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Editorial Results (free)

1. Chopping remodeling costs when wood prices are high -

Wood costs have skyrocketed over the last year, leaving would-be home renovators to choose between waiting in price purgatory or moving forward and possibly overpaying.

Lumber mills incorrectly predicted that the housing market would crumble under the weight of the pandemic rather than boom as it did, says David Logan, senior economist with the National Association of Home Builders.

2. Marchetti receives national recognition -

L. Gino Marchetti, Jr., managing partner of Taylor, Pigue, Marchetti and Blair PLLC, was recently presented the Richard Boyette Award from the National Foundation for Judicial Excellence for outstanding contributions to the foundation.

3. Ford plans to develop, produce electric vehicle batteries -

DETROIT (AP) — Saying that it wants to control the key technology for electric vehicles, Ford plans to open a battery development center near Detroit by the end of next year.

The company said the 200,000-square-foot facility will have equipment to design, test and even do small-scale manufacturing of battery cells and packs. The $185 million lab also will develop electronic controls and other items as Ford moves more of the process in-house.

4. Stites & Harbison raises ABA Health ranking -

The American Bar Association Health Law Section has ranked Stites & Harbison, PLLC sixth in its eighth annual Regional Law Firm Recognition List for the South region for 2020.

The firm improved its ranking by one spot from the previous year’s listing, now having been honored seven consecutive times to the Top 10 list. Stites & Harbison’s Health Care Practice Group draws on the firm’s many years of experience to assist professionals, providers and suppliers in all aspects of the expanding health care industry.

5. Union, automakers headed for fight over battery plant wages -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The United Auto Workers union is calling on General Motors to pay full union wages at electric vehicle battery factories, thrusting what had been a festering conflict into the spotlight.

6. US average mortgage rates fall again; 30-year loan at 3.04% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Mortgage rates fell for a second straight week amid signs of economic improvement.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday that the benchmark 30-year home-loan rate declined to 3.04% this week from 3.13% last week. At this time last year, the long-term rate was 3.31%.

7. Biden sees `win' for US in electric vehicle battery deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two big South Korean electric vehicle battery makers said Sunday they have settled a long-running trade dispute that will allow one company to move ahead with plans to manufacture batteries in Georgia. President Joe Biden called it "a win for American workers and the American auto industry."

8. World leaders' call for pandemic treaty short on details -

LONDON (AP) — More than 20 heads of government and global agencies called in a commentary published Tuesday for an international treaty for pandemic preparedness that they say will protect future generations in the wake of COVID-19.

9. AP FACT CHECK: Biden's fuzzy math on 1 million new auto jobs -

DETROIT (AP) — Casting his climate policy as a jobs plan, President Joe Biden left out important context and used fuzzy math when he announced sweeping new green initiatives that he says will boost the U.S. economy with the creation of 1 million new auto jobs.

10. Biden picks familiar faces for top roles at FEMA, CIA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden is nominating New York emergency department commissioner Deanne Criswell to serve as the Federal Emergency Management Agency administrator and has tapped former CIA deputy director David Cohen to return to the agency in the same role he served during the Obama administration.

11. Cupcake Collection wins NAACP grant -

Nashville’s The Cupcake Collection is one of 10 Black-owned small business winners of the NAACP Powershift Grant.

The company, which also has a location in New Orleans, was founded by Mignon Francois, who serves as CEO.

12. Analysis: Racial inequity in who takes career, tech courses -

Alphina Kamara wonders what might have happened if she'd been introduced to science and engineering careers at her high school in Wilmington, Delaware.

Kamara, who is Black, was enrolled in an "audio engineering" course that taught her how to make music tracks and videos instead of a regular engineering course that she recalls was mostly filled with white students.

13. Wood Stabell adds pair of attorneys -

Wood Stabell Law Group, PLLC has hired two attorneys, Lin Ye and Ashley Gold. WSLG has now added four attorneys since 2019.

Lin is focusing on corporate law, mergers and acquisitions and health care. With more than 10 years of experience, companies and investors in health care, technology, manufacturing, distribution and other industries have come to rely on Lin to advise them on a wide range of strategic corporate transaction and business arrangements.

14. Smith named president of Tennessee Medical Association -

The Tennessee Medical Association has named Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s M. Kevin Smith, M.D., Ph.D., MMHC of Nashville as 2020-21 president of the member-based nonprofit advocacy organization that represents 9,500 physicians statewide.

15. Bradley’s Odubeko accepted to ABA Leaders Academy -

Junaid Odubeko, a partner in Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP’s Nashville office, has been accepted to the American Bar Association Section of Litigation’s Diverse Leaders Academy.

DLA provides opportunities for lawyers in underrepresented groups to participate in leadership roles within the ABA Section of Litigation. Odubeko will serve a two-year term beginning Aug. 1, during which he will participate in Diversity & Inclusion Committee activities and engage in substantive work as a member of a Section committee or task force.

16. Thomason names 4 Nashville shareholders -

Ten attorneys have been named shareholders at Lewis Thomason, including four based in Nashville. The Nashville attorneys are:

Brad Craig, who focuses his practice on general civil litigation defense, employment law, and education law in the Nashville office. He also regularly counsels boards of education on a variety of issues and his practice includes defending public entities and private businesses before the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Office for Civil Rights, and the Tennessee Human Rights Commission.

17. State adopts COVID-19 spending plans -

The state has outlined new spending plans that reflect significant revenue reductions due to the economic impact of COVID-19.

Department of Finance and Administration Commissioner Butch Eley presented state lawmakers with the revised budget plans for the current fiscal year, as well as FY 2020-21, which begins July 1, 2020, and a framework for the following fiscal year, 2021-22.

18. Coronavirus shakes the conceit of 'American exceptionalism' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — What if the real "invisible enemy" is the enemy from within — America's very institutions?

When the coronavirus pandemic came from distant lands to the United States, it was met with cascading failures and incompetencies by a system that exists to prepare, protect, prevent and cut citizens a check in a national crisis.

19. Bradley honored as top Tennessee litigation firm -

Benchmark Litigation has named Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP as its 2020 Tennessee Litigation Firm of the Year.

Bradley was one of three finalists for the award, which recognizes litigation firms in each state based on the significance of their representations. The firm also was a finalist for Alabama and Mississippi Litigation Firm of the Year.

20. AP FACT CHECK: Trump says Pelosi, Dems defended Iran general -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's relentless attacks on the impeachment investigation and Democrats' stance on Iran strained the truth on various fronts, from claiming that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi defended Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani to asserting that even Ukraine's president said Trump did nothing wrong in withholding military aid.

21. State Department approves $1B weapons sale to India -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The State Department says it has approved the sale of naval guns and related equipment to India in a deal worth more than $1 billion.

The department says it provide the legally required notification to Congress of the proposed sale of up to 13 of the naval guns after it determined it was in the interests of U.S. national security by "improving the security of a strategic national partner."

22. AP FACT CHECK: Dems flub details on guns, Syria in debate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A dozen Democrats seeking the presidency tussled in a debate packed with policy, flubbing some details in the process.

Several gave an iffy explanation Tuesday of why they're not swinging behind a bold proposal to make people turn over their assault-style weapons. Sloppiness also crept in during robust exchanges over foreign policy, health care, taxes and more.

23. Veteran attorney West moves to Miller & Martin -

Attorney Dudley West, formerly with White & Reasor, has joined Miller & Martin’s Nashville office.

West has a diverse civil practice with an emphasis on business litigation and real estate. He has handled numerous commercial real estate acquisitions, dispositions and other transactions, and represented clients in a wide variety of business, real estate and other civil litigation matters in state and federal courts.

24. Lipscomb gets $2.49M grant to develop program -

Lipscomb University’s College of Education has been awarded a $2.49 million grant from the Kern Family Foundation to develop an innovative leadership development program for principals focused on character, academic excellence and business acumen in the rising generation of leaders.

25. AP analysis: Steel tariffs waived even with tough trade talk -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite President Donald Trump's tough talk on trade, his administration has granted hundreds of companies permission to import millions of tons of steel made in China, Japan and other countries without paying the hefty tariff he put in place to protect U.S. manufacturers and jobs, according to an Associated Press analysis.

26. Dalton commits $12.75M to Vanderbilt Law School -

A new $12.75 million gift to Vanderbilt Law School will provide support for its Law and Business Program, which prepares students to enter legal practice with a solid understanding of business law, corporate management, accounting and finance.

27. On road to make an affordable car, Tesla cuts jobs -

Tesla will cut 7 percent of its workforce as it tries to lower prices and break out of the niche-car market to produce an electric vehicle that more people can afford.

Tesla's cheapest model right now is the $44,000 Model 3, and it needs to broaden its customer base to survive.

28. HealthStream buys Denver health care firm -

HealthStream, a Nashville-based provider of workforce and provider solutions for the health care industry, has acquired Providigm LLC.

A Denver-based company focused on quality assurance and performance improvement in health care, Providigm primarily serves skilled nursing facilities.

29. From travel to IPOs, how shutdown is upsetting US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Delta Air Lines can't get eight new aircraft in the air. Roughly a million government employees and contractors aren't being paid. Some Americans who are trying to start small businesses face delays in obtaining the required tax identification number from the IRS.

30. Banker Ayers to receive 2019 Horatio Alger Award -

The Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans, Inc., a nonprofit educational organization honoring the achievements of outstanding individuals and encouraging youth to pursue their dreams through higher education, has selected James W. Ayers, executive chairman of the board, FirstBank, as a recipient of its 2019 award.

31. Stewart succeeds Whisenant as WSW managing partner -

WSW CPAs founder Bob Whisenant, a veteran of 46 years in the industry, is stepping aside as managing partner on Jan. 1. Taking over those duties will be WSW partner Geoffrey Stewart.

Whisenant will remain as partner emeritus, continuing to serve clients and mentor staff. His career began with CPA Jack Grannis in 1972, and he was later managing partner for Horne LLP’s Tennessee Office. Horne is a national accounting firm with a regional presence.

32. Lee is now member-in-charge at Frost Brown Todd -

Frost Brown Todd has named Thomas H. Lee member-in-charge of the firm’s Nashville office. Lee succeeds Mekesha Montgomery, who led FBT’s Nashville team of attorneys for the past seven years and will now become chair of the firm’s Manufacturing Industry Team while continuing to chair the Member Personnel Committee.

33. Tivity Health reports strong second quarter -

Franklin-based Tivity Health, Inc., provider of fitness and health improvement programs, has announced financial results for the second quarter ending June 30, including an increase in revenue year to year.

34. Bass, Berry & Sims names new practice leadership -

Bass, Berry & Sims PLC has appointed Kevin H. Douglas to serve as chair of the firm’s Corporate & Securities Practice Group.

In this role, Douglas will work closely with firm management and with the more than 100 corporate attorneys and staff across the firm’s four offices to develop goals and implement initiatives for the department that are in line with the firm’s overall strategy.

35. Littler elevates Rosenblatt to Nashville shareholder -

Littler, the world’s largest employment and labor law practice representing management, has named Rachel Ross Rosenblatt a shareholder in its Nashville office. Rosenblatt is one of 28 attorneys elected to shareholder status across Littler’s U.S. offices, effective January 1, 2018.

36. City’s building boom remains on rise -

As Nashville welcomes 2018, it’s entering its fifth year in the national spotlight as one of the fastest-growing – and most popular – cities in the nation. It’s a popularity seen in tourism, as well as the number of people choosing to live and work here.

37. Changes to who enforces state’s marijuana laws -

A law taking effect in January removes the Tennessee Alcoholic Beverage Commission from the Governor’s Task Force on Marijuana Eradication.

The push to remove the commission began in 2012, when WSMV-TV reported law enforcement discovered what they believed to be marijuana in the home of the commission’s director. Police never did a criminal investigation, and the director retired in 2012.

38. Opioid crisis and juvenile justice -

With the state’s budget projected to be tight and lawmakers lining up to run for re-election in 2018, the coming legislative session isn’t expected to yield many surprises.

But the 110th General Assembly still has a long row to hoe as the session starts Jan. 9 with new legislative offices and committee rooms in the renovated Cordell Hull Building in downtown Nashville.

39. Next door but millions of dollars apart -

Ole South Properties owner John Floyd has a simple answer for why Rutherford County and Murfreesboro homes are selling for 35 to 40 percent less than those in Williamson and Davidson counties: income.

40. Transportation construction basics -

Who designs and builds roads and bridges? Civil engineers do the design work. They prepare drawings, specify materials and address safety issues for construction workers and the traveling public while the work is being done. The civil engineers may be employed by the state to design the project, or the state may turn to private companies. Most states use both methods.

41. Tennessee Bank & Trust gets state approval -

Tennessee Bank & Trust has received approval from the Tennessee Department of Financial Institutions and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, moving the organization one step closer to becoming the first bank to open in the state of Tennessee in 10 years. The charter for the bank was filed with the state of Tennessee on June 30, 2017.

42. Baker Donelson names 3 to firm leadership roles -

Baker Donelson has named Bruce C. Doeg the firm’s chief strategic officer, Tonya Mitchem Grindon chair of Baker Donelson’s Business Department, a position previously held by Doeg for the last eight years, and Matthew T. Harris chair of the firm’s Real Estate Group.

43. Baker Donelson security chair joins Nashville office -

Alisa L. Chestler, the chair of Baker Donelson’s Privacy and Information Security Team, has joined Baker Donelson’s Nashville office. Chestler will continue to maintain a presence in the firm’s Washington, D.C. office, where she was previously based.

44. Rambsy leads Spiggle Law Firm’s Nashville expansion -

The Spiggle Law Firm, a Washington, D.C.-based employment law firm focusing on wrongful termination and pregnancy and family-care discrimination in the workplace, recently opened a new office in Nashville.

45. Tennessee’s a hot job market (If you’re in the right field) -

If you’re a Tennessean just starting to plan for a career – or considering a new career – you can take heart. Indicators that show Tennessee, as a whole, is emerging as a job-friendly place with stable, good paying jobs with good benefits available.

46. Doeg elected vice chair of Launch Tennessee -

Bruce Doeg of Baker Donelson has been named vice chairman of Launch Tennessee.

LaunchTN is a public-private partnership focused on supporting the development of high-growth companies in Tennessee. Doeg was recently elected vice chairman by LaunchTN’s board of directors. Randy Boyd, commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Economic & Community Development, is its chairman.

47. TAMA hires Frye as executive director -

The Tennessee Automotive Manufacturers Association is announcing former Nissan and Hyundai executive Ashley Frye as its first-ever executive director.

Frye will work with and be overseen by TAMA’s board, which is composed exclusively of executives from Tennessee’s automotive suppliers and original equipment manufacturers.

48. Change Healthcare taps Roberts as vice president -

Change Healthcare, a provider of software and analytics, network solutions and technology-enabled services designed to enable smarter health care, has hired Keith Roberts as vice president of engagement solutions.

49. Dickinson Wright welcomes associates -

Dickinson Wright PLLC has hired Ariel Mason and Dustin Kovacic as associate attorneys. Mason joins the firm’s downtown Nashville office, and Kovacic joins the office on Music Row.

Mason previously worked for Dickinson Wright as a summer associate in the Nashville office, where she composed arguments for inclusion in trial briefs and motion memoranda. She also conducted extensive research on general litigation issues, including business disputes, employment law, and bankruptcy law.

50. Kachnic to chair VUMC Radiation Oncology -

Vanderbilt University Medical Center announces that Lisa Kachnic, M.D., has been named professor and chair of the Vanderbilt Department of Radiation Oncology.

Previously, she was professor and chair of Radiation Oncology and associate director of Multidisciplinary Cancer Research at Boston University School of Medicine and chief of Radiation Oncology at Boston Medical Center.

51. How lower oil prices could fuel more hiring in US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In June, when oil cost $107 a barrel, U.S. employers added a healthy number of jobs — 267,000. Now, with oil below $50, hopes are rising that hiring in the United States is poised to intensify.

52. US stands strong despite fear over global slowdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Beyond the turmoil shaking financial markets, the U.S. economy remains sturdier than many seem to fear.

The Dow Jones industrial average has lost 874 points since Oct. 8, largely over worries about another recession in Europe, a slowdown in China and world-spanning crises that include the Ebola outbreak and the rise of the Islamic State.

53. Stocks end mixed; S&P closes near all-time high -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market got back on track in the second quarter.

After a bumpy start to the year, the Standard & Poor's 500 index resumed its upward climb in the March-June period. The index rose 4.7 percent, versus a 1.3 percent gain in the first three months of the year.

54. Pay raises go mainly to those in select industries -

NEW YORK (AP) — If you hope to get a raise that finally feels like one, it helps to work in the right industry.

Historically, at this stage in the economy's recovery, pay would be rising in most sectors. But five years after the Great Recession officially ended, raises remain sharply uneven across industries and, as a whole, have barely kept up with prices. Overall pay has been rising about 2 percent a year, roughly equal to inflation.

55. Capella Healthcare makes leadership promotions -

Capella Healthcare has announced the promotions of three senior leaders to executive management positions and four others to its senior management team. Promoted to executive vice president duties are:

56. Survey: Businesses more optimistic, but not hiring -

Businesses expect their companies to perform better this year but that optimism still isn't translating into a push to hire more workers, according to a new survey from the National Association for Business Economics.

57. J. Alexander’s promotes Hagler to AVP, controller -

J. Alexander’s LLC, operator of J. Alexander’s restaurants and Stoney River Legendary Steak restaurants, has promoted Jessica Hagler to assistant vice president and controller.

58. Aegis Sciences promotes 4 to vice president -

Aegis Sciences Corporation, a provider of forensic toxicology and health care sciences laboratories, has promoted four leaders to vice president:

59. TriStar Centennial names chief medical officer - Jeffrey Guy, M.D., M.S.c., M.M.H.C, F.A.C.S., has been named chief medical officer of TriStar Centennial Medical Center in Nashville.

Guy joined TriStar Centennial as the chief medical officer of TriStar Centennial Women’s & Children’s hospital in September 2012 and has been serving as interim chief medical officer of TriStar Centennial since November 2012.

60. Lamb, Self to be honored by Tennessee Medical Association -

John W. Lamb, Sr., MD, and Catherine Self, PT, PhD, both of Nashville, are among the recipients of 2013 Tennessee Medical Association awards, which will be presented during the TMA’s 178th annual Meeting on Saturday in Franklin.

61. Butler Snow names practice group leaders -

Butler, Snow, O’Mara, Stevens & Cannada, PLLC attorneys Kara Shea and William “Bill” R. O’Bryan, Jr., have been named to leadership positions with the firm.

62. Practically human: Can smart machines do your job? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Art Liscano knows he's an endangered species in the job market: He's a meter reader in Fresno, Calif. For 26 years, he's driven from house to house, checking how much electricity Pacific Gas & Electric customers have used.

63. AP IMPACT: Recession, tech kill middle-class jobs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Five years after the start of the Great Recession, the toll is terrifyingly clear: Millions of middle-class jobs have been lost in developed countries the world over.

And the situation is even worse than it appears.

64. Brock is president, CEO of Launch Tennessee -

Launch Tennessee, a public-private partnership focused on supporting the creation and development of high-growth companies in Tennessee, has named Charlie Brock as the organization’s new president and chief executive officer and Stuart McWhorter as the organization’s new vice chair.

65. Waller elects five new partners -

Waller, Nashville’s oldest and largest law firm, has elected five new attorneys as partners. Each attorney was previously an associate at the firm:

66. Lifepoint names new VP, corporate secretary -

LifePoint Hospitals has promoted Christy Green to vice president, corporate secretary. In her new role, Green will work directly with LifePoint’s board and will oversee various corporate functions.

67. Morin named COO of Ingram Content -

Shawn Morin, who joined Ingram Content Group Inc. in 2009 and has served as the chief information officer since that time, has been named the company’s new Chief Operating Officer.

68. Shortages could slow down US auto production -

DETROIT (AP) — The U.S. auto industry, already stretching to meet rising demand for cars and trucks, is facing shortages of parts and materials that could limit the number of new vehicles in showrooms later this year and crimp a historic turnaround.

69. Economy adds 227K jobs, jobless rate unchanged -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States added 227,000 jobs in February in the latest display of the economic recovery's surprising breadth and brawn. The country has put together the strongest three months of pure job growth since the Great Recession.

70. Economic Council selects Qualls-Brooks -

The Tennessee Economic Council on Women has named Phyllis Qualls-Brooks its executive director.

The Tennessee Economic Council on Women focuses on research, offering the premiere economic summit for women in Tennessee each year, and working to get women on boards and commissions. Its research covers a myriad of topics focusing on women, including job training, wages and earnings, domestic violence, political participation, preventive healthcare, women-owned businesses and women in Tennessee.

71. Analysis: Bipartisan deal, bipartisan opposition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The newly struck debt-ceiling compromise between President Barack Obama and the Republican leaders of Congress represents a historic accomplishment of divided government, with all the disappointment that implies for the most ardent partisans inside the two major parties and out.