the second quarter with stronger than expected growth of 2.0% over the quarter before, according to official figures released Friday, as restrictions eased, consumers started spending built-up savings and major companies showed stronger results.

38. Sales of new homes fall 6.6% in June -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sales of new homes fell for a third straight month in June, dropping by 6.6%. to the lowest level in more than a year.

The June sales decline left sales at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 676,000, the Commerce Department reported Monday. That followed a 7.7% sales decline in May and a 10.1% fall in April.

39. Carbon-capture pipelines offer climate aid; activists wary -

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Two companies seeking to build thousands of miles of pipeline across the Midwest are promising the effort will aid rather than hinder the fight against climate change, though some environmental groups remain skeptical.

40. Americans spend again, American Express profit surges -

NEW YORK (AP) — Spending at restaurants, shops and entertainment venues has come back in force as vaccines become more common and it fueled a revenue surge at American Express during the second quarter.

41. Should vaccinated people mask up with COVID-19 cases rising? -

Should vaccinated people mask up with COVID-19 cases rising?

It depends on your situation, but masking in public can provide another layer of protection and help prevent the virus from spreading to others who aren't protected.

42. Effort to fund racially diverse climate groups gets momentum -

Efforts to increase how much philanthropic funding goes to minority-led environmental organizations are gaining momentum, with one group's push for transparency from the nation's top climate donors drawing big-name support.

43. 4 companies on verge of US opioid lawsuits settlements -

The yearslong effort by state and local governments in the U.S. to force the pharmaceutical industry to help pay to fix a nationwide opioid addiction and overdose crisis took a major step forward Tuesday when lawyers for local governments announced they were on the verge of a $26 billion settlement with the nation's three biggest drug distribution companies and the drugmaker Johnson & Johnson.

44. US opioid lawsuits on verge of settlements with 4 companies -

The yearslong effort by state and local governments in the U.S. to force the pharmaceutical industry to help pay to fix a nationwide opioid addiction and overdose crisis took a major step forward Tuesday when lawyers for local governments announced they were on the verge of a $26 billion settlement with the nation's three biggest drug distribution companies and the drugmaker Johnson & Johnson.

45. US home construction jumps 6.3% in June -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Home construction in the U.S. jumped 6.3% in June, another big swing in a volatile year.

The rise in June put home construction at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.64 million units, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday.

46. Pacific Rim leaders discuss economic way out of pandemic -

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — U.S. President Joe Biden, his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping, Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga and Russian President Vladimir Putin are among Pacific Rim leaders gathering virtually to discuss strategies to help economies rebound from a resurgent COVID-19 pandemic.

47. Fed survey: US economy strong but hindered by bottlenecks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve's latest nationwide business survey found that the economy strengthened further in late May and early June, despite supply-chain bottlenecks that led to price hikes.

48. Rail officials push 15-year plan to boost Northeast Corridor -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As Congress eyes an infrastructure package, a coalition of transportation agencies and Amtrak on Wednesday released a 15-year plan of rail improvements for the congested Northeast Corridor that would boost daily train routes and significantly speed travel on Acela express lines.

49. Bone McAllester Norton adds Meredith in Sumner -

Bone McAllester Norton PLLC has hired Brandon Meredith, a University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law alumnus, as the firm’s newest attorney at its Sumner County office. Meredith joins Bone McAllester Norton with 13 years of legal experience at Phillips and Ingrum in Gallatin.

50. Electrify America to double EV charging stations by 2025 -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Electrify America, an electric vehicle charging network funded with money paid by Volkswagen as punishment for its emissions cheating scandal, says it plans to more than double its number of charging stations throughout the United States and Canada.

51. Biden relaunches council of governors with bipartisan group -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Thursday will relaunch the council of governors, an advisory board of governors and a number of key Cabinet secretaries and top administration officials focused on strengthening federal and state collaboration on major national security issues.

52. Russia launches booster shots amid soaring infections -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian health authorities on Thursday launched booster vaccination for those who had been sick with COVID-19 or immunized more than six months ago, an effort that comes amid a surge in new infections and deaths.

53. US home contract signings see big rebound in May -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — More Americans signed contracts to buy homes in May, a surprising rebound after months of cooling in the housing market, where lack of inventory has pushed prices to record levels.

54. Nissan Foundation gives $697K to 28 nonprofits -

The Nissan Foundation has announced it is awarding $697,000 in grants to 28 nonprofit organizations for its 2021 grant cycle at metro areas where Nissan has an operational presence. Eight Nashville area agencies will benefit.

55. Pandemic points to need to work together as Italy hosts G-20 -

MATERA, Italy (AP) — With the pandemic providing painful lessons on how interconnected the world is, ministers from nations accounting for more than half the world's population were meeting in Italy on Tuesday to explore how to better cooperate, including on vaccines and climate change efforts.

56. Surprise 5.9% drop in new home sales; prices hit record high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sales of new homes fell unexpectedly in May and the 5.9% retreat was the second consecutive monthly decline even as the median price hit an all-time high.

The May sales decline pushed sales to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 769,000, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday. That followed a 7.8% sales decline in April, a figure that was revised lower from what was initially thought to be a drop of only 5.9%.

57. Biden pushes shots for young adults as variant concern grows -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government is stepping up efforts to get younger Americans vaccinated for COVID-19 as concerns grow about the spread of a new variant that threatens to set the country back in the months ahead.

58. Millions fear eviction as housing crisis worsens -

NEW YORK (AP) — More than 4 million people say they fear being evicted or foreclosed upon in the coming months just as two studies released Wednesday found that the nation's housing availability and affordability crisis is expected to worsen significantly following the pandemic.

59. Amazon allots $300 million for housing near mass transit -

ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — Amazon is providing $300 million in low-interest loans to support housing located near mass transit in the Washington, D.C., area and the Seattle and Nashville, Tennessee, regions.

60. What They Want: Divergent goals for Biden, Putin at summit -

GENEVA (AP) — An American president won't side with Moscow over his own intelligence agencies. There will be no talk of a "reset" in Russian relations. And it is highly doubtful that anyone will gaze into Vladimir Putin's eyes and discuss his soul.

61. Yellen: Administration is watching inflation closely -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen assured Congress that the recent jump in inflation is being monitored very carefully by the Biden administration, but said again that any increase will prove temporary.

62. France eases mask rules; will end nightly virus curfew -

PARIS (AP) — France on Wednesday eased several COVID-19 restrictions, with authorities saying it's no longer always mandatory to wear masks outdoors and halting an 8-month nightly coronavirus curfew this weekend.

63. Robotic ship sets off to retrace the Mayflower's journey -

SWANSEA, Wales (AP) — Four centuries and one year after the Mayflower departed from Plymouth, England, on a historic sea journey to America, another trailblazing vessel with the same name has set off to retrace the voyage.

64. US vaccine surplus grows by the day as expiration dates loom -

In Tennessee and North Carolina, demand for the COVID-19 vaccine has slowed down so much that they have given millions of doses back to the federal government, even though less than half of their total populations are vaccinated.

65. Japan's vaccine push ahead of Olympics looks to be too late -

TOKYO (AP) — It may be too little, too late. That's the realization sinking in as Japan scrambles to catch up on a frustratingly slow vaccination drive less than two months before the Summer Olympics, delayed by a year because of the coronavirus pandemic, are scheduled to start.

66. Fewer Americans sign contracts to buy homes in April -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Fewer Americans signed contracts to buy homes in April as a lack of supply continues to foil would-be buyers.

The National Association of Realtors' index of pending home sales fell 4.4% to 106.2 in April, a third straight sluggish month after nearly a year-long rebound from the depths of the pandemic. The decline this month was far greater than economists were expecting heading into the summer.

67. Major Japan newspaper Asahi calls for Olympic cancellation -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan's Asahi Shimbun newspaper on Wednesday called for the Tokyo Olympics to be canceled with the games set to open in less than two months.

It is the first of Japan's major newspapers to make the move and joins some regional newspapers that have recently added to the growing opposition to holding the Olympics.

68. Conservatives seize on gas crunch to blame Biden, stir base -

A graphic calling the East Coast fuel supply crunch "Biden's Gas Crisis." A tweet speculating that gas stations running dry was an "INSIDE JOB." A meme depicting the president and vice president cheering about the "Green New Deal" in front of a snaking line at a fuel station.

69. Biden team moves swiftly to tackle pipeline political peril -

The Biden administration swung aggressively into action after a primary gasoline pipeline fell prey to a cyberattack — understanding that the situation posed a possible series of political and economic risks.

70. Gasoline pipeline shutdown tests Biden administration -

The cyberattack last week on a primary gasoline pipeline has created new political and economic risks for the Biden administration, which is working to keep the fuel flowing as prices spike.

Officials laid out plans Wednesday to address transportation issues and price pressures after ransom-seeking hackers last week shut down the Colonial Pipeline, which delivers about 45% of the East Coast's gas.

71. UN raises global economic forecast to 5.4% growth in 2021 -

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The United Nations on Tuesday responded to the rebounding Chinese and U.S. economies by revising its global economic forecast upward to 5.4% growth for 2021, but it warned that surging COVID-19 cases and inadequate availability of vaccines in many countries threaten a broad-based recovery.

72. General: China's Africa outreach poses threat from Atlantic -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The top U.S general for Africa is warning that a growing threat from China may come not just from the waters of the Pacific but from the Atlantic as well.

U.S. Gen. Stephen Townsend, in an interview with The Associated Press, said Beijing is looking to establish a large navy port capable of hosting submarines or aircraft carriers on Africa's western coast. Townsend said China has approached countries stretching from Mauritania to south of Namibia, intent on establishing a naval facility. If realized, that prospect would enable China to base warships in its expanding Navy in the Atlantic as well as Pacific oceans.

73. More Americans sign contracts to buy homes in March -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — More Americans signed contracts to buy homes in March after two months of declines, pointing to a healthy housing market as summer approaches and the economy continues what is shaping up to be a rapid recovery.

74. Biden releases money in push to modernize US electric grid -

NEW YORK (AP) — The federal government said Tuesday it is making more than $8 billion available to build and improve the nation's transmission lines as part of its efforts to improve America's aging electric grid and meet President Joe Biden's ambitious clean-energy goals.

75. German government raises 2021 economic growth forecast -

BERLIN (AP) — Germany is raising its economic growth forecast for the year on the expectation of the gradual lifting of coronavirus restrictions and an anticipated rise in domestic spending, the economy minister said Tuesday.

76. US drop in vaccine demand has some places turning down doses -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Louisiana has stopped asking the federal government for its full allotment of COVID-19 vaccine. About three-quarters of Kansas counties have turned down new shipments of the vaccine at least once over the past month. And in Mississippi, officials asked the federal government to ship vials in smaller packages so they don't go to waste.

77. US ends oil, gas lease sales from public land through June -

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The U.S. Interior Department is cancelling oil and gas lease sales from public lands through June amid an ongoing review of how the program contributes to climate change, officials said Wednesday.

78. Stites & Harbison raises ABA Health ranking -

The American Bar Association Health Law Section has ranked Stites & Harbison, PLLC sixth in its eighth annual Regional Law Firm Recognition List for the South region for 2020.

The firm improved its ranking by one spot from the previous year’s listing, now having been honored seven consecutive times to the Top 10 list. Stites & Harbison’s Health Care Practice Group draws on the firm’s many years of experience to assist professionals, providers and suppliers in all aspects of the expanding health care industry.

79. Coca-Cola sales rise as vaccinations roll out, venues open -

Sales are steadily improving at Coca-Cola Co. as vaccinations allow for the opening of stadiums, restaurants and theaters in many regions globally.

80. March US home construction jumps to fastest pace since 2006 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. housing construction rebounded strongly in March to the fastest pace since 2006 as home builders recovered from an unusually frigid February that shut down projects.

Builders began construction on new homes and apartments at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.74 million units in March, the Commerce Department reported Friday, a 19.4% increase over February when housing construction fell by 11.3%. It was the fastest pace for home building since a level of 1.8 million in June 2006 during the last housing boom.

81. With layoffs down and spending up, US rebound gains momentum -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A much-awaited economic boom coming off the pandemic recession appeared to edge closer to reality Thursday with fresh data showing the pace of layoffs dwindling, consumers spending freely and manufacturing rebounding.

82. European lawmakers, executives urge US to halve emissions -

BERLIN (AP) — Dozens of European lawmakers, business executives and union leaders on Tuesday urged the United States to cut its greenhouse gas emissions by 50% in the coming decade compared with 2005 levels.

83. Drivers wanted: Record demand at Uber as vaccinations rise -

Uber is offering sign-up bonuses and other incentives for drivers as it faces record demand for rides and meal delivery.

The San Francisco ride-hailing company said Monday that total monthly bookings, including food delivery and passenger service, reached an all-time high in March.

84. No region in the world spared as virus cases, deaths surge -

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Hospitals in Turkey and Poland are filling up fast. Pakistan is restricting domestic travel to bring a surge in coronavirus infections under control. Even Thailand, which has weathered the coronavirus pandemic far better than many nations, is now struggling to contain a new COVID-19 surge.

85. Christians mark Good Friday amid lingering virus woes -

JERUSALEM (AP) — Christians in the Holy Land are marking Good Friday this year amid signs the coronavirus crisis is winding down, with religious sites open to limited numbers of faithful but none of the mass pilgrimages usually seen in the Holy Week leading up to Easter.

86. Events -

Industry Roundtable – Hospitality. Roundtables grouped by industry offer a new way to network in the New Year for Gallatin Chamber members. These meetings offer a place to promote community and to discuss what is happing in area businesses. Coffee will be provided, and a Chamber team member will attend each meeting. The Gathering Place, 450 W Main Street, Suite B1. Thursday, 7-8 a.m. Fee included in Chamber membership; registration is required. Information

87. Feb. US home contract signings tumble, now lag year-ago pace -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — The number of Americans who signed contracts to buy homes last month fell by the most since last year's virus outbreak sent the economy into freefall.

The National Association of Realtors' index of pending home sales tumbled 10.6% to 110.3 in February, its lowest level since May of last year.

88. China's Huawei says 2020 sales rose despite US sanctions -

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese tech giant Huawei said Wednesday it eked out higher sales and profit last year but growth plunged after its smartphone unit was hammered by U.S. sanctions imposed in a fight with Beijing over technology and security.

89. Germany to restrict AstraZeneca use in under-60s due to clots -

BERLIN (AP) — German health officials have agreed to restrict the use of AstraZeneca's coronavirus vaccine in people under 60, amid fresh concern over unusual blood clots reported from those who received the shots.

90. Weisenseel named Lipscomb executive-in-residence -

Lipscomb University’s College of Business has named longtime finance executive John Weisenseel an executive-in-residence this spring.

Most recently, Weisenseel served as senior vice president and chief financial officer for AllianceBernstein LP, a global asset management firm. There he supervised all global finance and administrative services activities for the $9 billion market cap, $3 billion revenue publicly traded asset manager including SEC financial reporting, investor relations, treasury, tax, financial planning and analysis, strategic plan and financial forecast, real estate and office services functions.

91. Top Davidson County commercial sales for February 2021 -

Top commercial real estate sales, February 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

92. Gov't data show race, region disparities in school reopening -

Nearly half of the nation's elementary schools were open for full-time classroom learning as of last month, but the share of students learning in-person has varied greatly by region and by race, with most nonwhite students learning entirely online, according to results from a national survey conducted by the Biden administration.

93. Tourism groups push US to eliminate travel restrictions -

Airlines and other tourism-related businesses are pushing the White House to draw up a plan in the next five weeks to boost international travel and eliminate restrictions that were imposed early in the pandemic.

94. AstraZeneca vaccinations resume in Europe after clot scare -

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Countries across Europe resumed vaccinations with the AstraZeneca shot on Friday, as leaders sought to reassure their populations it is safe following brief suspensions that cast doubt on a vaccine that is critical to ending the coronavirus pandemic.

95. Scientist behind coronavirus shot says next target is cancer -

BERLIN (AP) — The scientist who won the race to deliver the first widely used coronavirus vaccine says people can rest assured the shots are safe, and the technology behind it will soon be used to fight another global scourge — cancer.

96. Major European nations suspend use of AstraZeneca vaccine -

BERLIN (AP) — A cascading number of European countries — including Germany, France, Italy and Spain — suspended use of AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine Monday over reports of dangerous blood clots in some recipients, though the company and international regulators say there is no evidence the shot is to blame.

97. Homebound children drive surge in Lego sales -

COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — Sales of Lego sets surged last year as more children stayed home during global pandemic lockdowns - and parents bought the colorful plastic brick toys to keep them entertained through days of isolation.

98. Forecast: Virus vaccines help inject hope in world economy -

PARIS (AP) — The world economy is bouncing back from the pandemic crisis faster than expected, thanks in part to successful coronavirus vaccines and U.S. stimulus efforts, but the improvements are uneven and joblessness remains a big concern, according to a new forecast.

99. House panel seeks storm documents from Texas grid operator -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Oversight Committee is investigating the agency that operates the Texas power grid, seeking information and documents about the lack of preparation for the recent winter storm that caused millions of power outages and dozens of deaths across the state.

100. Fed survey finds modest gains in the US economy in February -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Federal Reserve survey of business conditions across the United States has found that economic activity was expanding at a modest pace in February.

The Fed survey released Wednesday shows that the central bank's business contacts were expressing optimism last month about a stronger rebound as more COVID-19 vaccines are distributed.