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Editorial Results (free)

1. Slightly fewer Americans apply for jobless claims last week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Slightly fewer Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week, reflecting a robust job market despite rising job cuts in some sectors of the economy that have cooled in recent months.

2. Be careful sharing your political views in workplace -

Have you ever had a close family member die? Sometimes the pain of the loss is so great that it’s hard to even say to another person, “My grandfather died.” It makes it real. And, it makes it more painful.

3. Why captions are suddenly everywhere and how they got there -

NEW YORK (AP) — People with hearing loss have a new ally in their efforts to navigate the world: Captions that aren't limited to their television screens and streaming services.

The COVID pandemic disrupted daily life for people everywhere, but many of those with hearing loss took the resulting isolation especially hard. "When everyone wears a mask they are completely unintelligible to me," said Pat Olken of Sharon, Massachusetts, whose hearing aids were insufficient. (A new cochlear implant has helped her a lot.)

4. Stocks dip deeper into bear market ahead of big Fed news -

NEW YORK (AP) — Most stocks on Wall Street dipped Tuesday in their first trading after tumbling into a bear market on worries that high inflation will push central banks to clamp the brakes too hard on the economy.

5. US inflation at new 40-year high as price increases spread -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The cost of gas, food and most other goods and services jumped in May, pushing inflation to a four-decade high and offering Americans no respite.

Consumer prices surged 8.6% last month from a year earlier, faster than April's year-over-year increase of 8.3%, the Labor Department said Friday. The new inflation figure, the biggest increase since December 1981, heightens pressure on the Federal Reserve to continue raising interest rates aggressively.

6. Netflix pays $59 million to settle tax dispute in Italy -

MILAN (AP) — Netflix has agreed to pay more than 55.8 million euros ($59 million) to settle a tax dispute, Milan prosecutors said Friday.

The payment covers taxes, penalties and interest from October 2015 through 2019. The streaming service also established an Italian legal entity this year, which will determine its Italian tax burden based on subscriptions to Italian residents, prosecutors said.

7. Nintendo's profit dips slightly as Switch console sales slow -

TOKYO (AP) — Nintendo's profit for the fiscal year ended in March was little changed from the previous year, edging down 0.6% to 477.7 billion yen ($3.7 billion), the Japanese video game maker behind the Super Mario and Pokemon franchises said Tuesday.

8. Wall Street, tech investors back Musk Twitter bid with $7B -

Elon Musk has strengthened the equity stake in his $44 billion offer to buy Twitter with commitments of more than $7 billion from a diverse group of investors including Silicon Valley heavy hitters like Oracle co-founder Larry Ellison.

9. Amazon reports rare quarterly loss as online shopping slows -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon reported its first quarterly loss since 2015 on Thursday, its money-making juggernaut stalled by a slowdown in pandemic-induced online shopping and a huge write-down of its investment in an electric-vehicle startup.

10. CNN's streaming service shutting down a month after launch -

NEW YORK (AP) — CNN is shutting down its CNN+ streaming service less than a month after its launch, a spectacular flameout for a venture that had attracted stars like Chris Wallace and Alison Roman and was seen as a way to attract a new generation of news consumers.

11. Indexes end mixed, Netflix plunges on subscriber losses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street's major stock indexes ended mixed Wednesday after another day of choppy trading, while Netflix lost more than a third of its value after reporting its first subscriber loss in more than a decade and predicting more grim times ahead.

12. Netflix shares drop 22% after it loses 200K subscribers -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Netflix's video streaming service suffered the first loss in worldwide subscribers in its history, deepening troubles that have been mounting since enjoying a surge from a captive audience locked down during the pandemic's early stages.

13. Cities ask Netflix, Hulu, stream services to pay cable fees -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Should Netflix and other streaming services have to pay local governments the same fees levied on cable operators?

That was the question before the Ohio Supreme Court during a Wednesday hearing, as the court debates whether streaming services such as Netflix and Hulu are covered by a state law that would require them to pay to play.

14. Opening day: CNN+ streaming service ready for launch Tuesday -

NEW YORK (AP) — Once a familiar voice on NPR, Audie Cornish says she signed on to the new CNN+ streaming service in part out of the sense she was helping to open a new frontier.

After much talk, nearly $100 million in development costs and some 500 employees assigned to the task — many, like Cornish, new hires — CNN+ is set to launch next Tuesday.

15. Amazon closes $8.5B deal to acquire Hollywood studio MGM -

Amazon announced Thursday it has closed its acquisition of Hollywood studio MGM, two days after European regulators said the deal "would not significantly reduce competition" in European markets.

The retail giant had announced the $8.5 billion deal in May, making it the company's second-largest acquisition following its $13.7 billion deal with Whole Foods in 2017. The latest acquisition was aimed at boosting Amazon's streaming services to compete against Netflix and Disney+.

16. Hyundai Ioniq 5 a better option than Tesla Model Y -

Consumer appetites for small SUVs seem insatiable, and – as electrification reaches every corner of the automotive landscape – a spotlight has appeared over compact EV SUVs.

For two years, the Tesla Model Y has led this burgeoning niche with longer range estimates, cutting-edge driver aids and an established charging network. But other automakers are offering new alternatives, and the most promising may be from Hyundai.

17. Not all Western companies sever ties to Russia over Ukraine -

A shrinking number of well-known companies are still doing business in Russia, even as hundreds have announced plans to curtail ties.

Burger King restaurants are open, Eli Lilly is supplying drugs, and PepsiCo is selling milk and baby food, but no more soda.

18. Jack Daniel's producer to suspend operations in Russia -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Iconic whiskey maker Jack Daniel's will become the latest company to suspend business operations in Russia following its invasion of Ukraine.

19. Europe faces pressure to join US, British ban on Russian oil -

BRUSSELS (AP) — Europe faces a tough choice: Is it worth a recession to choke off oil and gas money to Russia while it fights a war in Ukraine?

While U.S. and British bans on Russian oil increase the pressure on Europe to follow suit, the continent's dependence on Russia for energy makes an immediate embargo much more difficult. Still, some officials say it is the only way to stop pouring billions in oil and gas revenue into President Vladimir Putin's coffers, despite the near certainty of record inflation worsening.

20. EU pledges to fight Russia's "information war" in Europe -

BRUSSELS (AP) — European Union officials on Tuesday defended the 27-nation bloc's decision to ban Russian state-controlled media outlets from broadcasting in the region as decisive steps to check a Kremlin-led "information war."

21. Russia-Ukraine War: What to know about the war in Ukraine -

Two million people — half of them children — have fled Ukraine since Russia's invasion, according to key U.N. agencies and the International Organization for Migration.

The U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees and UNICEF confirmed the figures as more people headed for the borders. Poland has received more than 1.2 million Ukrainian refugees, the most of any nation.

22. Russia-Ukraine war: Key things to know about the conflict -

Russian and Ukrainian delegations resumed talks on Monday following failed attempts to begin evacuating civilians from besieged Ukrainian cities, including the port city of Mariupol.

After the first two attempts failed over the weekend, Russia announced yet another limited cease-fire that would allow desperate civilians to flee encircled cities through humanitarian corridors, though there was no word as of Monday night that shelling had stopped.

23. Netflix, TikTok block services in Russia to avoid crackdown -

Netflix and TikTok suspended most of their services in Russia on Sunday as the government cracks down on what people and media outlets can say about Russia's war in Ukraine.

Pulling the plug on online entertainment — and information — is likely to further isolate the country and its people after a growing number of multinational businesses have cut off Russia from vital financial services, technology and a variety of consumer products in response to Western economic sanctions and global outrage over the invasion of Ukraine.

24. Russia-Ukraine War: What to know on Russia's war in Ukraine -

Russia's invasion of Ukraine entered its 12th day following what Ukrainian authorities described as increased shelling of encircled cities and another failed attempt to start evacuating hundreds of thousands of civilians from the besieged areas, including the southern port of Mariupol.

25. Russia's war spurs corporate exodus, exposes business risks -

LONDON (AP) — Car factories idled, beer stopped flowing, furniture and fashion orders ceased, and energy companies fled oil and gas projects.

Russia's invasion of Ukraine has thrown business plans into disarray and forced a growing number of the world's best known brands — from Apple to Mercedes-Benz and BP — to pull out of a country that's become a global outcast as companies seek to maintain their reputations and live up to corporate responsibility standards.

26. Ruble plummets as sanctions bite, sending Russians to banks -

MOSCOW (AP) — Ordinary Russians faced the prospect of higher prices and crimped foreign travel as Western sanctions over the invasion of Ukraine sent the ruble plummeting, leading uneasy depositors to line up at banks and ATMs on Monday in a country that has seen more than one currency disaster in the post-Soviet era.

27. Dream cars: Looking for love behind the wheel -

February is the month of love, and for many people that means trying to find Mr. or Mrs. Right. The same goes for cars. It isn’t easy finding the right one, and many have personalities of their own. So why not choose your next car as you would a date?

28. Disney's parks rebound aids profit; Disney+ subscribers grow -

A theme-park comeback continued to boost Disney's results in the most recent quarter. The company also added more subscribers to its Disney+ streaming service than analysts expected.

Disney had closed or limited capacity at its theme parks and suspended cruises earlier in the pandemic. Domestic parks have reopened, and revenue in that division doubled in the most recent quarter, to $7.23 billion, while profit came to $2.45 billion from a year-ago loss of $119 million, even as the omicron variant suppressed some people's travel plans COVID-19 restrictions continued to affect some international operations.

29. Amazon reports strong 4Q results despite supply-chain snags -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon reported Thursday that its profits nearly doubled in the final three months of last year, even as it contended with surging costs tied to a snarled supply chain and labor shortages.

30. Stocks extend losses for third week; Netflix plunges -

Stocks extended their losses on Wall Street Friday as major indexes finished with another weekly loss.

The S&P 500 fell 1.9%, and notched its worst weekly performance since March 2020.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 1.3% and the Nasdaq lost 2.7%. Technology and communications stocks fell.

31. Netflix stock plunges as subscriber growth worries deepen -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Netflix delivered its latest quarter of disappointing subscriber growth during the final three months of last year, a trend that management foresees continuing into the new year as tougher competition is undercutting the video streaming leader.

32. Netflix upping US, Canada prices with competition growing -

NEW YORK (AP) — Netflix is raising prices for its video streaming customers in the U.S. and Canada, less than a year and a half since its last price increase, as competition from other streaming services increases.

33. Animation boom draws on local talent -

Part of the summary of “The Wingfeather Saga,’’ a four-book fantasy/adventure series written by Nashville singer-songwriter Andrew Peterson, reads thus:

“The family is at the center of a great mystery that will change their lives – and their world – forever.”

34. Explainer: What caused Amazon's outage? Will there be more? -

Explainer: What caused Amazon's outage? Will there be more?

By MATT O'BRIEN and FRANK BAJAK AP Technology Writers

Robotic vacuum cleaners halted in their tracks. Doorbell cameras stopped watching for package thieves, though some of those deliveries were canceled anyway. Netflix and Disney movies got interrupted and The Associated Press had trouble publishing the news.

35. Trump media venture under scrutiny by market regulators -

NEW YORK (AP) — Regulators are looking into the deal that would bring Donald Trump's new social media company to the stock market, one that has attracted both legions of fans of the former president and people looking to make a quick profit.

36. Here’s how to sustain generosity beyond the holidays -

2020 asked a lot of us. We faced new challenges and reckoned with old ones, and often the world’s problems collided with our own individual needs. Help – whether in donations or even just attention – might’ve been hard to give when you required some yourself.

37. Tesla has competition with Volkswagen ID.4 -

Introduced for 2021, the Volkswagen ID.4 is the German automaker’s first all-electric SUV and part of a new wave of electric vehicles for American consumers. It boasts a spacious interior and styling that’s futuristic but not too futuristic.

38. Amazon stumbles on slower sales growth, higher labor costs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon isn't just grappling with the easing of pandemic-induced shopping splurges. The online retail behemoth is also contending with surging costs as it navigates a snarled supply chain and labor shortages.

39. Facebook Inc.: A look at other corporate rebranding efforts -

NEW YORK (AP) — Facebook Inc. announced Thursday that it is changing its name to Meta Platforms Inc., joining a long list of companies that have tried to rebrand themselves over the years.

The move comes as the company deals with the fallout from the Facebook Papers, a leaked document trove that has revealed the ways Facebook ignored internal reports and warnings of the harms its social network created or magnified across the world.

40. Trump plan for new media venture gets investors' thumbs up -

NEW YORK (AP) — Some investors aren't waiting to see if former President Donald Trump's plans for a media company to challenge the likes of Facebook, Twitter and even Disney can actually become reality — they're all in.

41. Stocks end higher, bringing S&P 500 to the cusp of a record -

Stocks ended higher on Wall Street Wednesday, bringing the S&P 500 to the brink of another record high.

The benchmark index climbed 0.4% for its sixth gain in a row.

Anthem and Abbott Laboratories helped lead gains among health care stocks after turning in solid quarterly earnings reports.

42. Netflix posts higher 3Q earnings, solid subscriber growth -

Netflix posted sharply higher third-quarter earnings Tuesday thanks to a stronger slate of titles, including "Squid Game," the dystopian survival drama from South Korea that the company says became its biggest-ever TV show.

43. Stocks end mixed on Wall Street ahead of busy earnings week -

Stocks wobbled to a mixed finish on Wall Street Monday as the market's momentum slowed down following its best week since July.

The S&P 500 index rose 0.3% but the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 0.1%. Gains in several big technology companies helped push the Nasdaq up 0.8%.

44. Hollywood's behind-the-scenes crews vote to authorize strike -

Film and television production in North America is in jeopardy of coming to a standstill after its behind-the-scenes workers overwhelmingly voted to authorize a strike for the first time in its 128-year history.

45. TV was easier when there were fewer choices -

I used to be a professional TV viewer, as a critic for a daily newspaper. I thought it would be a dream job. It was not. Turned out that a lot of the stuff I had to watch was bad.

For every “Hill Street Blues” there was a “Manimal.” For every “Cheers” an “AfterMASH.” For every “Greatest American Hero” a “Mama’s Family.”

46. Epic Games appeals ruling in lawsuit alleging Apple monopoly -

Epic Games filed notice that is appealing a federal judge's decision in a lawsuit alleging that Apple has been running an illegal monopoly that stifles competition.

The maker of the popular Fortnite video game said in a court filing Sunday that it will take the ruling to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco.

47. Judge loosens Apple's grip on app store in Epic decision -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — A federal judge ordered Apple to dismantle a lucrative part of the competitive barricade guarding its closely run iPhone app store, but rejected allegations that the company has been running an illegal monopoly that stifles competition and innovation.

48. 'Varsity Blues' trial promises fresh insights in old scandal -

BOSTON (AP) — The first trial in the "Operation Varsity Blues" college admissions bribery scandal will begin this week, with the potential to shed light on investigators' tactics and brighten the spotlight on a secretive school selection process many have long complained is rigged to favor the rich.

49. EXPLAINER: What is Apple doing with its App Store? -

Over the past week or so, Apple has eased some longstanding restrictions that helped make its App Store into a big moneymaker for the company. The company has long required app developers to pay high commissions to Apple on the sales of paid apps as well as purchases of subscriptions or digital items inside their apps.

50. Apple eases App Store rules again, to allow outside signups -

LONDON (AP) — Apple is relaxing rules to allow some app developers such as Spotify, Netflix and digital publishers to include an outside link so users can sign up for paid subscription accounts.

51. Back to basics How to bounce back when your income drops -

Losing income is never easy, but it’s become increasingly common over the last year and a half: Pew Research Center found 44% of U.S. adults say their household has experienced either job loss (including temporarily) or a pay cut since the beginning of the pandemic, with Hispanic and Asian adults most likely to say so.

52. Amazon delivers a mixed bag of 2Q results, shares slide -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon on Thursday turned in a mixed bag of results for its fiscal second quarter, coming up short of Wall Street expectations in revenue but beating on profits.

During the three-month period ended June 30, the Seattle-based company reported profit of $7.78 billion, or $15.12 per share compared to $5.24 billion, or $10.30 a share, during the year-ago period. Revenue jumped 27% to $113.08 billion.

53. Netflix confirms move into video games as its growth slows -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Netflix reported its worst slowdown in subscriber growth in eight years as people emerge from their pandemic cocoons. So it's adding a new attraction to its marquee: Video games.

54. Video games coming to Netflix? Latest hiring offers a clue -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Netflix has hired veteran video game executive Mike Verdu, signaling the video streaming service is poised to expand into another fertile field of entertainment.

Verdu's addition as Netflix's vice president of game development, confirmed Thursday, comes as the company seeks to sustain the momentum it gathered last year when people turned to the video streaming service to get through lockdowns imposed during the pandemic.

55. Amazon begins new chapter as Bezos hands over CEO role -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon founder Jeff Bezos stepped down as CEO on Monday, handing over the reins as the company navigates the challenges of a world fighting to emerge from the coronavirus pandemic.

Andy Jassy, who ran Amazon's cloud-computing business, replaced Bezos, a change the company announced in February.

56. Are sports fans tuning out? -

Remember the panic of 2020 when live sports disappeared from our TV screens? March Madness? Gone. NBA? Multiple delays, game played in a “bubble” and a season that ended four months later than normal. Major league baseball? Reduced to 60 games beginning in late July and then played with cardboard cutouts of fans filling otherwise empty seats.

57. Media consumers may be reaching limit of streaming services -

A British research company may have discovered a magic number for American media consumers — and it's seven.

That's seven streaming services, paid or free, that consumers are willing to subscribe to before the hassle of keeping track of log-ins and passwords just becomes too much, said Maria Rua Aguete, senior research director at the London-based media consultancy OMDIA.

58. Missing the moment: Virtual reality's breakout still elusive -

NEW YORK (AP) — Virtual reality — computer generated 3D environments that can range from startlingly realistic to abstract wonderlands — has been on the cusp of wide acceptance for years without ever really taking off.

59. Amazon to buy MGM, studio behind James Bond and 'Shark Tank' -

NEW YORK (AP) — Online shopping giant Amazon is buying MGM, the movie and TV studio behind James Bond, "Legally Blonde" and "Shark Tank," with the hopes of filling its video streaming service with more stuff to watch.

60. Stocks end higher on Wall Street, breaking a 3-day slump -

Stock closed higher on Wall Street Thursday, ending a three-day losing streak. Technology and communications companies led the way higher.

Chipmaker Nvidia and Netflix were among the winners. The S&P 500 rose 1.1%, while the tech-heavy Nasdaq added 1.8%.

61. Biden to spotlight electric vehicle future he sees for US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is putting the spotlight Tuesday on the electric vehicle future he envisions for the United States, as a way to tackle climate change and create jobs.

Biden is touring Ford's Electric Vehicle Center, a new factory being built on the grounds of the automaker's massive Rouge complex in Dearborn, Michigan.

62. Streaming landscape shifts with $43B AT&T Discovery deal -

NEW YORK (AP) — AT&T said Monday it will combine its massive WarnerMedia media assets, which includes HBO and CNN, with Discovery Inc. to create a new media heavyweight in a $43 billion deal.

63. Passing on your password? Streaming services are past it -

NEW YORK (AP) — Many of us were taught to share as kids. Now streaming services ranging from Netflix to Amazon to Disney+ want us to stop.

That's the new edict from the giants of streaming media, who are hoping to discourage the common practice of sharing account passwords without alienating subscribers who've grown accustomed to the hack.

64. Actor indicted in $227M Ponzi scheme involving film rights -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — An aspiring actor was indicted Tuesday in Los Angeles on suspicion of running a massive Ponzi scheme that solicited hundreds of millions of dollars from investors for phony Hollywood film licensing deals, federal prosecutors said.

65. Amazon's profit more than triples as pandemic boom continues -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon's pandemic boom isn't showing signs of slowing down. The company said Thursday that its first-quarter profit more than tripled from a year ago, fueled by the growth of online shopping. It also posted revenue of more than $100 billion, the second quarter in a row that the company has passed that milestone.

66. Stocks end higher on Wall Street after a day of steady gains -

Stocks ended broadly higher on Wall Street after steadily gaining throughout the day.

The S&P 500 index added 0.9% Wednesday following its first back-to-back loss since March.

Technology companies and banks helped lead the way higher. Communications stocks were among the only losers, led by a 7.4% drop in Netflix after the video streaming pioneer disappointed investors with a slowdown in subscriber additions.

67. Netflix's subscriber growth, stock zapped as pandemic eases -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Netflix's pandemic-fueled subscriber growth is slowing far faster than anticipated as people who have been cooped at home are able to get out and do other things again.

The video-streaming service added 4 million more worldwide subscribers from January through March, its smallest gain during that three-month period in four years.

68. Study: Facebook delivers biased job ads, skewed by gender -

Facebook is showing different job ads to women and men in a way that might run afoul of anti-discrimination laws, according to a new study.

University of Southern California researchers who examined the ad-delivery algorithms of Facebook and LinkedIn found that Facebook's were skewed by gender beyond what can be legally justified by differences in job qualifications.

69. Netflix scores streaming rights to new top Sony films -

NEW YORK (AP) — Netflix further beefed up its film catalog on Thursday in a multi-year deal that will make it the new streaming home to Sony Pictures' top releases in the U.S.

Beginning next year, Sony's new films will exclusively stream domestically on Netflix after their theatrical runs. That includes movies in popular franchises like "Spider-Man," "Venom" and "Jumanji," and 2022 releases including "Morbius," "Where the Crawdads Sing," "Uncharted" and "Bullet Train."

70. Open your door and say ‘Ahhhh’ -

Jacob Melnychuk grew up in San Jose, California, where he occasionally skipped science class at Leland High School to surf.

“I was a terrible high school student,” he admits.

But he also had a genuine sense of community, which rallied around the family of Pat Tillman, a fellow Leland graduate, after the Army Ranger was killed in Afghanistan in 2004. Tillman’s family was a staple in their community, and it was upsetting to Melnychuk to see how the military handled his death.

71. US stocks slip in mixed trading as rate pressure ratchets up -

Rising Treasury yields put pressure once more on big technology companies Tuesday, pulling U.S. stock indexes further below their recent all-time highs.

The S&P 500 lost 0.3%. Health care stocks also dragged down the market, outweighing gains by banks, industrial stocks and companies that rely on consumer spending. Smaller companies bucked the downward trend, powering the Russell 2000 index to a 1.7% gain.

72. Stocks pull mostly higher, shaking off some early wobbles -

Stocks regained their footing after an early slide and closed broadly higher Thursday, led by gains in financial and industrial companies.

The S&P 500 rose 0.5% after having been down 0.9% in the early going. The gain is the benchmark index's first in three days after a recent stretch of back-and-forth trading the last few weeks. Even so, the S&P 500 was still on track for a small weekly loss.

73. Wall Street closing lower; bank stocks fall -

Wall Street closed out a choppy week of trading Friday with major stock indexes mostly lower and all finishing in the red for the week.

The S&P 500 ended 0.1% lower after reversing a small gain. The benchmark index, which hit an all-time high on Wednesday, posted its first weekly decline in three weeks. Losses by banks, industrial companies and technology stocks weighed on the market. They offset gains in companies that rely on consumer spending, health care and other sectors.

74. Netflix tests possible password-sharing crackdown -

NEW YORK (AP) — Netflix is testing a way to crack down on password sharing.

The popular streaming service has been asking some users of the popular streaming site to verify their account via email or text, or to "verify later."

75. India introduces new rules to regulate online content -

NEW DELHI (AP) — India on Thursday rolled out new regulations for social media companies and digital streaming websites to make them more accountable for the online content shared on their platforms, giving the government more power to police it.

76. Late gains reverse most of an early slide on stock market -

A late-afternoon burst of buying on Wall Street helped reverse most of a stock market sell-off Tuesday, nudging the S&P 500 to its first gain after a five-day losing streak.

The benchmark index eked out a 0.1% gain after having been down more than 1.8% earlier. The Nasdaq lost 0.5% as technology stocks fell for a sixth straight day. The tech-heavy index had been down nearly 4%. The Dow Jones Industrial Average, which is less exposed to tech stocks than the two other indexes, managed to rise 0.1%.

77. Bezos, Bloomberg among top 50 US charity donors for 2020 -

As the world grappled with COVID-19, a recession and a racial reckoning, the ultrawealthy gave to a broader set of causes than ever before — bestowing multimillion-dollar gifts on food pantries, historically Black colleges and universities and organizations that serve the poor and the homeless, according to the Chronicle of Philanthropy's annual rankings of the 50 Americans who gave the most to charity last year.

78. Apple CEO lambasts tech rivals ahead of privacy update -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Apple CEO Tim Cook lambasted social media companies, though without naming them, accusing them of prioritizing user attention and data collection at the cost of allowing and even rewarding dangerous conspiracies, extremism and polarization.

79. Stocks have their worst day since October as Big Tech sinks -

The stock market posted its biggest drop since October Wednesday, led by declines in several Big Tech companies.

The S&P 500 gave up 2.6%. The benchmark index had set a record high just two days earlier.

80. Wall Street hits records as hopes build for more stimulus -

Wall Street marked the dawn of President Joe Biden's administration with stocks rallying to record highs as hopes build that new leadership in Washington will mean more support for the struggling U.S. economy.

81. Netflix's big 4Q lifts video service above 200M subscribers -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Netflix's video streaming service has surpassed 200 million subscribers for the first time as its expanding line-up of TV series and movies continues to captivate people stuck at home during the ongoing battle against the pandemic.

82. Business as usual for high court, despite riot, impeachment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Amid insurrection and impeachment, the Supreme Court's big news Thursday was a decision in a bankruptcy case. Wednesday brought arguments over the Federal Trade Commission's ability to recapture ill-gotten gains.

83. Disney unveils plans to stream a galaxy of new series, films -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Walt Disney Co.'s streaming plans shifted into hyper speed Thursday, as the studio unveiled a galaxy's worth of new streaming offerings including plans for 10 "Star Wars" series spinoffs and 10 Marvel series that will debut on Disney+.

84. House votes to decriminalize marijuana at federal level -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democratic-controlled House on Friday approved a bill to decriminalize and tax marijuana at the federal level, reversing what supporters call a failed policy of criminalizing pot use and taking steps to address racial disparities in enforcement of federal drug laws.

85. Trump expected to flex pardon powers on way out door -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Advocates and lawyers anticipate a flurry of clemency action from President Donald Trump in the coming weeks that could test the limits of presidential pardon power.

Trump is said to be considering a slew of pardons and commutations before he leaves office, including potentially members of his family, former aides and even himself. While it is not unusual for presidents to sign controversial pardons on their way out the door, Trump has made clear that he has no qualms about intervening in the cases of friends and allies whom he believes have been treated unfairly, including his former national security adviser, Michael Flynn.

86. Virus keeps Black Friday crowds thin, shoppers shift online -

NEW YORK (AP) — The raging coronavirus pandemic kept crowds thin at malls and stores across the country on Black Friday, but a surge in online shopping offered a small beacon of hope for struggling retailers after months of slumping sales and businesses toppling into bankruptcy.

87. The pandemic is changing Hollywood, maybe forever -

NEW YORK (AP) — "No New 'Movies' Till Influenza Ends" blared a New York Times headline on Oct. 10, 1918, while the deadly second wave of the Spanish Flu was unfolding.

A century later, during another pandemic, movies — quotes no longer necessary — are again facing a critical juncture. But it's not because new films haven't been coming out. By streaming service, video-on-demand, virtual theater or actual theater, a steady diet of films have been released under COVID-19 every week. The Times has reviewed more than 460 new movies since mid-March.

88. Dow returns to record, S&P 500 adds to its on vaccine hopes -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose to a record Monday for the first time in nine months, riding a swell of optimism that a vaccine may soon control the coronavirus and the economic destruction it's caused.

89. S&P 500 closes at a record high, ending another banner week -

The S&P 500 is closing at a record high for the first time since September, posting its second weekly gain in a row.

The index rose 1.4% Friday, bringing its for November to 9.6%.

Hopeful news this week on progress toward a coronavirus vaccine prompted investors to plow money into stocks, especially those of smaller companies, which stand to benefit greatly as the economy recovers. Those gains came at the expense of winners of the stay-at-home economy like Netflix and Amazon that investors have been favoring during the pandemic.

90. Netflix raising US streaming prices amid booming growth -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Netflix is raising most of its U.S. prices by 8% to 13% as its video streaming service rides a wave of rising popularity spurred by government-imposed lockdowns that corralled people at home during the fight against the pandemic.

91. Surge in virus threatens to reverse global economic rebounds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The resurgence of coronavirus cases engulfing the United States and Europe is imperiling economic recoveries on both sides of the Atlantic as millions of individuals and businesses face the prospect of having to hunker down once again.

92. Tupperware is partying like it's 1965 -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Tupperware relied on social gatherings for explosive growth in the mid 20th century. In the 21st century, it is social distancing that is fueling sales.

Restaurant pain has turned into Tupperware's gain with millions of people in a pandemic opening cookbooks again and looking for solutions to leftovers. They've found it again in Tupperware, suddenly an "it brand" five decades after what seemed to be its glory days.

93. T-Mobile offers up yet another TV streaming service -

Yet another service provider is jumping into the TV streaming wars. This time it's T-Mobile and its TVision service with live news, entertainment and sports channels, starting at $10 a month.

T-Mobile says it's aiming to offer a simpler and and cheaper service for people dissatisfied with cable. But it's entering a crowded field. And most similar streaming services have found it difficult to sustain low prices over time.

94. Stocks slip on Wall Street as virus aid deal remains elusive -

U.S. stocks capped another wobbly day of trading with modest losses Wednesday as Wall Street waited for any signs of progress as lawmakers in Washington negotiate over how to deliver more aid for the economy.

95. Netflix reports a summer slump in subscriber growth -

Netflix's subscriber growth slowed dramatically during the summer months after surging in the spring fueled by pandemic lockdowns that corralled millions of people in their homes.

The summer slump came as more people sought distraction from the pandemic outdoors and major U.S. professional sports resumed play, offering other entertainment alternatives to the world's most popular video streaming service.

96. Stocks fall on Wall Street as hopes for new virus aid fade -

Stocks gave up some of their recent gains Monday as Wall Street's hopes that Washington will come through with badly needed aid for the economy before Election Day faded.

The S&P 500 dropped 1.6%, its worst day in more than three weeks. The benchmark index had been up 0.5% in the early going following a report that China's economy grew at a 5% annual rate in the last quarter. The market's slide was broad, though technology, health care and communication stocks bore the brunt of the selling. Treasury yields were mixed.

97. Disney reorg to further bolster company's focus on streaming -

Disney said Monday that it is reorganizing its business units to focus even more on streaming.

The company said in August that its Disney Plus service has more than 60 million subscribers, and subscribers to its main combination of streaming services — Disney Plus, ESPN Plus and Hulu — top 100 million. It still plans to launch another international streaming service called Star.

98. Stocks tick up as Wall Street waits for aid from Washington -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks climbed on Thursday, but only after pinballing through another shaky day of trading, as Wall Street waits to see if Washington can get past its partisanship to deliver another economic rescue package.

99. Trump went even further than other uber-rich to shrink taxes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The tax-avoidance strategies that President Donald Trump capitalized on to shrink his tax bill to essentially zero are surprisingly common among major real estate developers and other uber-wealthy Americans.

100. Ford to build electric truck plant in Michigan, add 300 jobs -

DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) — Ford says it will add 300 jobs at a new factory that's being built to assemble batteries and manufacture an electric version of the F-150 pickup truck.

The new plant is being built in Dearborn, Michigan, where Ford is starting to produce a new version of the F-150 that's due in showrooms this November.