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Editorial Results (free)

1. Fed likely to signal a coming pullback in economic support -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is expected this week to send its clearest signal yet that it will start reining in its ultra-low-interest rate policies later this year, a first step toward unwinding the extraordinary support it's given the economy since the pandemic struck 18 months ago.

2. Wall Street rallies back to records following Fed speech -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street rallied to more record highs Friday after the head of the Federal Reserve said it's still far from pulling interest rates off the record low that has helped the market soar, even if it does begin dialing back its support for the economy later this year.

3. More COVID-19 shots, studies offer hope for US schools -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Officials offered new hope for the safety of U.S. schoolchildren threatened by COVID-19 on Friday as Gulf Coast hospitals already full of unvaccinated patients braced for the nightmare scenario of a major hurricane causing a wave of fractures, cuts and heart attacks without enough staff to treat the injured.

4. Powell: Fed on track to slow aid for economy later this year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve will start dialing back its ultra-low-rate policies this year as long as hiring continues to improve, Chair Jerome Powell said Friday, signaling the beginning of the end of the Fed's extraordinary response to the pandemic recession.

5. Taliban took Afghanistan but face cash squeeze -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Taliban face a frontal challenge in cementing control of Afghanistan: Money.

Despite their dominant military blitz over the past week, the Taliban lack access to billions of dollars from their central bank and the International Monetary Fund that would keep the country running during a turbulent shakeup. Those funds are largely controlled by the U.S. and international institutions, a possible leverage point as tense evacuations proceed from the airport in the capital of Kabul. Tens of thousands of people remain to be evacuated ahead of the United States' Aug. 31 deadline to withdraw its troops from the country.

6. Potential military vaccine mandate brings distrust, support -

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Since President Joe Biden asked the Pentagon last week to look at adding the COVID-19 vaccine to the military's mandatory shots, former Army lawyer Greg T. Rinckey has fielded a deluge of calls.

7. A dozen years after last minimum wage hike, is $15 new norm? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The signs and banners are dotted along suburban commercial strips and hanging in shop windows and restaurants, evidence of a new desperation among America's service-industry employers: "Now Hiring, $15 an hour."

8. Fed to discuss a pullback in economic aid with inflation up -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With inflation uncomfortably high and the COVID-19 Delta variant raising economic concerns, a divided Federal Reserve will meet this week to discuss when and how it should dial back its ultra-low-interest rate policies.

9. US consumer prices surged in past year the most since 2008 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prices for U.S. consumers jumped in June by the most in 13 years, extending a run of higher inflation and fueling concerns that the rapidly rebounding economy is making goods and services increasingly expensive.

10. Waller adds 6 to Nashville corporate practice -

Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP has made several hires to strengthen the firm’s corporate practice in Nashville. They are:

• Matt Bryson, an associate who represents private companies and financial sponsors in mergers, acquisitions, divestitures and other investment, financing and exit transactions. Bryson previously was a member of the corporate team in Dentons’ Atlanta office.

11. Fewer working-age people may slow economy. Will it lift pay? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As America's job market rebounds this summer and the need for workers intensifies, employers won't likely have a chance to relax anytime soon. Worker shortages will likely persist for years after the fast-reopening economy shakes off its growing pains.

12. Stocks again post records following encouraging jobs data -

Wall Street capped a milestone-shattering week Friday with stock indexes hitting more record highs as investors welcomed a report showing the nation's job market was even stronger last month than expected.

13. Worried about inflation? Check paystubs, not just pump price -

NEW YORK (AP) — Everyone would like to get paid more, but the worry on Wall Street is there could be too much of a good thing.

Wages are going up for workers across many industries as the economy roars out of the recession. And in terms of inflation, which is the bogeyman for investors right now, a big and sustained gain in wages would be even more dangerous than the price spikes already seen for oil and other commodities.

14. Freed from COVID restrictions, big US banks hike dividends -

NEW YORK (AP) — Recently freed from regulators' coronavirus restrictions, the largest U.S. banks on Monday announced plans to return tens of billions of dollars to their shareholders over the next year in the form of dividends and stock buybacks.

15. Tech gains nudge S&P 500, Nasdaq further into record heights -

NEW YORK (AP) — Strength for tech stocks nudged U.S. indexes a bit further into record heights Monday, more than making up for losses across much of the rest of Wall Street.

The S&P 500 rose 9.91 points, or 0.2%, to 4,290.61 after drifting between small gains and losses for much of the day. It added to its all-time high set Friday as optimism builds about the strengthening economy and expectations that the Federal Reserve will keep interest rates low for a while longer.

16. All big banks pass latest Federal Reserve 'stress tests' -

NEW YORK (AP) — All 23 of the nation's biggest banks are healthy enough to withstand a sudden economic catastrophe, the Federal Reserve said Thursday as it released the results from its latest "stress tests," giving the banks the green light to resume paying out dividends to investors and buying back stock.

17. Prosecutor: Bank CEO sought 'power' with $16M Manafort loans -

NEW YORK (AP) — A Chicago bank owner traded $16 million in loans to ex-President Donald Trump's ex-campaign manager in a bid for a prestigious position in Trump's administration, a prosecutor told jurors in an opening statement Wednesday before a defense attorney assured them that the banker committed no crimes.

18. Stocks end listless day on Wall Street mixed as calm returns -

NEW YORK (AP) — A listless day on Wall Street ended with indexes mixed on Wednesday, as nervousness continues to wash out of the market following last week's jolt by the Federal Reserve.

The S&P 500 slipped 4.60 points, or 0.1%, to 4,241.84 after earlier meandering between very modest gains and losses. It's 0.3% below its record high set a week and a half ago.

19. Wall Street rises, pushing S&P 500 back near record high -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks finished higher on Wall Street Tuesday, nudging the S&P 500 closer to the record high it reached last week. The benchmark index added 0.5%.

The Nasdaq did a bit better, climbing 0.8%, with an assist from gains in several big technology stocks.

20. Fed's Powell says high inflation temporary, will 'wane' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell on Tuesday responded to concerns from Republican lawmakers about spiking inflation by reiterating his view that current price increases will likely prove temporary.

21. Powell says economy growing rapidly, inflation up 'notably' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The economy is growing at a healthy clip, and that has accelerated inflation, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell says in written testimony to be delivered Tuesday at a congressional oversight hearing.

22. Wall Street snaps back following worst week since February -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rebounded on Wall Street Monday and clawed back most of their sharp loss from last week. The S&P 500 snapped 1.4% higher as the initial jolt passed from the Federal Reserve's reminder that it will eventually offer less help for markets. Oil producers, banks and other companies that were hit particularly hard last week made the biggest gains. High-growth tech stocks lagged. Shorter-term yields fell, and longer-term yields rose in another reversal from last week's initial reaction to the Fed's saying it may raise rates twice by late 2023.

23. US stocks slump; S&P 500 has its worst week since February -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks sank again on Wall Street Friday, knocking the S&P 500 to its worst weekly loss since February, as more steam comes out of banks and other stocks that soared earlier this year with expectations for the economy and inflation.

24. Most stocks fall, tech holds up as markets digest Fed moves -

NEW YORK (AP) — Most stocks ended lower on Wall Street Thursday as investors continued to interpret new guidance from the Federal Reserve, which is now looking at potentially raising interest rates as soon as 2023.

25. Stocks dip, yields rise as Fed hints at dialing back support -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks fell on Wall Street and bond yields rose Wednesday after Federal Reserve officials signaled they may start easing off the accelerator on their massive support for markets and the economy earlier than previously thought.

26. US stocks dip from records ahead of Fed decision on rates -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks eased back below their record heights Tuesday as investors waited to hear whether the mixed bag of data coming in about the economy will push the Federal Reserve to let up on its massive support for markets.

27. Delicate task for Fed: When to pull back on low-rate support -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With inflation rising in a fast-rebounding economy, the Federal Reserve is poised this week to discuss when it will take its first steps toward dialing back its ultra-low interest rate policies.

28. Another jump in prices tightens the squeeze on US consumers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — American consumers absorbed another surge in prices in May — a 0.6% increase over April and 5% over the past year, the biggest 12-month inflation spike since 2008.

The May rise in consumer prices that the Labor Department reported Thursday reflected a range of goods and services now in growing demand as people increasingly shop, travel, dine out and attend entertainment events in a rapidly reopening economy.

29. US economy: Plenty of growth, not enough workers or supplies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy is sparking confusion and whiplash almost as fast as it's adding jobs.

Barely more than a year after the coronavirus caused the steepest economic fall and job losses on record, the speed of the rebound has been so unexpectedly swift that many companies can't fill jobs or acquire enough supplies to meet a pent-up burst of customer demand.

30. Saved by online lenders, businesses say they'll borrow again -

NEW YORK (AP) — Some small businesses forced to turn to online lenders for pandemic relief are making those niche players a bigger part of their financial game plan, and are even considering dumping their traditional banks altogether.

31. A stifling worker shortage threatens Nashville's recovery -

NASHVILLE (AP) — In downtown Nashville, honky-tonks rattle back to life, peddle taverns crowd the streets and bartenders can't pour fast enough.

The post-pandemic business boom arrived as expected. But one big, unexpected challenge stands in the way of a full recovery: There aren't enough workers to keep up with a national surge in demand.

32. High inflation? A generation of investors has never felt it -

NEW YORK (AP) — The central question gripping Wall Street is whether the burst of inflation hitting the economy as it recovers from the pandemic is just temporary or the start of a real problem. The answer threatens to crack the stock market's incredible, record-setting run that began in March 2020.

33. EXPLAINER: Why has the price of Bitcoin been falling? -

NEW YORK (AP) — The price of Bitcoin fell as much as 29% Wednesday after the China Banking Association warned member banks of risks associated with digital currencies. Other digital currencies suffered sharp declines as well.

34. Biden reverses Trump changes to bank antidiscrimination law -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Biden administration said Tuesday it will repeal changes made by the Trump administration to a law aimed at stopping banks from discriminating against racial minorities and the poor.

35. Big Tech stocks flex muscles again after a rough winter -

NEW YORK (AP) — Big Tech stocks are flexing their enormous strength again, after getting knocked around a bit earlier this year.

Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, Google's parent company and Facebook all gave profit reports this week that blew past investors' already high expectations. Apple earned 40% more than what Wall Street forecast, for example, leading one analyst to call it a "drop the mic" performance.

36. US recovery from pandemic recession is showing momentum -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Powered by consumers and fueled by government aid, the U.S. economy is achieving a remarkably fast recovery from the recession that ripped through the nation last year on the heels of the coronavirus and cost tens of millions of Americans their jobs and businesses.

37. AP FACT CHECK: Biden skews record on migrants; GOP on virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Taking a swipe at his predecessor, President Joe Biden gave a distorted account of the historical forces driving migrants to the U.S. border, glossing over the multitudes who were desperate to escape poverty in their homelands when he was vice president.

38. Explainer: Capital gains tax hike targets wealthy investors -

NEW YORK (AP) — After massive U.S. government spending helped send the stock market back to record heights, with even more potentially on the way, the bill may be coming due for the nation's wealthiest investors.

39. Biden to pitch sweeping 'family plan' in speech to Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Marking his first 100 days in office, President Joe Biden will use his first joint address to Congress to pitch a $1.8 trillion investment in children, families and education that would fundamentally transform the role government plays in American life.

40. With layoffs down and spending up, US rebound gains momentum -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A much-awaited economic boom coming off the pandemic recession appeared to edge closer to reality Thursday with fresh data showing the pace of layoffs dwindling, consumers spending freely and manufacturing rebounding.

41. $1,400 stimulus checks helped March retail sales soar 9.8% -

NEW YORK (AP) — Newly vaccinated and armed with $1,400 stimulus checks, Americans went on a spending spree last month, buying new clothes and going out to eat again.

Retail sales surged a seasonally adjusted 9.8% after dropping about 3% the month before, the Commerce Department said Thursday. The rise in March was much better than the 5.5% increase Wall Street analysts had expected.

42. Most US stocks rise, indexes end mixed as earnings kick off -

NEW YORK (AP) — Most U.S. stocks rose on Wednesday, but indexes petered out to a mixed finish as momentum weakened following an encouraging start to what's expected to be a thunderous earnings reporting season.

43. Fed survey: Economy rebounding, helped by stimulus, vaccines -

A Federal Reserve survey has found that the economy was rebounding in late February through early April, helped by billions of dollars in a new round of stimulus payments and the stepped-up rollout of coronavirus vaccines.

44. Poll: 15% of Americans worse off a year into pandemic -

While most Americans have weathered the pandemic financially, about 38 million say they are worse off now than before the outbreak began in the U.S.

Overall, 55% of Americans say their financial circumstances are about the same now as a year ago, and 30% say their finances have improved, according to a new poll from Impact Genome and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. But 15% say they are worse off.

45. Businesses, philanthropy unite to fight racial wealth gap -

NEW YORK (AP) — The CEOs of Starbucks and Goldman Sachs will join leaders from philanthropy and academia in a new initiative to address the racial wealth gap in the United States.

The initiative is called NinetyToZero, so named for the roughly 90% wealth gap between white and Black Americans. Its leaders describe the goal as providing a roadmap for organizations to "counteract centuries of discrimination, segregation, and financial exploitation," according to the group's launch plans announced Tuesday.

46. Stocks climb, erasing weekly losses for the S&P 500 index -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rose on Wall Street Friday, erasing the market's losses from earlier in the week and avoiding a second straight weekly drop for the S&P 500.

The index rose 1.7% Friday, and some of the biggest gains came from companies whose profits are likely to jump the most if COVID-19 vaccinations and massive spending by the U.S. government juice the economy as much as economists expect.

47. Biden eyes $3T package for infrastructure, schools, families -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fresh off passage of the COVID-19 relief bill, President Joe Biden is assembling the next big White House priority, a sweeping $3 trillion package of investments on infrastructure and domestic needs.

48. Overstimulated? Stocks soar 75% in historic 12-month run -

NEW YORK (AP) — It was one year ago that the terrifying free fall for the stock market suddenly ended, ushering in one of its greatest runs.

On March 23, 2020, the S&P 500 fell 2.9%. In all, the index dropped nearly 34% in about a month, wiping out three years' worth of gains for the market.

49. Wall Street closes lower, pulled down by IT and energy -

Stocks fell broadly on Wall Street Thursday, as rising bond yields once again pulled down shares of technology companies and the energy sector sold off on a sharp drop in oil prices.

The S&P 500 index fell 1.5%, on track for its first weekly loss in three weeks. Technology companies accounted for a big swath of the sell-off, which contributed to the tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite dropping 3%, its second-worst loss of the year.

50. AP-NORC poll: People of color bear COVID-19's economic brunt -

NEW YORK (AP) — A year ago, Elvia Banuelos' life was looking up. The 39-year-old mother of two young children said she felt confident about a new management-level job with the U.S. Census Bureau — she would earn money to supplement the child support she receives to keep her children healthy, happy and in day care.

51. From job cuts to online commerce, virus reshaped US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At first, it was expected to be brief. At least that was the hope.

Instead, a once-in-a-century pandemic has ground on for a year, throwing millions out of work and upending wide swathes of the American economy. Delivery services thrived while restaurants suffered. Home offices replaced downtown offices. Travel and entertainment spending dried up.

52. Why the pandemic left long-term scars on global job market -

Esther Montanez's housecleaning job at the Hilton Back Bay in Boston was a lifeline for her, a 31-year-old single mother with a 5-year-old son.

The pay was steady and solid — enough to pay her bills and still have money left over to sock away for a savings account for her child. Montanez liked her co-workers and felt pride in her work.

53. Jump in hiring fuels optimism for US economic recovery -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added a surprisingly robust 379,000 jobs last month in a sign the economy is strengthening as virus cases drop, vaccinations ramp up, Americans spend more and states ease business restrictions.

54. EXPLAINER: Why rising rates are unsettling Wall Street -

NEW YORK (AP) — Interest rates keep marching higher, and Wall Street keeps shaking because of it.

The yield on the 10-year Treasury climbed back above 1.50% Thursday, prodded higher by comments by the Federal Reserve's chair, and it helped send stocks on Wall Street on another slide. The speed at which the yield has climbed has forced investors to re-examine how they value stocks, bonds and every other investment. And the immediate verdict has been to sell them at lower prices, particularly the most popular investments of the last year.

55. Fed survey finds modest gains in the US economy in February -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Federal Reserve survey of business conditions across the United States has found that economic activity was expanding at a modest pace in February.

The Fed survey released Wednesday shows that the central bank's business contacts were expressing optimism last month about a stronger rebound as more COVID-19 vaccines are distributed.

56. EXPLAINER: Why rising rates are unsettling Wall Street -

NEW YORK (AP) — Yes, it's possible to have too much of a good thing, and that's exactly why stock markets around the world are getting so unsettled.

Optimism for an economic revival is surging following a year of coronavirus-induced misery. But expectations for stronger growth — plus the higher inflation that could accompany it — are pushing interest rates higher, which is forcing investors to re-examine how they value stocks, bonds and every other investment.

57. Fed officials expressed concerns in over slowing economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials were convinced last month that the U.S. economy and job growth had slowed as coronavirus cases surged across the country, noting that the outlook is heavily dependent on the course of the virus.

58. Sign of inequality: US salaries recover even as jobs haven't -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a stark sign of the economic inequality that has marked the pandemic recession and recovery, Americans as a whole are now earning the same amount in wages and salaries that they did before the virus struck — even with nearly 9 million fewer people working.

59. US jobless claims fall slightly to 793,000 with layoffs high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits fell slightly last week to 793,000, evidence that job cuts remain high despite a substantial decline in new confirmed viral infections.

60. Powell stresses commitment to full employment, low rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell on Wednesday underscored the Fed's commitment to reducing unemployment to multi-decade lows, where it stood before the pandemic, while signaling little concern about the risk of potentially high inflation or financial-market instability.

61. US regulators launch review of stock market turbulence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation's top financial markets regulators say they will look into whether recent stock market turbulence is an indication that current trading practices are not doing enough to protect investors.

62. It's not just GameStop worrying Wall Street about a bubble -

NEW YORK (AP) — Now, even the pros on Wall Street are asking if the stock market has shot too high.

U.S. stocks have been on a nearly nonstop rip higher since March, up roughly 70% to record heights and causing outsiders to say the market had lost touch with the pandemic's reality. But Wall Street kept justifying the gains by pointing to massive support from the Federal Reserve, lifesaving deliverance from COVID-19 vaccines and efforts by Congress to pump more stimulus into the economy.

63. A bumpy day on Wall Street ends with stock indexes mixed -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks swerved to a mixed finish on Wall Street Monday, ahead of a deluge of corporate earnings reports scheduled to arrive this week.

The S&P 500 rose 13.89 points, or 0.4%, to 3,855.36 as gains for influential Big Tech stocks were big enough to steady the index and return it to a record. It recovered from a 1.2% loss earlier in the day, as investors expect Apple and other tech giants to report healthy profits for the end of 2020 in coming days.

64. Biden inherits damaged economy, with signs of hope emerging -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has inherited a badly damaged economy pulverized by the pandemic, with 10 million fewer jobs than a year ago and as many as one in 6 small businesses shut down.

65. Anger in states over pace of COVID-19 vaccine allotments -

Uncertainty over the pace of federal COVID-19 vaccine allotments triggered anger and confusion Friday in some states, with officials worried that the shipments they expected won't be coming through.

66. Stocks fall as economic pain deepens, rally runs out of gas -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street closed out its first losing week in three with another drop on Friday after reports showed the pandemic is deepening the hole for the economy, as Washington prepares to throw it another lifeline.

67. US loses 140,000 jobs, first monthly drop since spring -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers shed jobs last month for the first time since April, cutting 140,000 positions, clear evidence that the economy is faltering as the viral pandemic tightens its grip on consumers and businesses.

68. Biden picks Rhode Island Gov. Raimondo as commerce secretary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden has picked Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo to lead the Commerce Department, helping set trade policy and looking to promote U.S. opportunities for growth domestically and overseas.

69. Restaurants to retailers, virus transformed business -

It would be just a temporary precaution. When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon – as soon as New York was safe again.

70. Wall Street ends wobbly day near records after Fed meeting -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks ended a wobbly day with mixed results Wednesday after the Federal Reserve pledged to keep buying bonds until the economy makes substantial progress from its virus-wracked state. The S&P 500 eked out a gain of 0.2%, even though most stocks in the index fell. The tech-heavy Nasdaq closed at another all-time high, and the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell slightly. The Fed is keeping the accelerator floored on its support for the economy, but investors are more interested in what's happening across Washington. They want to see Congress reach a deal to deliver another dose of financial support for the economy.

...

71. From restaurants to retailers, virus transformed economies -

NEW YORK (AP) — It would be just a temporary precaution.

When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon — as soon as New York was safe again.

72. A pandemic atlas: USA by the numbers, telling and horrifying -

Month after dismal month, Americans have been inundated by an ever-rising tide of devastating numbers. Hundreds of thousands of deaths. Tens of million unemployed.

By mid-December, five in every 100 Americans – more than 16 million – had been infected by COVID-19.

73. In Wall Street years, 2020 felt like a decade for markets -

NEW YORK (AP) — While lockdown life has kept time standing still for nearly everyone through 2020, Wall Street has been locked in at super fast-forward.

The stock market tumbled through years' worth of losses in just over a month this spring, only to turn around and pack an entire bull market's worth of gains into less than nine months. Even within the span of a few hours, the market in 2020 would sometimes careen to a loss that would have been remarkable for a full year.

74. Across US and Europe, pandemic's grip on economies tightens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The worsening of the viral pandemic across the United States and Europe is threatening their economies and intensifying pressure on governments and central banks on both continents to intervene aggressively.

75. Hunter Biden tax probe examining Chinese business dealings -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is investigating the finances of President-elect Joe Biden's son, including scrutinizing some of his Chinese business dealings and other transactions, a person familiar with the matter told The Associated Press.

76. Hunter Biden tax probe examining Chinese business dealings -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is investigating the finances of President-elect Joe Biden's son, including scrutinizing some of his Chinese business dealings and other transactions, a person familiar with the matter told The Associated Press.

77. Analysis: Biden prioritizes experience with Cabinet picks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Competence is making a comeback.

President-elect Joe Biden has prized staying power over star power when making his first wave of Cabinet picks and choices for White House staff, with a premium placed on government experience and proficiency as he looks to rebuild a depleted and demoralized federal bureaucracy.

78. Analysis: Biden prioritizes experience with Cabinet picks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Competence is making a comeback.

President-elect Joe Biden has prized staying power over star power when making his first wave of Cabinet picks and choices for White House staff, with a premium placed on government experience and proficiency as he looks to rebuild a depleted and demoralized federal bureaucracy.

79. EXPLAINER: Why the Dow topped 30,000 for the first time -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street busted through its latest milestone Tuesday, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average topped 30,000 for the first time.

It's an attention-grabbing psychological threshold, and it's an encouraging signal that the market's rally is broadening beyond the handful of stocks that carried Wall Street through the pandemic. But the Dow at 30,000 means less to most investors' 401(k) accounts than the fact that broader market indexes are also at record highs.

80. Stocks pull further below record highs as infections spread -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks pulled back on Thursday, amid increasing worries about worsening coronavirus counts across the country.

Markets around the world have taken a pause after galloping higher this month, at first on expectations that Washington will continue several pro-business policies following last week's U.S. elections. More recently, encouraging early results for a potential COVID-19 vaccine have investors envisioning a global economy returning to normal.

81. Rally fades on Wall Street, pulling indexes below records -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks closed mostly higher on Wednesday, helped by big technology stocks, but news of tighter restrictions in New York State helped dent an earlier rally.

The S&P 500 closed up 27.13 points, or 0.8%, to 3,572.66. The technology-heavy Nasdaq composite, meanwhile, rose by 2%.

82. Stocks rally worldwide with hopes for a return to "normal" -

NEW YORK (AP) — Brimming hopes that people will again return to office buildings, shopping centers and normal life sent markets rallying worldwide on Monday, following encouraging data about a potential coronavirus vaccine.

83. Tennessee mulling independent review on COVID-19 vaccine -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee is considering independently reviewing the safety and efficacy of a coronavirus vaccine once it is eventually approved by the federal government before distributing it to the public, Health Commissioner Lisa Piercey said Wednesday.

84. Trump trade policy: 4 years of high drama, limited results -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump spent four years upending seven decades of American trade policy.

In what became his defining economic act, Trump launched a trade war with China. On another front, he taxed the steel and aluminum of U.S. allies. And he terrified America's own corporations by threatening to wreck $1.4 trillion in annual trade with Mexico and Canada.

85. US jobless claims rise to 898,000 with layoffs still high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits rose last week by the most in two months, to 898,000, a historically high number and evidence that layoffs remain a hindrance to the economy's recovery from the pandemic recession.

86. US jobless claims climb to 898,000 as layoffs remain -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits rose last week by the most in two months, to 898,000, a historically high number and evidence that layoffs remain a hindrance to the economy's recovery from the pandemic recession.

87. Use COVID-19 crisis to build helpful money habits -

As millennials, we’ve learned about money the hard way. From the Great Recession to stratospheric student loan debt to a pandemic, there’s been no shortage of life giving us lemons.

While the long-term economic effects of the pandemic are yet to be fully realized, you may have noticed one positive trend in the short term: For once, your debt may have dropped.

88. US layoffs remain elevated as incomes and spending weaken -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits declined last week to a still-high 837,000, evidence that the economy is struggling to sustain a tentative recovery that began this summer.

89. US layoffs remain elevated as 837,000 seek jobless aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits declined last week to a still-high 837,000, evidence that the economy is struggling to sustain a tentative recovery that began this summer.

90. Wall Street rallies to close out strong, but wild quarter -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rallied on Wednesday, but only after zooming up, down and back up again in a fitting end to what was a wild month and quarter for Wall Street.

Prospects for additional support from Congress for the economy helped drive the day's trading, as they have for weeks. The S&P 500 shot to a gain of as much as 1.7% after Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told CNBC that he would talk with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi about a potential deal in the afternoon, "and I hope we can get something done."

91. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's dubious claims on health care, court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump isn't providing all the facts when he promises that people with preexisting medical problems will always be covered by health insurance if "Obamacare" is ruled unconstitutional.

92. Fear of bankruptcy can be worse than actually filing -

The mystery isn’t why so many people file for bankruptcy each year. It’s why more people don’t.

Each year, only a fraction of the Americans who could benefit financially from bankruptcy actually seek relief. Economists say some don’t file because collectors aren’t aggressively pursuing them, while others may strategically delay filing because bankruptcy could benefit them more down the road.

93. Wall Street falls, S&P 500 down 1.2% as global markets swoon -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street slumped Monday as markets tumbled worldwide on worries about the pandemic's economic pain, though the S&P 500 had pared its losses by the end of the day.

The drops began in Asia as soon as trading opened for the week, and they accelerated in Europe on worries about the possibility of tougher restrictions there to stem rising coronavirus counts. In the U.S., stocks and Treasury yields weakened, while prices sank for oil and other commodities that a healthy economy would demand.

94. US layoffs remain elevated as job market's gains weaken -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits was unchanged last week at 884,000, a sign that layoffs remain stuck at a historically high level six months after the viral pandemic flattened the economy.

95. Jane Fraser to become Citi CEO; 1st woman to lead major bank -

NEW YORK (AP) — Citigroup's Jane Fraser will become the first woman to ever lead a Wall Street bank when she succeeds CEO Michael Corbat in February.

96. Jane Fraser to become Citi CEO; 1st woman to lead major bank -

NEW YORK (AP) — Citigroup's Jane Fraser will become the first woman to ever lead a Wall Street bank when she succeeds CEO Michael Corbat in February.

97. US layoffs remain elevated as job market's gains weaken -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits was unchanged last week at 884,000, a sign that layoffs remain stuck at a historically high level six months after the viral pandemic flattened the economy.

98. Stocks bounce back on Wall Street as tech bloodletting halts -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street snapped back to life on Wednesday, recovering from its worst stretch of losses in months, as the bloodletting for big technology stocks came to at least a temporary halt.

99. Tech rout sends stock market to its biggest loss since June -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street's euphoria took a break Thursday, as steep losses in technology stocks dragged the rest of the market down with them.

It was the biggest decline for the U.S. stock market since early June, when investors were dealing with a surge of coronavirus infections in places like Florida, Texas and Arizona. There seemed to be no explicit catalyst for the sell-off, with economic data coming in roughly where the market had expected and no companies issuing foreboding warnings.

100. Business owners tap into savings to withstand pandemic -

New York (AP) — When the coronavirus outbreak forced cruise lines to cancel trips to Alaska, it wiped out Midgi Moore's tour business, leaving her with thousands of dollars in deposits to refund.

Moore's company, Juneau Food Tours, didn't have enough cash on hand. So, she withdrew $30,000 from her retirement account — a painful decision for a 56 year old starting to look forward to the day when she can stop working.