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Editorial Results (free)

1. Klondike discontinues Choco Taco -

Choco Taco, a favored poolside cuisine for generations, will soon be no more after owner and ice cream maker Klondike decided to discontinue the summer treat.

"Over the past 2 years, we have experienced an unprecedented spike in demand across our portfolio and have had to make very tough decisions to ensure availability of our full portfolio nationwide," said a Klondike representative in an email. "A necessary but unfortunate part of this process is that we sometimes must discontinue products, even a beloved item like Choco Taco."

2. Instagram, Facebook remove posts offering abortion pills -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook and Instagram have begun promptly removing posts that offer abortion pills to women who may not be able to access them following a Supreme Court decision that stripped away constitutional protections for the procedure.

3. Crypto meltdown is wake-up call for many, including Congress -

NEW YORK (AP) — Meltdowns in the cryptocurrency space are common, but the latest one really touched some nerves. Novice investors took to online forums to share tales of decimated fortunes and even suicidal despair. Experienced crypto supporters, including one prominent billionaire, were left feeling humbled.

4. Twitter expands Birdwatch, its crowdsourced fact check pilot -

Twitter is expanding Birdwatch, its crowd-sourced fact checking project it started as a small and little-publicized pilot program more than a year ago.

The program lets regular people flag and notate misleading tweets. This is separate from Twitter's news verification partnerships with The Associated Press and Reuters.

5. Big tech grapples with Russian state media, propaganda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As Russia's war in Ukraine  plays out for the world on social media, big tech platforms are moving to restrict Russian state media from using their platforms to spread propaganda and misinformation.

6. Sportsbooks pick a winner in Tennessee -

With Super Bowl LVI fast approaching, you might be surprised by the number of friends and co-workers who are talking about bets they’ve placed via one of Tennessee’s nine legal online sportsbooks.

7. Jan. 6 committee requests interview with Ivanka Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House committee investigating the U.S. Capitol insurrection is asking Ivanka Trump, daughter of former President Donald Trump, to voluntarily cooperate with its probe.

The committee sent a letter Thursday requesting a meeting with Ivanka Trump, who served as an adviser to her father, in early February. In the letter, committee chairman Bennie Thompson says she was in direct contact with her father during key moments of Jan. 6, 2021, when Trump supporters stormed the Capitol in an effort to halt certification of Joe Biden's presidential win.

8. Twitter, Meta among tech giants subpoenaed by Jan. 6 panel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Months after requesting documents from more than a dozen social platforms, the House committee investigating the Capitol insurrection has issued subpoenas targeting Twitter, Meta, Reddit and YouTube after lawmakers said the companies' initial responses were inadequate.

9. Markets 2021: Stocks soar, IPOs explode, crypto goes wild -

Wall Street delivered another strong year for investors in 2021, as a resurgence in consumer demand fueled by the reopening of the global economy pumped up corporate profits.

As of Dec. 22, the S&P 500 had risen 25%, its third-straight annual increase. Along the way, the benchmark index set 67 all-time highs.

10. US court revives suit against Facebook over TV host's image -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A federal appeals court has revived a Philadelphia newscaster's lawsuit against Facebook over the unauthorized use of her image in advertisements for dating sites and sex-related products that ran on the site.

11. MassMutual fined for failing to monitor GameStop saga star -

NEW YORK (AP) — Massachusetts regulators are fining MassMutual $4 million and ordering it to overhaul its social-media policies after accusing the company of failing to supervise an employee whose online cheerleading of GameStop's stock helped launch the frenzy that shook Wall Street earlier this year.

12. House panel seeks records from tech companies in riot probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House panel investigating the riot at the U.S. Capitol issued sweeping document requests on Friday to social media companies, expanding the scope of its investigation as it seeks to examine the events leading to the Jan. 6 insurrection.

13. Robinhood shares fly again, soaring as much as 80% -

NEW YORK (AP) — Robinhood's stock is flying again Wednesday, jumping so much that trading was temporarily halted three times in the first half hour after the market opened.

Robinhood Markets was up 28.5% at $60.15, as of 10:47 a.m. Eastern time, accelerating what's already been a blistering week of gains. At one point the stock was up 80%. It's a sharp turnaround from the lackluster debut last week, when Robinhood's stock dropped 8.4% from its initial price of $38 on Thursday.

14. Should you take money advice from ‘experts’ on Reddit? -

Should you take money advice from a stranger on the internet? In Reddit’s r/personalfinance channel, anonymous users exchange tips on buying homes, choosing insurance plans and managing very personal, nuanced money situations. (Think: “How do I handle my dying dad’s debts?”)

15. Hottest seller at GameStop is its own stock, $1B raised -

GameStop raised more than $1 billion in its latest stock sale, capitalizing on a newly arrived and fervent army of online investors.

The video game retailer has taken center stage among a handful of companies that have come to be known this year as meme stocks. The phenomenon has pitted smaller investors who snap up shares of beleaguered companies, against large, institutional investors who have shorted shares of those companies, or bet that shares in those companies will fall.

16. AMC, this summer's blockbuster stock, warns of plot twists -

AMC may sell up to 11.6 million of its shares with a trading phenomenon pushing stock in the movie theater chain up almost 3,000% this year, and 140% just this week.

AMC is emerging from pandemic lockdowns that threatened the very existence of the company. Industry analysts have yet to fully explain, or even comprehend, the extreme enthusiasm for its stock that being driven by large numbers of online traders who seem to disregard the rough path the company faces in its recovery.

17. AMC embraces its meme stock status, shares quickly double -

After its movie theaters were shut and its stock was nearly left for dead because of the pandemic, AMC Entertainment is embracing the horde of fanatical investors who helped shock its shares back to life as part of this year's "meme stock" buying spree.

18. Vote? Not yet. Invest? Yes. Fidelity launches teen accounts -

NEW YORK (AP) — Looking to draw in the next generation of investors, Fidelity Investments is launching a new type of account for teenagers to save, spend and invest their money.

The account is for 13- to 17-year-olds, and it will allow them to deposit cash, have a debit card and trade stocks and funds. The teens can make their own trades through a simplified experience on Fidelity's mobile app, with zero account fees or minimum balances, though the youth account requires a parent or guardian to have their own Fidelity account as well.

19. EXPLAINER: Will Trump return to Facebook? -

Former President Donald Trump will find out whether he gets to return to Facebook on Wednesday, when the social network's quasi-independent Oversight Board plans to announce its ruling in the high-profile case.

20. Dogecoin has its day, as cryptocurrency fans push it up -

NEW YORK (AP) — Dogecoin, the digital currency advertised as the one "favored by Shiba Inus worldwide," is having its day.

Fans of the cryptocurrency are touting April 20, long an unofficial holiday for marijuana devotees, as "Doge Day" and imploring each other to get its value up to $1. That may not sound like much, particularly when compared against the $50,000 or $60,000 that a bitcoin is worth, depending on the day. But it would be an astonishing ascent from the roughly half of a cent that a Dogecoin was fetching at the start of the year.

21. Overstimulated? Stocks soar 75% in historic 12-month run -

NEW YORK (AP) — It was one year ago that the terrifying free fall for the stock market suddenly ended, ushering in one of its greatest runs.

On March 23, 2020, the S&P 500 fell 2.9%. In all, the index dropped nearly 34% in about a month, wiping out three years' worth of gains for the market.

22. 'Meme stocks' go mainstream: There's now a fund for that -

NEW YORK (AP) — Interested in trading some of the stocks that have rocked Wall Street recently fueled by social media buzz? Has the craziness of the comments talking up the so-called meme stocks on Reddit and other sites kept you away? Well, the financial industry has something for you.

23. Game on, again: GameStop surges and no one truly knows why -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street's GameStop saga can't stop. At the very least, it won't stop.

After weeks of going dormant, shares of GameStop have suddenly shot higher again, jumping 75% in the last hour of trading Wednesday and another 60% so far Thursday. It's reminiscent of the shocking 1,625% surge for GameStop in January, when bands of smaller and novice investors communicating on Reddit and other social media helped launch the struggling video game retailer's stock.

24. Robinhood CEO defends actions in GameStop saga at hearing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Key players in the GameStop saga faced questions Thursday from House lawmakers concerned that even as investing becomes more democratized the scales are still tilted in favor of the big Wall Street institutions.

25. Lawmakers to face off with GameStop saga's key players -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The GameStop saga has been portrayed as a victory of the little guy over Wall Street giants but not everyone agrees, including some lawmakers in Washington.

GameStop shares soared 1,600% in January before falling back to earth. Entangled in the mess are massive short-selling hedge funds, a social media message board and ordinary investors wanting in on the hottest new trade among others. The House Financial Services Committee is ready to dig into the confounding episode at a hearing on Thursday.

26. GameStop's saga may be over; its effect on Wall Street isn't -

NEW YORK (AP) — The frenzy around GameStop's stock may have quieted down, but the outsized influence small investors had in the saga is likely to stick around.

No one expects another supernova like GameStop to happen again, where a band of smaller-pocketed investors helped boost a struggling company's stock 1,000% in two weeks. But the tools they employed can be used again and again, if those smaller investors stay connected on social media forums and if regulators don't change the rules to hinder them.

27. US regulators launch review of stock market turbulence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation's top financial markets regulators say they will look into whether recent stock market turbulence is an indication that current trading practices are not doing enough to protect investors.

28. More GameStops possible as small investors flex muscles -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — GameStop and a handful of other stocks whose meteoric rise last month shocked Wall Street began falling back to Earth this week.

But the campaign that briefly pushed GameStop up by 1,600% at the expense of hedge funds that were betting it would lose value, known as "shorting," could be a blueprint for similar efforts with other companies' shares, some analysts say.

29. Yellen warns of 'tough months' ahead, urges congress to act -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen warned of "tough months ahead" with COVID-19 continuing to flare, making it critical that Congress pass President Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion relief package.

30. Big Tech leads stocks to broad gains; GameStop collapses -

Big Tech companies and banks helped power a broad rally on Wall Street Tuesday, though shares in GameStop and other recent high-flying stocks hyped by online traders plunged.

The S&P 500 rose 1.4%, extending gains from a day earlier, as investors sized up the latest batch of company earnings reports. Rising crude oil prices and solid earnings results helped lift energy companies, including Exxon Mobil and Marathon Petroleum. Treasury yields rose and the VIX, a measure of fear in the market, fell sharply, a sign volatility was easing.

31. Robinhood raises $3.4B from investors amid surge in trading -

Popular online trading platform Robinhood said Monday that it has lined up $3.4 billion to help meet its funding requirements amid a spike in trading on Wall Street fueled by small investors driving up shares in GameStop and other stocks.

32. GameStop soars again; Wall Street bends under the pressure -

Another bout of selling gripped the U.S. stock market Friday, as anxiety mounts over whether the frenzy behind a swift, meteoric rise in GameStop and a handful of other stocks will damage Wall Street overall.

33. EXPLAINER: Why GameStop's stock surge is shaking Wall Street -

NEW YORK (AP) — It's not just you. What's going on with GameStop's stock doesn't make sense to a lot of people.

The struggling video game retailer's stock has been making stupefying moves this month, wild enough to raise concerns from professional investors on Wall Street to the hallways of regulators and the White House in Washington.

34. Smaller investors face down hedge funds, as GameStop soars -

NEW YORK (AP) — A head-scratching David and Goliath story is playing out on Wall Street over the stock price of a money-losing videogame retailer.

An army of smaller-pocketed, optimistic investors is throwing dollars and buy orders at the stock of GameStop — in direct opposition to a group of wealthy investors who are counting on the stock price to plunge.

35. YouTube suspends Trump's channel for at least a week -

HONG KONG (AP) — YouTube has suspended U.S. President Donald Trump's channel for at least a week amid concerns over "ongoing potential for violence," making it the latest platform to limit the president's online activities.

36. Agency homing in on social media companies' data collection -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal regulators are ordering Facebook, Twitter, Amazon, TikTok's parent and five other social media companies to provide detailed information on how they collect and use consumers' personal data and how their practices affect children and teens.

37. Facebook says it will ban groups that openly support QAnon -

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Facebook said it will ban groups that openly support QAnon, the baseless conspiracy theory that paints President Donald Trump as a secret warrior against a supposed child-trafficking ring run by celebrities and "deep state" government officials.

38. Cyberattack hobbles major hospital chain's US facilities -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A computer outage at a major hospital chain thrust healthcare facilities across the U.S. into chaos Monday, with treatment impeded as doctors and nurses already burdened by the coronavirus pandemic were forced to rely on paper backup systems.

39. Trump, Biden fight for primacy on social media platforms -

WASHINGTON (AP) — On an average day, President Donald Trump sends about 14 posts to the 28 million Facebook followers of his campaign account. His Democratic rival, Joe Biden, delivers about half that many posts to an audience of just 2 million.

40. Reddit, Twitch clamp down Trumpist forums for hate speech -

Reddit, an online comment forum that is one of the internet's most popular websites, on Monday banned a forum that supported President-Donald Trump as part of a crackdown on hate speech.

The Trump forum, called The_Donald, was banned because it encouraged violence, regularly broke other Reddit rules, and defiantly "antagonized" both Reddit and other forums, the company said in a statement. Reddit had previously tried to discipline the forum.

41. Govts pledge aid as global commerce seizes in face of virus -

Governments and central banks are scrambling to find ways to keep businesses from going bankrupt as the virus outbreak grinds the world economy to a halt.

A day after Wall Street endured its worst daily drop since the crash of 1987, European markets wavered, as did U.S futures markets. There is tremendous volatility, with the extent of economic damage from the pandemic still anyone's guess. Factories are closed, retail stores are closed, travel has ground almost to a halt and billions of people are sheltering at home, going outside only to find essential supplies.

42. Paid parental leave for fed workers could spur wider changes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal government's 2.1 million employees will get paid parental leave for the first time, a galvanizing moment in the growing movement to bring the benefit to all U.S. workers.

43. Reddit raises $300M in finance round led by China's Tencent -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Social media service Reddit Inc. says it has raised $300 million in a financing round led by Chinese internet giant Tencent.

44. Democrats' not-so-secret plan to fight midterm malaise -

WASHINGTON (AP) — They're asking pastors to text their congregants about the importance of voting. They're connecting with thousands of Puerto Ricans displaced by Hurricane Maria. And they're relying on groups like the NAACP, which has tripled its spending from 2016 to energize black voters.

45. Poll: Young Americans say online bullying a serious problem -

WETHERSFIELD, Conn. (AP) — Teens and young adults say cyberbullying is a serious problem for people their age, but most don't think they'll be the ones targeted for digital abuse.

That's according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and MTV, which also finds that about half of both young people and their parents view social media as having a mostly negative effect on the younger generation.

46. AP FACT CHECK: Trump wrongly claims Google shunned speech -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is wrongly claiming that Google shunned his State of the Union speech but promoted Barack Obama's addresses.

In a tweet Wednesday, Trump posts a video that shows Google promoting Obama's State of the Union address on its homepage from 2012 to 2016, while seemingly failing to do the same for Trump in 2017 and 2018.

47. Tech giants still stumbling in the social world they created -

NEW YORK (AP) — Who knew connecting the world could get so complicated? Perhaps some of technology's brightest minds should have seen that coming.

Social media bans of conspiracy theorist Alex Jones have thrust Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and others into a role they never wanted — as gatekeepers of discourse on their platforms, deciding what should and shouldn't be allowed and often angering almost everyone in the process. Jones, a right-wing provocateur, suddenly found himself banned from most major social platforms this week, after years in which he was free to use them to promulgate a variety of false claims.

48. Social media plays whack-a-mole with Russia interference -

Facebook is spending heavily to avoid a repeat of the Russian interference that played out on its service in 2016, bringing on thousands of human moderators and advanced artificial intelligence systems to weed out fake accounts and foreign propaganda campaigns.

49. Report: Millions of tweets spread anti-Semitic messages -

Millions of anti-Semitic messages on Twitter have spread negative stereotypes and conspiracy theories about Jews across the social media platform, according to a report Monday by the Anti-Defamation League.

50. Reddit says it banned 944 suspicious accounts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Discussion forum company Reddit issued its transparency report for 2017 during Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's Senate appearance, saying it had found and banned 944 suspicious accounts associated with Russia's Internet Research Agency.

51. As 'net neutrality' vote nears, some brace for a long fight -

NEW YORK (AP) — As the federal government prepares to unravel sweeping net-neutrality rules that guaranteed equal access to the internet, advocates of the regulations are bracing for a long fight.

The Thursday vote scheduled at the Federal Communications Commission could usher in big changes in how Americans use the internet, a radical departure from more than a decade of federal oversight. The proposal would not only roll back restrictions that keep broadband providers like Comcast, Verizon and AT&T from blocking or collecting tolls from services they don't like, it would bar states from imposing their own rules.

52. As 'net neutrality' vote nears, some brace for a long fight -

NEW YORK (AP) — As the federal government prepares to unravel sweeping net-neutrality rules that guaranteed equal access to the internet, advocates of the regulations are bracing for a long fight.

The Thursday vote scheduled at the Federal Communications Commission could usher in big changes in how Americans use the internet, a radical departure from more than a decade of federal oversight. The proposal would not only roll back restrictions that keep broadband providers like Comcast, Verizon and AT&T from blocking or collecting tolls from services they don't like, it would bar states from imposing their own rules.

53. NOT REAL NEWS: A look at what didn't happen this week -

A roundup of some of the most popular, but completely untrue, headlines of the week. None of these stories are legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked these out; here are the real facts:

54. FCC chief lays out attack on 'net neutrality' rules -

NEW YORK (AP) — Internet companies are readying for a showdown with a Republican-controlled government over a policy near and dear to their hearts: net neutrality.

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai said in a Wednesday speech that he wants to ditch the Obama-era rules, hated by telecoms, that prevent broadband and wireless companies from interfering with the sites and apps that consumers use. He wants to undo their legal basis and to eliminate the FCC's broad powers to monitor Verizon, AT&T and Comcast for bad behavior.

55. Tech companies move to target terrorist propaganda online -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook, Microsoft, Twitter and YouTube are joining forces to more quickly identify the worst terrorist propaganda and prevent it from spreading online.

The new program announced Monday would create a database of unique digital "fingerprints" to help automatically identify videos or images the companies could remove.

56. Why are drownings increasing at Percy Priest Lake? -

Jeremy Cross, 36, was canoeing with his 11-year-old son and a family friend when they encountered high winds and rough waters near Hole in the Wall Island at J. Percy Priest Lake.

Cross, a swimmer, was not wearing his life vest when his boat toppled over. He attempted to put his vest on, according to reports, but vanished before he could gear up.

57. Tech industry groups, security experts back Apple -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The nation's leading tech companies joined security experts, independent programmers and civil liberties advocates who filed court papers backing Apple in its fight with the FBI over an encrypted iPhone used by an extremist killer.

58. Inked and irked: Apple Watch users report tattoo problems -

NEW YORK (AP) — It's an annoying problem for the unlucky few: the Apple Watch's heart rate monitor might not work if you have a tattoo on your wrist.

Inked and irked Apple fans have dubbed the issue "TattooGate" on Twitter, complaining that they must choose between their body art and their stylish gadget. Apple, for its part, acknowledged the issue on its support website.

59. Young adults want news every day, survey shows -

CHICAGO (AP) — Young adults have a reputation for being connected to one another and disconnected from the news. But a survey has found that mobile devices and social networking are keeping them more engaged with the broader world than previously thought.

60. Report: Digital sites bring momentum to news -

NEW YORK (AP) — Growing digital outlets are bringing "a sense of momentum" to the news business even as long-term problems continue to plague the industry, a journalism think tank said on Wednesday.

61. NSA revelations reframe digital life for some -

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances, worried an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government probe.

62. Wikipedia editors question site's blackout -

NEW YORK (AP) — Can the world live without Wikipedia for a day? The shutdown of one of the Internet's most-visited sites is not sitting well with some of its volunteer editors, who say the protest of anti-piracy legislation could threaten the credibility of their work.