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Editorial Results (free)

1. Stocks fall on Wall Street, giving up the week's gains -

Wall Street capped an up-and-down week of trading Friday with a broad sell-off that wiped out the major indexes' gains for the week.

The S&P 500 lost 0.9% and posted its second straight weekly loss. Roughly 80% of the stocks in the benchmark index fell. Technology and communication companies accounted for much of the pullback. Industrial and financial stocks also were big drags on the index. Only the index's health care sector managed a gain.

2. Utility gives up construction permit for nuclear plant -

CHATTANOOGA (AP) — The Tennessee Valley Authority is giving up its construction permit for an unfinished nuclear plant in northeast Alabama nearly 50 years after work began on the facility.

The TVA notified the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission last week that it would not renew its regulatory permit at the Bellefonte Nuclear Power Plant, the Chattanooga Times Free Press reported. The move came after a federal judge agreed to cancel the proposed sale of the plant to developer Franklin L. Haney's Nuclear Development LLC because the company wasn't able to transfer the construction permit.

3. Biden, world leaders try to hammer out next steps on climate -

Washington (AP) — President Joe Biden tried to hammer out the world's next steps against rapidly worsening climate change in a private, virtual session with a small group of other global leaders Friday, and announced a new U.S.-European pledge to cut climate-wrecking methane leaks.

4. Biden faces limits of $1.9T COVID aid as some states resist -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden entered the White House promising to stop the twin health and economic crises caused by COVID-19, but $1.9 trillion and countless initiatives later he's confronting the limits of what Washington can achieve when some state and local governments are unwilling or unable to step up.

5. Biden angers France, EU with new Australia, UK initiative -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's decision to form a strategic Indo-Pacific alliance with Australia and Britain to counter China is angering France and the European Union. They're feeling left out and seeing it as a return to the Trump era.

6. Biden's 'summer of love' with Europe hits an abrupt break-up -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's summer of love with Europe appears to have come to an abrupt end.

After promising European leaders that "America is back" and that multilateral diplomacy would guide U.S. foreign policy, Biden has angered numerous allies with a go-it-alone approach on key issues, the latest being a new security initiative for the Indo-Pacific that notably excluded France and the European Union.

7. Fed reviews ethics polices after prolific trading uncovered -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is reviewing the ethics policies that govern the financial holdings and activities of its senior officials in the wake of recent disclosures that two regional Fed presidents engaged in extensive trading last year.

8. Drought haves, have-nots test how to share water in the West -

MADRAS, Ore. (AP) — Phil Fine stands in a parched field and watches a harvester gnaw through his carrot seed crop, spitting clouds of dust in its wake. Cracked dirt lines empty irrigation canals, and dust devils and tumbleweeds punctuate a landscape in shades of brown.

9. Biden announces Indo-Pacific alliance with UK, Australia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden announced Wednesday that the United States is forming a new Indo-Pacific security alliance with Britain and Australia that will allow for greater sharing of defense capabilities — including helping equip Australia with nuclear-powered submarines. It's a move that could deepen a growing chasm in U.S.-China relations.

10. House panel rejects drug pricing plan in setback to Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A House committee dealt an ominous if tentative blow Wednesday to President Joe Biden's huge social and environment package, derailing a money-saving plan to let Medicare negotiate the price it pays for prescription drugs.

11. Contest winners, health worker orbiting world in SpaceX 1st -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The four people on SpaceX's first private flight are fairly ordinary, down-to-Earth types brought together by chance.

They'll circle Earth for three days at an unusually high altitude — on their own without a professional escort — before splashing down off the Florida coast.

12. VA loans mount comeback; August sales in slight retreat -

There was a time when there were fewer veterans than there are now, and Veterans’ Administration loans had seemingly faded away.

With the 20 years of fighting in and around Iraq and Afghanistan, there have been tens of thousands of men and women serving our country, and the number of veterans eligible for VA loans has skyrocketed.

13. A few random thoughts as summer fades -

Here, there and everywhere: Speaking strictly from a male perspective, I think it’s unfortunate that nothing rhymes with “happy husband.”

• The little bios posted online and elsewhere of people who die from COVID should say whether the victim had been vaccinated, just as articles about traffic fatalities say (or used to) whether the victims were wearing seat belts. Same principle.

14. Maverick Dem senators meeting with Biden on spending plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden was holding face-to-face meetings Wednesday with two moderate Democratic senators who have opposed the size of his signature social and environment package as the White House amped up its drive to win the unanimous Democratic support the huge plan will need to survive in the Senate.

15. 5 takeaways after California governor handily defeats recall -

California Gov. Gavin Newsom ably fended off a recall attempt from Republicans on Tuesday, changing the stakes of the contest from a referendum on his own performance and into a partisan fight over Trumpism and the coronavirus.

16. Biden: Nearly 3M get health coverage during COVID-19 sign-up -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly 3 million consumers took advantage of a special six-month period to sign up for subsidized health insurance coverage made more affordable by the COVID-19 relief law, President Joe Biden said Wednesday.

17. General promises US 'surge' against foreign cyberattacks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The general who leads U.S. efforts to thwart foreign-based cyberattacks, and punish those responsible, says he's mounting a "surge" to fight incursions that have debilitated government agencies and companies responsible for critical infrastructure.

18. UK recommends COVID-19 booster shots for over 50s -

LONDON (AP) — The U.K. said Tuesday it will offer a third dose of COVID-19 vaccine to everyone over age 50 and other vulnerable people after an expert panel said the boosters were needed to protect against waning immunity this winter.

19. No time for excuses or pouting for Titans after ugly loss -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee is about to find out if the Titans are who they thought they were coming into this season.

The Titans came into this season with high expectations as the defending AFC South champs. That swagger deflated quickly as the Arizona Cardinals scored the first 17 points in romping all over them in a 38-13 flop Sunday that had fans booing before halftime and leaving before the fourth quarter.

20. Capitol rally seeks to rewrite Jan. 6 by exalting rioters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — First, some blamed the deadly  Jan. 6 attack at the U.S. Capitol  on left-wing antifa antagonists, a theory quickly debunked. Then came comparisons of the rioters to peaceful protesters or even tourists.

21. Biden's vaccine rules ignite instant, hot GOP opposition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's aggressive push to require millions of U.S. workers to vaccinate against the coronavirus is running into a wall of resistance from Republicans threatening everything from lawsuits to civil disobedience, plunging the country deeper into culture wars that have festered since the onset of the pandemic.

22. Analysis: Biden takes fight to unvaccinated in virus battle -

WASHINGTON (AP) — They're a source of frustration. A risk to their fellow citizens. A threat to the nation's economic recovery.

President Joe Biden is trying to concentrate the anger of the nation's inoculated majority against the refusal of 25% of eligible Americans to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

23. As flights resume, plight of Afghan allies tests Biden's vow -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Evacuation flights have resumed for Westerners, but thousands of at-risk Afghans who had helped the United States are still stranded in their homeland with the U.S. Embassy shuttered, all American diplomats and troops gone and the Taliban now in charge.

24. Southern Festival of Books goes virtual -

Humanities Tennessee, the organizer of the 33rd annual Southern Festival of Books: A Celebration of the Written Word, has announced the festival will take place completely online and free-of-charge this year out of an abundance of caution for public health amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

25. EPA seeks to restart process that could restrict Alaska mine -

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday it would seek to restart a process that could restrict mining in Alaska's Bristol Bay region, which is renowned for its salmon runs.

26. US, Mexico restart high-level economic talks after 4 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States and Mexico restarted high-level economic talks Thursday after a four-year pause as top advisers to presidents Joe Biden and Andrés Manuel López Obrador expressed eagerness to make headway on issues important to both nations such as infrastructure, trade and migration.

27. Biden, Democrats push Civilian Climate Corps in echo of New Deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inspired by the New Deal-era Civilian Conservation Corps, President Joe Biden and congressional Democrats are pushing for a modern counterpart: a Civilian Climate Corps that would create hundreds of thousands of jobs building trails, restoring streams and helping prevent catastrophic wildfires.

28. Magnet milestones move distant nuclear fusion dream closer -

SAINT-PAUL-LES-DURANCE, France (AP) — Teams working on two continents have marked similar milestones in their respective efforts to tap an energy source key to the fight against climate change: They've each produced very impressive magnets.

29. EasyJet rejects bid offer as it seeks to raise more money -

LONDON (AP) — British airline easyJet said Thursday it rejected an unsolicited takeover approach as it announced plans to raise another 1.2 billion pounds ($1.7 billion) from shareholders to shore up its recovery from the coronavirus pandemic.

30. Tennessee panel OKs $65M in state incentives for Oracle -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee panel has approved $65 million in state incentives for Oracle Corp. as the company plans to bring 8,500 jobs and an investment topping $1 billion to fast-growing Nashville over the coming decade.

31. Don’t love your work? It’s time to look elsewhere -

Labor Day was designed to both honor and recognize the American labor movement. It’s a nod to the works and contributions of workers in the United States. But, let’s face it. As you celebrated Labor Day this week, could you confidently say you love your work?

32. From ‘It’s curtains!’ to ‘curtains up!’ -

The show must go on? No, March 14, 2020, changed all that when the shows definitely did not go on. Theaters, concert halls and other arts venues around Tennessee were forced to cease operations as COVID-19 began its march across the state. A jarring situation, certainly, but given that a life in the performing arts is one that requires near-daily adapting to new challenges, everyone from actors and musicians to artistic directors and CEOs initially took it in stride.

33. Texas GOP bets on hard right turn amid changing demographics -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Republicans in America's largest conservative state for years racked up victories under the slogan "Keep Texas Red," a pledge to quash a coming blue wave that Democrats argued was inevitable given shifting demographics.

34. Industry group backs global carbon price for large ships -

BERLIN (AP) — A major maritime industry association on Monday backed plans for a global surcharge on carbon emissions from shipping to help fund the sector's shift toward climate-friendly fuels.

35. Stocks end mostly lower even as tech drives Nasdaq higher -

Major stock indexes on Wall Street closed mostly lower Friday, though a rally in Big Tech companies nudged the Nasdaq to another all-time high.

The S&P 500 fell less than 0.1% a day after notching a record high. The benchmark index still managed its second straight weekly gain. Losses in financial, industrial and utilities companies outweighed gains in technology stocks and other sectors of the S&P 500. Energy prices mostly fell. Gold and silver rose. Treasury yields were mixed.

36. EXPLAINER: What is Apple doing with its App Store? -

Over the past week or so, Apple has eased some longstanding restrictions that helped make its App Store into a big moneymaker for the company. The company has long required app developers to pay high commissions to Apple on the sales of paid apps as well as purchases of subscriptions or digital items inside their apps.

37. EU, AstraZeneca reach deal to end vaccine delivery dispute -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union and coronavirus vaccine-maker AstraZeneca said Friday that they have clinched an agreement to end a damaging legal battle over the slow pace of deliveries of the Anglo-Swedish company's shots.

38. Heupel's debut ends in Tennessee's 38-6 win -

KNOXVILLE (AP) — If Tennessee head coach Josh Heupel's offense is going to work, its got to start on the ground.

The Volunteers' 38-6 season-opening win over Bowling Green on Thursday night was a perfect example of how the first-year coach's up-tempo attack can function on all cylinders.

39. Lee: No plans to take up Texas abortion law -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Republican Gov. Bill Lee on Thursday said he has no plans to introduce anti-abortion legislation similar to what Texas adopted earlier this year.

"We do not have any current plans to move forward beyond than what we're currently awaiting which is a ruling from the court on the existing piece of legislation that we already have," Lee told reporters.

40. Millions to lose jobless aid as claims fall to pandemic low -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Millions of jobless Americans who have depended on federal unemployment aid as a financial lifeline are about to lose those benefits just as the delta variant of the coronavirus poses a renewed threat to the economy and the job market.

41. Companies loosen job requirements but challenges remain -

NEW YORK (AP) — Landing a waitressing job or bartending gig at the Lost Dog Cafe in Northern Virginia had never been easy.

"Help Wanted" signs were a rarity, and half the chain's staff stuck around for at least 10 years. The onset of the pandemic made job prospects even worse when Lost Dog had to temporarily shut down indoor dining.

42. US jobless claims reach a pandemic low as hiring strengthens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits fell last week to 340,000, a pandemic low and another sign that the job market is steadily rebounding from the economic collapse caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

43. FTC orders company to quit surveillance app business -

BOSTON (AP) — The Federal Trade Commission has for the first time banned a company that makes so-called stalkerware — software used to surreptitiously track a cellphone user's activities and location — from continuing in the surveillance app business.

44. WHO launches hub in Berlin to help prevent future pandemics -

BERLIN (AP) — The World Health Organization on Wednesday inaugurated a new "hub" in Berlin that aims to help prepare the globe better to prevent future pandemics.

WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus and German Chancellor Angela Merkel cut the ribbon to launch the new WHO Hub for Pandemic and Epidemic Intelligence. WHO says Germany is making an initial investment of $100 million in the facility.

45. OPEC steadily adds back production as economy recovers -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The OPEC oil producers' cartel and allied non-member countries led by Russia signed off Wednesday on gradually increasing production as the global economy and demand for fuel continue to recover from the worst of the coronavirus pandemic.

46. Work from home not much help to low-wage workers -

Working from home has been a benefit that has developed over the last year and a-half. It has allowed us to see that we can work outside of the normal work building and still be productive.

This situation has encouraged companies to rethink forcing employees to come back in person. In order to be more competitive at recruiting job applicants, many companies are hiring employees from all over the country without forcing them to relocate. The new employees can work from wherever they are today.

47. South Korea bans Google, Apple payment monopolies -

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea's National Assembly approved legislation on Tuesday that bans app store operators such as Google and Apple from forcing developers to use their in-app payment systems.

48. Snail darter, tiny and notorious, is no longer endangered -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The snail darter, a tiny fish that notoriously blocked a federal dam project in Tennessee decades ago, should no longer be on the endangered species list, federal officials announced on Tuesday.

49. Honolulu to require vaccine or negative test at restaurants -

HONOLULU (AP) — Seeking to beat back a COVID-19 surge, Honolulu will soon require patrons of restaurants, bars, museums, theaters and other establishments to show proof of vaccination or a recent negative test for the disease, the city's mayor said Monday.

50. Last troops exit Afghanistan, ending America's longest war -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States completed its withdrawal from Afghanistan late Monday, ending America's longest war and closing a chapter in military history likely to be remembered for colossal failures, unfulfilled promises and a frantic final exit that cost the lives of more than 180 Afghans and 13 U.S. service members, some barely older than the war.

51. Uncertainty abounds in AFC South as Titans attempt to repeat -

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — There's more uncertainty than usual surrounding the AFC South, and it extends beyond Houston quarterback Deshaun Watson.

The NFL's lone division with two playoff teams in each of the last four years is dealing with significant changes heading into the 2021 season. Two new head coaches, three new offensive coordinators, three new quarterbacks and several prominent cleats to fill could put the South's postseason streak in jeopardy.

52. US health agency will prod hospitals to cut carbon emissions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration on Monday launched a new health office that will prod hospitals to cut carbon emissions, aiming to provide greener, more environmentally friendly medical care.

53. Wall Street rallies back to records following Fed speech -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street rallied to more record highs Friday after the head of the Federal Reserve said it's still far from pulling interest rates off the record low that has helped the market soar, even if it does begin dialing back its support for the economy later this year.

54. Powell: Fed on track to slow aid for economy later this year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve will start dialing back its ultra-low-rate policies this year as long as hiring continues to improve, Chair Jerome Powell said Friday, signaling the beginning of the end of the Fed's extraordinary response to the pandemic recession.

55. Peloton stock skids as company posts loss, cuts bike price -

NEW YORK (AP) — Peloton's shares skidded in aftermarket trading Thursday after the exercise bike and treadmill company posted a loss for its most-recent quarter, showed slower revenue growth, and cut the price of its most-popular product.

56. Chinese regulators to exercise more control over algorithms -

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese regulators will exercise greater control over the algorithms used by Chinese technology firms to personalize and recommend content, the latest move in a regulation spree across the internet sector.

57. Supreme Court allows evictions to resume during pandemic -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court's conservative majority is allowing evictions to resume across the United States, blocking the Biden administration from enforcing a temporary ban that was put in place because of the coronavirus pandemic.

58. Tennessee flood response aided by out-of-town cellphones -

NASHVILLE (AP) — When deadly floods knocked out all communications but radio in rural Tennessee last weekend, an emergency official took advantage of a new system developed for this kind of emergency: He redirected 911 calls to several cellphones in a neighboring city.

59. Loan forgiveness offered to more former ITT Tech students -

The Education Department announced Thursday it will forgive student debt for more than 100,000 borrowers who attended colleges in the now-defunct ITT Technical Institute chain but left before graduating.

60. Israeli PM and Biden postpone meeting because of Afghanistan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden and Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett have postponed their White House meeting as Biden focused his attention on dealing with the aftermath of deadly explosions near the Kabul airport that targeted U.S. troops and Afghans seeking to flee their country after the Taliban takeover.

61. Korean company to make auto parts in Washington County -

TELFORD, Tenn. (AP) — A Korean manufacturer of auto parts is making its first expansion into the U.S. in Tennessee, state officials said.

Officials with Sungwoo Hitech America said the company is investing $40 million to bring manufacturing operations to the town of Telford in Washington County, Tennessee economic development officials said in a news release Wednesday. The company plans to create more than 100 jobs with the move.

62. Back to basics How to bounce back when your income drops -

Losing income is never easy, but it’s become increasingly common over the last year and a half: Pew Research Center found 44% of U.S. adults say their household has experienced either job loss (including temporarily) or a pay cut since the beginning of the pandemic, with Hispanic and Asian adults most likely to say so.

63. Reese’s contributions to Titans can't be overstated -

Quantifying the on-field impact that Floyd Reese had on the Tennessee Titans franchise is easy enough. With 111 victories in 13 seasons as the team’s general manager, and its only Super Bowl appearance to date, it is easy to see the contributions of Reese, who died last week at 73.

64. Pentagon: US troops must get their COVID-19 vaccines ASAP -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Military troops must immediately begin to get the COVID-19 vaccine, Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin said in a memo Wednesday, ordering service leaders to "impose ambitious timelines for implementation."

65. Delta Air Lines will make unvaccinated employees pay charge -

Delta Air Lines will charge employees on the company health plan $200 a month if they fail to get vaccinated against COVID-19, a policy the airline's top executive says is necessary because the average hospital stay for the virus costs the airline $40,000.

66. House passes $3.5T Biden blueprint after deal with moderates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Striking a deal with moderates, House Democratic leaders have muscled President Joe Biden's multitrillion-dollar budget blueprint over a key hurdle, ending a risky standoff and putting the party's domestic infrastructure agenda back on track.

67. Walmart to launch delivery service for other businesses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart said Tuesday it will start farming out its delivery service, using contract workers, autonomous vehicles and other means to transport rival retailers' products directly to their customers' homes as fast as just a few hours.

68. Pelosi deal with moderates set to ease Biden budget standoff -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Striking a deal with moderates, House Democratic leaders are set Tuesday to muscle President Joe Biden's multitrillion-dollar budget blueprint over a key hurdle, in a compromise designed to end a risky standoff and put the party's domestic infrastructure agenda back on track.

69. Bus driver shortages are latest challenge hitting US schools -

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — A Montana school district is dangling $4,000 bonuses and inviting people to test drive big yellow school buses in hopes of enticing them to take a job that schools are struggling to fill as kids return to in-person classes.

70. States banning mask mandates could face civil rights probes -

In an escalating battle with Republican governors, President Joe Biden on Wednesday ordered his Education secretary to explore possible legal action against states that have blocked school mask mandates and other public health measures meant to protect students against COVID-19.

71. AP Source: Biden to require vaccines for nursing home staff -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration will require that nursing home staff be vaccinated against COVID-19 as a condition for those facilities to continue receiving federal Medicare and Medicaid funding.

72. Rookie Radunz making the most of return to football -

Welcome to the NFL and back to football, rookie. The switch from college football to the pros is an adjustment for any player. But when that player comes from the FCS level and only got to play one game his senior year due to COVID wiping out North Dakota State’s season, well, you get the idea that the adjustment could be a bit tough.

73. Kind souls provide for those with no place to call home -

In spite of all the homes sales being logged in and around in the Greater Nashville area, homelessness remains a major concern for the city. Homeless advocate and Room in the Inn founder Charles Strobel recently noted that homelessness is increasing even as the city flourishes.

74. Schweid’s latest book a good look at Nashville’s past -

It’s not true that the first thing I did after buying the new Nashville history book was to flip through looking for the picture I took that appears in it.

That is, it’s not entirely true*

75. Dollar General thrives despite ‘retail apocalypse' -

Don’t blink! You might miss the grand opening of another Dollar General store. OK, that’s an exaggeration. But not by much.

In the 14 years since an investment group purchased the family owned business and took it public again two years later, the Goodlettsville-based chain has added nearly 10,000 stores to boast more retail locations than any other company in the United States – quickly closing on 18,000 stores in 46 states.

76. TSA extends into January mask rule for airline passengers -

Federal officials are extending into January a requirement that people on airline flights and public transportation wear face masks, a rule intended to limit the spread of COVID-19.

The Transportation Security Administration's current order was scheduled to expire Sept. 13. An agency spokesman said Tuesday that the mandate will be extended until Jan. 18.

77. Gov. Lee allows opt-out of student mask requirements -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee signed an executive order Monday letting parents opt their children out of coronavirus-related mask mandates in K-12 schools, after a few school districts issued mask requirements for students and others.

78. Pelosi takes step to quell moderates' budget rebellion -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has proposed a procedural vote this month that would set up future passage of two economic measures crucial to President Joe Biden's domestic agenda, a move Democratic leaders hope will win must-have votes from unhappy party moderates.

79. Evidence presented to grand jury in Durham's Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — John Durham, the federal prosecutor tapped to investigate the origins of the Russia investigation, has been presenting evidence before a grand jury as part of his probe, a person familiar with the matter said Friday.

80. Biden made 'Obamacare' cheaper, now sign-up deadline is here -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With the Obama health care law undergoing a revival under President Joe Biden, this Sunday is the deadline for consumers to take advantage of a special sign-up period for private coverage made more affordable by his COVID-19 relief law.

81. Pelosi faces new threat from Dem moderates in budget fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi faced a fresh hurdle Friday to passing President Joe Biden's multi-trillion dollar domestic policy aspirations, as nine moderate Democrats threatened to derail a budget blueprint crucial to opening the door to much of that spending.

82. Biden's complicated new task: keeping Democrats together -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden overcame skepticism, deep political polarization and legislative gamesmanship to win bipartisan approval in the Senate this week of his $1 trillion infrastructure bill.

83. Metro Council approves grants to 21 nonprofits -

Metro Council has approved 21 Opportunity Grants to nonprofits working to enhance community safety and reduce violence in Nashville-Davidson County. This is the first round of funding from the $2 million Community Safety Partnership Fund, which Metro Nashville created with Governor’s Grant dollars earlier this year.

84. Gresham Smith announces executive team expansion -

Gresham Smith, a national architecture and engineering firm based in Nashville, has expanded its executive management team, with Peter Oram, market vice president for the firm’s Transportation and Water + Environment businesses, being named chief operating officer, and Kelly Knight Hodges, market vice president for the firm’s Corporate + Urban Design business, selected as chief development and engagement officer, a new role that expands Gresham Smith’s executive management team from four to five members.

85. Judge, historian Haywood a little strange, even for his era -

Some once-prominent historical figures are being eased into the background now, judged by contemporary standards as having been on the wrong side of history.

Think Nathan Bedford Forrest, for one, whose slave-trading, Civil War-crime and Klan bona fides have led to removing his bust from the Tennessee Capitol and relocating his remains from a Memphis park.

86. Dems renew push on elections bill that GOP vows to block -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats are renewing their push to enact their marquee voting bill, pledging to make it the first order of business when the Senate returns in the fall even though they don't have a clear strategy for overcoming steadfast Republican opposition.

87. Biden team is seeking ways to address rising energy prices -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's administration is moving at home and abroad to try to address concerns about rising energy prices slowing the nation's recovery from the pandemic-induced recession.

88. Explainer: Will we need vaccine passports to do fun things? -

NEWPORT, R.I. (AP) — Ready to go out on the town before summer ends? In parts of the U.S., you might have to carry your COVID-19 vaccine card or a digital copy to get into restaurants, bars, nightclubs and outdoor music festivals.

89. US turns to social media influencers to boost vaccine rates -

DENVER (AP) — As a police sergeant in a rural town, Carlos Cornejo isn't the prototypical social media influencer. But his Spanish-language Facebook page with 650,000 followers was exactly what Colorado leaders were looking for as they recruited residents to try to persuade the most vaccine-hesitant.

90. SoftBank profit declines following Sprint perk a year ago -

TOKYO (AP) — Japanese technology company SoftBank's fiscal first quarter earnings dropped 39% because of the absence of the cash benefit from the merger of Sprint, which boosted its profits a year ago.

91. Pandemic prompts changes in how future teachers are trained -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Before last year, a one-credit technology course for students pursuing master's degrees in education at the University of Washington wasn't seen as the program's most relevant. Then COVID-19 hit, schools plunged into remote learning, and suddenly material from that course was being infused into others.

92. Fauci hopeful COVID vaccines get full OK by FDA within weeks -

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — The U.S. government's top infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, said Sunday that he was hopeful the Food and Drug Administration will give full approval to the coronavirus vaccine by month's end and predicted the potential move will spur a wave of vaccine mandates in the private sector as well as schools and universities.

93. Senators push infrastructure bill a step closer to passage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators hoisted the $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure package over another hurdle late Sunday, a coalition of Democrats and Republicans pushing it closer to passage despite a few holdouts trying to derail one of President Joe Biden's top priorities.

94. Strong jobs report sends most stocks, bond yields higher -

Wall Street capped a choppy week of trading Friday with broad gains, which helped push the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Average to new highs.

The S&P 500 rose 0.2%, a day after setting another all-time high. Every major index notched a weekly gain after slipping last week.

95. Senate Dems rallying behind Biden's $3.5T budget vision -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Democrats across the political spectrum seem near the unanimity they'll need for the crucial first step toward their $3.5 trillion vision of bolstering health care, education, family services and environment programs

96. US automakers pledge huge increase in electric vehicles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Declaring the U.S. must "move fast" to win the world's carmaking future, President Joe Biden on Thursday announced a commitment from the auto industry to produce electric vehicles for as much as half of U.S. sales by the end of the decade.

97. Biden nudges Senate over 'historic' $1T infrastructure bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite a rocky week of fits and starts, President Joe Biden on Friday praised the Senate for edging the bipartisan infrastructure  plan closer to passage, ahead of a key vote on the $1 trillion package.

98. FTC official raps Facebook for booting political ads probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A senior Federal Trade Commission official is criticizing Facebook's move to shut down the personal accounts of two academic researchers and terminate their probe into misinformation spread through political ads on the social network.

99. EXPLAINER: The impact of Joe Biden's new fuel economy rules -

DETROIT (AP) — President Joe Biden wants to erase Donald Trump's rollback of automobile pollution and fuel economy standards.

He proposed new rules Thursday and unveiled a nonbinding deal with most automakers to have electric, plug-in hybrid or hydrogen-electric vehicles make up half of their U.S. sales by 2030.

100. Nashville school officials agree to implement mask mandate -

Nashville's top school officials on Thursday agreed to enforce an universal mask mandate for the upcoming school year as part of an effort to protect children too young to receive the COVID-19 vaccine while the pandemic resurges across the state.