» Subscribe Today!
The Power of Information
Home
The Ledger - EST. 1978 - Nashville Edition
X
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search

Name & Property Search

Search results for 'Outreach' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:13
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:116
Middle Tennessee:746
East Tennessee:120
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

TNLedger Knoxville Edition subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Crunch time: Biden faces critical next 2 weeks for agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is entering a crucial two weeks for his ambitious agenda, racing to conclude contentious congressional negotiations ahead of both domestic deadlines and a chance to showcase his administration's accomplishments on a global stage.

2. VUMC helps develop first COVID-19 pill -

U.S.-based pharmaceutical giant Merck& Co. is seeking authorization for the first oral antiviral pill to treat COVID-19, after a Vanderbilt University Medical Center clinical trial showed it cut the risk of hospitalization or death in half when given to high-risk people during infection.

3. McGlinchey adds Schwegler to corporate law team -

Michael Schwegler has joined McGlinchey Stafford’s Nashville office where he will work in its national business corporate practice.

Schwegler has represented lenders, creditors and businesses in commercial and consumer lending transactions, consumer finance regulation and compliance, real estate, workouts, bankruptcy and commercial litigation matters.

4. Foundations aim to persuade Americans to get vaccinated -

For months, Maria Cristina was hesitant about getting a COVID-19 vaccine. Her fears came from social media, where she heard ample amounts of misinformation about what was in the vaccine and what it could do to her.

5. Loop hopes to go mainstream with reusable packaging -

Reusable packaging – from stainless steel ice cream containers to glass jars of soap – is about to become more common at groceries and restaurants worldwide.

Loop, a two-year-old company that collects and sanitizes reusable containers, said Wednesday it's expanding after successful trials at groceries in France and Japan. Kroger and Walgreens in the U.S., Tesco in the United Kingdom and Woolworths in Australia are among the chains partnering with Loop to sell household staples in reusable packages. McDonald's, Burger King and Tim Hortons have also signed on.

6. US unveils plan to address 'silent killer' extreme heat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is moving to protect workers and communities from extreme heat after a dangerously hot summer that spurred an onslaught of drought-worsened wildfires and caused hundreds of deaths from the Pacific Northwest to hurricane-ravaged Louisiana.

7. Biden faces limits of $1.9T COVID aid as some states resist -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden entered the White House promising to stop the twin health and economic crises caused by COVID-19, but $1.9 trillion and countless initiatives later he's confronting the limits of what Washington can achieve when some state and local governments are unwilling or unable to step up.

8. EU earmarks 30 billion euros for health crisis agency -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union said Thursday that it will fund its new health preparedness and rapid response agency to the tune of 30 billion euros ($35 billion) over the next six years, even pushing it higher if individual efforts from the member nations and private sector are taken into account.

9. Largest colleges push student vaccines with mandates, prizes -

STORRS, Conn. (AP) — At most of the largest U.S. public universities, students are under no obligation to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Some schools do require vaccines, but with leniency for those who opt out. Still others have expelled students who do not comply.

10. US steps up effort to unite families separated under Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is expanding its effort to find and reunite migrant families who were separated at the U.S.-Mexico border under President Donald Trump as part of a zero-tolerance policy on illegal crossings.

11. Analysis: Biden takes fight to unvaccinated in virus battle -

WASHINGTON (AP) — They're a source of frustration. A risk to their fellow citizens. A threat to the nation's economic recovery.

President Joe Biden is trying to concentrate the anger of the nation's inoculated majority against the refusal of 25% of eligible Americans to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

12. AP FACT CHECK: Biden skirts broken promise on Afghan exit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden glossed over his broken promise to keep U.S. troops in Afghanistan until the last Americans are out and offered the faint assurance — even with the last U.S. planes gone — that it's never too late for U.S. citizens to leave.

13. White House details plans to improve housing affordability -

WASHINGTON (AP) — White House officials are outlining plans to build and restore more than 2 million homes, a response to the volcanic rise in housing prices over the past year.

Millions of Americans are getting priced out of ownership or stuck spending the bulk of their income on rent. The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index climbed a record 19.1% in June from a year ago, as too few homes are available to buy and low interest rates have enabled affluent buyers and real estate investors to pay more for homes.

14. Army: Full environmental review of $9.4B plastics complex -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A civilian Pentagon official ordered the Army Corps of Engineers on Wednesday to conduct a full environmental assessment of a $9.4 billion Formosa Plastics complex planned in Louisiana, drawing praise from environmentalists.

15. Mayor names Jurkovich public affairs senior adviser -

Tom Jurkovich has joined Mayor John Cooper’s administration as senior adviser for public affairs.

Jurkovich will provide strategic leadership in communications, community outreach, issue management, and coalition building as part of the effort to advance the mayor’s priorities on a range of policy areas, including transportation, sustainability, affordable housing and economic development.

16. Metro Council approves grants to 21 nonprofits -

Metro Council has approved 21 Opportunity Grants to nonprofits working to enhance community safety and reduce violence in Nashville-Davidson County. This is the first round of funding from the $2 million Community Safety Partnership Fund, which Metro Nashville created with Governor’s Grant dollars earlier this year.

17. UT to conduct vaccination outreach in 6 rural counties -

MEMPHIS (AP) — The University of Tennessee's nursing school has received a grant to conduct COVID-19 vaccination outreach in six rural counties in the state.

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center's College of Nursing said Monday it has received more than $76,000 to help improve vaccination rates in rural and underserved communities in Benton, Fentress, Hardin, Lawrence, McNairy and Wayne counties.

18. Health chief: Vaccinations on the rise in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee has seen a 90% increase in people receiving the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccination over the past two weeks, Health Commissioner Lisa Piercey said Friday.

Piercey praised the bump in inoculations while warning that the virus continues to surge throughout the state. She said pediatric cases are "quickly on the rise."

19. Tennessee won't incentivize COVID shots but pays to vax cows -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee has sent nearly half a million dollars to farmers who have vaccinated their cattle against respiratory diseases and other maladies over the past two years.

But Republican Gov. Bill Lee, who grew up on his family's ranch and refers to himself as a cattle farmer in his Twitter profile, has been far less enthusiastic about incentivizing herd immunity among humans.

20. Senate GOP leaders urge public to get COVID-19 vaccine -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A group of Tennessee Senate Republicans are urging the public to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, a move that comes as case numbers are beginning to once again climb throughout the state.

21. 'We have to get it right,' Dem vows as Jan. 6 probe begins -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, Bennie Thompson, didn't realize the severity of the Jan. 6 insurrection until his wife called him.

22. Conservative Nashville talk radio host with COVID regrets vaccine hesitancy -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A conservative talk radio host from Tennessee who had been a vaccine skeptic until he was hospitalized from COVID-19 now says his listeners should get vaccinated.

Phil Valentine's brother, Mark Valentine, spoke at length on WWTN-FM in Nashville on Thursday about his brother's condition, saying he is in a critical care unit on supplemental oxygen, but not on a ventilator. Phil Valentine has had an afternoon talk radio show on the station for years.

23. In shift, GOP ramps up vaccine push as resistance hardens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican politicians are under increasing pressure to speak out to persuade COVID-19 vaccine skeptics to roll up their sleeves and take the shots as a new, more contagious variant sends caseloads soaring. But after months of ignoring — and, in some cases, stoking — misinformation about the virus, new polling suggests it may be too late to change the minds of many who are refusing.

24. Gov defends agency's vaccine chief firing, outreach rollback -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Republican Gov. Bill Lee on Thursday came out in full defense of his administration's firing of the state's vaccination chief and rollback of outreach for childhood vaccines, both of which have sparked national scrutiny over Tennessee's inoculation efforts against COVID-19.

25. Lawmakers: Parental OK needed for minors to get COVID shot -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Two Tennessee Republican lawmakers said Wednesday they received assurances that the state's health agency won't vaccinate minors for COVID-19 without parental consent, doubling back on a decades-old provision about children's vaccination rights that was a lightning rod in the firing of the state's top vaccine official.

26. Infrastructure bill fails first vote; Senate to try again -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans rejected an effort Wednesday to begin debate on a big infrastructure deal that a bipartisan group of senators brokered with President Joe Biden. But supporters in both parties remained hopeful of another chance in coming days.

27. Big infrastructure bill in peril as GOP threatens filibuster -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The bipartisan infrastructure deal senators brokered with President Joe Biden is hanging precariously ahead of a crucial Wednesday test vote as senators struggle over how to pay for nearly $1 trillion in public works spending.

28. Review praised vaccine director's leadership before firing -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Before a top Tennessee health official recommended firing the state's former vaccine director over claims that include shortcomings in her leadership, her supervisor had praised her "strong leadership" as recently as last month while her program faced "very intense scrutiny and performance expectations," according to a state job performance evaluation circulated publicly on her behalf.

29. Fired Tennessee vaccine leader rebuts claims point-by-point -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Days after she was fired under pressure from Republican legislators, Tennessee's former vaccinations director has issued a point-by-point rebuttal to a letter recommending her removal and to other claims by state officials about the program she ran that offers shots for children.

30. Records reveal Tennessee's claims for firing vaccine leader -

NASHVILLE (AP) — As controversy raged on over the firing of Tennessee's vaccination leader after state lawmakers complained about efforts to promote COVID-19 vaccination among teenagers, state officials released documents Thursday that for the first time offer other reasons for her dismissal.

31. Fired Tennessee vaccine official received dog muzzle in mail -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee's former top vaccination official received a dog muzzle in the mail a few days before she was fired this week in what she has said was an attempt to use her as a scapegoat to appease lawmakers, a newspaper reported.

32. Bone McAllester Norton adds Meredith in Sumner -

Bone McAllester Norton PLLC has hired Brandon Meredith, a University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law alumnus, as the firm’s newest attorney at its Sumner County office. Meredith joins Bone McAllester Norton with 13 years of legal experience at Phillips and Ingrum in Gallatin.

33. Tennessee fires top vaccination official amid pandemic -

Tennessee officials have fired the state’s top vaccination official, who had been facing scrutiny from Republican state lawmakers over her department’s outreach efforts to vaccinate teenagers against COVID-19.

34. Ex-Tennessee health official: State backed off vaccine push -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee health officials will not acknowledge that August is National Immunization Awareness Month per an order from the state's health commissioner, emails show.

The order, obtained by NewsChannel 5, was given to Tennessee's former top vaccination chief earlier this month just days before she was fired amid Republican outrage over her push to inoculate teenagers against COVID-19.

35. Summer camps hit with COVID outbreaks — are schools next? -

The U.S. has seen a string of COVID-19 outbreaks tied to summer camps in recent weeks in places such as Texas, Illinois, Florida, Missouri and Kansas, in what some fear could be a preview of the upcoming school year.

36. Tennessee fires top vaccination official amid pandemic -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee officials have fired the state's top vaccination official, who had been facing scrutiny from Republican state lawmakers over her department's outreach efforts to vaccinate teenagers against COVID-19.

37. Pfizer to discuss COVID-19 vaccine booster with US officials -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pfizer says it plans to meet with top U.S. health officials Monday to discuss the drugmaker's request for federal authorization of a third dose of its COVID-19 vaccine as President Joe Biden's chief medical adviser acknowledged that "it is entirely conceivable, maybe likely" that booster shots will be needed.

38. Cesar Chavez's legacy lives on in Biden's staff, Oval Office -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When President Barack Obama flew to California to dedicate a national monument to Latino labor leader Cesar Chavez nearly a decade ago, a group of the activist's relatives were invited to pose for photos with the president.

39. UK pushes Pacific trade talks amid broader new focus on Asia -

BANGKOK (AP) — The U.K. launched negotiations Tuesday to join a trans-Pacific trade bloc as it looks to explore new opportunities following its departure from the European Union and strengthen its strategic interests in Asia.

40. First lady to visit Nashville, encourage vaccinations -

NASHVILLE (AP) — First lady Jill Biden will travel to Nashville, Tennessee, on Tuesday as part of a national effort to get more Americans vaccinated against COVID-19.

Biden will attend a pop-up vaccination site with signer-songwriter Brad Paisley at Ole Smoky Distillery in Nashville in the evening.

41. Cabinet secretaries launch roadshow to sell the Biden plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Marty Walsh remembers what it was like when a Cabinet secretary would come to town.

"It really is a big deal. They give you the dates, and you just clear your schedule," said Walsh, a former mayor of Boston.

42. Racial tensions simmer as Southern Baptists hold key meeting -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Race-related tensions within the Southern Baptist Convention are high heading into a national meeting next week. The election of a new SBC president and debate over the concept of systemic racism may prove pivotal for some Black pastors as they decide whether to stay in the denomination or leave.

43. The new guy? Biden debuts at democracy's most exclusive club -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Angela, Boris, Emmanuel, Justin, Mario, Yoshihide and a relative newcomer: Joe.

They're the board of global democracy's most exclusive club, and they're meeting this week after four years of U.S. disruption and a two-year coronavirus interruption.

44. On 1st overseas trip, Biden to assure allies and meet Putin -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Set to embark on the first overseas trip of his term, President Joe Biden is eager to reassert the United States on the world stage, steadying European allies deeply shaken by his predecessor and pushing democracy as the only bulwark to rising forces of authoritarianism.

45. As deadlines slip, Biden agenda faces crucial assessment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's infrastructure plan is hitting roadblocks. A policing overhaul after the killing of George Floyd is up in the air. Even a seemingly bipartisan effort to investigate the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol faces the blockade of Republican opposition in Congress.

46. China says it's providing vaccines to almost 40 African states -

BEIJING (AP) — China said Thursday it is providing COVID-19 vaccines to nearly 40 African countries, describing its actions as purely altruistic in an apparent intensification of what has been described as "vaccine diplomacy."

47. Biden, GOP senators upbeat, plan more infrastructure talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After meeting at the White House, President Joe Biden and a group of Republican senators agreed to talk again early next week as negotiations intensified over a potentially bipartisan infrastructure package that could become one piece of the administration's ambitious $4 trillion public investment plan.

48. Biden and McConnell may be friends, but can they cut a deal? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The two players in the most important relationship in Washington finally are ready for a face-to-face meeting.

President Joe Biden's sit-down on Wednesday with Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell and other congressional leaders comes as the White House accelerates its efforts to reach a bipartisan infrastructure agreement — or at least aims to show it's trying. But McConnell is plainly stating in advance that he's not interested in the plan as proposed.

49. Biden announces Uber, Lyft rides amid July 4 vaccine push -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is highlighting new programs from ride-sharing companies Uber and Lyft to provide free rides to and from vaccination sites, as the pace of shots nationally declines and he looks to meet his July Fourth inoculation targets.

50. Poll: Most in US who remain unvaccinated need convincing -

Fewer Americans are reluctant to get a COVID-19 vaccine than just a few months ago, but questions about side effects and how the shots were tested still hold some back, according to a new poll that highlights the challenges at a pivotal moment in the U.S. vaccination campaign.

51. Free rides, beer and savings bonds: Vaccinators get creative -

Free beer, pot and doughnuts. Savings bonds. A chance to win an all-terrain vehicle. Places around the U.S. are offering incentives to try to energize the nation's slowing vaccination drive and get Americans to roll up their sleeves.

52. 'Fetal heartbeat' in abortion laws taps emotion, not science -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Dr. Michael Cackovic has treated his share of pregnant women. So when Republican lawmakers across the U.S. began passing bans on abortion at what they term "the first detectable fetal heartbeat," he was exasperated.

53. Shopping small makes a big impact on our community -

I get it. It’s easy to shop on Amazon. Running low on toilet paper? Need lightbulbs? Want a bath caddy on a whim? With two clicks and even less thought, the item you need/want/desire is at your doorstep, often in 48 hours or less.

54. TDEC honors 10 parks for ‘Go Green’ projects -

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation has recognized 10 of the 56 Tennessee State Parks with platinum level status for their performance in environmental sustainability in the state’s Go Green With Us program.

55. US drop in vaccine demand has some places turning down doses -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Louisiana has stopped asking the federal government for its full allotment of COVID-19 vaccine. About three-quarters of Kansas counties have turned down new shipments of the vaccine at least once over the past month. And in Mississippi, officials asked the federal government to ship vials in smaller packages so they don't go to waste.

56. White House offers new tax credit to help spur vaccinations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House is trying to overcome diminishing demand for COVID-19 shots by offering businesses a tax incentive to give employees paid leave to get vaccinated. The move comes as the United States is set to meet President Joe Biden's goal of administering 200 million coronavirus doses in his first 100 days in office.

57. Dems push $25B to electrify school buses, a Biden priority -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic lawmakers are unveiling legislation that would invest $25 billion to convert the nation's fleet of gasoline- and diesel-powered school buses to electric vehicles, aiming at a component of President Joe Biden's $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan to improve children's health.

58. Hitting latest vaccine milestone, Biden pushes shots for all -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States is set to meet President Joe Biden's latest vaccine goal of administering 200 million coronavirus shots in his first 100 days in office as the White House steps up efforts to inoculate the rest of the public.

59. Biden's virtual climate summit: Diplomacy sans human touch -

WASHINGTON (AP) — There will be no hands to shake or backs to slap, no way to look a foreign leader in the eye. The small human moments that define statecraft will be reduced to images on a screen.

60. Biden aims for bipartisanship but applies sly pressure -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has begun publicly courting Republicans to back his sweeping infrastructure plan, but his reach across the aisle is intended just as much to keep Democrats in line as it is a first step in an uphill climb to any bipartisan deal.

61. Charting a crossover hit -

Whenever proponents of the proposed National Museum of African American Music would hit a snag, they could take solace by looking south from their hoped-for home at Fifth Avenue and Broadway.

There they’d see the rippling contours of the Music City Center, another ambitious effort that took more than two decades to move from concept to reality. And then they’d go back to the business of fundraising, working with developers and other partners, working with the artifact collection and building local and national awareness on their march toward a museum.

62. Biden boosted by Senate rules as GOP bucks infrastructure -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With an appeal to think big, President Joe Biden is promoting his $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan directly to Americans, summoning public support to push past the Republicans lining up against the massive effort they sum up as big taxes, big spending and big government.

63. Biden summons public support as GOP bucks infrastructure -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With an appeal to think big, President Joe Biden is promoting his $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan directly to Americans, summoning public support to push past the Republicans lining up against the massive effort they sum up as big taxes, big spending and big government.

64. Biden's 'Jobs Cabinet' to sell infrastructure as GOP resists -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden set about convincing America it needs his $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan on Thursday, deputizing a five-member "jobs Cabinet" to help in the effort. But the enormity of his task was clear as Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell's vowed to oppose the plan "every step of the way."

65. Justice Department to review how best to fight hate crimes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General Merrick Garland on Tuesday ordered a review of how the Justice Department can best deploy its resources to combat hate crimes during a surge in incidents targeting Asian Americans.

66. White House to spend $10 billion to bolster vaccine effort -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House announced Thursday that it is dedicating another $10 billion to try to drive up vaccination rates in low-income, minority and rural enclaves throughout the country.

67. Building boom’s dark cloud -

One year into the coronavirus pandemic, Nashville builders and homeowners are holding on to the bucking bronco that is the construction industry.

Prices for some much-used wood products have doubled and even tripled over the past year. Lead times for windows, appliances and more have stretched into weeks and months. Prices of other materials are rising or in short supply as well, and mortgage rates have been edging up.

68. Biden eyes $3T package for infrastructure, schools, families -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fresh off passage of the COVID-19 relief bill, President Joe Biden is assembling the next big White House priority, a sweeping $3 trillion package of investments on infrastructure and domestic needs.

69. Pinnacle adds Frazee as financial adviser -

Nashville commercial real estate lender Michael Frazee has joined Pinnacle Financial Partners as a financial adviser, based at the firm’s Symphony Place headquarters office. Frazee is part of commercial real estate manager Tyler Muesch’s Nashville team.

70. 'I don't need the vaccine': GOP worries threaten virus fight -

FRONT ROYAL, Virginia (AP) — In this rural swath of Virginia's Shenandoah valley, former President Donald Trump remains deeply admired, with lawn signs and campaign flags still dotting the landscape. The vaccines aimed at taming the coronavirus, however, aren't so popular.

71. Biden intent on selling benefits of virus aid plan to public -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Final congressional approval of the $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill Wednesday represents an undeniable victory for President Joe Biden -- and one the White House knows it needs to sell to the public.

72. Teacher vaccinations go untracked amid school reopening push -

The national rush to vaccinate teachers in hopes of soon reopening pandemic-shuttered schools is running into one basic problem: Almost no one knows how many are getting the shots, or refusing to get them.

73. 'Falling through cracks': Vaccine bypasses some older adults -

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Jean Andrade, an 88-year-old who lives alone, has been waiting for her COVID-19 vaccine since she became eligible under state guidelines nearly a month ago. She assumed her caseworker would contact her about getting one, especially after she spent nearly two days stuck in an electric recliner during a recent power outage.

74. House passes sweeping voting rights bill over GOP opposition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats passed sweeping voting and ethics legislation over unanimous Republican opposition, advancing to the Senate what would be the largest overhaul of the U.S. election law in at least a generation.

75. 4 Nashville ‘bottlenecks’ make US Top 100 list -

Six Tennessee bottlenecks for trucks – including four in Nashville – have made the top 100 of most congested traffic locations, the American Transportation Research Institute reports.

“Tennessee is at the crossroads of the country, and increasingly that intersection is being choked by congestion,” says Tennessee Trucking Association President Dave Huneryager. “Despite the pandemic, trucks continued moving and delivering their critical loads, but their jobs were made more difficult by these chokepoints.

76. House prepares to pass landmark voting rights, ethics bill -

Washington (AP) — House Democrats are poised to pass a sweeping elections and ethics bill, offering it up as a powerful counterweight to voting rights restrictions advancing in Republican-controlled statehouses across the country.

77. Analysis: Biden aims to manage expectations with pandemic -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden doesn't just have to manage the coronavirus pandemic — he also has to manage people's expectations for how soon the country will come out of it.

And on the latter task, projecting too much optimism can be as risky as offering too little, requiring what one public health expert calls a "necessarily mixed message."

78. Biden attempt to resurrect Iran nuke deal off to bumpy start -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration's early efforts to resurrect the 2015 Iran nuclear deal are getting a chilly early response from Tehran. Though few expected a breakthrough in the first month of the new administration, Iran's tough line suggests a difficult road ahead.

79. Whatever happened to car subscription services? -

Just a few years ago, car subscriptions looked like the next sure thing. Picking up on consumers’ comfort with paying monthly for the likes of streaming services or phones, many automakers introduced programs that allowed people to get a new car and a variety of perks for a monthly fee.

80. Sitting on billions, Catholic dioceses amassed taxpayer aid -

When the coronavirus forced churches to close their doors and give up Sunday collections, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Charlotte turned to the federal government's signature small business relief program for more than $8 million.

81. Events -

Chamber Chat (Virtual). Zoom Meeting to hear from Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce staff about member benefits and involvement opportunities. Thursday, 1-2 p.m. Information

82. Biden flexible on who gets aid, tells lawmakers to 'go big' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden told Democratic lawmakers Wednesday he's "not married" to an absolute number on his $1.9 trillion COVID rescue plan but Congress needs to "act fast" on relief for the pandemic and the economic crisis.

83. Biden warns of growing cost of delay on $1.9T econ aid plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden warned Friday of a steep and growing "cost of inaction" on his $1.9 trillion COVID relief plan as the White House searched for "creative" ways to win public support for a package that is getting a cold shoulder from Senate Republicans.

84. Events -

Coffee & Connect. Join fellow members of Gallatin Young Professionals for coffee and networking. Black Press #003, 1188 Long Hollow Pike. Wednesday, 8-9 a.m. Fee: Free event with members purchasing their own coffee. Information

85. 1st private space crew paying $55M each to fly to station -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The first private space station crew was introduced Tuesday: Three men who are each paying $55 million to fly on a SpaceX rocket.

They'll be led by a former NASA astronaut now working for Axiom Space, the Houston company that arranged the trip for next January.

86. At least 4 Tennessee men receive presidential pardons -

NASHVILLE (AP) — At least four Tennessee men are among the 73 people pardoned by President Donald Trump during the final hours of his term, and three of them have dedicated their lives to helping other inmates and those at risk of incarceration.

87. Patterson names Douglass shareholder in firm -

Patterson Intellectual Property Law has elected Scott M. Douglass to a shareholder of the firm.

Douglass concentrates his practice in the areas of trademarks, copyrights and data privacy. He litigates trademark, trade dress, and copyright claims in federal courts across the country. He represents companies and individuals acting as both rightsholders asserting their rights and defendants accused of infringing others’ rights.

88. Biden picks Samantha Power, former UN envoy, for US aid post -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden announced Wednesday that he has picked Samantha Power, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations under President Barack Obama, to run the agency overseeing American foreign humanitarian and development aid.

89. Meet the online gadget show, a hall of mirrors to the future -

Every January, huge crowds descend on Las Vegas for the CES gadget show, an extravaganza of tech and glitz intended to set the tone for the coming year in consumer technology. CES kicks off this week, but thanks to the pandemic, it will be in a radical new format — a "virtual" show taking place only in cyberspace.

90. Biden chooses veteran diplomat Burns as CIA director -

WASHINGTON (AP) — William Burns, a well-known figure in diplomatic circles around the world, is President-elect Joe Biden's choice to lead the CIA, a selection likely to be embraced by the rank and file at the nation's premier spy agency.

91. US Attorney: FBI agents search lawmakers' offices and homes -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Federal prosecutors in Tennessee said Friday that FBI agents have searched the homes and offices of several state lawmakers.

U.S. Attorney's Office of Middle Tennessee spokesman David Boling confirmed the searches included the homes of former GOP House Speaker Glen Casada, state Rep. Robin Smith and Casada's former chief of staff, Cade Cothren, Boling confirmed. The office of Republican Rep. Todd Warner was also searched, according to House Speaker Cameron Sexton.

92. Warnock, Biden wins give twin thrills to religious liberals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Rev. and Sen.-elect Raphael Warnock shares more than a party with President-elect Joe Biden: Both Democrats made faith a central part of their political identity on the campaign trail — and their victories are emboldening religious liberals.

93. Child labor in palm oil industry tied to Girl Scout cookies -

They are two young girls from two very different worlds, linked by a global industry that exploits an army of children.

Olivia Chaffin, a Girl Scout in rural Tennessee, was a top cookie seller in her troop when she first heard rainforests were being destroyed to make way for ever-expanding palm oil plantations. On one of those plantations a continent away, 10-year-old Ima helped harvest the fruit that makes its way into a dizzying array of products sold by leading Western food and cosmetics brands.

94. Bridgestone, Predators reach helmet logo deal -

Bridgestone Americas and the Nashville Predators have agreed to a deal establishing Bridgestone as the team’s first-ever helmet entitlement partner. The deal will place Bridgestone’s iconic “B Mark” logo on the team’s home and away helmets for the entire 2020-21 season.

95. Pence, wife Karen, get COVID-19 vaccine injections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Mike Pence became the highest ranking U.S. official to receive the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine on Friday in a live-television event aimed at reassuring Americans the shot is safe. He celebrated the milestone as "a medical miracle" that could eventually contain the raging pandemic.

96. Emails: School choice org caused 'confusion' in voucher plan -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A prominent voucher group's outreach efforts to families of students "caused nothing but confusion" while Tennessee attempted to enact a program that would have allowed parents to use tax dollars to pay for private school tuition, a state official said in emails detailing the implementation efforts.

97. Penguin to buy Simon & Schuster, create publishing giant -

BERLIN (AP) — German media giant Bertelsmann said Wednesday that its Penguin Random House division is buying rival Simon & Schuster in a megadeal that would reshape the U.S. publishing industry.

98. MP&F promotes five to senior leadership roles -

MP&F Strategic Communications has promoted five members of its senior leadership team.

Account supervisor to senior account supervisor:

• Stacy Alcala joined MP&F in 2007. Her areas of expertise are crisis communications, event planning, community outreach, media relations and marketing materials development. She leads MP&F’s work within the senior living industry.

99. 'No more room for delay': Biden wants emergency COVID-19 aid -

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden is calling on Congress to enact billions of dollars in emergency COVID-19 assistance before the year's end, according to a senior adviser who warned Friday that "there's no more room for delay."

100. Biden adds Obama administration veterans to top staff -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden is adding four Obama-Biden administration veterans to his top ranks as he continues to build out his White House team.

Cathy Russell, who was Jill Biden's chief of staff during the Obama administration, will serve as director of the White House Office of Presidential Personnel, evaluating applicants for administration roles. Louisa Terrell, who served as a legislative adviser to the president in the Obama administration and worked as deputy chief of staff for Biden in the Senate, will be director of the White House Office of Legislative Affairs. Terrell has already been engaged in Capitol Hill outreach as part of Biden's transition team.