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Editorial Results (free)

1. Epic Games appeals ruling in lawsuit alleging Apple monopoly -

Epic Games filed notice that is appealing a federal judge's decision in a lawsuit alleging that Apple has been running an illegal monopoly that stifles competition.

The maker of the popular Fortnite video game said in a court filing Sunday that it will take the ruling to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco.

2. Judge loosens Apple's grip on app store in Epic decision -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — A federal judge ordered Apple to dismantle a lucrative part of the competitive barricade guarding its closely run iPhone app store, but rejected allegations that the company has been running an illegal monopoly that stifles competition and innovation.

3. 'Varsity Blues' trial promises fresh insights in old scandal -

BOSTON (AP) — The first trial in the "Operation Varsity Blues" college admissions bribery scandal will begin this week, with the potential to shed light on investigators' tactics and brighten the spotlight on a secretive school selection process many have long complained is rigged to favor the rich.

4. EXPLAINER: What is Apple doing with its App Store? -

Over the past week or so, Apple has eased some longstanding restrictions that helped make its App Store into a big moneymaker for the company. The company has long required app developers to pay high commissions to Apple on the sales of paid apps as well as purchases of subscriptions or digital items inside their apps.

5. Apple eases App Store rules again, to allow outside signups -

LONDON (AP) — Apple is relaxing rules to allow some app developers such as Spotify, Netflix and digital publishers to include an outside link so users can sign up for paid subscription accounts.

6. Back to basics How to bounce back when your income drops -

Losing income is never easy, but it’s become increasingly common over the last year and a half: Pew Research Center found 44% of U.S. adults say their household has experienced either job loss (including temporarily) or a pay cut since the beginning of the pandemic, with Hispanic and Asian adults most likely to say so.

7. Amazon delivers a mixed bag of 2Q results, shares slide -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon on Thursday turned in a mixed bag of results for its fiscal second quarter, coming up short of Wall Street expectations in revenue but beating on profits.

During the three-month period ended June 30, the Seattle-based company reported profit of $7.78 billion, or $15.12 per share compared to $5.24 billion, or $10.30 a share, during the year-ago period. Revenue jumped 27% to $113.08 billion.

8. Netflix confirms move into video games as its growth slows -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Netflix reported its worst slowdown in subscriber growth in eight years as people emerge from their pandemic cocoons. So it's adding a new attraction to its marquee: Video games.

9. Video games coming to Netflix? Latest hiring offers a clue -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Netflix has hired veteran video game executive Mike Verdu, signaling the video streaming service is poised to expand into another fertile field of entertainment.

Verdu's addition as Netflix's vice president of game development, confirmed Thursday, comes as the company seeks to sustain the momentum it gathered last year when people turned to the video streaming service to get through lockdowns imposed during the pandemic.

10. Amazon begins new chapter as Bezos hands over CEO role -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon founder Jeff Bezos stepped down as CEO on Monday, handing over the reins as the company navigates the challenges of a world fighting to emerge from the coronavirus pandemic.

Andy Jassy, who ran Amazon's cloud-computing business, replaced Bezos, a change the company announced in February.

11. Are sports fans tuning out? -

Remember the panic of 2020 when live sports disappeared from our TV screens? March Madness? Gone. NBA? Multiple delays, game played in a “bubble” and a season that ended four months later than normal. Major league baseball? Reduced to 60 games beginning in late July and then played with cardboard cutouts of fans filling otherwise empty seats.

12. Media consumers may be reaching limit of streaming services -

A British research company may have discovered a magic number for American media consumers — and it's seven.

That's seven streaming services, paid or free, that consumers are willing to subscribe to before the hassle of keeping track of log-ins and passwords just becomes too much, said Maria Rua Aguete, senior research director at the London-based media consultancy OMDIA.

13. Missing the moment: Virtual reality's breakout still elusive -

NEW YORK (AP) — Virtual reality — computer generated 3D environments that can range from startlingly realistic to abstract wonderlands — has been on the cusp of wide acceptance for years without ever really taking off.

14. Amazon to buy MGM, studio behind James Bond and 'Shark Tank' -

NEW YORK (AP) — Online shopping giant Amazon is buying MGM, the movie and TV studio behind James Bond, "Legally Blonde" and "Shark Tank," with the hopes of filling its video streaming service with more stuff to watch.

15. Stocks end higher on Wall Street, breaking a 3-day slump -

Stock closed higher on Wall Street Thursday, ending a three-day losing streak. Technology and communications companies led the way higher.

Chipmaker Nvidia and Netflix were among the winners. The S&P 500 rose 1.1%, while the tech-heavy Nasdaq added 1.8%.

16. Biden to spotlight electric vehicle future he sees for US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is putting the spotlight Tuesday on the electric vehicle future he envisions for the United States, as a way to tackle climate change and create jobs.

Biden is touring Ford's Electric Vehicle Center, a new factory being built on the grounds of the automaker's massive Rouge complex in Dearborn, Michigan.

17. Streaming landscape shifts with $43B AT&T Discovery deal -

NEW YORK (AP) — AT&T said Monday it will combine its massive WarnerMedia media assets, which includes HBO and CNN, with Discovery Inc. to create a new media heavyweight in a $43 billion deal.

18. Passing on your password? Streaming services are past it -

NEW YORK (AP) — Many of us were taught to share as kids. Now streaming services ranging from Netflix to Amazon to Disney+ want us to stop.

That's the new edict from the giants of streaming media, who are hoping to discourage the common practice of sharing account passwords without alienating subscribers who've grown accustomed to the hack.

19. Actor indicted in $227M Ponzi scheme involving film rights -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — An aspiring actor was indicted Tuesday in Los Angeles on suspicion of running a massive Ponzi scheme that solicited hundreds of millions of dollars from investors for phony Hollywood film licensing deals, federal prosecutors said.

20. Amazon's profit more than triples as pandemic boom continues -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon's pandemic boom isn't showing signs of slowing down. The company said Thursday that its first-quarter profit more than tripled from a year ago, fueled by the growth of online shopping. It also posted revenue of more than $100 billion, the second quarter in a row that the company has passed that milestone.

21. Stocks end higher on Wall Street after a day of steady gains -

Stocks ended broadly higher on Wall Street after steadily gaining throughout the day.

The S&P 500 index added 0.9% Wednesday following its first back-to-back loss since March.

Technology companies and banks helped lead the way higher. Communications stocks were among the only losers, led by a 7.4% drop in Netflix after the video streaming pioneer disappointed investors with a slowdown in subscriber additions.

22. Netflix's subscriber growth, stock zapped as pandemic eases -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Netflix's pandemic-fueled subscriber growth is slowing far faster than anticipated as people who have been cooped at home are able to get out and do other things again.

The video-streaming service added 4 million more worldwide subscribers from January through March, its smallest gain during that three-month period in four years.

23. Study: Facebook delivers biased job ads, skewed by gender -

Facebook is showing different job ads to women and men in a way that might run afoul of anti-discrimination laws, according to a new study.

University of Southern California researchers who examined the ad-delivery algorithms of Facebook and LinkedIn found that Facebook's were skewed by gender beyond what can be legally justified by differences in job qualifications.

24. Netflix scores streaming rights to new top Sony films -

NEW YORK (AP) — Netflix further beefed up its film catalog on Thursday in a multi-year deal that will make it the new streaming home to Sony Pictures' top releases in the U.S.

Beginning next year, Sony's new films will exclusively stream domestically on Netflix after their theatrical runs. That includes movies in popular franchises like "Spider-Man," "Venom" and "Jumanji," and 2022 releases including "Morbius," "Where the Crawdads Sing," "Uncharted" and "Bullet Train."

25. Open your door and say ‘Ahhhh’ -

Jacob Melnychuk grew up in San Jose, California, where he occasionally skipped science class at Leland High School to surf.

“I was a terrible high school student,” he admits.

But he also had a genuine sense of community, which rallied around the family of Pat Tillman, a fellow Leland graduate, after the Army Ranger was killed in Afghanistan in 2004. Tillman’s family was a staple in their community, and it was upsetting to Melnychuk to see how the military handled his death.

26. US stocks slip in mixed trading as rate pressure ratchets up -

Rising Treasury yields put pressure once more on big technology companies Tuesday, pulling U.S. stock indexes further below their recent all-time highs.

The S&P 500 lost 0.3%. Health care stocks also dragged down the market, outweighing gains by banks, industrial stocks and companies that rely on consumer spending. Smaller companies bucked the downward trend, powering the Russell 2000 index to a 1.7% gain.

27. Stocks pull mostly higher, shaking off some early wobbles -

Stocks regained their footing after an early slide and closed broadly higher Thursday, led by gains in financial and industrial companies.

The S&P 500 rose 0.5% after having been down 0.9% in the early going. The gain is the benchmark index's first in three days after a recent stretch of back-and-forth trading the last few weeks. Even so, the S&P 500 was still on track for a small weekly loss.

28. Wall Street closing lower; bank stocks fall -

Wall Street closed out a choppy week of trading Friday with major stock indexes mostly lower and all finishing in the red for the week.

The S&P 500 ended 0.1% lower after reversing a small gain. The benchmark index, which hit an all-time high on Wednesday, posted its first weekly decline in three weeks. Losses by banks, industrial companies and technology stocks weighed on the market. They offset gains in companies that rely on consumer spending, health care and other sectors.

29. Netflix tests possible password-sharing crackdown -

NEW YORK (AP) — Netflix is testing a way to crack down on password sharing.

The popular streaming service has been asking some users of the popular streaming site to verify their account via email or text, or to "verify later."

30. India introduces new rules to regulate online content -

NEW DELHI (AP) — India on Thursday rolled out new regulations for social media companies and digital streaming websites to make them more accountable for the online content shared on their platforms, giving the government more power to police it.

31. Late gains reverse most of an early slide on stock market -

A late-afternoon burst of buying on Wall Street helped reverse most of a stock market sell-off Tuesday, nudging the S&P 500 to its first gain after a five-day losing streak.

The benchmark index eked out a 0.1% gain after having been down more than 1.8% earlier. The Nasdaq lost 0.5% as technology stocks fell for a sixth straight day. The tech-heavy index had been down nearly 4%. The Dow Jones Industrial Average, which is less exposed to tech stocks than the two other indexes, managed to rise 0.1%.

32. Bezos, Bloomberg among top 50 US charity donors for 2020 -

As the world grappled with COVID-19, a recession and a racial reckoning, the ultrawealthy gave to a broader set of causes than ever before — bestowing multimillion-dollar gifts on food pantries, historically Black colleges and universities and organizations that serve the poor and the homeless, according to the Chronicle of Philanthropy's annual rankings of the 50 Americans who gave the most to charity last year.

33. Apple CEO lambasts tech rivals ahead of privacy update -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Apple CEO Tim Cook lambasted social media companies, though without naming them, accusing them of prioritizing user attention and data collection at the cost of allowing and even rewarding dangerous conspiracies, extremism and polarization.

34. Stocks have their worst day since October as Big Tech sinks -

The stock market posted its biggest drop since October Wednesday, led by declines in several Big Tech companies.

The S&P 500 gave up 2.6%. The benchmark index had set a record high just two days earlier.

35. Wall Street hits records as hopes build for more stimulus -

Wall Street marked the dawn of President Joe Biden's administration with stocks rallying to record highs as hopes build that new leadership in Washington will mean more support for the struggling U.S. economy.

36. Netflix's big 4Q lifts video service above 200M subscribers -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Netflix's video streaming service has surpassed 200 million subscribers for the first time as its expanding line-up of TV series and movies continues to captivate people stuck at home during the ongoing battle against the pandemic.

37. Business as usual for high court, despite riot, impeachment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Amid insurrection and impeachment, the Supreme Court's big news Thursday was a decision in a bankruptcy case. Wednesday brought arguments over the Federal Trade Commission's ability to recapture ill-gotten gains.

38. Disney unveils plans to stream a galaxy of new series, films -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Walt Disney Co.'s streaming plans shifted into hyper speed Thursday, as the studio unveiled a galaxy's worth of new streaming offerings including plans for 10 "Star Wars" series spinoffs and 10 Marvel series that will debut on Disney+.

39. House votes to decriminalize marijuana at federal level -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democratic-controlled House on Friday approved a bill to decriminalize and tax marijuana at the federal level, reversing what supporters call a failed policy of criminalizing pot use and taking steps to address racial disparities in enforcement of federal drug laws.

40. Trump expected to flex pardon powers on way out door -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Advocates and lawyers anticipate a flurry of clemency action from President Donald Trump in the coming weeks that could test the limits of presidential pardon power.

Trump is said to be considering a slew of pardons and commutations before he leaves office, including potentially members of his family, former aides and even himself. While it is not unusual for presidents to sign controversial pardons on their way out the door, Trump has made clear that he has no qualms about intervening in the cases of friends and allies whom he believes have been treated unfairly, including his former national security adviser, Michael Flynn.

41. Virus keeps Black Friday crowds thin, shoppers shift online -

NEW YORK (AP) — The raging coronavirus pandemic kept crowds thin at malls and stores across the country on Black Friday, but a surge in online shopping offered a small beacon of hope for struggling retailers after months of slumping sales and businesses toppling into bankruptcy.

42. The pandemic is changing Hollywood, maybe forever -

NEW YORK (AP) — "No New 'Movies' Till Influenza Ends" blared a New York Times headline on Oct. 10, 1918, while the deadly second wave of the Spanish Flu was unfolding.

A century later, during another pandemic, movies — quotes no longer necessary — are again facing a critical juncture. But it's not because new films haven't been coming out. By streaming service, video-on-demand, virtual theater or actual theater, a steady diet of films have been released under COVID-19 every week. The Times has reviewed more than 460 new movies since mid-March.

43. Dow returns to record, S&P 500 adds to its on vaccine hopes -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose to a record Monday for the first time in nine months, riding a swell of optimism that a vaccine may soon control the coronavirus and the economic destruction it's caused.

44. S&P 500 closes at a record high, ending another banner week -

The S&P 500 is closing at a record high for the first time since September, posting its second weekly gain in a row.

The index rose 1.4% Friday, bringing its for November to 9.6%.

Hopeful news this week on progress toward a coronavirus vaccine prompted investors to plow money into stocks, especially those of smaller companies, which stand to benefit greatly as the economy recovers. Those gains came at the expense of winners of the stay-at-home economy like Netflix and Amazon that investors have been favoring during the pandemic.

45. Netflix raising US streaming prices amid booming growth -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Netflix is raising most of its U.S. prices by 8% to 13% as its video streaming service rides a wave of rising popularity spurred by government-imposed lockdowns that corralled people at home during the fight against the pandemic.

46. Surge in virus threatens to reverse global economic rebounds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The resurgence of coronavirus cases engulfing the United States and Europe is imperiling economic recoveries on both sides of the Atlantic as millions of individuals and businesses face the prospect of having to hunker down once again.

47. Tupperware is partying like it's 1965 -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Tupperware relied on social gatherings for explosive growth in the mid 20th century. In the 21st century, it is social distancing that is fueling sales.

Restaurant pain has turned into Tupperware's gain with millions of people in a pandemic opening cookbooks again and looking for solutions to leftovers. They've found it again in Tupperware, suddenly an "it brand" five decades after what seemed to be its glory days.

48. T-Mobile offers up yet another TV streaming service -

Yet another service provider is jumping into the TV streaming wars. This time it's T-Mobile and its TVision service with live news, entertainment and sports channels, starting at $10 a month.

T-Mobile says it's aiming to offer a simpler and and cheaper service for people dissatisfied with cable. But it's entering a crowded field. And most similar streaming services have found it difficult to sustain low prices over time.

49. Stocks slip on Wall Street as virus aid deal remains elusive -

U.S. stocks capped another wobbly day of trading with modest losses Wednesday as Wall Street waited for any signs of progress as lawmakers in Washington negotiate over how to deliver more aid for the economy.

50. Netflix reports a summer slump in subscriber growth -

Netflix's subscriber growth slowed dramatically during the summer months after surging in the spring fueled by pandemic lockdowns that corralled millions of people in their homes.

The summer slump came as more people sought distraction from the pandemic outdoors and major U.S. professional sports resumed play, offering other entertainment alternatives to the world's most popular video streaming service.

51. Stocks fall on Wall Street as hopes for new virus aid fade -

Stocks gave up some of their recent gains Monday as Wall Street's hopes that Washington will come through with badly needed aid for the economy before Election Day faded.

The S&P 500 dropped 1.6%, its worst day in more than three weeks. The benchmark index had been up 0.5% in the early going following a report that China's economy grew at a 5% annual rate in the last quarter. The market's slide was broad, though technology, health care and communication stocks bore the brunt of the selling. Treasury yields were mixed.

52. Disney reorg to further bolster company's focus on streaming -

Disney said Monday that it is reorganizing its business units to focus even more on streaming.

The company said in August that its Disney Plus service has more than 60 million subscribers, and subscribers to its main combination of streaming services — Disney Plus, ESPN Plus and Hulu — top 100 million. It still plans to launch another international streaming service called Star.

53. Stocks tick up as Wall Street waits for aid from Washington -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks climbed on Thursday, but only after pinballing through another shaky day of trading, as Wall Street waits to see if Washington can get past its partisanship to deliver another economic rescue package.

54. Trump went even further than other uber-rich to shrink taxes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The tax-avoidance strategies that President Donald Trump capitalized on to shrink his tax bill to essentially zero are surprisingly common among major real estate developers and other uber-wealthy Americans.

55. Ford to build electric truck plant in Michigan, add 300 jobs -

DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) — Ford says it will add 300 jobs at a new factory that's being built to assemble batteries and manufacture an electric version of the F-150 pickup truck.

The new plant is being built in Dearborn, Michigan, where Ford is starting to produce a new version of the F-150 that's due in showrooms this November.

56. European Union's top court supports net neutrality rules -

LONDON (AP) — The European Union's highest court has given its support to the bloc's rules that stop internet providers from charging customers for preferential access to their networks.

The European Court of Justice on Tuesday issued its first interpretation of the EU's net neutrality rules since they were adopted in 2015.

57. Netflix film dissects a technology-driven 'social dilemma' -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — A new Netflix documentary is setting out to expose technology's corrosive effects on society during a pandemic that's left people more dependent than ever on tools that keep them connected with friends, family and colleagues they can no longer meet in person.

58. Michael Jordan gets stake in DraftKings for advisory role -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — DraftKings shares jumped in midday trading after announcing that basketball legend Michael Jordan would take an ownership stake in the company in exchange for becoming a special adviser to the sports betting site.

59. Apple CEO Tim Cook is fulfilling another Steve Jobs vision -

BERKELEY, Calif. (AP) — Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, who died in 2011, was a tough act to follow. But Tim Cook seems to be doing so well at it that his eventual successor may also have big shoes to fill.

60. Disney 3Q revenue drops 42%, missing expectations -

BURBANK, Calif. (AP) — Walt Disney Co. on Tuesday reported that its net income fell dramatically in the three-month period that ended in June when it most of its theme parks were shuttered and theatrical movie releases were postponed.

61. In an upside-down summer, 'Jaws,' 'E.T.' are hits again -

NEW YORK (AP) — When historians look back on the top films at the box office in the summer of 2020, they may feel like they've slipped into a time warp, or maybe "Back to the Future."

Over the second weekend in July, "Empire Strikes Back" — 40 years after it was first released — was again No. 1. "Ghostbusters" claimed the July 4th weekend, 36 years after opening. Over the June 19-21 weekend and 27 years after it last led the box office, "Jurassic Park" again ruled theaters.

62. ‘Hard to imagine’ a fall without football in Knoxville -

We all remember those glory days of sitting in Neyland Stadium, peering down at the field and listening to the broadcast on radio headphones. The thrills and chills that ran up the spine just before kickoff as the late, great announcer John Ward uttered his signature catchphrase:

63. Movie theaters implore studios: Release the blockbusters -

NEW YORK (AP) — A long time ago in a pre-COVID universe far, far away, blockbusters opened around the globe simultaneously or nearly so. In 1975, "Jaws" set the blueprint. Concentrate marketing. Open wide. Pack them in.

64. Stocks end higher; S&P 500 gets its 3rd weekly gain in a row -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street ended another wobbly day broadly higher, giving the S&P 500 its third straight weekly gain.

The benchmark index rose 0.3% after flipping between small gains and losses earlier.

65. Netflix names new co-CEO; adds 10M new subscribers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Netflix added a flood of new subscribers amid the coronavirus pandemic and also offered clues to a possible successor for founding CEO Reed Hastings, who on Thursday named the company's chief content officer, Ted Sarandos, as co-CEO.

66. Stocks rise on vaccine hopes; S&P 500 back within 5% of high -

NEW YORK (AP) — Markets worldwide rallied on rising hopes for a COVID-19 vaccine Wednesday, and the S&P 500 climbed back to where it was a few days after it set its record early this year.

67. Erdogan vows social media controls after insults to family -

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey's president vowed Wednesday to tighten government control over social media following alleged insults directed at his daughter and son-in-law when they announced the birth of their fourth child on Twitter.

68. Netflix CEO to donate $120M to historically black colleges -

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings and his wife, Patty Quillin, are donating $120 million toward student scholarships at historically black colleges and universities.

The couple is giving $40 million to each of three institutions: the United Negro College Fund, Spelman College and Morehouse College. The organizations said it is the largest individual gift in support of student scholarships at HBCUs.

69. Wall Street hits the brakes after strong, weekslong rally -

Wall Street hit the brakes Tuesday, a day after its remarkable, weekslong rally brought the S&P 500 back to positive for the year and the Nasdaq to a record high.

The benchmark index fell 0.8%, its largest loss in almost three weeks, as traders cashed in on some of the market's recent gains. Financial, industrial and health care stocks led the slide. Technology companies were among the gainers, helping to push the Nasdaq to another all-time high.

70. Stocks vault higher as Nasdaq hits record on economy hopes -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street's enthusiasm about the reopening economy sent stocks scrambling even higher on Monday, and the Nasdaq composite wiped away the last of its coronavirus-induced losses to set a record.

71. Cinema chain AMC warns it may not survive the pandemic -

Movie theater chain AMC warned Wednesday that it may not survive the coronavirus pandemic, which has shuttered its theaters and led film studios to explore releasing more movies directly to viewers over the internet.

72. Brands weigh in on national protests over police brutality -

As thousands of protesters take to the streets in response to police killings of black people, companies are wading into the national conversation but taking care to get their messaging right.

Netflix's normally lighthearted Twitter account took on a more somber tone on Saturday: "To be silent is to be complicit. Black lives matter. We have a platform, and we have a duty to our Black members, employees, creators and talent to speak up." That got retweeted over 216,000 times and "liked" over a million times.

73. CEO pay has topped $12.3M. Can it keep rising post-pandemic? -

The typical pay package for CEOs at the biggest U.S. companies topped $12.3 million last year, and the gap between the boss and their workforces widened further, according to AP's annual survey of executive compensation.

74. Too much TV? Enter HBO Max, the latest streaming wannabe -

Is a pandemic the perfect time to launch a new and relatively expensive streaming service? AT&T sure hopes so.

The phone company is investing billions in HBO Max, its first big entertainment venture since it spent $85 billion for Time Warner in 2018. The good news for its timing: millions are stuck at home, watching more video than ever. The bad news: many of them also out of work and carefully watching their incomes. The service launches Wednesday in the U.S.

75. 33 million have sought US unemployment aid since virus hit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly 3.2 million laid-off workers applied for unemployment benefits last week as the business shutdowns caused by the viral outbreak deepened the worst U.S. economic catastrophe in decades.

76. 33 million have sought US unemployment aid since virus hit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly 3.2 million laid-off workers applied for unemployment benefits last week as the business shutdowns caused by the viral outbreak deepened the worst U.S. economic catastrophe in decades.

77. With camps shut, families face summer in the great indoors -

Welcome to summer in the great indoors. Parents around the country are learning their children's summer camps will be canceled, delayed or moved online as the fallout from the coronavirus seeps into another facet of American life.

78. Amazon profit falls as pandemic-related costs rise -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon's sales soared in the first three months of the year, as more home-bound people shopped online amid the coronavirus pandemic.

But getting millions of packages to shopper's doorsteps is expensive. The rising costs pushed Amazon's first-quarter profit down 29% and its earnings missed Wall Street expectations. Amazon shares slipped about 5% in after-hours trading Thursday.

79. Comcast profit slides as pandemic hits movies, theme parks -

Comcast's net income slid in the first three months of the year as the coronavirus pandemic forced it to shut down its theme parks and its movies were kept out of shuttered theaters.

Comcast also reported Thursday that it lost 409,000 cable TV customers, the biggest source of the company's profits, as cord-cutting accelerated. That's already more than half the 671,000 customers it lost in all of 2019.

80. Stocks climb after two drops; oil prices crawl off the floor -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rallied on Wednesday, and the S&P 500 clawed back a chunk of this week's sharp losses as a bit of oxygen pumped through markets around the world.

Even oil gained ground, pulling further away from zero after earlier getting turned upside down amid a collapse in demand. Stocks rose from Seoul to Spain, and winners outnumbered losers in New York by more than two to one. Treasury yields also pushed higher in a sign of a bit less pessimism among investors.

81. Pandemic and chill: Netflix adds a cool 16M subscribers -

BERKELEY, Calif. (AP) — Netflix picked up nearly 16 million global subscribers during the first three months of the year, helping cement its status as one of the world's most essential services in times of isolation or crisis.

82. Oil price goes negative as demand collapses; Dow drops 592 pts. -

NEW YORK (AP) — Oil futures plunged below zero on Monday, the latest never-before-seen number to come out of the economic coma caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Stocks and Treasury yields also dropped on Wall Street, with the S&P 500 down 1.8%, but the market's most dramatic action by far was in oil, where the cost to have a barrel of U.S. crude delivered in May plummeted to negative $37.63. It was at roughly $60 at the start of the year.

83. Stocks end higher as Amazon, Netflix pull away from pack -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stock indexes ended a wobbly day with modest gains Thursday, while the biggest increases went to Amazon, Netflix and other companies poised to do the best during the coronavirus crunch.

84. Panic grocery buying slows; iPhone sales plummeted in March -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

85. Shut-in TV viewers push 'Let's Make a Deal' to record rating -

NEW YORK (AP) — Shut-in television viewers tuned in to the game show "Let's Make a Deal" in record numbers last week.

TV programs across the dial recorded superlatives last week with a captive audience of millions of Americans told to stay home because of the coronavirus. Few were as interesting as the newfound fervor for CBS' "Let's Make a Deal," which recorded its most-watched week since the show was brought back 11 years ago with Wayne Brady as host, the Nielsen company said.

86. Those without broadband struggle in a stuck-at-home nation -

NEW YORK (AP) — In Sandwich, New Hampshire, a town of 1,200 best known as the setting for the movie "On Golden Pond," broadband is scarce. Forget streaming Netflix, much less working or studying from home. Even the police department has trouble uploading its reports.

87. Ride it till the wheels fall off? We’re past that -

As an early-warning coronavirus screening, Kayne tested our new temporal thermometer on my forehead for evidence of a fever. Initial results – 87.6 degrees – showed I was apparently freezing to death

88. Home internet jammed up? Try these steps before upgrading -

With so much of the U.S. workforce — and their families — now cooped up at home to combat the spread of the novel coronavirus, it's not a huge surprise that home internet is showing the strain.

If you've had a business videoconference stutter while your teenagers play Call of Duty online, or found yourself unable to stream the news while your spouse uploads huge data files for work, you'll have a good idea of the problem.

89. Netflix: $100 million in virus relief for creative ranks -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Netflix said Friday it is establishing a $100 million relief fund for workers in the worldwide creative community affected by the corona-virus caused halt of most film and television production.

90. Virus-shocked Hollywood gets break with streaming services -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Sports are on hold, theaters are closed and so are amusement parks, a disaster-movie scenario that has Hollywood reeling. But Americans held captive at home by the coronavirus can turn to Netflix, Amazon, Hulu and other streaming services, outliers in an entertainment industry brought to an unprecedented standstill.

91. Cinemas close nationwide, studios push new movies into homes -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. movie theaters have closed nationwide due to the coronavirus pandemic, turning dark nearly all of the country's 40,000-plus screens in an unprecedented shutdown.

The largest chains had tried to remain open even as Hollywood postponed its upcoming release plans and guidelines for social distancing steadily diminished the recommended size of crowds. But after President Donald Trump on Monday urged against gatherings of more than 10 people, AMC Theaters, the nation's largest chain, said Tuesday its theaters would close altogether.

92. What now? Facing life without the entertainment world -

NEW YORK (AP) — Overheard as the entertainment world stalled in response to the coronavirus outbreak: "What are we gonna do now, read books?"

That's exactly what Pamela Milam will be doing, and lots of them.

93. Virus threat prompts cancellation of SXSW -

Austin city officials have canceled the South by Southwest arts and technology festival.

Mayor Steve Adler announced a local disaster as a precaution because of the threat of the novel coronavirus, effectively cancelling the annual event that had been scheduled for March 13-22.

94. Publisher Simon & Schuster for sale, not 'core' to ViacomCBS -

NEW YORK (AP) — Simon & Schuster, the publisher of such authors as Stephen King and Bob Woodward, is up for sale.

95. AT&T launches new online TV service as satellite customers fall -

NEW YORK (AP) — AT&T is launching a new internet-delivered TV service Monday as it struggles with a shrinking DirecTV satellite business.

The new service, AT&T TV, will have most of the same channels offered on DirecTV, but it'll come over the internet rather than a satellite dish. AT&T has been testing the service in 13 markets and is now making it available to anyone.

96. Disney CEO Bob Iger steps down in surprise announcement -

NEW YORK (AP) — Disney CEO Bob Iger, who steered the company through successful purchases of Star Wars, Marvel and Fox's entertainment businesses and the launch of a Netflix challenger, is stepping down immediately, the company said in a surprise announcement Tuesday.

97. What T-Mobile takeover of Sprint means for you -

NEW YORK (AP) — T-Mobile's $26.5 billion takeover of Sprint could mean higher or lower phone bills, depending on whom you ask.

A federal judge in New York ultimately took T-Mobile's track record of aggressive competition into account in ruling Tuesday that the deal would be good for consumers. In doing so, he rejected a challenge by a group of states worried about reduced competition. Though the deal still needs a few more approvals, T-Mobile expects to close it as early as April 1.

98. UK government, at odds with media, set to review BBC funding -

LONDON (AP) — Britain's government announced Wednesday that it is considering a change in the way the BBC is funded that would hit the coffers of the nation's public broadcaster.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Conservative administration — which is increasingly at odds with the country's news media — said it would hold a "public consultation" on whether to decriminalize non-payment of the annual levy that funds the BBC.

99. Disney Plus streamer hits nearly 29M subscribers in 3 months -

NEW YORK (AP) — Disney said its Disney Plus streaming service reached nearly 29 million paid subscribers in less than three months, an impressive start for what the company has positioned as its future as more people drop cable subscriptions.

100. Taylor Swift shakes Sundance with revealing documentary -

PARK CITY, Utah (AP) — The normally private Taylor Swift premiered an intimate documentary Thursday at the Sundance Film Festival in which the pop star discloses a past eating disorder, chronicles her inner battle over speaking forthrightly about politics and says her victorious 2017 sexual assault court case was a dramatic turning point in her life.